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Encyclopedia > Speed limits in the United States

Speed limits in the United States are set by each state. Speed limits are usually: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A road speed limit is the maximum speed allowed by law for road vehicles. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of...

  • 25–30 mph (40–50 km/h) on residential streets
  • 35–45 mph (55–70 km/h) on urban arterial roads
  • 50–65 mph (80–105 km/h) on major highways inside cities
  • 45–65 mph (70–105 km/h) on rural two-lane roads
  • 55–70 mph (90–110 km/h) on rural expressways
  • 65–75 mph (105–120 km/h) on rural Interstate highways

The highest limits are usually found in the inland West and the lowest limits are usually found in the Northeast, and some limits fall outside these ranges. For example, some two-lane rural roads in Texas have 75 mph (120 km/h) speed limits, and there are two stretches of Interstate in West Texas with a daytime 80 mph (130 km/h) speed limit for passenger vehicles. In contrast, the highest speed limit posted on Interstates in Hawaii is 60 mph (95 km/h). This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A typical expressway in Santa Clara County, California. ... A typical rural stretch of Interstate highway, with two lanes in each direction separated by a large grassy median, and with cross-traffic limited to overpasses and underpasses. ... The dry plains of West Texas, have often been divided up into tracks of land divided by barbed wire fences. ...



A standard sign indicating a speed limit of 80 miles per hour (mph), a night-time speed limit of 65 mph, and a truck speed limit of 55 mph

Contents

Image File history File links Speed_limit_80_sign. ... Image File history File links Night_speed_65_sign. ... Image File history File links Trucks_speed_55_sign. ... Miles per hour is a unit of speed, expressing the number of international miles covered per hour. ... For other uses, see Truck (disambiguation). ...

Charts

Speed limits

This table contains the usual speed limit, in miles per hour, on typical roads in each category. This is usually, but not always, the statutory speed limit.


Some states have lower truck speed limits applicable to heavy trucks. Speed limits in the United States are set by each state. ... For other uses, see Truck (disambiguation). ...

State Interstate (rural) Interstate (urban) 4 lane (rural) 2 lane (rural) County (rural) Residential (urban) School Zones
Alabama 70, 55hazmat 60, 55hazmat 65, 55hazmat 55 45paved, 35unpaved
Alaska 65 65 65 65 50
Arizona 75 65 65 65 65 25
Arkansas 70 65 60 or 65 55
California 70 65, 55, 50 (Bay Bridge) 65 55, 65ca 55, 65ca 25
Colorado 75, 65mtn 55 65 65
Connecticut 65 55, 50 65 55
Delaware 65 55 55 50 20
District of Columbia N/A 55 N/A N/A N/A 25
Florida 70, Minimum 50 65,55, 50 (I-4 Orlando), Minimum 40 65 60 60 CR 74 In Glades County, Generally 55 Elsewhere 30 10, 15, 20
Georgia 70 55 65 55 45 30 25
Hawaii 60 50 45 45 45
Idaho 75 65 65 65
Illinois 65 55 65 55 55
Indiana 70 55 60 55 55
Iowa 70 55 65 55
Kansas 70 65 65 65 55 30
Kentucky[1] 70 55 55 55 55
Louisiana 70 60 65 55 45 25
Maine 65 55 55 55 50
Maryland 65 55 55 55
Massachusetts 65 55 55 55 30
Michigan[2] 70 70 55 55 55 25 25
Minnesota[3] 70 55, 60 65 60[4] 55 30
Mississippi 70 70 65 55
Missouri 70 55, 60, 65 65, 70us 65, 60, 55 mohwys
State Interstate (rural) Interstate (urban) 4 lane (rural) 2 lane (rural) County (rural) Residential (urban) School Zones
Montana 75 65 70 70
Nebraska[5] 75 65lin, 60 65 65west, 60 55paved, 50gravel 25
Nevada 75 65 70 70 70 30
New Hampshire 65 55 55 45 35 30
New Jersey 65 55 65, 55 50 30-50 Depending on location, generally 40 25
New Mexico 75 65, 55 75, 70 65, 60, 55
  • US70 between Las Cruces and Alamogordo is posted at 75 mph on a section between the WSMR and White Sands National Monument entrances. It is the only non-Interstate road to be posted at 75 mph.
  • A section of Interstate 25 in Albuquerque between the Sunport Blvd exit and downtown is posted at 55 mph.
  • 2 lane 65 mph speed limits are posted on roads with wide paved shoulders. Roads with a narrow paved shoulders are posted at 60 mph. 2 lane roads with no paved shoulders are posted at 55 mph.
  • left lane minimum speed limit on roads posted at 75 mph is 65 mph.
  • US84/285 has a 65 mph speed limit on the whole stretch between Pojoaque and NM 599.
  • NM502 between the NM30 interchange to US84/285 in Pojoaque is posted at 55 mph (used to be 65 mph)
New York 65 55, 50nyc 55 55 55 30
North Carolina 70 65 70 (freeways), 55 55 35, 30, 25
North Dakota[6] [7] 75 60, 55 70 65 Most Hwys., 55 (ND 57, ND 43) 55 Unmarked or Other wise posted. 25, 20, or 15 25, 20, 15
Ohio [8] 65 65, 60, or 55 65, 60, or 55 55 55 25
Oklahoma 75t, 70 65 70 65 45 25
Oregon 65 60, 55 55 55 55 25 20
Pennsylvania 65 55 55 55 25 15
Rhode Island 65 55 55 55
South Carolina 70 60 60 55 45 30
South Dakota 75 65 70, 65 65 55 35, 25
Tennessee 70 55 70, 65 55
Texas 80, 75, 70, 65night 60 75, 70, 65night 75, 70, 65night 70hctra, 60, 55night 30
Utah 75 65 65 65
Vermont 65 55 55 50 50
Virginia 70 (I-85), 65 60, 55 60 (US 29, US 301, US 58), 55 55 55 25
Washington 70 60 60 60 50 25
West Virginia 70 55 65 55
Wisconsin 65 55 65 55 55 25
Wyoming 75 60 65 65

Image File history File links Flag_of_Alabama. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Alaska. ... Official language(s) None[1] Spoken language(s) English 85. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Arizona. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Arkansas. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_California. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Colorado. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Connecticut. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Washington,_D.C..svg The flag of Washington, D.C. It is from openclipart. ... ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Florida. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami metropolitan area Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Georgia_(U.S._state). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Idaho. ... Official language(s) English [1] Capital Boise Largest city Boise Largest metro area Boise metropolitan area Area  Ranked 14th  - Total 83,642 sq mi (216,632 km²)  - Width 305 miles (491 km)  - Length 479 miles (771 km)  - % water 0. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Illinois. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Indiana. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iowa. ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kansas. ... Official language(s) English[2] Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kentucky. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Louisiana. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Maine. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Maryland. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... Image File history File links Flag_of_Massachusetts. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Michigan. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Largest metro area Metro Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Minnesota. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mississippi. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Missouri. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Montana. ... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  Ranked 4th  - Total 147,165 sq mi (381,156 km²)  - Width 255 miles (410 km)  - Length 630 miles (1,015 km)  - % water 1  - Latitude 44°26N to 49°N  - Longitude 104°2W to 116°2W Population  Ranked... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nebraska. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nevada. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Hampshire. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Jersey. ... “NJ” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Mexico. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... Albuquerque International Sunport (IATA: ABQ, ICAO: KABQ) is a public airport located three miles (5 km) southeast of the central business district (CBD) of Albuquerque, a city in Bernalillo County, New Mexico, USA. The airports IATA airport code ABQ is also Amtraks 3-letter code for its rail... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_York. ... This article is about the state. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_North_Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_North_Dakota. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ohio. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Oklahoma. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Largest metro area Oklahoma City metro area Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Oregon. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Pennsylvania. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Rhode_Island. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Dakota. ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,163 sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Texas. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Utah. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Vermont. ... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Virginia. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Washington. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_West_Virginia. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Wisconsin. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to 92° 53′ W Population  Ranked... Image File history File links Flag_of_Wyoming. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ...

Legend

  • Interstate: Interstate highway or other state- or federally numbered road built to Interstate standards.
  • 4 lane: State- or federally numbered 4 lane road not built to Interstate standards.
  • 2 lane: State- or federally numbered 2 lane road.
  • County: County-owned roads that are generally not numbered by the state.
  • Residential: Residential roads or streets within an urban or rural area.

Footnotes

  • CA: The default limit on 2-lane roads is 55 mph, however CalTrans or a local agency can post a speed of up to 65 mph after an engineering study. [9]
  • gravel: Gravel roads.
  • hazmat: Trucks hauling hazardous materials. Only applies to four-lane and Interstate roads in Alabama. [10]
  • hctra: Harris County, Texas's toll road authority may post up to 70 mph limits on its tollway system.[11]
  • lin: Interstate 80 through Lincoln.
  • mohwys: 60 or 65 mph on most 2-lane US Highways, 60 or 65 on a few NHS-class primary state highways, and very few lettered state roads. 55 mph on all other 2-lane highways.
  • mtn: Speed limit in mountainous areas.
  • night: Night speed limit.
  • nyc: New York City freeway speed limit.
  • paved: Paved roads.
  • t: Turnpike.
  • west: West side of state.
  • us: Selected 4-lane US or primary state highways with few crossover points.

Harris County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas within the Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown metropolitan area. ... The Harris County Toll Road Authority (HCTRA) came into existence when, in September, 1983, Harris County voters approved a referendum by a 7-3 margin to release up to $900 million in bonds to create two tollroads - the Hardy Toll Road and the Sam Houston Tollway, ostensibly to improve the...

Other speed-related laws

State Typical Fine Recklessness threshold or enhanced penalty Absolute/Prima Facie Ticket Dismissal Options Point System
Texas $1-$200[12] plus court fees. Doubled in active school zone or construction zone when workers are present[13]. None[14] Prima facie[15] Defensive driving[16] (once per year) or deferred disposition[17] (restrictions vary, but generally at least 4 per year), but only valid if:
  • Texas resident,
  • speed < 25 under limit and < 95 mph, and
  • not in construction zone where workers are present or active school zone.
Point system is annual surcharge only. No provision for license suspension.[18]
Virginia
  • Up to $250[19]
  • School zone: up to $250 additional[20]
  • Work zone: up to $500[21]
  • $100 civil penalty in certain towns[22]
20 mph over limit or over 80 mph[23] or "exceeds reasonable speed"[24]. Absolute[25] Point system[26] leading to fines, suspension, and mandatory driver education[27].

Image File history File links Flag_of_Texas. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Virginia. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...

Definition of speeding

For record keeping purposes, speeding is defined by the US federal government as 1. exceeding posted limits or 2. driving too fast for the conditions[28]. Speeds in excess of posted maximum speed limits account for most speed-related traffic citations. However, most speed-related crashes involve speed too fast for conditions[29] such as limited visibility or reduced road traction.


A libertarian criticism of this definition of speeding is when speed limits are posted below the maximum safe speed, crashes that occur at speeds in excess of the limit can count as speed-related even when it is unclear whether the speed was unsafe.


Variable speed limits offer some potential to reduce speed-related crashes. However, due to the high cost of implementation, they exist primarily on motorways. Furthermore, most speed-related crashes occur on local and collector roads [30]. Speed-related crashes can also occur at speeds below 30 miles per hour; for example, truck rollovers on exit ramps.[31] The field of road safety is concerned with reducing the numbers or the consequences of vehicle crashes, by developing and implementing management systems ideally based in a multidisciplinary and holistic approach, with interrelated activities in a number of fields. ...


Prima facie

Most states have absolute speed limits, meaning that a speed in excess of the limit is illegal per se. However, some states have prima facie speed limits. This offers motorists a valid defense to a speeding charge if it can be proven that the speed was in fact reasonable and prudent. Look up prima facie in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


A successful prima facie defense is rare. Not only does the burden of proof rest upon the accused, a successful defense may involve expert witnesses or other expenses well in excess of the cost of a ticket. Furthermore, since prima facie defenses must be presented in a court, such a defense is difficult for out of town motorists.


Speed limits in Texas, Utah, and Rhode Island are prima facie. Some other states have a hybrid system: speed limits may be prima facie up to a certain speed or only on certain roads.


Federal speed limit controls (55 mph)

For more details on this topic, see National Maximum Speed Law.

In response to the 1973 oil crisis, Congress enacted a National Maximum Speed Law that federally mandated that no speed limit may be higher than 55 mph. The law was widely disregarded, even after the national maximum was increased to 65 mph in 1987 on certain roads. In 1995, the law was repealed, returning the choice of speed limit to each state. 55 mph speed limit being erected in response to the National Maximum Speed Law. ... The 1973 Oil Crisis began in earnest on October 17, 1973, when the members of Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC, consisting of the Arab members of OPEC plus Egypt and Syria) announced, as a result of the ongoing Yom Kippur War, that they would no longer ship petroleum... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... 55 mph speed limit being erected in response to the National Maximum Speed Law. ...


Political considerations in the U.S.

Notwithstanding the reduction in the number of crashes, reduced damage in a crash, and the increased fuel efficiency due to lower speed limits, it has been claimed that political considerations have led to unreasonably low speed limits in the US.


Traffic violations have proved to be a great source of income for many states. As a direct consequence to this many State Administrations have been reluctant to increase the speed limit on State roads. By keeping speed limits "unreasonably" low the logical conclusion to this effort is that more motorists will appear to "speed". This gives law enforcement personnel the authority to issue traffic citations and thus improve the state's revenue. This policy has rarely been voiced or acknowledged. As a direct consequence of this, insurance companies have benefited as well. As motorists are charged with speeding violations their drivers licenses are assigned "violation points". The more points accumulated on a license the more of a risk an insurance company will associate with the driver. This has a direct consequence of increasing insurance premiums thus resulting in greater revenue for the insurance company. Insurance companies rarely compete with each other as their premiums are determined by state guidelines. The same state of course, that sets the speed limits which results in a revenue generating enterprise between itself and the insurance companies. This association between the state and insurance companies is further solidified by the state insisting (through laws and policies) that "all" drivers have insurance policies with the insurance companies. If a driver either cannot be covered under an insurance policy because of high risk the state will assume that high risk for a greater monetary amount; thus resulting in even more revenue generation for the State.[32] [33] [34]


Noteworthy state distinctions

Alabama

Alabama recently set the speed limit for HAZMAT trucks to 55 mph, being the only state to have done so as of the present time. Also, in Birmingham, a 50-mph limit is being proposed for flatbed trucks carrying coils due to recent occurrences of coils falling off the trucks on the interstates there.


California

In California, many speed limit signs are identified as "Maximum Speed," usually when the limit is 55 mph (90 km/h) or more. Rural Speed Limit on Interstate Highways such as: I-5, I-8, I-10, I-15, I-40, I-80 and even CA-99 south of Madera, and Fresno, and U.S. 101 on the central coast carry the Maximum Speed of 70 mph (110 km/h), with supplementary signage stating "AUTOS WITH TRAILERS/TRUCKS 55 MAXIMUM." This is an accident of legal history.[attribution needed] California's Basic Speed Law, [35] of the California Vehicle Code, defines the maximum speed at which a car may travel as a reasonable and prudent speed, given road conditions. The numerical limit set by CalTrans engineers for "Speed Limit" signs, generally found on all non-controlled-access routes, is considered a presumptive maximum "reasonable and prudent" speed. However, it is technically allowable for a driver ticketed for exceeding this "Speed Limit" to present the argument that his or her speed was "reasonable and prudent" at the time the ticket was issued. While rare, some speeding tickets have been thrown out based on this provision. When the National Maximum Speed Limit was enacted, California was forced to create a new legal signage category, Maximum Speed, to indicate to drivers that the Basic Speed Law did not apply on these federally funded highways; rather, it would be a violation to exceed the fixed maximum speed indicated on the sign, regardless of whether the driver's speed could be considered "reasonable and prudent." Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Interstate 5 (abbreviated I-5) is the westernmost interstate highway in the continental United States. ... Uplandia Regiment, or Upplands regemente, also I 8, is a Swedish Army infantry regiment that traces its origins back to the 16th Century. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 10 Interstate 10 (abbreviated I-10) is the southernmost east-west, coast-to-coast interstate highway in the United States. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 15 “I-15” redirects here. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 40 Interstate 40 (abbreviated I-40) is a major west-east interstate highway in the United States. ... Interstate 80 (abbreviated I-80) is the second-longest Interstate Highway in the United States. ... JUNCTION POSTMILE I-5 KER 0. ... Madera is the county seat of Madera County, California. ... “Fresno” redirects here. ... Highway 101 redirects here. ... Caltrans logo The soaring ramps in the stack interchanges favored by Caltrans often provide stunning views. ...


Delaware

In Delaware, only two roads are posted with a 65 mph (105 km/h) speed limit: I-495 and Delaware Route 1. The remaining two Interstates, Interstate 95 and Interstate 295, along with all rural four-lane non-Interstate highways, have 55 mph (90 km/h) speed limits. All rural two-lane state-owned roads have 50 mph (80 km/h) speed limits, while all urban speed limits, regardless of location, is held at 25 mph (40 km/h) for two-lane roads and up to 35 mph (55 km/h) for four-lane roads. School zones are posted at 20 mph (30 km/h). This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... Interstate 495 (abbreviated I-495) in Delaware is a six-lane three-digit bypass of Interstate 95 around the city of Wilmington, Delaware. ... Delaware Route 1 is a 110 mile long, four-to-six lane highway going from the Maryland-Delaware State line on the eastern Atlantic shoreline to the Delaware Turnpike (Interstate 95) just outside of Wilmington. ... In Delaware, Interstate 95 runs diagonally from the border with Pennsylvania in northeast to the border with Maryland. ... Interstate 295 (abbreviated I-295) in New Jersey and Delaware is a bypass route from a junction with Interstate 95 south of Wilmington, Delaware to another junction with I-95 north of Trenton, New Jersey. ... A school zone refers to the area of a street near a school, where the speed limit is reduced to protect student pedestrians. ...


Florida

Florida wasted no time, and quickly raised its speed limit from the federally mandated 55 mph national limit (1974-1987) to 65 mph in 1987. In 1995, the 65 mph national speed limit cap was lifted, and in 1996 Florida raised the speed limit to 70 mph on rural interstate highways, 65 mph on rural 4 lane highways, including US and State Highways, and 60 mph on rural state 2 lane highways. County roads remained posted at 55 mph. In 2007, however, County Road 74 in Glades County, just west of Lake Okeechobee in south Florida posted a 60 mph limit. This is up from the previously posted 55 mph speed limit. This includes about 17 miles of the this particular county road, from SR 29, in Palmdale, to the Charlotte County line. (This area is an extremely rural area). West of the Charlotte County line, the limit drops back to 55 mph to the US 17 junction, just east of I-75, near Punta Gorda. Floridas minimum speed limit on interstate highways is now 50 mph in most 70 mph zones, up from the previous 40 mph minimum. In 55 mph, and 65 mph urban interstate zones, the minimum remains 40 mph. The state of Florida also does not impose a lower truck speed limit. All interstate traffic is permitted to travel at the same speed. "School Zones" in Florida are usually posted from 10 mph, to no higher than 20 mph. Most have "flashing yellow lights" activated during the times they are in effect, as well as accompanying signs, which post the times these reduced speed limits are effective. All are strictly enforced, and carry a stiff fine, as well as points if one is issued a citation for speeding in a school zone. Florida does post night time speed limits on some roads, though they are rare. These signs are black, with white writing. They say the word "NIGHT" with the numeric speed posted below this word, also colored white. Examples include parts of Daniels Parkway just east of the Southwest Florida International Airport, in Ft. Myers, to the SR 82 junction. (Speed limits in this stretch of highway are posted 50 mph Day, and 45 mph Night) For the most part, these night time reduced speeds are located in "Panther Zones", or other wildlife preserves. It is not common at all to see night time speed limit signs posted on interstate highways. It is, however, very common to see "black painted stripes" in conjunction with the normal "white stripes" which separate the lanes on many Florida highways. These "black stripes" are much more visible to drivers traveling during the day on Florida highways, as it is normal for much of the pavement to become "bleach-white" colored with passing time.


Hawaii

Hawaii was the last state to raise its maximum speed limit after the National Maximum Speed Limit was repealed in 1995. In 2002, after public outcry after a controversial experiment with speed enforcement using road safety cameras, the state Department of Transportation raised the speed limit to 60 mph on two stretches of road: A red-light camera in use in Beaverton, Oregon, USA A picture taken by a speed camera A Road safety camera is a system, including a camera and a vehicle-monitoring device, used to detect and identify vehicles disobeying a speed limit or some other road legal requirement. ...

  • Interstate H-1 between Kapolei and Waipahu, and
  • Interstate H-3 between the Tetsuo Harano Tunnels and the junction with H-1.[36]

All other Interstates have a maximum speed limit of 55 mph, with the limit dropping to 50 mph in central Honolulu. Non-interstates generally have speed limits of 55 mph and in many cases much less.[37] Interstate H-1 is an intrastate interstate highway in Hawaii, United States, on the island of Oahu. ... Interstate H-3 in Halawa Valley looking towards the Koolau crest Interstate H-3 (also known as the John A. Burns Freeway) is an intrastate interstate highway located on the island of O‘ahu in the state of Hawai‘i, United States. ... The Tetsuo Harano Tunnels are a pair of highway tunnels passing through the Ko‘olau Range on the island of O‘ahu. ... Honolulu as seen from the International Space Station Honolulu is the largest city and the capital of the U.S. state of Hawai&#8216;i. ...


Indiana

In Indiana speed limits on Interstate highways are usually 70 mph (110 km/h) for cars and 65 mph (105 km/h) for trucks, except in urban areas, where it is generally 55 mph (90 km/h) in city centers and 65 mph (105 km/h) cars/60 mph (95 km/h) trucks in suburban areas. Prior to July 5, 2005, all Interstate highways were 65 mph and below. Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Most non-Interstate highways are 55 mph, but some rural four-lane divided highways are set at 60 mph. These limits often decrease to 30-45 mph (50-70 km/h) approaching urban areas, and within cities a speed limit of 20–30 mph (30–50 km/h) is not uncommon, though larger arterial roads within cities may reach as high as 45 mph (70 km/h).


Montana

From December 1995 through December 1998, Montana had only a "reasonable and prudent" speed limit on rural roads, meaning that speeds that were not reasonable and prudent were illegal and ticketable. From December 1998 through June 1999 (6 months), Montana had no rural highway speed limit whatsoever. However, a law prohibiting reckless driving, applicable to extreme speeds but less stringent than the previous "reasonable and prudent" standard, still applied.


Reasonable and prudent era

In the years before 1974's 55 mph National Maximum Speed Limit, and for three years after the 1995 65 mph repeal, Montana had a non-numeric "reasonable and prudent" speed limit during the daytime on most rural roads. Montana Code Annotated (MCA) Section 61-8-303 said "A person . . . shall drive the vehicle . . . at a rate of speed no greater than is reasonable and proper under the conditions existing at the point of operation . . . so as not to unduly or unreasonably endanger the life, limb, property, or other rights of a person entitled to the use of the street or highway."

Typical speed limit sign that one would see at the Montana state line from December 1995 to June 1999.

Montana law also specified a few numeric limits: a night speed limit, usually 55 or 65 mph (90–105 km/h), depending on road type; 25 mph (40 km/h) in urban districts and 35 mph (60 km/h) in construction zones. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...


The phrase "reasonable and prudent" is found in the language of most state speed laws. This allows prosecution under non-ideal conditions such as rain or snow when the posted speed limit would be imprudently fast.


No speed limit

On March 10, 1996 [38], a Montana Patrolman issued a speed ticket to a driver traveling at 85 mph (140 km/h) on a stretch of State Highway 200. The 50 year-old male driver (Rudy Stanko) was operating a 1996 Camaro with less than 10,000 miles (16,000 km) on the odometer. Although the officer gave no opinion as to what would have been a reasonable speed, the driver was convicted. The driver appealed all the way to the Montana Supreme Court. The Court reversed the conviction in case No. 97-486 on December 23, 1998; it held that a law requiring drivers to drive at a non-numerical "reasonable and proper" speed "is so vague that it violates the Due Process Clause ... of the Montana Constitution".


75 mph speed limit

Due to this reversal, Montana scrambled to vote in a numerical limit as it technically had no speed limit whatsoever in the meantime. In June 1999, a new Montana speed limit law went into effect. The law's practical effect was to require posted limits on all roads and disallow any speed limit higher than 75 mph (120 km/h).


Montana law still contains a section that says "a person shall operate a vehicle in a careful and prudent manner and at a reduced rate of speed no greater than is reasonable and prudent under the conditions existing at the point of operation, taking into account the amount and character of traffic, visibility, weather, and roadway conditions." However, this is a standard clause that appears in other state traffic codes and has the practical effect of requiring a speed lower than the posted limit where a lower speed is necessary to maintain a reasonable and prudent road manner.


New Hampshire

The highest limit is a maximum lawful speed limit of 65 mph (105 km/h), which can be found on the Interstate System, the Everett Turnpike, the New Hampshire Turnpike and the Spaulding Turnpike, in locations in which the highways are divided and have four or more lanes. The Frederick E. Everett Turnpike is a toll road in New Hampshire, USA, running 44 miles from the Massachusetts border at Nashua north to Concord. ... The Blue Star Turnpike is a toll road located in New Hampshire, USA. It is 15 miles long, and comprises almost the entire New Hampshire section of Interstate 95, from the Massachusetts border at Seabrook to just south of the Maine border in Portsmouth. ... The Spaulding turnpike is a toll road in New Hampshire, USA, running 33 miles from Interstate 95 in Portsmouth northwest to Milton. ...


Provided that no hazard exists that requires lower speed, the speed of any vehicle not in excess of the limit is deemed to be prima facie lawful. The limit for "rural residential districts" and Class V highways outside the city or town compact is 35 mph. The limit for any "business or urban residence district" is 30 mph. School zones receive a 10 mph reduction in the limit 45 minutes before and after the beginning and end of a school day. The speed limit for a road work or construction area is 10 mph lower, but no more than 45 mph, than the posted limit when work is in progress. The speed limit for all other locations is 55 mph. The minimum limit that a speed can be set in a rural or urban district is 25 mph.


New Jersey

The common speed limit on a New Jersey highway is 65 mph. Highways such as the New Jersey Turnpike south of Exit 11, the Garden State Parkway (north of Exit 163 in Paramus and south of the Sayreville toll barrier), I-80, I-287, and I-78 have 65 mph limits where speeding fines are doubled. Residential roads are posted at 25 mph. Two-lane rural highways and two-lane county roads generally have 45 and 50 mph limits. Paramus is a borough located in Bergen County, New Jersey. ... Sayreville is a borough located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. ...


New Mexico

The highest speed limit found in New Mexico is 75 mph, which can be found on Interstates 25, 40, and 10, and US 70 in the WSMR. In Albuquerque, speed limits on surface streets range from 35-45 mph, while 65 mph on the freeway. In 2004, the speed limit on Interstate 25 between downtown Albuquerque and the airport exit was lowered to 55 mph to help reduce accidents on that stretch. Prior to the NMSL in 1974, the speed limit on rural Interstates was 70 mph. In 2007, the speed limit on New Mexico state highway 502 between the NM-30 interchange and its end at US 84/285 in Pojoaque was lowered from 65 mph to 55 mph. This article is about the largest city of New Mexico. ...


New York

A standard-style New York State speed sign indicating the 'State Speed Limit'.

The highest speed limit is 65 mph (100 km/h), which is found on most of the New York State Thruway and other rural Interstate highways. The State Speed Limit (a blanket speed limit for rural roads) is 55 mph (90 km/h), which is also the highest a non-expressway or parkway highway may have. Signs in New York thus read "State Speed Limit" when the speed limit is 55. The theme is followed, and many signs read "Area Speed Limit", "Town Speed Limit", "City Speed Limit" or "Village Speed Limit" with varying speeds shown below. The default speed limit on any road not marked with a speed limit sign is 30 mph within New York State (unless local restrictions are stricter) (source NYS DMV drivers Handbook ||) New York City (and some other urbanized areas) has a blanket speed limit of 25 mph (40 km/h) except where otherwise posted. The highest speed limit on expressways or parkways in New York City is 50 mph (80 km/h) speed limit. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The New York State Thruway (officially the Governor Thomas E. Dewey Thruway) is a limited-access toll highway in the U.S. state of New York. ... Interstate Highways in the 48 contiguous states. ... A typical expressway in Santa Clara County, California. ... Harden Parkway in Salinas, CA. For other uses, see Parkway (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... An expressway is a divided highway, usually 4 lanes or wider in size, where direct access to adjacent properties has been eliminated. ...



Governor George Pataki signed legislation in September 2003 that enables NYSDOT and NYSTA to raise speed limits to 65 mph on its roads that meet established design and safety standards. This legislation became active in March 2004, and has been used on over 100 miles worth of highway. Prior to the new law, consent of the State Legislature was necessary to enact a 65 mph speed limit, a process that could take months or years. In fact, New York was one of the last states in the United States to enable speed limits above 55 mph on any roads. George Elmer Pataki (born June 24, 1945) is an American politician who was the 57th Governor of New York serving from January 1995 until January 1, 2007. ... The New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) is reponsible for the development and operation of highways, railroads, mass transit systems, ports, waterways and aviation facilities in the U.S. state of New York. ... The New York State Thruway (officially the Governor Thomas E. Dewey Thruway) is a limited-access toll highway in the U.S. state of New York. ... This article is about the state. ...


Ohio

The maximum speed limit found on highways in Ohio is 65 miles per hour. Truck maximum speed applied to all vehicles with an empty vehicle weight greater than 8,000 pounds and all non-commercial buses.[39]


The truck maximum speed is typically 55 miles per hour, 10 miles per hour lower than which is allowed for smaller vehicles. The only road in Ohio that allows trucks to exceed 55 mph is the Ohio Turnpike, which doesn't post a lower truck limit, allowing them to travel at 65 mph, in an effort to divert truck traffic off of the non-toll US-20 roadway. The westbound Ohio Turnpike Ohio Turnpike (officially James W. Shocknessy Ohio Turnpike) is a -long, limited-access toll highway in the U.S. state of Ohio, serving as a primary corridor to Chicago and Pittsburgh. ...


Oregon

A standard-style Oregon speed sign omitting the word 'limit'.

Up until 2002, Oregon state law required that all speed limit signs omit the word 'limit' from their display. The reasoning behind this is unknown but the practice has been known to produce some unusual number fonts. The spacing between and appearance of the numbers on the signs vary greatly depending on which jurisdiction made the sign. In 2002, the Oregon Department of Transportation permitted the inclusion of the word 'limit' on speed signs and left it up to local government agencies to decide on whether 'limit'-branded signs would be installed. Most have chosen not to change over with a few exceptions to the rule. Speed Limit 60 signs can be found on Interstate 5 through Salem and on Interstate 84 through east Portland. The City of Beaverton has been the most liberal in retrofitting the standard-form Speed Limit sign, presumably because the 'SPEED' signs do not use a standard number font and are likely more expensive to make. Whenever a 'Speed' sign is damaged or vandalized in Beaverton city limits, a 'Speed Limit' sign takes its place. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 896 KB) A typical Oregon-style speed law sign showing the unique number font necessary due to the extra space given when the word limit is not included. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 896 KB) A typical Oregon-style speed law sign showing the unique number font necessary due to the extra space given when the word limit is not included. ... Nickname: Location in Marion and Polk Counties, state of Oregon Coordinates: , County Founded 1842 Government  - Mayor Janet Taylor Area  - City 120. ... Nickname: Location of Portland in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country State County Multnomah County Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Mayor Tom Potter[1]  - Commissioners Sam Adams Randy Leonard Dan Saltzman Erik Sten  - Auditor Gary Blackmer Area  - City 376. ... Location in Oregon Coordinates: , County Washington County Incorporated 1893 Government  - Mayor Rob Drake Area  - City 42. ...


Throughout the late 1990s the Oregon State Legislature passed multiple bills that would have raised the speed limit to 75 miles per hour on rural Interstate highways and up to 70 mph on certain rural two lane highways in the eastern portions of the state. Each year Governor John Kitzhaber vetoed the bill. In 2003, the Oregon State Legislature passed a bill that would have raised the maximum permissible speed limit on Interstate highways to 70 mph for cars with a 5 mph differential for trucks, up from the previous 65 mph limit for cars with a 10 mph differential, this bill was signed into law by then newly elected Governor Ted Kulongoski. In 2004 the Oregon Department of Transportation decided to not implement the increase out of concerns that it would not be safe to have trucks traveling at 65 mph. Prior to the National Maximum Speed Law, the speed limit on Oregon interstates could be as high as 75 mph. Oregon remains the only state west of the Mississippi River to have a maximum state speed limit that is under 70 mph. A typical rural stretch of Interstate highway, with two lanes in each direction separated by a large grassy median, and with cross-traffic limited to overpasses and underpasses. ... The Governor of Oregon is the top executive of the government of the U.S. state of Oregon. ... John Kitzhaber (born March 5, 1947) is a physician and United States Democratic Party politician from Oregon. ... A typical rural stretch of Interstate highway, with two lanes in each direction separated by a large grassy median, and with cross-traffic limited to overpasses and underpasses. ... Theodore R. Ted Kulongoski (born November 5, 1940, in rural Missouri[1]) is an American Democratic politician. ... 55 mph speed limit being erected in response to the National Maximum Speed Law. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ...


In 2004, a law was passed revising Oregon's school speed limit laws. In school zones, on roads with speed limits of 30 mph or below, drivers were required to slow to the school speed limit of 20 mph 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, regardless of whether or not children were present. This replaced most 'when children are present' placards. If the speed limit was 35 mph or higher, the school zone limit would be imposed either by flashing yellow lights or a placard denoting times and days of the week when the limit was in effect. The at-all times rule was highly unpopular with motorists and was widely ignored. In fact, it is likely that this law has led to a reduced acceptance of school speed limits, regardless of how and when they are in effect. In 2006, the law was revised again, taking away the 'at all times' requirement and replacing it with a time-of-day system (usually school days, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.). School crossings with flashing yellow lights remain.


Pennsylvania

In 1940, when the Pennsylvania Turnpike was opened between Irwin and Carlisle, the entire 110 mile highway did not have a posted speed limit, similar to that of the German Autobahns. In 1941, a speed limit of 70 mph (110 km/h) was established, only to be reduced to 35 mph (55 km/h) during the war years (1942–45). After WWII, the limit was raised to 70 mph on the four-lane sections, with the two-lane tunnels having 50 mph (80 km/h) for cars and 40 mph (65 km/h) for trucks. Prior to the 1974 federal speed limit law, all Interstates and the Turnpike had a 65 mph (105 km/h) speed limit on rural stretches and 60 mph (100 km/h) speed limit in urban areas. This Pennsylvania state route article needs to be cleaned up to conform to both a higher standard of article quality and accepted design standards outlined in the WikiProject Pennsylvania State Highways. ... Irwin is a borough located in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. ... Coordinates: , Country State County Cumberland Founded 1751 Government  - Mayor Kirk R. Wilson Area  - Borough  5. ... This article is about the German, Swiss road system. ...


In 1995, the state raised the speed limit on rural stretches of Interstate Highways and the Pennsylvania Turnpike system to 65 mph (105 km/h), with urban area having a 55 mph (90 km/h) limit. In 1997, PennDOT raised the speed limit to some rural non-Interstate highway bypasses to 65 mph (105 km/h). In 2005, with the change in the designation of "urban zones" in the state, the entire lengths of both the Pennsylvania Turnpike's east-west mainline and Northeast Extension were given 65 mph (105 km/h) limits, except at the tunnels and through the very winding 5.5 mile (9 km) eastern approach to the Allegheny Mountain Tunnel.


On non-freeway roads, speed limits are generally held at 55 mph (90 km/h) for rural two and four-lane roads, 45 mph (70 km/h) for urban four lane and state-owned two lane roads, 35 mph (55 km/h) for major roadways in residential areas, 25 mph (40 km/h) for most municipal residential streets, including main north–south and east–west roads in county seats, and 15 mph (25 km/h) for school zones.


South Dakota

Shortly after the December 1995 repeal of the 65/55 mph National Maximum Speed Limit, South Dakota raised its general rural speed limits to 75 mph on freeways and 65 mph on other roads. Almost a decade after posting the 75 mph limit, average speeds on South Dakotan rural freeways remain at or below the posted speed limit[40]. South Dakota also has the distinction of being the only state that does not assign points to one's driving record for speeding convictions.


Texas

Typical Texas rural speed limit sign. Note the black backgrounded 65 mph night speed limit sign, common on Texas roads. (Few other states have widespread night speed limits.) This sign is on southbound U.S. 69/96/287 just north of Beaumont.

Texas is the only state that does not prescribe a speed limit for each road type. Any rural road—two lane, four lane, Interstate, or otherwise—that is numbered by the state or federal government has a 70 mph (110 km/h) statutory limit[41]. The law generally allows changing the 70 mph limit only if a study recommends a different limit[42]. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2576x1932, 1307 KB)Typical Texas speed limit sign. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2576x1932, 1307 KB)Typical Texas speed limit sign. ... U.S. Route 69 is a north-south United States highway. ... U.S. Highway 96 is a north-south United States highway. ... View south along U.S. Highway 287 in Larimer County, Colorado U.S. Highway 287 is a north-south United States highway. ... Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: Counties Jefferson County Government  - Mayor Guy Goodson Area  - City 222. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ...


75 mph and 80 mph limits

Texas statutorily allows the Texas Department of Transportation to post 75 mph (120 km/h) speed limits in counties with average populations of fewer than 15 people per square mile.[43] The same statute also allows 80 mph (130 km/h) speed limits on I-10 and I-20 in certain counties named in the statute, all of which happen to be rural, in west Texas, and have a low population density. Daytime truck limits are capped at 70 mph, and nighttime speed limits remain 65 mph for all vehicles. (Nothing prohibits nighttime speed limits from being raised to 70 mph, but the Department has not elected to do so.) Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 10 Interstate 10 (abbreviated I-10) is the southernmost east-west, coast-to-coast interstate highway in the United States. ... “I-20” redirects here. ...


In 2001, the Texas Legislature allowed the Texas Department of Transportation to post 75 mph (120 km/h) speed limits in counties with fewer than 10 people per square mile[44]. This has the practical effect of only allowing 75 mph speed limits in the most sparsely populated counties, all of which are generally well west of a line stretching from San Antonio to Odessa. In 2005, the Texas Legislature revised this law, allowing 80 mph (130 km/h) limits on I-10 and I-20 in certain rural counties in west Texas[45]. This bill also revised the eligibility for 75 mph speed limits: now eligible counties can have up to 15 persons per square mile. This did not substantially increase the miles of roadway eligible for higher limits, however.[46] Texas Senate in session The Texas Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Texas. ... // History The Texas Legislature created the Texas Highway Department in 1917 to administer federal highway construction and maintenance. ... “San Antonio” redirects here. ... Nickname: Location within the state of Texas Country State County Ector Government  - Mayor Larry Melton Area  - City 36. ... Interstate 10, or I-10, is the southernmost east-west, coast-to-coast interstate highway in the United States. ... This is a disambiguation page &#8212; a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

Texas Legislator Pete Gallego unveiling a new 80 mph speed limit sign on Interstate 10 near Fort Stockton, Texas.

On May 25, 2006, the Texas Transportation Commission has approved 80 mph speed limits[47], and signs are posted. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 876 KB)Texas Legislator Pete Gallego (D-Alpine)) unveiling the new 80 mph speed limit, presumably on I-10 near Fort Stockton. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 876 KB)Texas Legislator Pete Gallego (D-Alpine)) unveiling the new 80 mph speed limit, presumably on I-10 near Fort Stockton. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 10 Interstate 10 (abbreviated I-10) is the southernmost east-west, coast-to-coast interstate highway in the United States. ... Paisano Pete, the worlds largest roadrunner, welcomes visitors to Fort Stockton. ...


In a widely printed Associated Press story about the 80 mph speed limit[48], Texas is incorrectly reported as having legalized 75 mph limits in 1999. In fact, the bill that would have done this, HB 3328[49] by Pete Gallego, died in conference committee just before the Texas Legislature's session ended. This bill would have, in effect, set 75 mph as the statutory speed limit on any rural road numbered by the state or federal government, and it would have enacted—not simply allowed—an 80 mph speed limit on I-10 and I-20 in any county with fewer than 25,000 residents. The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... Texas Senate in session The Texas Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Texas. ...


While Texas's 80 mph limit is higher than any limit authorized by another state, it is equivalent to the 130 km/h recommended speed on the Autobahn and the actual 130 km/h rural expressway speed limit in thirteen other European countries[50]. It has been suggested that German Autobahns be merged into this article or section. ...


Since Texas law allows 75 mph speed limits on any road numbered by the state or federal government, it is the only state with 75 mph limits on two-lane roads. Several west Texas two-lane roads carry 75 mph limits, including portions of US 90[51]. No other state has a limit higher than 70 mph on any two-lane road. United States Highway 90 is an east-west United States highway. ...


85 mph limits

The legislation creating the Trans-Texas Corridor allows speed limits of up to 85 mph (140 km/h)[52] on roads built under the program. However, no such roads have been built as of September 2006. The language of the statute does not prohibit the Texas Transportation Commission from raising the truck speed limit or the night speed limit on these roads. The Trans-Texas Corridor (TTC) is a transportation network in the planning and early construction stages in the U.S. state of Texas. ... Speed limits in the United States are set by each state. ... Speed limits in the United States are set by each state. ...


Night speed limits

While the "basic rule," which requires drivers to drive a "reasonable and prudent" speed at all times, is usually relied upon to regulate proper night speed reductions, night speed limits generally may be established on roads where safety problems require a speed lower than what is self-selected by drivers.


Texas

Texas is the only state with a broadly-applicable, legislatively-specified night speed limit. Texas statutorily prescribes:

  • a blanket 65 mph (105 km/h) night speed limit on roads with a speed limit of at least 70 mph (110 km/h)[53]. While the Texas Department of Transportation has the power to lower this night speed limit or raise it to 70 mph, it in fact rarely does, so nearly every 70 mph or higher speed limit sign has an accompanying 65 mph night speed limit sign.
  • a 55 mph night speed limit for trucks on farm to market roads, complementing the statutory 60 mph truck day limit on these roads. (This is a holdover from Texas's truck speed limits.)
  • a 55 mph night speed limit on county roads (except for Harris County Toll Road Authority-owned toll freeways).

Other states

North Dakota, Montana[54], and Oklahoma also have night speed limits, but they are only generally applicable to rural, non-Interstate-class roads. Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  Ranked 4th  - Total 147,165 sq mi (381,156 km²)  - Width 255 miles (410 km)  - Length 630 miles (1,015 km)  - % water 1  - Latitude 44°26N to 49°N  - Longitude 104°2W to 116°2W Population  Ranked... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Largest metro area Oklahoma City metro area Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ...


Minnesota once had a night speed limit on sections of MN 61, between Duluth and Two Harbors, due to the danger of rocks falling off the cliffs alongside the road. Tunnels have since been constructed, bypassing the dangerous areas under the cliffs and making the night speed limit unnecessary. Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Minnesota State Highway 61 is a state highway in Minnesota. ...


Environmental speed limits

Texas

55 mph speed limit signs photographed on August 20, 2002. These signs were on southbound I-45 at the north border of Montgomery County. Immediately before this point, the speed limit was 70 mph. These were part of an unpopular 55 mph speed limit cap in the Houston–Galveston area.
Same location as prior picture with the more recent 65 mph speed limit, photographed on August 4, 2005.

Texas is the first state to lower speed limits for air quality reasons. In roughly a 50 mile (80 km) radius of the HoustonGalveston and DallasFt. Worth regions, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality convinced[55] the Texas Department of Transportation to reduce the speed limit on all roads with 70 mph (110 km/h) or 65 mph (105 km/h) speed limits by 5 mph[56]. This was instituted as part of a plan to reduce smog-forming emissions in areas out of compliance with the federal Clean Air Act.[57] Image File history File links 55 MPH speed limit signs on I-45 southbound at the Montgomery County border. ... Image File history File links 55 MPH speed limit signs on I-45 southbound at the Montgomery County border. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Montgomery County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas within the Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown Metropolitan Area. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2576x1932, 1141 KB)Part of a series of 65 MPH speed limit signs on I-45 southbound that start at the Montgomery County, TX line. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2576x1932, 1141 KB)Part of a series of 65 MPH speed limit signs on I-45 southbound that start at the Montgomery County, TX line. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Houston” redirects here. ... Galveston redirects here. ... “Dallas” redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Where the West Begins Location of Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas Coordinates: , Country State Counties Tarrant and Denton Government  - Mayor Michael J. Moncrief Area  - City  298. ... The Texas Commission for Environmental Quality is the environmental agency for the state of Texas. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Initial studies found that lower speed limits could bring the areas roughly 1.5% closer to compliance[58]. However, follow up studies found that the actual reduction is far less:

  1. The emissions modeling software initially used, MOBILE 5a, overestimated the emissions contribution of speed limit reductions. Rerunning the models with the next generation software, MOBILE 6, produced dramatically lower emissions reductions.
  2. Speed checks in the Dallas area performed 1 year after implementation of speed limit reductions show that actual speed reductions are only about 1.6 mph, a fraction of the anticipated 10% (5.5 mph) speed reduction.

With both of these facts combined, it is possible that the speed limit reductions only provide a thousandth of the total emissions reductions necessary for Clean Air Act compliance.[59]


In mid-2002, all speed limits in the Houston–Galveston area were capped at 55 mph (90 km/h)[60]. Facing immense opposition[61][62], poor compliance[63], and the finding that lowered speed limits produced only a fraction of the originally estimated emissions reductions[64], the TCEQ relented and reverted to the 5 mph reduction scheme[65].


In 2003, the Texas Legislature prospectively banned environmental speed limits effective September 1, 2003. The wording of the bill allows environmental speed limits already in place to remain indefinitely; no new miles of roadway may be subjected to environmental speed limits, however[66].


This law has allowed interesting inconsistencies. Generally, all primary arterial roadways within the inner loops of Texas cities have speed limits of 60 mph (95 km/h) or lower, so they were not subjected to environmental speed limits. Arterial roads between the inner loop and the outer loop generally have 65 mph (105 km/h) limits, and arterial roads outside the outer loop generally have 70 mph (110 km/h) limits. (Note that this is only the typical pattern and is not prescribed by law.) In at least one case—TX 121 between I-35W and I-820 in Ft. Worth—the speed limit rises from 60 mph to 65 mph as one crosses IH-820 approaching downtown[67], contravening the standard. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Texas State Highway 121, locally known as 121, is a diagonal state highway, angling from southwest to northeast through north central Texas. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 35 Interstate 35 (abbreviated I-35) is a north–south interstate highway in the central United States. ... Interstate 820 is a loop of Interstate 20 in Fort Worth, Texas of approximately 35 miles around the city and some of its suburbs. ...


Tennessee

Following the example of Texas, Tennessee has used environmental speed limits as part of pollution control efforts in Shelby, Hamilton, Sullivan, Knox, Blount, Jefferson, Roane, Loudon, Anderson, and Sevier counties, lowering the maximum truck speed limit to 55 mph (90 km/h) and the maximum car speed limit to 65 mph (100 km/h) within portions of these counties.[68][69] Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Shelby County is a county in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Hamilton County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Sullivan County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Knox County is a county in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Blount County is a U.S. county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Jefferson County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Roane County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Loudon County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Anderson County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Sevier County (pronounced severe) is a U.S. county of the state of Tennessee, United States. ...


Delaware

Interstate 495, which forms a bypass around Wilmington, features changeable speed limit signs for environmental purposes. These signs typically display a 65 mph speed limit, but this limit changes to 55 mph on days when air quality is a concern. Interstate 495 (abbreviated I-495) in Delaware is a six-lane three-digit bypass of Interstate 95 around the city of Wilmington, Delaware. ... : Chemical Capital of the World , Corporate Capital of the World , Credit Card Capital of the World : A Place to Be Somebody United States Delaware New Castle 17. ...


Minimum speed limits

In addition to the legally defined maximum speed, minimum speeds may be posted. There is little evidence to suggest they are enforced.[citation needed] Image File history File links Speed_limit_70_minimum_40_sign. ...

  • Connecticut limited access divided highways have minimum speed of 40 mph (65 km/h),[70] but they are not always posted.
  • Florida interstate highways have minimum speeds of 40 to 50 mph.[citation needed]
  • Hawaii has a minimum speed posted along much of Interstate H-1 of only 10 mph below the speed limit. The minimum speed is usually 45 mph when the speed limit is 55, and 40 mph when the speed limit is 50.
  • Illinois interstate highways are usually posted with both minimum and maximum speed limits, except in some urban areas, particularly Chicago. The minimum speed is almost always 45 mph.[citation needed]
  • Iowa rural interstates have a maximum speed limit of 70 mph and a minimum speed limit of 40 mph, and U.S. Highway 20 between Interstate 35 and Dubuque also has a 40 mph minimum speed, even though its interstate-quality road is signed at a 65 mph maximum. Other four-lane divided rural highways are signed at 65 mph, with no minimum speed. Urban minimum speeds are becoming increasingly uncommon in Iowa, however, until the recent reconstruction of Interstate 235 in Des Moines, a 40 mph minimum speed was signed.
  • Michigan freeways are usually posted with both minimum and maximum speeds. The minimum speed is currently 55 mph for cars, despite a maximum speed limit of 60 mph for trucks.[2]
  • Mississippi has a minimum speed of 30 mph on four-lane U.S. highways when no hazard exists. Strangely, there is no law for the minimum speed of the state's growing number of four-lane state highways. The minimum is 40 mph on Interstate highways and on 4 lane U.S. designated highways which have a posted maximum speed limit of 70 mph, but this minimum shall be posted.[71] In 2004, Mississippi posted minimum speed limits (40 mph) on all rural Interstates, but this minimum speed limit was already state law before the widespread posting.
  • New Hampshire has a minimum speed of 45 mph for all sections of Interstate Highway where the speed limit is 65 mph.[citation needed]
  • North Carolina has blanket minimum speed limits on interstate and primary highways only when signs are posted. The minimum is 40 mph if the maximum is 55 mph. The minimum is 45 mph if the maximum is at least 60 mph. These minimums do not apply to vehicles that are towing other vehicles.[73]
  • Oklahoma has minimum speed limits posted on more or less all interstate highways that are 25 mph below the maximum speed limit. For example, on the turnpikes, which have a maximum speed limit of 75 mph, they are nearly always accompanied by a sign stating a minimum speed limit of 50 mph.
  • The Pennsylvania Turnpike has a minimum speed limit of 15 mph below the posted maximum speed limit. Therefore, the minimum speed is 50 mph when the speed limit is 65 mph, and 40 mph when the speed limit is 55 mph. The Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission also states that vehicles that cannot maintain this speed on a level road may not use the turnpike. This minimum speed is not generally posted.
  • In Tennessee, a minimum speed limit of 45 mph (70 km/h) is posted in some metropolitan areas where the speed limit is 55 mph (90 km/h) or 65 mph (105 km/h).[citation needed]
  • In Utah, there is a minimum speed limit of 45 mph on interstate highways, when conditions permit.

Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami metropolitan area Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ... Interstate H-1 is an intrastate interstate highway in Hawaii, United States, on the island of Oahu. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... U.S. Highway 20 is an east-west United States highway. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 35 Interstate 35 (abbreviated I-35) is a north–south interstate highway in the central United States. ... Nickname: Location in the State of Iowa Coordinates: , Country United States State Iowa County Dubuque Incorporated 1833 Government  - Type Council-Manager  - Mayor Roy D. Buol  - City manager Michael C. Van Milligen Area  - City 71. ... Interstate 235 in Iowa is a 13. ... “Des Moines” redirects here. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Largest metro area Metro Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... This article is about the state. ... Interstate 787 (abbreviated I-787) is a 9. ... The Long Island Expressway (LIE) is one of the interstate highways with the designation of Interstate 495. ... The New York State Thruway (officially the Governor Thomas E. Dewey Thruway) is a limited-access toll highway in the U.S. state of New York. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Largest metro area Oklahoma City metro area Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... This Pennsylvania state route article needs to be cleaned up to conform to both a higher standard of article quality and accepted design standards outlined in the WikiProject Pennsylvania State Highways. ... The Pennsylvania Turnpike is a toll highway system in the state of Pennsylvania, USA. The turnpike system encompasses 532 miles (855 km) in three distinct sections. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... Interstate 89 (abbreviated I-89) is an interstate highway in the New England portion of the United States. ... Interstate 189 is the only spur on the entire length of Interstate 89. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Articles with similar titles include Chesapeake Bay Bridge. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...

Truck speed limits

Some jurisdictions set lower speed limits applicable only to large commercial vehicles like heavy trucks and buses. While they are called "truck speed limits", they generally do not apply to light trucks. Image File history File links Trucks_speed_55_sign. ... For other uses, see Truck (disambiguation). ... “Autobus” redirects here. ... Light truck is a vehicle classification generally used by the United States government for regulating fuel economy and safety. ...


Theory

Since trucks are far heavier than other vehicles, they take longer to stop, are less adept at avoiding hazards, and have much greater crash energy. Therefore, it follows from basic physics that limiting truck speeds could reduce the severity and incidence of truck-related crashes.


However, the research record is mixed. A 1987 study finds that crash involvement significantly increases when trucks drive much slower than passenger vehicles[74], suggesting that the difference in speed between passenger vehicles and slower trucks could cause crashes that otherwise may not happen. Furthermore, in a review of available research, the Transportation Research Board, part of the United States National Research Council, states "[no] conclusive evidence could be found to support or reject the use of differential speed limits for passenger cars and heavy trucks" (page 11) and "a strong case cannot be made on empirical grounds in support of or in opposition to differential speed limits" (page 109) [75]. The Transportation Research Board (TRB) is a division of the National Research Council, which serves as an independent adviser to the federal government and others on scientific and technical questions of national importance. ... The National Research Council (NRC) of the USA is the working arm of the United States National Academy of Sciences and the United States National Academy of Engineering, carrying out most of the studies done in their names. ...


Two thirds of truck/passenger car crashes are the fault of the passenger vehicle[76].


Truck speed limit differentials

The following states have different statutory speed limits for cars and trucks.

State Statutory car speed limit Statutory truck speed limit
Alabama 70 55 (HAZMAT only)
Arkansas 70 65
California 70 55
Idaho 75 65
Illinois 65 55
Indiana 70 65
Michigan 70 60
Montana 75 65
Ohio 65 65 on Ohio Turnpike, 55 on all other freeways.
Oregon 70* never implemented, 65 or less still in effect[77] 5 mph differential, effectively 60[78] although 55 is still posted in most locations
Texas 70-80 mph day/65 mph night 70 day/65 night
Texas (Farm-to-Market roads only) 70 mph day/65 mph night 60 day/55 night
Washington 70 60

This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) English [1] Capital Boise Largest city Boise Largest metro area Boise metropolitan area Area  Ranked 14th  - Total 83,642 sq mi (216,632 km²)  - Width 305 miles (491 km)  - Length 479 miles (771 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Largest metro area Metro Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  Ranked 4th  - Total 147,165 sq mi (381,156 km²)  - Width 255 miles (410 km)  - Length 630 miles (1,015 km)  - % water 1  - Latitude 44°26N to 49°N  - Longitude 104°2W to 116°2W Population  Ranked... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... The westbound Ohio Turnpike Ohio Turnpike (officially James W. Shocknessy Ohio Turnpike) is a -long, limited-access toll highway in the U.S. state of Ohio, serving as a primary corridor to Chicago and Pittsburgh. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ...

Texas

Example of 70 mph truck speed limit sign immediately behind an 80 mph speed limit sign.

Texas formerly had a 60 mph (100 km/h) day/55 mph (90 km/h) night truck speed limit. This speed limit did not apply to buses or to trucks transporting United States Postal Service mail. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 576 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 737 pixel, file size: 153 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Image is from http://houstonfreeways. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 576 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 737 pixel, file size: 153 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Image is from http://houstonfreeways. ... USPS and Usps redirect here. ...


Whenever the speed limit on a road was above this threshold, separate truck speed limit signs were posted. These signs disappeared when all speed limits were capped at 55 mph (90 km/h) in 1974, but reappeared with the introduction of 65 mph (105 km/h) limits in 1987. Effective September 1, 1999, Texas repealed truck speed limits on all roads except farm to market and ranch to market roads.[79] A Farm to Market Road is a state government road which serves to connect rural and agricultural areas to market towns. ...


Even after Texas repealed the truck speed limit, the Harris County Toll Road Authority erroneously retained the separate truck speed limits on its Interstate-class toll roads. The separate truck speed limits were removed with the 2002 adoption of the 55 mph environmental speed limit. The signs did not reappear when a 65 mph limit was imposed, but the truck speed limit sign posts are still standing as of January 2006. The Harris County Toll Road Authority (HCTRA) came into existence when, in September, 1983, Harris County voters approved a referendum by a 7-3 margin to release up to $900 million in bonds to create two tollroads - the Hardy Toll Road and the Sam Houston Tollway, ostensibly to improve the...


2001 and 2003 statutes allowing 75 and 80 mph speed limits in certain areas of west and south Texas only apply to passenger vehicles. Truck speed limits remain 70 mph, so separate truck speed limit signs are slowly reappearing on these roads.


Due to the enormous unpopularity of a 55 mph speed limit cap that was imposed on the greater Houston area in 2002, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality examined alternatives. Analysis suggested that the vast majority of emissions reductions from a 55 mph limit was from reduced heavy truck emissions. A proposed alternative was to restore passenger vehicle limits but retain a 55 mph truck speed limit. Concerns about safety problems and enforceability of such a large differential (up to 15 mph on many roads) scuttled that proposal, and a compromise plan, described above, was enacted that retained uniform, but still reduced, speed limits.


Louisiana

In August 2003, Governor Mike Foster announced speed and lane restrictions on trucks on the 18 mile (29 km) stretch of Interstate 10 known as the Atchafalaya Swamp Freeway. The restrictions lower the truck speed limit to 55 mph and restrict them to the right lane for the entire length of the elevated freeway.[80] Murphy J. Mike Foster, Jr. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 10 Interstate 10 (abbreviated I-10) is the southernmost east-west, coast-to-coast interstate highway in the United States. ...


Utah

In 2007, The Utah State Legislature is considering legislation which would limit trucks to a speed limit of 65 miles per hour. The bill is H.B. 199 Speed Restrictions on Commercial Vehicles- Allen, S. The complete text of the bill is available here: [1]


Metric speed limits

Though not common in the United States, a speed limit may be defined in kilometers per hour (km/h) as well as miles per hour (mph). The MUTCD states that "speed limits shown shall be in multiples of 10 km/h or 5 mph."[81] If a speed limit is posted in km/h, the number is circumscribed and "km/h" is written below. Prior to 2003, metric speed limits were designated using the standard speed limit sign, but with yellow supplemental "METRIC" and "km/h" plaques above it and below it, respectively.[82] Nearby many border crossings, there will be supplemental speed limit signs giving the approximate speed limit in metric units to aid travelers.[83] Image File history File links US_metric_speed_limit. ... The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, or MUTCD, is a document issued by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT) to specify the standards by which traffic signs, road markings (see lane), and signals are designed and installed. ...


References

  1. ^ Commonwealth of Kentucky (2007-03-21). Governor Fletcher Signs Speed Limit Bill. Press release. Retrieved on [[2007-03-22]].
  2. ^ a b Public Michigan Vehicle code: Speed Restrictions. Michigan Legislature (2006-11-09). Retrieved on 2007-04-30.
  3. ^ http://www.revisor.leg.state.mn.us/stats/169/14.html
  4. ^ http://www.dot.state.mn.us/hottopics/speedlimits/60mph_map.pdf
  5. ^ http://www.nebraskatransportation.org/docs/speed-limit.pdf
  6. ^ http://www.legis.nd.gov/cencode/t39c09.pdf
  7. ^ http://www.dot.nd.gov/spdzones.html
  8. ^ http://onlinedocs.andersonpublishing.com/oh/lpExt.dll?f=templates&fn=main-h.htm&cp=PORC
  9. ^ http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/cgi-bin/waisgate?WAISdocID=9352382531+0+0+0&WAISaction=retrieve
  10. ^ http://www.legislature.state.al.us/codeofalabama/1975%2009feb2004/32%2D5a%2D171.htm
  11. ^ Texas Statutes, Transportation Code, § 545.355. AUTHORITY OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COURT TO ALTER SPEED LIMITS, paragraph (e)
  12. ^ http://tlo2.tlc.state.tx.us/statutes/docs/TN/content/htm/tn.007.00.000542.00.htm#542.401.00
  13. ^ http://tlo2.tlc.state.tx.us/statutes/docs/TN/content/htm/tn.007.00.000542.00.htm#542.404.00
  14. ^ http://tlo2.tlc.state.tx.us/statutes/docs/TN/content/htm/tn.007.00.000545.00.htm#545.401.00
  15. ^ http://tlo2.tlc.state.tx.us/statutes/docs/TN/content/htm/tn.007.00.000545.00.htm#545.352.00
  16. ^ http://tlo2.tlc.state.tx.us/statutes/docs/CR/content/htm/cr.001.00.000045.00.htm#45.0511.00
  17. ^ http://tlo2.tlc.state.tx.us/statutes/docs/CR/content/htm/cr.001.00.000045.00.htm#45.051.00
  18. ^ http://tlo2.tlc.state.tx.us/statutes/docs/TN/content/htm/tn.007.00.000708.00.htm#708.001.00
  19. ^ http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+18.2-11
  20. ^ http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+46.2-873
  21. ^ http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+46.2-878.1
  22. ^ http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+46.2-874.1
  23. ^ http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+46.2-862
  24. ^ http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+46.2-861
  25. ^ http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+46.2-878
  26. ^ http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+46.2-492
  27. ^ http://www.dmv.virginia.gov/webdoc/citizen/drivers/points_assess.asp
  28. ^ US Federal Government brochure
  29. ^ http://www.tfhrc.gov/safety/speed/speed.htm
  30. ^ http://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/speed_manage/docs/speeding_counts.pdf
  31. ^ http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/facts-research/research-technology/publications/vehicular-stability-systems.htm
  32. ^ http://www.nationalreview.com/moore/moore062503.asp
  33. ^ http://www.thenewspaper.com/rlc/docs/2006/fed-tickets.pdf
  34. ^ http://research.stlouisfed.org/wp/2006/2006-048.pdf
  35. ^ http://leginfo.ca.gov/cgi-bin/displaycode?section=veh&group=22001-23000&file=22348-22366 section 22350-22351
  36. ^ http://starbulletin.com/2002/04/18/news/story5.html
  37. ^ http://www.hawaiihighways.com/FAQs-page2.htm#speed-limit
  38. ^ http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/scripts/getcase.pl?court=MT&vol=97&invol=486
  39. ^ http://onlinedocs.andersonpublishing.com/oh/lpExt.dll?f=templates&fn=main-h.htm&cp=PORC
  40. ^ http://www.sddot.com/pe/data/Docs/SPEED2006.pdf
  41. ^ http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/statutes/docs/TN/content/htm/tn.007.00.000545.00.htm#545.352.00
  42. ^ http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/statutes/docs/TN/content/htm/tn.007.00.000545.00.htm#545.353.00
  43. ^ http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/statutes/docs/TN/content/htm/tn.007.00.000545.00.htm#545.353.00
  44. ^ http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/cgi-bin/tlo/textframe.cmd?LEG=77&SESS=R&CHAMBER=H&BILLTYPE=B&BILLSUFFIX=00299&VERSION=5&TYPE=B
  45. ^ http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/cgi-bin/tlo/textframe.cmd?LEG=79&SESS=R&CHAMBER=H&BILLTYPE=B&BILLSUFFIX=02257&VERSION=5&TYPE=B
  46. ^ http://home.att.net/~texhwyman/h_imgs/txpopdens.jpg
  47. ^ http://www.txdot.gov/oda/newsrel/026%2D2006.htm
  48. ^ http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,197072,00.html
  49. ^ http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/cgi-bin/db2www/tlo/billhist/billhist.d2w/report?LEG=76&SESS=R&CHAMBER=H&BILLTYPE=B&BILLSUFFIX=03328
  50. ^ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_limit#Table
  51. ^ http://www.houstonfreeways.com/modern/2005-01_road_trip_us90.aspx
  52. ^ http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/statutes/docs/TN/content/htm/tn.007.00.000545.00.htm#545.3531.00
  53. ^ http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/statutes/docs/TN/content/htm/tn.007.00.000545.00.htm#545.352.00
  54. ^ http://www.opi.state.mt.us/pdf/drivered/manual/ch4.pdf
  55. ^ Texas Transportation Commission meeting minutes. Texas Department of Transportation (2000-05-25). Retrieved on 2007-07-24. Search for words "environmental speed limits," and refer to the paragraphs containing the first instance of the word and subsequent paragraphs.
  56. ^ http://www.tnrcc.state.tx.us/oprd/sips/speedlimit.html
  57. ^ http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/implementation/air/sip/speedlimit.html
  58. ^ http://people.smu.edu/acambre/esl-nctcog.htm
  59. ^ http://people.smu.edu/acambre/eslEPA102402.htm
  60. ^ http://www.tnrcc.state.tx.us/oprd/sips/dec2000hga.html
  61. ^ http://www.ghasp.org/publications/55chronicle.html
  62. ^ http://www.heartland.org/Article.cfm?artId=1097
  63. ^ http://tti.tamu.edu/cts/cts/organization/policy_initiatives_analysis/projects/pid_houston.stm
  64. ^ http://yosemite1.epa.gov/r6/press.nsf/0/b7d1c1828ed43ff586256c67005d51c4?OpenDocument
  65. ^ http://www.tnrcc.state.tx.us/oprd/sips/dec2002hga.html
  66. ^ http://www.dfwinfo.com/trans/env_speed_limits/
  67. ^ http://people.smu.edu/acambre/blog/PermaLink,guid,bdf9eca2-5fc4-430d-9721-b7426671e58a.aspx
  68. ^ http://www.tdot.state.tn.us/news/2005/031405.htm
  69. ^ http://www.tdot.state.tn.us/mediaroom/docs/2005/hamilton_existing.pdf
  70. ^ Connecticut General Statutes §14-220
  71. ^ Mississippi Code §63-3-509
  72. ^ Missouri Revised Statutes §304-011
  73. ^ North Carolina General Statutes §20-141(c)
  74. ^ http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/////reports/tswstudy/Vol2-Chapter5.pdf, table V-4
  75. ^ http://gulliver.trb.org/publications/sr/sr254.pdf
  76. ^ http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/pdfs/udarepo.pdf
  77. ^ http://downloads.transportation.org/Oregon_Safety_Report-March_2005.doc
  78. ^ http://downloads.transportation.org/Oregon_Safety_Report-March_2005.doc
  79. ^ http://www.landlinemag.com/Archives/1999/august99/legislative_news.html
  80. ^ http://www.dps.state.la.us/TIGER/lowerspdlimitsandlaneresttrucksI10.htm
  81. ^ http://mutcd.fhwa.dot.gov/HTM/2003r1/part2/part2b1.htm
  82. ^ http://lamar.colostate.edu/~hillger/laws/mutcd.html
  83. ^ http://web.mit.edu/smalpert/www/roads/ny/i-87/n.html

 
 

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