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Encyclopedia > Spartacus (film)
Spartacus

Original movie poster
Directed by Stanley Kubrick
Produced by Kirk Douglas (producer)
Written by Novel:
Howard Fast
Screenplay:
Dalton Trumbo
Starring Kirk Douglas
Jean Simmons
Laurence Olivier
Charles Laughton
Peter Ustinov
John Gavin
and
Tony Curtis
Music by Alex North
Cinematography Russell Metty
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date(s) Flag of United States 6 October 1960 (premiere)
Flag of United Kingdom 8 December 1960
Flag of Australia 9 December 1960
Running time 184 Min (premiere)
198 Min
Director's Cut
Language English
Budget $12,000,000
Gross revenue $60,000,000
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

Spartacus is a 1960 film directed by Stanley Kubrick and based on the novel of the same name by Howard Fast about the historical life of Spartacus and the Third Servile War. The film stars Kirk Douglas as rebellious slave Spartacus and Laurence Olivier as his foe, the Roman general and politician Marcus Licinius Crassus. The film also stars Peter Ustinov (who won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his role as slave trader Lentulus Batiatus), John Gavin (as Julius Caesar), Jean Simmons, Charles Laughton, Herbert Lom, Woody Strode, Tony Curtis, John Dall and Charles McGraw. The titles were designed by Saul Bass. [1] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Stanley Kubrick (July 26, 1928 – March 7, 1999) was an influential and acclaimed American film director and producer. ... Kirk Douglas (born Issur Danielovitch Demsky December 9, 1916) is an American actor and film producer known for his gravelly voice and his recurring roles as the kinds of characters Douglas himself once described as sons of bitches. He is also father to Hollywood actor and producer Michael Douglas. ... Howard Melvin Fast (November 11, 1914 – March 12, 2003) was a Jewish American novelist and television writer. ... Dalton Trumbo (December 9, 1905 – September 10, 1976) was an American screenwriter and novelist, and a member of the Hollywood Ten, one of group of film professionals who refused to testify before the 1947 House Un-American Activities Committee about alleged communist involvement. ... Kirk Douglas (born Issur Danielovitch Demsky December 9, 1916) is an American actor and film producer known for his gravelly voice and his recurring roles as the kinds of characters Douglas himself once described as sons of bitches. He is also father to Hollywood actor and producer Michael Douglas. ... Robert Mitchum and Jean Simmons in Angel Face Jean Merilyn Simmons (born January 31, 1929 in Crouch Hill, London, England, United Kingdom) is a British actress. ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (22 May 1907–11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... Charles Laughton (1 July 1899 – 15 December 1962) was an English stage and film actor. ... Ustinov at Large (book cover) Sir Peter Alexander Ustinov, CBE (16 April 1921 – 28 March 2004), born Peter Alexander Baron von Ustinov, was an Academy Award-winning British-born actor, writer, dramatist and raconteur of French, Italian, German, Russian and Ethiopian ancestry. ... John Gavin (born John Anthony Golenor on April 8, c. ... Roger Moore and Tony Curtis in The Persuaders! Tony Curtis (born June 3, 1925) is an American film actor. ... Alex North (December 4, 1910 - September 8, 1991) was an American composer responsible for the first jazz based film score (A Streetcar Named Desire) and the first truly modernist film score (Viva Zapata!). Born Isadore Soifer in Chester, Pennsylvania, Alex North was an original composer probably even by the classical... Russell Metty (born 1906, died 1978) was an American cinematographer, who worked on many films during the forties, fifties and sixties. ... Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... October 6 is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years). ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... December 8 is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... December 9 is the 343rd day (344th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... A directors cut is a specially edited version of a film, and less often TV series, music video or video games, that is supposed to represent the directors own approved edit. ... See also: 1959 in film 1960 1961 in film 1950s in film 1960s in film years in film film // Events April 20 - for the first time since coming home from military service in Germany, Elvis Presley returns to Hollywood, California to film G.I. Blues August 10 - Filming of West... Stanley Kubrick (July 26, 1928 – March 7, 1999) was an influential and acclaimed American film director and producer. ... Spartacus is a 1951 historical novel about the slave Spartacus written by Howard Fast that inspired the film by Stanley Kubrick. ... Howard Melvin Fast (November 11, 1914 – March 12, 2003) was a Jewish American novelist and television writer. ... Spartacus by Denis Foyatier, 1830 Spartacus (ca. ... Combatants Army of escaped slaves Roman Republic Commanders Crixus â€ , Oenomaus â€ , Spartacus â€  a, Castus â€ , Gannicus â€  Gaius Claudius Glaber, Publius Varinius, Gnaeus Clodianus, Lucius Gellius Publicola, Gaius Cassius Longinus, Gnaeus Manlius, Marcus Licinius Crassus, Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, Marcus Terentius Varro Lucullus, Lucius Quinctius, Gnaeus Tremellius Scrofa Strength 120,000 escaped slaves and... Kirk Douglas (born Issur Danielovitch Demsky December 9, 1916) is an American actor and film producer known for his gravelly voice and his recurring roles as the kinds of characters Douglas himself once described as sons of bitches. He is also father to Hollywood actor and producer Michael Douglas. ... Spartacus by Denis Foyatier, 1830 Spartacus (ca. ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (22 May 1907–11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... Marcus Licinius Crassus (Latin: M·LICINIVS·P·F·P·N·CRASSVS[1]) (c. ... Ustinov at Large (book cover) Sir Peter Alexander Ustinov, CBE (16 April 1921 – 28 March 2004), born Peter Alexander Baron von Ustinov, was an Academy Award-winning British-born actor, writer, dramatist and raconteur of French, Italian, German, Russian and Ethiopian ancestry. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... John Gavin (born John Anthony Golenor on April 8, c. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... Robert Mitchum and Jean Simmons in Angel Face Jean Merilyn Simmons (born January 31, 1929 in Crouch Hill, London, England, United Kingdom) is a British actress. ... Charles Laughton (1 July 1899 – 15 December 1962) was an English stage and film actor. ... Herbert Lom [Czech IPA: ] is an international film actor. ... Woodrow Wilson Woolwine Strode (born July 28, 1914, Los Angeles, California; died December 31, 1994) was a decathlete and football star at UCLA before becoming a film actor. ... Roger Moore and Tony Curtis in The Persuaders! Tony Curtis (born June 3, 1925) is an American film actor. ... John Dall (born May 26, 1918 in New York, New York; died January 15, 1971 in Hollywood, California) was an American actor. ... Born Charles Butters in Ohio May 10, 1914, square-jawed Charles McGraw grew up to become an actor and eventually made his first movie in 1942. ... Saul Bass Saul Bass (May 8, 1920 - April 25, 1996) was a graphic designer, but is best known for his design on motion picture title sequences, which is thought of as the best such work ever seen. ...

Contents

Synopsis

The film begins at a mine worked by slaves in the Roman province of Libya. Spartacus (Kirk Douglas), a burly Thracian, comes to the aid of an old man who has fallen down. A Roman soldier tells Spartacus to get back to work, only to be attacked and bitten on the ankle, apparently on the Achilles tendon. For this, Spartacus is tied up and sentenced to death by starvation. A slave dealer, Lentulus Batiatus (Peter Ustinov), arrives looking for recruits for his gladiatorial school, or lanista. He inspects several slaves with a disgusted look, before finally settling on Spartacus, recognizing his unbroken spirit. Batiatus sails for Capua and his villa in the country, which doubles as a training school for gladiators. Kirk Douglas (born Issur Danielovitch Demsky December 9, 1916) is an American actor and film producer known for his gravelly voice and his recurring roles as the kinds of characters Douglas himself once described as sons of bitches. He is also father to Hollywood actor and producer Michael Douglas. ... This is about vertebrate anatomy. ... Ustinov at Large (book cover) Sir Peter Alexander Ustinov, CBE (16 April 1921 – 28 March 2004), born Peter Alexander Baron von Ustinov, was an Academy Award-winning British-born actor, writer, dramatist and raconteur of French, Italian, German, Russian and Ethiopian ancestry. ... Pollice Verso (With a Turned Thumb), an 1872 painting by Jean-Léon Gérôme, is a well known history painters researched conception of a gladiatorial combat. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Capua is a city in the province of Caserta, (Campania, Italy) situated 25 km (16 mi) north of Napoli, on the northeastern edge of the Campanian plain. ...

Draba throws his trident into the spectators' box after refusing to execute Spartacus

After several scenes showing gladiator training and life at the school, Crassus (Laurence Olivier) arrives with some companions, wishing to be entertained by watching two pairs of gladiators fight to the death. Spartacus is selected, and is defeated, but the victor (Woody Strode) refuses to kill him, instead throwing his trident into the elevated spectators' box and leaping to attack the Romans. Crassus quickly dispatches the slave, and prepares to depart. As he leaves, he purchases the pretty slave woman Varinia, of whom Spartacus has grown fond. Batiatus personally takes her away, and Spartacus begins a successful uprising at the gladiator school. The gladiators eventually take Capua and all the surrounding districts. Many local slaves flock to the insurgents. Image File history File links Strode_spartacus. ... Image File history File links Strode_spartacus. ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (22 May 1907–11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... Woodrow Wilson Woolwine Strode (born July 28, 1914, Los Angeles, California; died December 31, 1994) was a decathlete and football star at UCLA before becoming a film actor. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In the Senate of Rome, plebeian senator Sempronius Gracchus (Charles Laughton) cunningly manipulates Crassus' protege and friend Marcus Glabrus (John Dall) into taking the Garrison of Rome out to crush the revolt, leaving the way open for Gracchus' ally, Julius Caesar (John Gavin) to take command of the city. Meanwhile, Crassus purchases a new slave, Antoninus (Tony Curtis), a former children's tutor from Sicily, and tries to seduce him. Antoninus soon runs away to join Spartacus. The Roman Senate (Latin: Senatus) was the main governing council of both the Roman Republic, which started in 509 BC, and the Roman Empire. ... In Ancient Rome, the plebs was the general body of Roman citizens, distinct from the privileged class of the patricians. ... Charles Laughton (1 July 1899 – 15 December 1962) was an English stage and film actor. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... John Gavin (born John Anthony Golenor on April 8, c. ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ...


Spartacus reviews some new recruits, assigning them positions according to their skills. Antoninus presents himself as a poet and illusionist, but Spartacus still wants him in the army, indirectly commenting on the relation between politics and art. Spartacus is reunited with Varinia, who had escaped from the portly Batiatus: he had run after her, but was too fat to catch her. After destroying the Garrison of Rome, Spartacus outlines his plan to escape by sea, aboard the ships of the Cilician (called "Silesian" by characters in the film) pirates, who have been paid from the plunder the slave army has amassed. Cilicia as Roman province, 120 AD In Antiquity, Cilicia (Κιλικία) was the name of a region, now known as Çukurova, and often a political unit, on the southeastern coast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey), north of Cyprus. ... Silesia (Czech: ; German: ; Latin: ; Polish: ; Silesian: Ślónsk) is a historical region in central Europe. ...


Rome keeps sending armies to put down the rebellion (the theatrical trailer mentions "nine armies"), but Spartacus defeats them all. Crassus resigns from the Senate, supposedly to share the disgrace of his exiled friend Glabrus. However, Gracchus suspects that he is merely waiting for the situation to become so desperate that the senators will make him dictator, thus neutralizing Gracchus' rival plebeian party. Gracchus maneuvers to help the slaves to escape to deny Crassus his opportunity. Caesar betrays Gracchus, however, and Crassus reaches deep into his own pockets to defeat the plan. Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law Dictator was a political office of the Roman Republic. ...


When the former slaves reach the coast, they discover that the Cilicians have been bought off by Crassus. Spartacus rejects an offer of the Cilician envoy (Herbert Lom) to smuggle him, his family (Varinia is with child), and aides to Asia to live as kings. The honest Thracian is unwilling to abandon his army of slaves, of course. Spartacus finds himself trapped between three Roman armies (Pompey in Calabria, Lucullus in Brundisium and the Garrison of Rome). The only solution is to fight their way through to Rome. Meanwhile, Crassus is given the sweeping powers he desires. In parallel scenes, Spartacus harangues the slaves, while Crassus warns against the elimination of patrician privileges. Batiatus is hired by Crassus to help him identify Spartacus after his (expected) capture. Herbert Lom [Czech IPA: ] is an international film actor. ... Pompey, Pompey the Great or Pompey the Triumvir [1] (Classical Latin abbreviation: CN·POMPEIVS·CN·F·SEX·N·MAGNVS[2], Gnaeus or Cnaeus Pompeius Magnus) (September 29, 106 BC–September 29, 48 BC), was a distinguished military and political leader of the late Roman republic. ... View in Calabria. ... Lucius Licinius Lucullus (c. ... Brindisi is an ancient city in the Italian region of Puglia, the capital of the province of Brindisi. ... The Praetorian Guard of Augustus - 1st century. ...

Spartacus fights his way through the Roman ranks on horseback
Spartacus fights his way through the Roman ranks on horseback

The climactic battle results in the total defeat of the rebel army and the capture of many survivors, including Spartacus. Crassus promises the captives that they will not be punished if they will just identify Spartacus or his body. In a powerful scene, one by one, they stand up and claim to be him ("I'm Spartacus!"), so Crassus has them all crucified, one by one all the way from the battlefield to the gates of Rome, along the Appian Way. He saves Antoninus and Spartacus for last, suspecting that the latter is the one he seeks. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Im Spartacus! is the catchphrase from the film Spartacus. ... Crucifixion is an ancient method of execution, where the condemned was tied or nailed to a large wooden cross and left to hang until dead. ... The path of the Via Appia and of the Via Appia Traiana. ...


Meanwhile, Batiatus sees that the revenge of Crassus denies him the promised lucrative auction of the surviving slaves. Varinia is taken to Crassus' home, where he unsuccessfully woos her. In his last act before committing suicide, the disgraced Gracchus generously hires Batiatus to steal Varinia from Crassus, then grants freedom for her and her son, personally writing out manumission documents for them. Frustrated at Varinia's rejection, Crassus orders Spartacus and Antoninus to duel to the death, too impatient to wait for the next day's celebrations. He declares that the winner will be crucified. Each man tries to kill the other, to spare his companion a slow, agonizing death on the cross. Spartacus is victorious and is crucified by the walls of Rome. Crassus admits to Caesar that he fears Spartacus now, as he will have the power of a martyr. Manumission is the act of freeing a slave, done at the will of the owner. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Batiatus and Varinia leave for Gaul through the Via Appia and find Spartacus hanging on the last cross by the road, not quite dead. Varinia shows Spartacus his newborn son and vows that he will grow up a free man. Spartacus's head slumps forward, and Varinia gets back onto the wagon and rides on. Remains of the Appian Way in Rome, Italy The Appian Way (Latin: Via Appia) is a famous road built by the Romans. ...


Production

The development of Spartacus was partly instigated by Kirk Douglas's failure to win the title role in William Wyler's Ben-Hur. Douglas had worked with Wyler before on Detective Story, and was disappointed when Wyler chose Charlton Heston instead. Not wanting to appear beaten, he decided to upstage Wyler, and create his own epic, Spartacus, with himself in the title role. William Wyler (July 1, 1902–July 27, 1981) was a prolific, Oscar-winning motion picture director. ... Ben-Hur is a 1959 epic film directed by William Wyler, and is the most popular live-action version of Lew Wallaces novel, Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ (1880). ... Detective Story is a 1951 film which tells the story of one day in the lives of the various people who populate a police detectives squad. ... Charlton Heston (born John Charles Carter on October 4, 1924) is an iconic Academy Award-winning American film actor, best known for playing larger-than-life heroic roles such as Moses in The Ten Commandments and Judah Ben-Hur in Ben-Hur. ...


Screenplay development

Originally, Howard Fast was hired to adapt his own novel as a screenplay, but he experienced difficulty working in the screenplay format and was replaced by the blacklisted Dalton Trumbo, who worked under the pseudonym "Sam Jackson". Some people[citation needed] feel Trumbo's adaptation of Spartacus is presented as a form of early communism that fights against the wealthy Roman establishment by liberating the slaves. The filming was plagued by the conflicting visions of Kubrick and Trumbo: Kubrick, a young director at the time, did not have the degree of control he would later have over his films, and the final product is more a result of Trumbo's optimistic screenplay than it is of Stanley Kubrick's trademark cynicism. Howard Melvin Fast (November 11, 1914 – March 12, 2003) was a Jewish American novelist and television writer. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Protestors opposing the jailing of the Hollywood Ten in 1950 (from the 1987 documentary Legacy of the Hollywood Blacklist). ... Dalton Trumbo (December 9, 1905 – September 10, 1976) was an American screenwriter and novelist, and a member of the Hollywood Ten, one of group of film professionals who refused to testify before the 1947 House Un-American Activities Committee about alleged communist involvement. ... A pseudonym (Greek pseudo + -onym: false name) is an artificial, fictitious name, also known as an alias, used by an individual as an alternative to a persons true name. ... Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production. ...


In post-production, Douglas was made aware that Kubrick intended to take writing credit for the film instead of Trumbo. The powerful Douglas publicly resisted Trumbo's exclusion, and when Trumbo's name appeared in the credits, the Hollywood blacklist was effectively broken.


Filming

Spartacus was originally to be directed by Anthony Mann. However, two weeks into shooting, Mann was fired by the studio because of his lack of leadership and Stanley Kubrick was hired to take over. At this point in his career, Kubrick had already directed four feature films, two of which were major Hollywood productions. Even so, Spartacus was Kubrick's biggest project so far, with a budget of $12 million and a cast of 10,500, an impressive achievement for such a young director (although his contract did not give him complete control over the filming). Anthony Mann (June 30, 1906 - April 29, 1967), was an American actor and film director. ... Stanley Kubrick (July 26, 1928 – March 7, 1999) was an influential and acclaimed American film director and producer. ...


Spartacus was filmed using 70 mm Super Technirama cameras, which was a change for Kubrick, who preferred using square-format ratios. Kubrick found working outdoors or in real locations to be distracting and thus preferred to film in the studio. He believed the actors would benefit more from working on a sound stage, where they could fully concentrate. To create the illusion of the large crowds that play such an essential role in the film, Kubrick's crew used three-channel sound equipment to record 76,000 spectators at a Michigan StateNotre Dame college football game shouting "Hail, Crassus!" and "I'm Spartacus!" Super Technirama 70 was the marketing name for films which were photographed in the 35mm 8-perf Technirama process and optically enlarged to 70mm 5-perf prints for exhibition. ... Michigan State University (MSU) is a public university in East Lansing, Michigan. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Roman Catholic institution located in Notre Dame, Indiana, immediately northeast of South Bend, Indiana, United States. ... A college football game between Colorado State University and the Air Force Academy. ...


The intimate scenes were filmed in Hollywood, but Kubrick insisted that all battle scenes be filmed on a vast plain outside Madrid. Eight thousand trained soldiers from the Spanish infantry were used to double as the Roman army. Kubrick directed the armies from the top of specially constructed towers. However, he eventually had to cut all but one of the gory battle scenes, due to negative audience reactions at preview screenings. Motto: De Madrid al Cielo (From Madrid to Heaven) Location Coordinates: Country Spain Autonomous Community Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid Province Madrid Administrative Divisions 21 Neighborhoods 127 Founded 9th century Government  - Mayor Alberto Ruiz-Gallardón (PP) Area  - Land 607 km² (234. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Music

The original score for Spartacus was composed and conducted by six-time Academy Award nominee Alex North. It is considered one of his best works, and a textbook example of how modernist compositional styles can be adapted to the Hollywood leitmotif technique. North's score is epic, as befits the scale of the film. After extensive research of music of that period, North gathered a collection of antique instruments that, while not authentically Roman, provided a strong dramatic effect. These instruments included a Sarrusophone, Israeli recorder, Chinese oboe, lute, mandolin, Yugoslav flute, kythara, dulcimer, and bagpipes. North's prize instrument was the Ondioline, similar to an earlier version of the electronic synthesizer, which had never been used in film before. Much of the music is written without a tonal center, or flirts with tonality in ways that most film composers wouldn't allow. One theme is used to represent both slavery and freedom, but is given different values in different scenes, so that it sounds like different themes. The love theme for Spartacus and Varinia (sung by Terry Callier) is the most accessible theme in the film, and there is a harsh trumpet figure for Crassus. Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Alex North (December 4, 1910 - September 8, 1991) was an American composer responsible for the first jazz based film score (A Streetcar Named Desire) and the first truly modernist film score (Viva Zapata!). Born Isadore Soifer in Chester, Pennsylvania, Alex North was an original composer probably even by the classical... Modernism in musicis characterized by a desire for or belief in progressand science, surrealism, anti-romanticism, politicaladvocacy, general intellectualism, and/or a breaking with tradition or common practice. ... ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The sarrusophone is a family of transposing musical instruments patented and placed into production by Pierre-Louis Gautrot in 1856. ... Two Suonas The suona (simplified: 唢呐; traditional: 嗩吶; also called the laba 喇叭 or haidi 海笛) is a Han Chinese shawm (oboe). ... A medieval era lute. ... A mandolin is a small, stringed musical instrument which is plucked, strummed or a combination of both. ... The kithara was an ancient Greek musical instrument. ... Dulcimer is the name given to two types of stringed musical instrument: The Appalachian dulcimer, a three-course, fretted, plucked instrument which is also referred to as a mountain dulcimer or just a dulcimer, and The Hammered dulcimer, which is a hammer-struck, trapezoid-shaped zither The instruments are quite... A piper playing the Great Highland Bagpipe. ... The Ondioline was a vacuum tube-powered keyboard instrument, invented by Georges Jenny, which was a forerunner of todays synthesizers. ... A synthesizer (or synthesiser) is an electronic musical instrument designed to produce electronically generated sound, using techniques such as additive, subtractive, FM, physical modelling synthesis, phase distortion, or Scanned synthesis. ... Terry Callier (born 24 May 1945) is an American Jazz, Soul and Folk guitarist singer-songwriter from Chicago, Illinois. ...


The soundtrack album runs less than forty-five minutes and is not very representative of the score. There were plans to re-record a significant amount of the music with North's friend and fellow film composer Jerry Goldsmith, but the project kept getting delayed until Goldsmith's death in 2004. There have been numerous bootlegs, but none of them have good sound quality. Jerrald King Goldsmith (February 10, 1929 – July 21, 2004) was a famous American film score composer from Los Angeles, California. ... An assortment of bootleg recordings A bootleg recording (or simply bootleg or boot) is an audio and/or video recording of a performance that was not officially released by the artist, or under other legal authority. ...


Cast

From left to right: Antoninus (Tony Curtis), Spartacus (Kirk Douglas) and Marcus Licinius Crassus (Laurence Olivier)

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Roger Moore and Tony Curtis in The Persuaders! Tony Curtis (born June 3, 1925) is an American film actor. ... Kirk Douglas (born Issur Danielovitch Demsky December 9, 1916) is an American actor and film producer known for his gravelly voice and his recurring roles as the kinds of characters Douglas himself once described as sons of bitches. He is also father to Hollywood actor and producer Michael Douglas. ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (22 May 1907–11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ...

Starring

  • Kirk Douglas as Spartacus. Spartacus is a Thracian slave working in Libya, who is purchased by the lanista Lentulus Batiatus, and trained as a gladiator.
  • Laurence Olivier as Crassus. Crassus is a patrician with an obsessive love of the city of Rome. He vies for power in the Roman senate, and thinks little of Spartacus' rebellion. Academy Award-winner Sir Laurence Olivier is considered by many to be the greatest classical actor of the 20th century. Olivier, when approached by Douglas (who knew him because they had both worked together on The Devil's Disciple), suggested that he play Spartacus, much to Douglas' chagrin. Olivier, however, accepted the secondary part and second billing.
  • Jean Simmons as Varinia. Varinia is a slave girl working for Batiatus, who falls in love with Spartacus. Academy Award-nominee Simmons had played many roles in notable British films (Great Expectations, Black Narcissus, Olivier's Hamlet), and had made a successful transition to Hollywood. This was one of her numerous leading roles.
  • Charles Laughton as Gracchus. Gracchus is a dedicated Roman senator who is Crassus' only real opposition. Academy Award-winner Laughton's career had dwindled somewhat since the late 30's. This was one of his last major roles, before his death in 1962.
  • Peter Ustinov as Batiatus. Lentulus Batiatus is a shrewd, manipulative, slave dealer, who purchases Spartacus, and ends up paying dearly for it. Peter Ustinov won his first Oscar for his role in this film (the second would come with Topkapi). Ustinov was a writer, director, and a distinguished raconteur. His performance was the only one that would win an Oscar from a Kubrick film.
  • John Gavin as Julius Caesar. Caesar is the young, ambitious, protege of Gracchus, who gains command of the Garrison of Rome during the chaos of the Spartacus rebellion. Gavin is today best known as the lover of Marion Crane in Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho. He would later become the United States Ambassador to Mexico.

Kirk Douglas (born Issur Danielovitch Demsky December 9, 1916) is an American actor and film producer known for his gravelly voice and his recurring roles as the kinds of characters Douglas himself once described as sons of bitches. He is also father to Hollywood actor and producer Michael Douglas. ... Spartacus by Denis Foyatier, 1830 Spartacus (ca. ... Thracian peltast, fifth to fourth century BC. Thracian Roman era heros (Sabazius) stele. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Pollice Verso (With a Turned Thumb), an 1872 painting by Jean-Léon Gérôme, is a well known history painters researched conception of a gladiatorial combat. ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (22 May 1907–11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... Marcus Licinius Crassus (Latin: M·LICINIVS·P·F·P·N·CRASSVS[1]) (c. ... The Devils Disciple is the only play by G. Bernard Shaw set in America. ... Robert Mitchum and Jean Simmons in Angel Face Jean Merilyn Simmons (born January 31, 1929 in Crouch Hill, London, England, United Kingdom) is a British actress. ... Great Expectations is a 1946 British film directed by David Lean and based on the novel by Charles Dickens. ... This page is about the film. ... Hamlet is a 1948 film adaptation of the William Shakespeare play Hamlet. ... Charles Laughton (1 July 1899 – 15 December 1962) was an English stage and film actor. ... Ustinov at Large (book cover) Sir Peter Alexander Ustinov, CBE (16 April 1921 – 28 March 2004), born Peter Alexander Baron von Ustinov, was an Academy Award-winning British-born actor, writer, dramatist and raconteur of French, Italian, German, Russian and Ethiopian ancestry. ... Ustinov, Schell, Mercouri Topkapi is a 1964 heist film by directed by American Jules Dassin. ... John Gavin (born John Anthony Golenor on April 8, c. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) was a highly influential film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Psycho is a 1960 suspense/horror film directed by auteur Alfred Hitchcock from the screenplay by Joseph Stefano. ... The United States has maintained diplomatic relations with Mexico since 1823, when Andrew Jackson was appointed Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to that country. ...

Supporting

  • Nina Foch as Helena Glabrus. Helena is the shrewd, maniplative sister of Marcus Publius Glabrus. The Academy Award-nominated Foch had gained mainstream stardom in another epic, Cecil B. DeMille's The Ten Commandments.
  • John Ireland as Crixus. Crixus is one of Spartacus' most loyal lieutenants, and serves him until he is slain in the final battle. Academy Award-nominee Ireland normally played supporting roles akin to the one he played in Spartacus.
  • Herbert Lom as Tigranes Levantus. Levantus is a Cilician pirate who is forced to betray Spartacus. Herbert Lom was a Czech who moved to Hollywood, eventually to gain his greatest fame as Inspector Dreyfuss in Blake Edwards' long running film series The Pink Panther.
  • John Dall as Marcus Publius Glabrus. Glabrus is the naïve protege of Crassus, who unwittingly plays into the hands of Gracchus. Academy Award-nominee Dall was an American actor who worked primarily in the theatre. His most famous screen role is as Brandon Shaw, one of the two murderers in Alfred Hitchcock's Rope (film).
  • Charles McGraw as Marcellus. Marcellus is Lentulus Batiatus' gruff and cruel gladiator trainer, who picks on Spartacus in particular. McGraw was well known for playing heavies similar to his role in Spartacus.
  • Tony Curtis as Antoninus. Antoninus is a young slave who leaves his master, Crassus, and joins Spartacus. At the conclusion of the movie Spartacus and Antoninus are forced to fight to the death in a gladiator match. Academy Award-nominee Curtis had recently had huge success with Billy Wilder's Some Like It Hot, and Douglas wanted him for the film to add more "star power".

Nina Foch (b. ... Cecil B. DeMille on August 27, 1934 cover of Time Magazine Cecil Blount DeMille (August 12, 1881 – January 21, 1959) was one of the most successful filmmakers during the first half of the 20th century. ... The Ten Commandments is a 1956 motion picture dramatizing the Biblical story of Moses, an Egyptian prince-turned deliverer of the Hebrew slaves. ... John Benjamin Ireland (January 30, 1914 - March 21, 1992) was an actor. ... Herbert Lom [Czech IPA: ] is an international film actor. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Pink Panther is a series of comedy films featuring the bumbling French police detective Jacques Clouseau. ... John Dall (born May 26, 1918 in New York, New York; died January 15, 1971 in Hollywood, California) was an American actor. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) was a highly influential film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Rope (1948) is an Alfred Hitchcock classic film notable for its single location covered in what appeared to be just a few continuous shots. ... Born Charles Butters in Ohio May 10, 1914, square-jawed Charles McGraw grew up to become an actor and eventually made his first movie in 1942. ... Roger Moore and Tony Curtis in The Persuaders! Tony Curtis (born June 3, 1925) is an American film actor. ... Some Like It Hot is a 1959 comedy film directed by Billy Wilder. ...

Versions

Ratings
Argentina:  13
Australia:  PG
Brazil:  12
Canada (Ontario):  PG (original)
AA(restored)
Canada (Manitoba):  G (original)
PG(restored)
Canada (Maritime):  G
Canada (Quebec):  G
Denmark:  15
Finland:  K-16
France:  U
Germany:  12
Ireland:  PG
Netherlands:  12
Norway:  16
Spain:  13
Sweden:  15
United Kingdom:  A (original)
PG
United States:  PG-13

The film was re-released in 1967 (in a version 23 minutes shorter than the original release), and again in 1991 with the same 23 minutes restored, plus an additional 14 minutes that had been cut from the film before its original release. This addition includes several violent battle sequences as well as a bath scene in which the Roman patrician and general Crassus (Olivier) attempts to seduce his slave Antoninus (Curtis) using the analogy of "eating oysters" and "eating snails" to express his opinion that sexual preference is a matter of taste rather than morality. When the film was restored, two years after Olivier's death, the original dialogue recording of this scene was missing, and so it had to be re-dubbed. Tony Curtis, by then 66, was able to re-record his part, but Crassus's voice is actually an impersonation of Olivier by actor Anthony Hopkins, a talented mimic who had been a protege of Olivier during his early career and knew his voice well. A motion picture rating system categorizes films with regard to suitability for children and/or adults in terms of issues such as sex, violence and profanity. ... The Ontario Film Review Board uses the following motion picture rating system for theatrical releases in the Canadian province of Ontario under the Theatres Act: General. ... The Manitoba Film Classification Board is part of the Ministry of Culture, Heritage and Tourism of the government of the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... The Maritime Film Classification Board is the government body responsible for reviewing films and granting film ratings in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island. ... British Board of Film Classification logo The British Board of Film Classification (BBFC), originally British Board of Film Censors, is the organisation responsible for film and some video game classification and censorship within the United Kingdom. ... The MPAA film rating system is a system used in the United States and territories and instituted by the Motion Picture Association of America to rate a movie based on its content. ... Lauren steiger, born in 1992 at Royal Womens hospital started acting and modelling at the age of 2 and is now currently 15 working in Milan on the catwalks. ... // April 28 - Bonnie Raitt marries actor Michael Noonan OKeefe in New York Tiny Toon Adventures: How I Spent My Vacation is made. ... Analogy is both the cognitive process of transferring information from a particular subject (the analogue or source) to another particular subject (the target), and a linguistic expression corresponding to such a process. ... Sir Philip Anthony Hopkins CBE (IPA: ) (born 31 December 1937) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning Welsh film, stage and television actor. ...


Historical inaccuracies

  • The events in the famous "I am Spartacus!" scene and all the scenes afterwards with Spartacus may never have occurred, as Spartacus is widely believed to have been killed in battle.
  • Marcus Crassus was actually unwilling to pursue Spartacus and his army. It is also widely believed that the film's large battle near the end was started when Spartacus' army attempted to ambush Crassus. Furthermore it was Crassus alone who won the final battle against Spartacus. Pompey's role was simply killing 5,000 slaves who had fled from that final battle. But Pompey received most of the honour.
  • There are fewer battles in the movie than actually took place in real life. For example, after being defeated in the north, Spartacus flees south, and rather than confront him, Crassus builds a wall across the boot of Italy to contain him.
  • Julius Caesar could not have commanded the garrison of Rome, since it did not exist at that time.
  • In the film, Spartacus was born into a life of slavery. The real Spartacus is believed to have served in the Roman Army as an auxiliary soldier who deserted, then was caught and sold into slavery as punishment. These facts, deemed less than heroic, were altered in the film and help explain the hero's seemingly uncanny leadership and grasp of how to build and strategically deploy large armies.
  • In the film there is a character referred to as Gracchus. The character is depicted as being part of the Senate and opposed to Crassus. Although there may have been a Gracchus at the time that opposed Crassus, there does not seem to be any documentary evidence of this. The most significant Gracchi were Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus and Gaius Sempronius Gracchus who were both revolutionary political figures. However, their combined lifetimes spanned the period between 163 BC121 BC. The slave revolts that the film refers to occurred around 73 BC71 BC. This means that the character in the film is most likely fictional. The character was probably used as a plot contrivance because his name is linked to populism, a recurring theme in the film. His words in the film portray him as a person who prefers political expediency over traditional laws and customs which was also a notable trait of the Gracchi. Note: The Gracchus family was a plebeian family in Rome. The plural of Gracchus is Gracchi.

For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... The Roman army is the set of land-based military forces employed by the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic and later Roman Empire as part of the Roman military. ... The Gracchi were a plebeian family of ancient Rome. ... Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus (Latin: TI·SEMPRONIVS·TI·F·P·N·GRACCVS) (163 BC-132 BC) was a Roman politician of the 2nd century BC. In his short life he caused a political turmoil in the Republic, by his attempts, as plebeian tribune, to legislate agrarian reforms. ... Gaius Sempronius Gracchus (Latin: C·SEMPRONIVS·TI·F·P·N·GRACCVS) (154 BC-121 BC) was a Roman politician of the 2nd century BC. He was the younger brother of Tiberius Gracchus and, like him, pursued a popular political agenda that eventually got him killed by the conservative faction of... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC - 160s BC - 150s BC140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC Years: 168 BC 167 BC 166 BC 165 BC 164 BC - 163 BC - 162 BC 161 BC 160... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC - 120s BC - 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC Years: 126 BC 125 BC 124 BC 123 BC 122 BC - 121 BC - 120 BC 119 BC... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC - 70s BC - 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC Years: 78 BC 77 BC 76 BC 75 BC 74 BC - 73 BC - 72 BC 71 BC 70... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC - 70s BC - 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC Years: 76 BC 75 BC 74 BC 73 BC 72 BC - 71 BC - 70 BC 69 BC 68... In Ancient Rome, the plebs was the general body of Roman citizens, distinct from the privileged class of the patricians. ...

Awards and nominations

Academy Awards

Award Person
Best Actor in a Supporting Role Peter Ustinov
Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Color Alexander Golitzen
Eric Orbom
Russell A. Gausman
Julia Heron
Best Cinematography, Color Russell Metty
Best Costume Design, Color Valles
Bill Thomas
Nominated:
Best Film Editing Robert Lawrence
Best Music, Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture Alex North
  • Best Sound Editing - Golden Reel Award

The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Ustinov at Large (book cover) Sir Peter Alexander Ustinov, CBE (16 April 1921 – 28 March 2004), born Peter Alexander Baron von Ustinov, was an Academy Award-winning British-born actor, writer, dramatist and raconteur of French, Italian, German, Russian and Ethiopian ancestry. ... The Academy Awards are the oldest awards ceremony for achievements in motion pictures. ... Alexander Golitzen, (Moscow, February 28, 1908 - San Diego, July 26, 2005) oversaw art direction on more than 300 movies. ... The Academy Award for Best Cinematography is awarded each year to a cinematographer for his work in one particular motion picture. ... Russell Metty (born 1906, died 1978) was an American cinematographer, who worked on many films during the forties, fifties and sixties. ... This Academy Award was first given for movies made in 1948 when separate awards were given for black-and-white and color movies. ... Vallis (plural valles) is the Latin word for valley. ... Bill Thomas For other people named William Thomas, see William Thomas. ... The Academy Award for Film Editing was first given for films issued in 1934. ... Robert Z. Lawrence, a former South African national, is the current Albert L. Williams Professor of International Trade and Investment at John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. ... From Rule Sixteen of the Special Rules for The Music Awards Original Score: An original score is a substantial body of music in the form of dramatic underscoring written specifically for the film by the submitting composer. ... Alex North (December 4, 1910 - September 8, 1991) was an American composer responsible for the first jazz based film score (A Streetcar Named Desire) and the first truly modernist film score (Viva Zapata!). Born Isadore Soifer in Chester, Pennsylvania, Alex North was an original composer probably even by the classical...

Criticism

Critics such as Roger Ebert have argued that the film has flaws which have caused it to become severely dated. Critics attribute the film's flaws to various elements including the interference of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), which imposed censorial conformity under the Production Code; the replacement of original director, Anthony Mann, after the first week's shooting; a sparring cast (Laughton vs. Olivier; replacement director Kubrick vs. executive producer/star Douglas); and a distracting and boisterous orchestral soundtrack. Roger Joseph Ebert (June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), originally called the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors Association of America, is a non-profit trade association based in the United States which was formed to advance the interests of movie studios. ... The Production Code (also known as the Hays Code) was a set of industry guidelines governing the production of American motion pictures. ... Anthony Mann (June 30, 1906 - April 29, 1967), was an American actor and film director. ...


In Popular Culture

Main article: I'm Spartacus!

A famous scene of the movie involves the recaptured slaves being asked to point out which one of them is Spartacus in exchange for leniency. Instead, they each proclaim themselves to be Spartacus and thus share his fate. A similar scene or event is sometimes called a 'Spartacus moment' in reference to this particular scene. Im Spartacus! is the catchphrase from the film Spartacus. ...


In the Seinfeld episode "The Gum", the show's central characters see Spartacus at a revival theatre. This article is about the sitcom. ... The Gum is an episode of NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ...


In the movie Clueless, Christian brings over the movie Spartacus to Cher's house because he "has a thing for Tony Curtis". Clueless is a 1995 comedy film, loosely based on Emma by Jane Austen, written and directed by Amy Heckerling and produced by Scott Rudin. ... Roger Moore and Tony Curtis in The Persuaders! Tony Curtis (born June 3, 1925) is an American film actor. ...


A Pepsi commercial circa 2006 had a Roman centurion coming upon a lost bag lunch labeled "Spartacus." He asks the assembled slaves "is there a Spartacus here?" When the slaves realize the bag lunch contains a Pepsi, each claims to be Spartacus. In the end, the Centurion drinks the beverage. Pepsi-Cola, commonly called Pepsi, is a cola soft drink produced and manufactured by PepsiCo. ...


In Monty Python's Life of Brian, Brian is to be released by Pontius Pilate as a gesture of goodwill. He will be taken down from his cross and set free. The actual character of Brian (played by Graham Chapman) is not paying attention, and nearby crucified characters claim to be Brian instead; a nod to the scene in Spartacus. One goes so far as to state, "I'm Brian, and so is my Wife!" Life of Brian is a film from 1979 by Monty Python which deals with the life of Brian (played by Graham Chapman), a young man born at the nearly the same time as, and in a manger right down the street from Jesus. ... Graham Chapman (8 January 1941–4 October 1989) was an English comedian, actor, writer and physician. ...


In the South Park episode Two Days Before The Day After Tomorrow when the boys try to admit they were the ones who broke a beaver damn, the entire community joins in with them - symbolically taking the blame of Global Warming onto themselves as they each state that "I broke the dam" South Park is an Emmy Award-winning[1] American animated television comedy series about four third/fourth-grade school boys who live in the small mountain town of South Park, Colorado. ... Two Days Before the Day After Tomorrow is episode 908 of the Comedy Central series South Park. ... Global mean surface temperatures 1850 to 2006 Mean surface temperature anomalies during the period 1995 to 2004 with respect to the average temperatures from 1940 to 1980 Global warming is the observed increase in the average temperature of the Earths atmosphere and oceans in recent decades and the projected...


References

  1. ^ Spartacus at the Internet Movie Database Retrieved June 17, 2006.

The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ...

External links

  • Spartacus at the Internet Movie Database
  • Anecdote about President Kennedy's screening
  • Criterion Collection essay by Stephen Farber

  Results from FactBites:
 
Spartacus (film) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2296 words)
Spartacus was the biggest project of Kubrick's career at that point with a budget of twelve million dollars and a cast total of 10,500 actors, which was very impressive for such a young director, although his contract did not give him complete control over the filming.
Spartacus was actually one of numerous rebel slaves, and not the sole leader of the Roman slave revolts, as portrayed in the film.
Spartacus' motivation to free the slaves is presented in the film as a fundamental opposition to the institution of slavery, an assertion that is not supported by historical evidence.
Spartacus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1616 words)
Spartacus, who was believed to be a Thracian (born in what is now Sandanski in present-day Bulgaria), was enslaved by the Romans and led a large slave uprising in modern-day Italy during the period 73 BC to 71 BC.
Spartacus managed to break through Crassus's lines, and escaped towards Brundisium (modern-day Brindisi), but Crassus's forces intercepted them in Lucania, and Spartacus was killed in a subsequent battle at the river Silarus.
Spartacus has been compared by many to American Civil War abolitionist John Brown, citing both their "extreme" views of slavery (respective of their time periods),and willingness to follow their own path, regardless of the consequences; in both cases they are killed due to their beliefs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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