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Encyclopedia > Speech from the Throne
Queen Elizabeth II reads Canada's Speech from the Throne in 1977
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Queen Elizabeth II reads Canada's Speech from the Throne in 1977

The Speech from the Throne (or Throne Speech) is an event in certain monarchies in which the monarch (or a representative) reads a prepared speech to a complete session of parliament, outlining the government's agenda for the coming year. This event is often held annually, although in some places it may occur more or less frequently whenever a new session of parliament is opened. In all locations, the speech from the throne is not written by the head of state who reads it, but rather by the government. Image File history File links EIIR-Canadian_Parliament. ... Image File history File links EIIR-Canadian_Parliament. ... The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of Canada, proclaimed by King George V, November 21, 1921. ... For related meanings see also Monarch (disambiguation) A monarchy, (from the Greek monos archein, meaning one ruler) is a form of government that has a monarch as Head of State. ... Look up monarch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... States currently utilizing parliamentary systems are denoted in red and orange—the former being constitutional monarchies where authority is vested in a parliament, and the latter being parliamentary republics whose parliaments are effectively supreme over a separate head of state. ...


In the United Kingdom, the speech from the throne is commonly called the Queen's Speech and is part of a lavish affair known as the State Opening of Parliament, with many formalities and traditions, including the Queen's wearing of her official state crown. It is not all formality as subsequently the House of Commons holds a debate and then vote on the speech and this is held to constitute a motion of confidence in the government which if lost would result in the end of that government[1]. In other Commonwealth Realms, the Governor-General (or sometimes the Queen herself) reads the throne speech. Furthermore, in some Commonwealth Realms such as Australia and Canada, a throne speech is also prepared by state or provincial governments to outline local plans and is read by the respective Governors of the Australian states or Lieutenant-Governor of the Canadian provinces, who represent the sovereign at the subnational level. In the United Kingdom, the State Opening of Parliament is an annual event held usually in October or November that marks the commencement of a session of Parliament. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... A motion of no confidence, also called a motion of non-confidence, a censure motion, a no-confidence motion, or simply a confidence motion, is a parliamentary motion traditionally put before a parliament by the opposition in the hope of defeating or embarrassing a government. ... A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the 16 sovereign states that recognize Queen Elizabeth II as their Queen and head of state. ... Governor-General (or Governor General) is a term used both historically and currently to designate the appointed representative of a head of state or their government for a particular territory, historically in a colonial context, but no longer necessarily in that form. ... This article describes the British monarchy from the perspective of the United Kingdom. ... The Governors of the Australian states are the representatives in the six states of Australia of Australias head of state, Queen Elizabeth II. The Governors perform the same constitutional and ceremonial functions at the state level as does the Governor-General of Australia at the national level. ... In Canada, the lieutenant-governor (sometimes without a hyphen, pronounced ), in French lieutenant-gouverneur (always with a hyphen), is the Queens, or Crown, representative in a province, much as the Governor General is her representative at the national level. ...


Other monarchies, such as the Netherlands (Day of the Princes) and Norway, have similar throne speech ceremonies as well. The Gouden Koets on Prinsjesdag. ...


In most cases, the speech is read in a neutral voice, and although the Head of State may refer to "my government," it is clearly established that the speech is not meant to imply endorsement or support for the stated policies. My Government is a term sometimes used in Commonwealth Realms by the monarch or his/her representatives during the Throne Speech. ...


In Japan, the emperor makes only a short greeting speech on Diet opening ceremony. He does not refer to any government policies. The prime minister makes the policy speech instead. This article is about the Japanese legislature. ...


Many republics, especially those who are members of the Commonwealth or former British colonies also hold a yearly event in which the president gives a speech to a joint session of the legislature, such as the State of the Union address given by the President of the United States. Where the President is the political head of the government the speech is more partisan in character. In a broad definition, a republic is a state or country that is led by people whose political power is based on principles that are not beyond the control of the people of that state or country. ... The Commonwealth of Nations (CN), usually known as the Commonwealth, is a voluntary association of 53 independent sovereign states, the majority of which are former colonies of the United Kingdom. ... Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the United States (1861-1865) The majority of this article is about heads of states. ... 2003 State of the Union address given by U.S. President George W. Bush The State of the Union Address is an annual event in which the President of the United States reports on the status of the country, normally to a joint session of the U.S. Congress (the... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1969 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ...


External links

  • Queen's Speech in the UK Parliament 2006
  • Queen's Speech in the UK Parliament 2005

  Results from FactBites:
 
Speech from the Throne - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (448 words)
The Speech from the Throne (or Throne Speech) is an event in certain monarchies in which the monarch (or a representative) reads a prepared speech to a complete session of parliament, outlining the government's agenda for the coming year.
In the United Kingdom, the speech from the throne is commonly called the Queen's Speech and is part of a lavish affair known as the State Opening of Parliament, with many formalities and traditions, including the Queen's wearing of her official state crown.
In most cases, the speech is read in a neutral voice, and although the Head of State may refer to "my government," it is clearly established that the speech is not meant to imply endorsement or support for the stated policies.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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