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Encyclopedia > Spanish Inquisition (Monty Python)

The Spanish Inquisition was one of the most popular Monty Python sketches. The principal catchphrase in this sketch was "Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!" The Monty Python troupe in 1970. ...

Nobody in their right mind could have expected this form of Spanish Inquisition, in which the inquisitors proceed to use such extremities of torture as poking with soft cushions and forcible seating in a comfy chair as a means of forcing a heretic (a housewife) to recant. This Inquisition has a hard time starting to inquisit, as they get bogged down in recitations of their chief weapons, among which are fear, surprise, ruthless efficiency, an almost fanatical devotion to the Pope, and nice red uniforms. (Listen: 15 seconds audio sample .ogg file.) Pedro Berruguete. ... Pedro Berruguete. ... A stereotypical housewife A homemaker is a person whose prime occupation is to care for his/her family and home. ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. ...


This was a recurring sketch, always predicated by an unrelated sketch in which one character, expressing irritation at being questioned by another, would announce "I didn't expect a kind of Spanish Inquisition!" At this point the Inquisition, consisting of Cardinal Ximinez (Michael Palin), Cardinal Biggles (Terry Jones), and Cardinal Fang (Terry Gilliam) would burst into the room and Ximinez would shout, with particular emphasis on the first syllable, "Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!" This has become a fairly widespread catchphrase. Cisneros visits the construction of the Hospital of the Charity. ... Michael Edward Palin (born May 5, 1943 in Sheffield, Yorkshire) is a British comedian and television presenter. ... Major James Bigglesworth, known to all as Biggles, is a fictional character created by W. E. Johns. ... Terry Jones Terence Graham Parry Jones (born February 1, 1942) is a British comedian and writer. ... Terry Gilliam Terence Vance Gilliam (born November 22, 1940) is an American film director and a member of the Monty Python comedy group. ... A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ...


In the original Monty Python's Flying Circus TV episode (episode 15), the Spanish Inquisition makes several "unexpected" appearances, until at the very end of the show they were caught by surprise. As the closing credits roll the Inquisitors race to where they weren't expected, only to arrive just as the words THE END appear, Ximinez crying "Nobody expects the Sp...oh, bugger!" (which, incidentally, was a pretty strong word for a BBC comedy show at the time). Monty Pythons Flying Circus (aka Flying Circus or MPFC, known during the fourth season as Monty Python) was the popular BBC sketch comedy show from Monty Python. ... Bugger is an expletive used in vernacular British English, Australian English and New Zealand English. ...


This sketch may have been an inspiration for "the Inquisition" portion of the movie History of the World Part I. The DVD cover artwork for the movie depicts many of the eras parodied in the film History of the World, Part I is a 1981 film directed by Mel Brooks. ...


"Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!" appeared as a fictional crossover in a Batman comic book; Robin is fighting desperately against terrible odds when Batgirl unexpectedly arrives to help. After the villains are safely dispatched, in the panel at the bottom right corner of the page Robin unleashes a barrage of questions at Batgirl, asking "What are you doing here? Why did you come? How did you know where I was?" and so on, causing the overwhelmed Batgirl to reply with "Hey, slow down, I didn't expect the Spanish Inquisition!" When the reader turns the page, the first panel on the next page features the Spanish Inquisition arriving on horseback, shouting "Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!". In a clever bit of plot twisting, this unlikely event was actually worked in as a rational part of the overall plot. A fictional crossover occurs when otherwise separated fictional characters, stories, settings, universes, or media meet and interact with each other. ... The comic book character Batman (originally referred to as The Batman, and occasionally as The Bat-Man), is a fictional character and superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... The given name Robin was originally a diminutive of Robert, derived from Rob and the diminutive Old French suffix -in. ... Cover to Batman: Gotham Knights #43, a reinterpretation of Detective Comics #359. ...


See also

  • Mel Brooks's film History of the World, Part I has a sketch with a singing and dancing inquisition

Mel Brooks (born June 28, 1926) is an American actor, writer director, and theatrical producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and parodies. ... The DVD cover artwork for the movie depicts many of the eras parodied in the film History of the World, Part I is a 1981 film directed by Mel Brooks. ...

References

  • The Monty Python script

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Spanish Inquisition (Monty Python) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (946 words)
Nobody in their right mind could have expected this form of Spanish Inquisition, where the Inquisitors use such torture methods as poking the accused with soft cushions and forcible seating in a comfy chair to force a heretic (an elderly housewife) to recant.
In the original Monty Python's Flying Circus TV episode (episode 15), the Spanish Inquisition makes several "unexpected" appearances, until at the very end of the show they are caught by surprise when a barrister in a court session at the Old Bailey says "I didn't expect a kind of Spanish Inquisition".
The popular "Life of Python" sketch, featured in the BBC comedy program, Not The Nine O'Clock News, included a line in which 'General Synod' exclaims, in response to a question of how he expected the public to react to his film "Well, I certainly didn't expect (slight pause) the Spanish Inquisition".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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