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Encyclopedia > Spanish cuisine

Spanish cuisine consists of a small variety of dishes which stem from differences in geography, culture and climate. It is heavily influenced by seafood available from the waters that surround the country, and reflects the country's deep Mediterranean roots. Spain's extensive history with many cultural influences has led to a unique cuisine with literally thousands of recipes and flavors. The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ...

Contents

Main components of Spanish cuisine

A significant portion of Spanish cuisine derives from the Jewish and Moorish traditions. The Moors were a strong influence in Spain for many centuries and some of their food is still eaten in Spain today. However, pork is popular and for centuries eating pork was also a statement of Christian ethnicity or cleanliness of blood, because it was not eaten by Jews or Muslims. Several native foods of the Americas were introduced to Europe through Spain, and a modern Spanish cook could not do without potatoes, tomatoes, peppers and beans. These are some of the primary influences that have differentiated Spanish cuisine from Mediterranean cuisine, of which Spanish cuisine shares many techniques and food items. Jewish cuisine isnt one unified cuisine, but rather a collection of international cookery traditions, loosely linked by kashrut, the Jewish dietary laws. ... For other uses, see moor. ... Limpieza de sangre (in Spanish), Limpeza de sangue (in Portuguese), both meaning cleanliness of blood was a concept of Iberian Modern History. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Native American Cuisine includes all food practices of the native peoples of the Americas. ... External links Mediterranean cuisine guide and recipes Categories: Stub | Mediterranean cuisine ...


The essential ingredient for real Spanish cooking is olive oil, as Spain produces 44% of the world's olives. However, butter or lard are also important, especially in the north. For the Popeye character, see Olive Oyl. ...


Daily meals eaten by the Spanish in many areas of the country are still very often made traditionally by hand, from fresh ingredients bought daily from the local market. This practice is more common in the rural areas and less common in the large urban areas like Madrid, where supermarkets are beginning to displace the open air markets. However, even in Madrid food can be bought from the local shops, bread from the panadería, meat from the carnicería, etc.


One popular custom when going out is to be served tapas with a drink (sherry, wine, beer, etc.). In some places, like Granada, tapas are given for free with a drink and have become very famous for that reason. It should be noted that almost every bar serves something edible when a drink is ordered, without charge. However many bars exist primarily to serve a purchased "tapa". Puntillitas, battered and fried baby squid Tapas (IPA: ) is the name for a wide variety of appetizers in Spanish cuisine. ... A glass of amontillado Sherry For other uses, see Sherry (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Granada (disambiguation). ...


Another traditional favorite is the churro with a mug of thick hot chocolate to dip churros in. Churrerías, or stores that serve churros, are quite common. The Chocolatería de San Ginés in Madrid is especially famous as a place to stop and have some chocolate with churros, often late into the night (even dawn) after being out on the town. Often traditional Spanish singers will entertain the guests. [1] Churros with chocolate Calientes A churro is a fried-dough pastry-based snack which originated in Spain, [1] and is popular in Latin America, France, Portugal, the USA, and Spanish-speaking Caribbean islands. ... For other uses, see Chocolate (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ...

Assorted tapas from a bar in Seville
Assorted tapas from a bar in Seville

As is true in many countries, the cuisines of Spain differ widely from one region to another, even though they all share certain common characteristics, which include: Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 694 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Menu Tapas pour touriste File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 694 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Menu Tapas pour touriste File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Seville (disambiguation). ...

  • The use of olive oil as a cooking fat in items such as fritters. It is also used raw.
  • The use of sofrito to start the preparation of many dishes.
  • The use of garlic and onions as major seasonings.
  • The custom of drinking wine during meals.
  • Serving bread with the vast majority of meals.
  • Consumption of salads, especially in the summer.
  • The consumption of a piece of fruit or a dairy product as dessert. Desserts such as tarts and cakes are typically reserved for special occasions.

It is sometimes said that in the south they fry, in the centre they roast (meat), but in the north they cook! For other uses, see FAT. Fats consist of a wide group of compounds that are generally soluble in organic solvents and largely insoluble in water. ... An apple fritter Malaysian roadside fritters A fritter is any kind of food coated in batter and deep fried. ... Sofrito is a Spanish word for a well cooked and fragrant sauce. ... Binomial name L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... For other uses, see Onion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bread (disambiguation). ... Salad Platter Cold Meat Salad Decorated green salad Salad is a mixture of foods (lettuce), usually including vegetables or fruits, often with a dressing or sauce, occasionally nuts or croutons and sometimes with the addition of meat, fish, pasta or cheese. ... Not to be confused with Desert. ... A tart is a pastry dish, usually sweet, that is a type of pie, with an open top that is not covered with pastry. ... For other uses, see Cake (disambiguation). ...


History

The first introduction of a product then unknown to ancient Iberia was that of wheat, which was thought to be brought by Iberians from the south of the peninsula. It was brought from Aquitaine in the north of the peninsula, due to the difficulty of transporting from the south. In time, the wheat of Iberia came to be considered to be the best in the Roman Empire, and became one of the main articles of foreign trade. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 3. ... Cooked mussels Shellfish is a term used to describe shelled molluscs and crustaceans used as food. ... Valencian paella. ... The Iberian Peninsula, or Iberia, is located in the extreme southwest of Europe, and includes modern day Spain, Portugal, Andorra and Gibraltar. ... Species T. aestivum T. boeoticum T. dicoccoides T. dicoccon T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta T. sphaerococcum T. timopheevii References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 Wheat Wheat For the indie rock group, see Wheat (band). ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Dordogne Gironde Landes Lot-et-Garonne Pyrénées-Atlantiques Arrondissements 18 Cantons 235 Communes 2,296 Statistics Land area1 41,308 km² Population (Ranked 6th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ...


There are two major diets in the peninsula. One was found in the northwest part of the peninsula, with more animal fats that correspond to the villages in the north. The other could be considered the precursor of the Mediterranean diet and was found in the Iberian part of the peninsula.


Foods found in archaeological excavations include diverse types of legumes, onions, and garlic. The olive was introduced by the Phoenicians. The other major components of a Spanish meal are tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, and beans. Phoenicia was an ancient civilization in the north of ancient Canaan, with its heartland along the coastal plain of what is now Lebanon and Syria. ...


Roman cuisine

As early as Roman times one can say that, with the exception of products later imported from the Americas, many modern foods were consumed, although mostly by the aristocracy, not the middle class. Cooking references from that era discuss the eating habits in Rome, where dishes from all of the Empire's provinces were brought. So, for example, it is known that thousands of amphorae of oil were sent to Rome from Spain. Nonetheless, and especially in the Celtic areas, consumption of animal products (from lamb, beef, etc.) was more common than consumption of vegetables. World map showing the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere historically considered to consist of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... Aristocrat redirects here. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the European people. ...


Already in that era, cabbages were well known and appreciated, and considered a panacea for various ailments. Other popular vegetables of that time were thistles (such as artichokes) and onions. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Milk thistle flowerhead Thistledown a method of seed dispersal by wind. ... Artichoke may refer to any of three types of vegetables. ...


In Roman Spain the hams of Pomeipolis (Pamplona) had great prestige. The export of pork products became the basis of a strong local economy. Pamplona (Basque: Iruñea or Iruña) is the capital city of Navarre, Spain. ...


It is almost certain that lentils were already consumed in Roman Spain, because they formed a staple food for the army and because they are easy to preserve and transport. Fava beans were known from antiquity and were considered sacred by the Romans. In the Saturnalia, the later December festival in honor of Saturn, fava beans were used to choose the king of the festival. This custom is believed to be the source of the present day custom of hiding an object in the Roscón de Reyes (similar to the sixpence traditional in a Christmas pudding); until quite recently, that object was a fava bean. Garbanzos were also popular, primarily among the poorer classes. Binomial name L. Vicia faba, the broad bean, fava bean, faba bean, horse bean, field bean, tic bean, or foul is a species of bean (Fabaceae) native to north Africa and southwest Asia, and extensively cultivated elsewhere. ... For other uses, see Saturnalia (disambiguation). ... Saturnus, Caravaggio, 16th c. ... The scilling or scylling (which possibly comes from the Teutonic root skil meaning to divide) was used in Anglo-Saxon times as money of account, even though no coins of that denomination existed. ... Christmas puddings are often dried out on hooks for weeks prior to serving in order to enhance the flavour. ... Binomial name Cicer arietinum L. The chickpea, garbanzo bean or bengal gram (Cicer arietinum) is an edible pulse of the Leguminosae or Fabaceae family, subfamily Faboideae or Papilionoideae. ...


Mushrooms were common and popular in the northern part of the country. For other uses, see Mushroom (disambiguation). ...


They mastered the science of grafting. According to Pliny, Tibur saw a tree that produced a distinct fruit on each of its branches: nuts, apples, pomegranates, cherries, pears, but he added that they dried out quickly. Grafted apple tree Malus sp. ... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... Tivoli (population 55,000), the classical Tibur, is an ancient Italian town some 20 km from Rome (Latium), at the falls of the Aniene, where it issues from the Sabine hills. ... For other uses, see Nut (disambiguation). ... For the color, see Pomegranate (color). ... For other uses, see Cherry (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Viticulture already was known and practiced by the Romans, but it seemed as well the fact that it was the Greeks who extended the vine across the Mediterranean region. This includes those wines that were most popular in the Empire. wine grapes Viticulture (from the Latin word for vine) is the science, production and study of grapes which deals with the series of events that occur in the vineyard. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


In this era (speaking now of the tables of the wealthy), they ate while lying in bed (a custom acquired from the Greeks) and using their hands, because forks were still unknown. Tablecloths were introduced in the 1st century. They came to use two plates, one flat (platina or patella) and the other deep (catinus), which they held with the left hand. That hand could not be used for many other things while eating, given that they ate with their left arms while reclining in bed, so that only the right hand was free. Knives were known, but not particularly needed at table because the dishes were cut up by slaves into bite-size pieces. They used spoons, which, like today, had different sizes, depending on what they were used for. The first spoons were made from clam shells (hence, the name cuchara), with silver handles. Assorted forks. ... For other uses, see Spoon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Clam (disambiguation). ...


The mode of flavoring and cooking was quite distinct from what is found in modern times.


Typical dishes

Pescaíto Frito
Pescaíto Frito

Among the multitude of recipes that make up the varied cuisines of Spain, a few can be considered poo common to all or almost all of Spain's regions, even though some of them have an origin known and associated with specific places. Examples include the potato omelette ("tortilla de patata", "tortilla española" or just "tortilla"), gazpacho, paella, stews, migas, sausages (such as embutidos, chorizo, and morcilla), jamón serrano, and cheeses. There are also many dishes based on beans (chickpeas, lentils, green beans); soups, with many regional variations; and bread, that has numerous forms, with distinct varieties in each region. The regional variations are less pronounced in Spanish desserts and cakes: flan, custard, rice pudding (arroz con leche), torrijas, churros, and madeleines are some of the most representative examples. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... A portion of tortilla Full tortilla de patatas Wikibooks Cookbook has more about this subject: Spanish Omelette Tortilla de patatas (Spanish for potato omelette, but sometimes also referred to as Spanish omelette in English) is a popular dish in Spain that can be served either cold or hot. ... Gazpacho with blended ingredients. ... Valencian paella. ... Beef Stew A stew is a common dish made of vegetables (particularly potatoes or beans), meat, poultry, or seafood cooked in some sort of broth or sauce. ... Migas (ME-gahz), also known as migajas, are a traditional breakfast dish eaten in Texas and an integral part of Tex-Mex cuisine. ... Some of the many varieties of Sausages A sausage consists of ground meat and other animal parts, herbs and spices, and possibly other ingredients, generally packed in a casing (traditionally the intestines of the animal), and preserved in some way. ... An embutido is a type of sausage found in Spain and Latin America. ... Chorizo (in Spanish; IPA: [tʃoriθo] or [tʃoɹɪso]) or Chouriço (in Portuguese) is a term encompassing several types of pork sausage originating from the Iberian Peninsula. ... Morcilla is Spanish for blood sausage, and is prepared for the matanza in Spain and the asado in South America. ... A Slice of Jamón serrano Jamón serrano (literally sierra (mountain) ham) is a dry-cured Spanish ham, which is generally served raw in thin slices, similar to the Italian prosciutto. ... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... Green beans Bean is a common name for large plant seeds of several genera of Fabaceae (formerly Leguminosae) used for food or feed. ... Binomial name Cicer arietinum L. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... This article is about the species Lens culinaris. ... Green common beans on the plant Green beans (American English) or French beans (British English) or Mahune (South Slavic, Balkans) are the unripe fruits of any kind of bean, including the yardlong bean, the hyacinth bean, the winged bean, and especially the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), whose pods are also... For other uses, see Soup (disambiguation). ... This article focuses on egg-thickened custards. ... This article focuses on egg-thickened custards. ... Rice pudding being served during the traditional Scandinavian Christmas meal, in Denmark Rice pudding (Arroz Doce) in a typical Christmas meal, in Portugal Pulut hitam served in a Malaysian restaurant Rice pudding is a dessert enjoyed by people of different cultures all over the world, originating in Japan. ... Arroz con leche, or rice with milk in English, is a popular dessert. ... Churros with chocolate Calientes A churro is a fried-dough pastry-based snack which originated in Spain, [1] and is popular in Latin America, France, Portugal, the USA, and Spanish-speaking Caribbean islands. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Others foods include:

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Arroz a la cubana, which means Cuban-style rice, is a Spanish dish consisting of rice, tomato sauce, fried eggs, and fried bananas. ... Suborders Myopsina Oegopsina Squid are a large, diverse group of marine cephalopods. ... For the Mesozoic island Cantabria, see Cantabria (Mesozoic island). ... Chorizo (in Spanish; IPA: [tʃoriθo] or [tʃoɹɪso]) or Chouriço (in Portuguese) is a term encompassing several types of pork sausage originating from the Iberian Peninsula. ... It has been suggested that Lambing be merged into this article or section. ... Gazpacho with blended ingredients. ... Binomial name Pollicipes polymerus Sowerby, 1833 The Gooseneck barnacle (Pollicipes polymerus) is a species of filter-feeding crustacean that lives attached to hard surfaces of rocks and flotsam in the ocean intertidal zone. ... Galicia (Spain) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Fabada Asturiana, a typical dish of Asturias Fabada Asturiana, often simply known as Fabada, is a rich bean stew, originally from and most commonly found in Asturias, but widely available throughout Spain and in Spanish restaurants world-wide. ... A Slice of Jamón serrano Jamón serrano (literally sierra (mountain) ham) is a dry-cured Spanish ham, which is generally served raw in thin slices, similar to the Italian prosciutto. ... It has been suggested that Lambing be merged into this article or section. ... Cooked mussels Shellfish is a term used to describe shelled molluscs and crustaceans used as food. ... Marmitako is a Basque fish stew that was eaten on tuna fishing boats. ... Pays Basque) see Northern Basque Country. ... Valencian paella. ... Location of Málaga Municipality Government  - Mayor Francisco de la Torre Prados Area  - Total 385. ... For other uses, see Andalusia (disambiguation). ... A portion of tortilla Full tortilla de patatas Wikibooks Cookbook has more about this subject: Spanish Omelette Tortilla de patatas (Spanish for potato omelette, but sometimes also referred to as Spanish omelette in English) is a popular dish in Spain that can be served either cold or hot. ... Torró dAlacant Turrón (Spanish), torró (Catalan), or torrone (Italian) is a nougat confection, typically made of honey, sugar, and egg white, coated in crushed, toasted almonds, and usually shaped into either a rectangular tablet or a round cake. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Cuisine in each region

  • Extremadura: olla podrida (a rich stew of bacon, fowl, ham, meats, and vegetables), excellent embutidos of Iberian pork, cheeses (including the indispensable torta del casar, a close relative of the Portuguese queijo da serra, one of the best of the world), pitarra wine.
  • Navarra: vegetable stews, Tudela's lettuce hearts with anchovies, salmon, or a simple vinaigrette (oil, salt and vinegar); piquillo peppers, which are often stuffed with meat; trout a la Navarra (cooked stuffed with bacon and cheese), Roncal and Idiazabal cheeses, curd from Ultzama, claret wine, and the liquor pacharán.
  • Valencia: The Valencian Community, over any other dish, specialises in the famous Paella, being like the "Capital" for this kind of food, even though it is very popular on Catalonia too. This dish is very popular, being common to cook one each sunday for a family lunch. In fact, in Valencia, on Fallas, one of the biggest holidays therre, it is normal to find big paellas cooked on the street. The typical Valencian Paella has meat and vegetables, but many other variants of rices can be found, as with shellfish or the delicious "Arroz Negro".
  • La Rioja: above all its international Rioja wines, as well as its vegetable soups, its pepper and its potato dishes (that dumbfounded even Paul Bocuse, so the story goes).
  • Murcia: products of its rich gardens, such as zarangollo; fish and lamb stews; and the wines of Jumilla.
  • Madrid: the cocido madrileño (Madrid's chickpea stew) and the tripe dish callos a la madrileña, strawberries from Aranjuez or melons from Villaconejos, the wines from Navalcarnero and the Anis del Toro of Chinchón.
  • Andalusia: (Andalucia) fried fish, salmorejo cordobés and gazpacho. Seafood, especially shrimps, mackerels and flatfishes. Jabugo ham, one of the finest in the world and Sherry wine.
  • Basque country: skillfully cooked dishes such as "txangurro relleno" (spider crab) "marmitako" and hake and clams. Idiazabal cheese and a distinctive wine "txakoli".
  • Galicia: Caldo gallego; an array of seafoods, especially octopus and bacalao; Tarta de Santiago, a delicious tart made of almonds and lemon; empanadas; Albariño wine from the Rias Baixas

Capital Mérida Official language(s) Spanish; Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 5th  41,634 km²  8. ... Olla podrida is a popular dish in Spain and Galicia. ... Torta del Casar is a cheese made from sheeps milk in the Extremadura region of Spain. ... Pitarra is a wine used by Catholic priests in Spain. ... Navarra is the Spanish name for Navarre (Basque: Nafarroa), an ancient kingdom in the Pyrenees, and now a province and an autonomous community in Spain. ... Beef Stew A stew is a common dish made of vegetables (particularly potatoes or beans), meat, poultry, or seafood cooked in some sort of broth or sauce. ... Flag of Tudela. ... Genera Amazonsprattus Anchoa Anchovia Anchoviella Cetengraulis Coilia Encrasicholina Engraulis Jurengraulis Lycengraulis Lycothrissa Papuengraulis Pterengraulis Setipinna Stolephorus Thryssa The anchovies are a family (Engraulidae) of small, common salt-water fish. ... For other uses, see Salmon (disambiguation). ... The word vinaigrette (from the French language) can refer to: An emulsion of vinegar (or sometimes lemon juice) and vegetable oil, often flavored with herbs, spices, and other ingredients. ... Roncal is a sheeps milk cheese. ... Idiazabal cheese is a pressed cheese made from unpasturized milk that can only come from the latxa breed of sheep in the Basque region of Spain. ... Curd is a dairy product obtained by curdling (coagulating) milk with rennet or an edible acidic substance such as lemon juice or vinegar and then draining off the liquid portion (called whey). ... Ultzama is a town located in the province of Navarra, in the autonomous community of Navarra, in the North of Spain. ... Claret is a name used in English for red wine from the Bordeaux region of France, along the valleys of the rivers Gironde, Garonne and Dordogne, including Medoc, Graves and St Emilion. ... Patxaran (Basque from baso aran (wild plum); called Pacharán in Spanish) is a sloe-flavoured liqueur from Navarra, commonly drunk in Navarra, in the Basque Country and in the rest of Spain. ... Valencia is the name of several places: In Spain: Valencia, Spain, capital of the Valencia Autonomous Community Valencia (autonomous community) Valencia (province), in the Valencia Autonomous Community The Kingdom of Valencia, which existed from 1237 to 1707 Valencia de Alcántara, a town in the province of Cáceres In... Capital Valencia Official language(s) Valencian and Spanish Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 8th  23,255 km²  4. ... Valencian paella. ... Traditional Saragüells costume for the men. ... La Rioja is a province and autonomous community of northern Spain. ... Rioja Wine Rioja is a wine from a region named after the Rio Oja in Spain, a tributary of the Ebro. ... Le Nord, one of Bocuses chain of brasseries in central Lyon. ... Capital Murcia Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 9th  11 313 km²  2,2% Population  â€“ Total (2003)  â€“ % of Spain  â€“ Density Ranked 10th  1 226 993  2,9%  108,46/km² Demonym  â€“ English  â€“ Spanish  Murcian  murciano/a Statute of Autonomy June 9, 1982 ISO 3166-2 MU Parliamentary representation  â€“ Congress seats  â€“ Senate... Zarangollo is a common dish in the Murcia province of Spain. ... Jumilla is a wine-producing region in southern Spain. ... Capital Madrid Official language(s) Spanish Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 12th  8,030. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... Tripe in an Italian market Look up tripe in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Aranjuez is a town in the southern part of Autonomous Community of Madrid in central Spain and is the southernmost, and 48 km south of the city of Madrid. ... Navalcarnero is a municipality in Madrid (province), (Spain). ... Anis del Toro is an alcoholic drink that is dark in color and taste like licorice. ... This article is about the Madrid town. ... For other uses, see Andalusia (disambiguation). ... Pays Basque) see Northern Basque Country. ... Txakoli (Spanish: ),or Txakolina, is a slightly sparkling white wine produced in the Basque Country. ... Galicia (Spain) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... This page is about the possible island called Bacalao, for the Portuguese dish that is also known as Bacalao, see Bacalhau. ... Tarta de Santiago is a typical almond pie from the Spanish region of Galicia. ... In South America, particularly Argentina, and Spain, an empanada is essentially a stuffed pastry. ...

Chefs

Today, Spanish cooking is "in fashion", especially thanks in part to Ferran Adrià, who in the summer of 2003 attained international renown thanks to praise in the Sunday supplement of the New York Times. (His restaurant El Bulli is located in the province of Girona) near Roses. In a long article, the New York Times declared him the best chef in the world, and postulated the supremacy of Spanish cooking over French cuisine. Ferran Adrià Acosta is a Catalan chef born 14 May 1962 in LHospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain, is the famed head chef of El Bulli Restaurant in Roses on the Costa Brava. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... El Bulli is a three-Michelin star restaurant run by chef Ferran Adrià in Roses on the Costa Brava in Catalonia, Spain. ... Girona province Girona (Catalan:Girona;Spanish: Gerona) is a province of eastern Spain, in the northern part of the autonomous community of Catalonia. ... French cuisine is a style of cooking derived from the nation of France. ...


Four other Spanish chefs hold three stars in the prestigious Michelin Guide: New York City 2006 First Michelin Red Guide for North America The Michelin Guide (Le Guide Michelin) is a series of annual guide books published by Michelin for over a dozen countries. ...

  • Karlos Arguiñano, who over the years has presented cooking programmes on various Spanish television channels, in which he shows his communication skills while he cooks.
  • Simoné Ortega, author of the cooking book best-seller in Spain "1080 recetas".
  • Sergi Arola, chef of the restaurant "La Broché", disciple of Adrià.

Prominent names in the history of Spanish cuisine include: Location Image:Donostia (San Sebastian), Euskadi location. ... Guipuscoa province. ... Santiago Santamaría (born 22 August 1952) is a former Argentine footballer. ... Can Fabes is a restaurant in Sant Celoni, Catalonia, Spain. ... Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Barcelona (Catalan) Spanish name Barcelona Nickname Ciutat Comtal (City of Counts) Postal code 08001–08080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 93 (Barcelona) Website http://www. ... Guipuscoa province. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Barcelona (Catalan) Spanish name Barcelona Nickname Ciutat Comtal (City of Counts) Postal code 08001–08080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 93 (Barcelona) Website http://www. ... We dont have an article called Karlos Arguiñano Start this article Search for Karlos Arguiñano in. ...

  • Ángel Muro: 19th century food expert, author of the book "Practicón", a reference of cooking in the 19th century; equivalent to Ma cuisine by Escoffier.
  • María Mestayer de Echagüe, "Marquesa de Parabere": author of a two-volume cooking encyclopedia (with the second dedicated to the pantry) that is still in print, and that contains a large number of recipes, as well as chapters dedicated to table manners.

Other notable chefs specializing in Spanish cuisine: Georges Auguste Escoffier (October 28, 1846 (?)-February 12, 1935) was a French chef, restaurateur and culinary writer who popularized and updated traditional French cooking methods. ... A pantry is a room in a domestic house used for food storage. ...

  • Ilan Hall, winner of Top Chef Season 2, was known for his Spanish-inspired dishes. He has worked at the acclaimed Casa Mono Spanish restaurant in Manhattan.[2]

Ilan D. Hall (born April 6, 1982) is an American chef, best known as the winner of the second season of the Bravo television networks reality series Top Chef, ahead of Marcel Vigneron. ... Top Chef is an American reality competition show that airs on the cable television network Bravo, in which chefs compete against each other in weekly challenges. ...

See also

Cooking is the act of preparing food. ... Andalucian cuisine is rather varied, corresponding to a region that is itself extensive and varied. ... Fabada Asturiana, a typical dish of Asturias Asturian cuisine refers to the typical dishes and ingredients found in the cuisine of the Asturias region of Spain. ... Aragonese cuisine refers to the typical dishes and ingredients of cuisine in the Aragon region of Spain. ... Balearic Islands cuisine refers to the typical dishes and ingredients in the cuisine of the Balearic Islands, in Spain. ... Basque cuisine refers to the typical dishes and ingredients of the cuisine of the Basque people in Spain. ... Canarian cuisine refers to the typical dishes and ingredients in the cuisine of the Canary Islands. ... Cantabrian cuisine refers to the typical dishes and ingredients in the cuisine of the Cantabria region of Spain. ... Castilian-Manchego cuisine refers to the typical dishes and ingredients in the cuisine of Castile-La Mancha region of Spain. ... Catalan cuisine refers to the cuisine of Catalonia, the Balearic Islands, and the Comunidad de Valencia in Spain; as well as French Roussillon. ... Galician cuisine refers to the typical dishes and ingredients found in the cuisine of the Galicia region of Spain. ... Leonese cuisine refers to the typical dishes and ingredients of the region of Castile-Leon in Spain. ... Valencian cuisine is a Mediterranean cuisine from the Land of Valencia, in Spain. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Protected geographical indications in the European Union. ...

References

External links

Wikibooks
Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on
Spanish cuisine
  • Spanish Recipes from RecipeHound
  • www.spain-recipes.com; opinions on Spanish recipes and culture.
  • Map of Spain, with information on the cuisine in different areas
  • A glossary and guide to food in Spain

  Results from FactBites:
 
Spanish Cuisine - CookbookWiki (1570 words)
The Wheat was one of such basic elements for cooking, and was brought from Aquitaine in the north of the peninsula in same period when mushrooms had become popular in the region.
Stews are one of the most important dishes in the Spanish cuisine, and preparing a delicious original stew, you have to use your imagination as well as gook cooking skills.
Spanish chefs are the most passionate ones in all cuisines, and some of them are well known worldwide in all food contests that take place annually.
Spanish Cuisine spices and paella sangria seafood special (866 words)
Spanish Cuisine and how it is different from the foods we are accustomed to, the Spanish certainly know how to please and tempt the most delicate palette and get the taste buds going.
Spanish Cuisine is also famous for freshly caught fish, so be sure to order the seafood special, this will come with all sorts of shellfish, clams mussels, prawns and shrimps accompanied by fresh vegetables.
Spanish Cuisine In the central provinces of Castile, meat in the form of roast lamb, pig, or goat is common.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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