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Encyclopedia > Spanish Harlem
116th Street between Third Avenue and Lexington Avenue
116th Street between Third Avenue and Lexington Avenue

Spanish Harlem, also known as El Barrio and East Harlem, is a low income neighborhood in Harlem area of New York City, in the north-eastern part of the borough of Manhattan. Spanish Harlem is one of the largest predominantly Latino communities in New York City. It includes the area formerly known as Italian Harlem, and still harbors a small Italian American population along Pleasant Avenue. However, since the 1950s it has been dominated by residents of Puerto Rican descent, sometimes called Nuyoricans. The neighborhood boundaries are Harlem River to the north, the East River to the east, East 96th Street to the south,[1][2] and 5th Avenue to the west. The neighborhood is part of Manhattan Community Board 11. The primary business hub of Spanish Harlem has historically been East 116th Street from 5th Avenue headed east to its termination at the FDR Drive. The area is patrolled by both the 23rd Precinct located at 162 East 102nd Street and the 25th Precinct located at 120 East 119th Street. 116th Street runs both directions through the neighborhood of Harlem in the New York City borough of Manhattan, and is divided into two parts on either side of Morningside Park. ... Third Avenue is a north-south thoroughfare on the East Side of Manhattan in New York City, running in that borough from East 4th Street north for over 120 blocks. ... Lexington Avenue is an avenue on the East Side of the borough of Manhattan in New York City that carries southbound one-way traffic from East 131st Street to Gramercy Park at East 21st Street. ... Look up barrios in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Five Boroughs redirects here. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... For the Brazilian pop singer, see Latino (singer). ... Italian Harlem is a neighborhood in East Harlem, formerly inhabitated by a large Italian American population. ... Nuyorican Poets Cafe. ... The Harlem River, shown in red, between the Bronx and Manhattan in New York City The Harlem River is a tidal strait in New York City, USA that flows 8 miles (13 km) between the East River and the Hudson River, separating the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx. ... New York City waterways: 1. ... The Manhattan Community Board 11 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of East Harlem, El Barrio/Spanish Harlem, Wards and Randalls Island in the borough of Manhattan. ... 116th Street runs both directions through the neighborhood of Harlem in the New York City borough of Manhattan, and is divided into two parts on either side of Morningside Park. ... FDR Drive is a major freeway-standard parkway on the east side of the New York City borough of Manhattan. ...

Contents

Demographics

Spanish Harlem has a population of 117,743 as of the 2000 US census. For decades East Harlem has been one of the poorest communities in the United States of America. Almost half the population lives below the poverty line and receives public assistance (AFDC, Home Relief, Supplemental Security Income, and Medicaid). Over 25% of the population resides in units managed by the NYCHA. East Harlem has one of the highest concentration of Puerto Ricans in all of New York City. The vast majority of units in Spanish Harlem are renter occupied.[3] 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ... Welfare has four main meanings. ... Aid to Families with Dependent Children is a welfare program administered by the United States Department of Health and Human Services. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Supplemental Security Income is a monthly stipend provided to some citizens by the United States federal government. ... Medicaid is the US health insurance program for individuals and families with low incomes and resources. ... NYCHA,Sheepshead Houses The New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) provides housing for low and moderate income residents throughout the five boroughs of New York City. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Puerto Rican. ...


History

The construction of the elevated transit to Harlem in the 1880s urbanized the area, precipitating the construction of apartment buildings and brownstones. Harlem was first populated by German immigrants, but soon after Irish, Italian, Lebanese and Russian Jewish immigrants began settling in Harlem. In East Harlem, Southern Italians and Sicilians soon predominated and the neighborhood became known as Italian Harlem, the Italian American hub of Manhattan. Puerto Rican immigration after the First World War established an enclave at the western portion of Italian Harlem (around 110th Street and Lexington Avenue), which became known as Spanish Harlem. The area slowly grew to encompass all of Italian Harlem as Italians moved out and Latinos moved in in another wave of immigration after the Second World War. A red brick apartment block in central London, England, on the north bank of the Thames An apartment building, block of flats or tenement is a multi-unit dwelling made up of several (generally four or more) apartments (US) or flats (UK). ... This article is about the building material and the dwelling. ... An Italian-American is an American of Italian descent either born in America or someone who has immigrated. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... 110th street is a street in Manhattan, New York City, New York. ... Lexington Avenue is an avenue on the East Side of the borough of Manhattan in New York City that carries southbound one-way traffic from East 131st Street to Gramercy Park at East 21st Street. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


In the 1920s and early 1930s, Italian Harlem was represented by future Mayor Fiorello La Guardia in Congress, and later by Italian-American socialist Vito Marcantonio. Italian Harlem lasted in some parts into the 1970s in the area around Pleasant Avenue. It still celebrates the first Italian feast in New York City, Our Lady of Mount Carmel. Some remnants of Italian Harlem, such as Rao's restaurant, started in 1896, and the original Patsy's Pizzeria which opened in the 1930s, still remain. Fiorello Henry LaGuardia (December 11, 1882–September 20, 1947) was the Mayor of New York from 1934 to 1945. ... Socialism refers to a broad array of ideologies and political movements with the goal of a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community. ... Vito Anthony Marcantonio (December 10, 1902 – August 9, 1954) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Raos is a restaurant founded in 1896 in East Harlem, New York City. ...


Spanish Harlem was one of the hardest hit areas in the 1960s and 1970s as New York City struggled with deficits, race riots, urban flight, drug abuse, crime and poverty. Tenements were crowded, poorly maintained and frequent targets for arson. The area still has some of the worst problems with poverty, drug abuse and public health in New York City. Latin Kings are extremely prevalent in Spanish Harlem. However, like the rest of New York, it has enjoyed a resurgence in terms of construction in the past two decades.


With the growth of the Latino population, the neighborhood is expanding. It is also home to one of the few major television studios north of midtown, Metropolis (106th St. and Park Ave.), where shows like BET's 106 & Park and Chappelle's Show have been produced. The major medical care provider to both East Harlem and the Upper East Side is the Mount Sinai Hospital, which has long provided tertiary care to the residents of Harlem. Many of the graduates of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine make careers out of East Harlem public health initiatives including the battle against asthma, diabetes, unsafe drinking water, lead paint and infectious disease. BET redirects here. ... 106 & Park: BETs Top 10 Live is a top-ten video countdown that has airs weekdays on BET. It is the networks #1 rated show. ... Chappelles Show is an American comedy television series starring comedian Dave Chappelle. ... The Mount Sinai Hospital is a hospital in New York City, New York, serving Manhattans Upper East Side and Harlem. ... This page is about a medical school in New York. ...


Many famous artists have lived and worked in Spanish Harlem, including the renowned timbalero Tito Puente (110th Street was renamed “Tito Puente Way”), Jazz legend Ray Barretto and one of Puerto Rico’s most famous poets, Julia de Burgos among others. Piri Thomas wrote a best-selling autobiography titled, "Down These Mean Streets" in 1967. Tito Puente, Sr. ... Ray Barretto a. ... Julia de Burgos (February 17, 1914 – July 6, 1953), born in Carolina, Puerto Rico has been considered by many as the greatest poet to have been born in Puerto Rico. ... Piri Thomas (born Juan Pedro Tomas September 30, 1928 in Spanish Harlem in New York City) is a Puerto Rican-Cuban who is influential in the Nuyorican Movement as a writer and poet. ...


The Harbor Conservatory for the Performing Arts serves as a focus for theatre, dance, and musical performance in the neighborhood, as well as its hosting the annual competition to award the Charlie Palmieri Memorial Piano Scholarship, a scholarship established in Palmieri's memory by Tito Puente for the benefit of intermediate and advanced young (12-25) pianists' study of Latin-style piano.[4] Charlie Palmieri a. ... Charlie Palmieri a. ... Tito Puente, Sr. ...


El Museo del Barrio, a museum of Latin American and Caribbean art and culture is located on nearby Museum Mile and endeavors to serve some of the cultural needs of the neighboring community. There is a diverse collection of religious institutions within the confines of East Harlem: from mosques, a Greek Orthodox monastery, several Roman Catholic churches, including Holy Rosary Parish-East Harlem, and a traditional Russian Orthodox church. Founded in 1969 by a group of Puerto Rican artists, educators,community activists and civic leaders, El Museo del Barrio is located at the top of Museum Mile in New York City (USA), in East Harlem a neighborhood also called El Barrio and is the only museum dedicated to the... The facade of Holy Rosary Church, which is situated in East Harlem or El Barrio, the world-renowned Spanish Harlem. ... The Russian Orthodox Church (Русская Православная церковь) is that body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ...


Despite the moniker of "Spanish Harlem" or "El Barrio," the region is now home to a new influx of immigrants from around the world. Yemeni merchants, for example, work in bodegas alongside immigrants from the Dominican Republic. Italians live next to the influx of Central and South American immigrant populations. Other businessmen and local neighbors can be Korean, Chinese or Haitian in origin. The rising price of living in Manhattan has also caused increasing numbers of young urban professionals, mainly Caucasians, to move in and take advantage of the inexpensive rents, relative to the adjacent neighborhoods of Yorkville and the Upper East Side. South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... A section of Yorkville as seen from a high rise on Second Avenue and 87th Street Yorkville is a neighborhood within the Upper East Side of the borough of Manhattan in the city of New York City. ... The Upper East Side at Sunset The Upper East Side is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, USA, between Central Park and the East River. ...


Food Access

Access to healthy food causes serious hardships to citizens of Spanish Harlem. According to an April, 2008 report prepared by the New York City Department of City Planning, Spanish Harlem is an area of the city with the highest levels of diet-related diseases due to limited opportunities for citizens to purchase fresh foods[5]. With a high population density and a lack of nearby supermarkets, the neighborhood has little access to fresh fruits and vegetables and a low consumption of fresh foods. Citizens of Spanish Harlem are likely to buy food from discount and convenience stores that have a limited supply of fruits and vegetables, which are often of poor quality and generally more expensive than the same products sold at supermarkets[6] Without access to affordable produce and meats, Spanish Harlem residents have difficulty eating a healthy diet, which contributes to high rates of obesity and diabetes[7]


"Residents of ...East and Central Harlem ...are largely limited to fast food restaurants and small bodegas as food sources, which primarily carry packaged foods and have limited fresh produce options. Area residents have also identified the need for more fitness options, particularly for youth and seniors. These inequities have resulted in health disparities and high rates of obesity."[8]


Social Issues

Social problems associated with poverty from crime to drug addiction have also affected the area for some time. Violent crime remains an obstacle to community security, but crime rates have dropped significantly—around 68% over the past 15 years[9][10]. Though crime is higher in Spanish Harlem than in other neighborhoods in the city, crime's rate of decline is roughly equal to the decline in crime seen in the city's more affluent neighborhoods[9].


Spanish Harlem has significantly higher drop out rates and incidents of violence in its schools.[11] Students must pass through metal detectors and swipe ID cards to enter the buildings. Other problems in local schools include low test scores and high truancy rates. Drug addiction is also a serious problem in the community[citation needed]. The neighborhood suffers from a high poverty rate, with many persons in Spanish Harlem below the poverty level.[12]. But since the neighborhood has such a great population density, the neighborhood as a whole possesses strong purchasing power.


The neighborhood's incarceration rate in the area is also very high.[citation needed] Many if not most males in the community have been arrested at some point in their lives.[citation needed] This has a direct correlation to aggressive policing tactics including "sweeps" due to the area's high crime rate[citation needed]. Spanish Harlem is home to a significant number of inmates currently held in New York state prison and jail facilities. With a decrease in affordable housing, homelessness has become a worsening problem.[citation needed] Many families double or triple up in a single apartment, relocate to other neighborhoods, or leave the city completely.[citation needed]


Urban renewal

After a wave of arson ravaged the low income communities of New York City throughout the 1970's and "planned shrinkage" policies, many of the residential structures in Spanish Harlem were left seriously damaged or destroyed. By the late 1970's, the city began to rehabilitate many abandoned tenement style buildings and designate them low income housing. Planned shrinkage is a United States policy of withdrawing essential city services (such as police patrols, garbage removal, street repairs, and fire services) from neighborhoods suffering from urban decay, crime and poverty so that neighborhoods may be claimed by outside interests for new development. ...


Go Green East Harlem! is a collaborative initiative sponsored by Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer’s Office. Go Green partners include WE ACT, North General Hospital, Mt. Sinai Medical Center, the City Department of Health, Manhattan Community Board 11, State Senator Jose Serrano, and the Little Sisters of the Assumption. Go Green aims to create community sustainability and is working to address six environmental issues in East Harlem: public health and asthma, parks and open space, sustainable business, farmers’ markets and healthy eating, green building, and transportation.[13] Go Green also recently launched a new East Harlem Green Market, open both Saturday and Sunday, to expand community access to healthy, fresh food.


In order to address the issues of healthy food access in East Harlem, the East Harlem Supermarket Task Force was created in April, 2008. Spearheaded by New York Senator Serrano and State Assemblyman Powell, the task force includes the Coalition Against Hunger, the Department of Health, We Act, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Council-member Viverito, and the Union of Food and Commercial Workers Local 1500.[14]


Gentrification

In recent years, property values in Spanish Harlem have climbed along with the rest of the Manhattan and the metro area. Many people priced out of more affluent sections of the city have begun to look at Spanish Harlem as an up and coming area due to the neighborhood's proximity to Manhattan's core and subway accessibility. With increased market rate housing, including luxury condos and co-ops, there has been a severe decline of affordable housing in the community.[citation needed] White non-Hispanic young professionals have settled in the newly constructed buildings[citation needed]. Many believe that Spanish Harlem real estate developers hoping for a wave of gentrification wish to displace current low income and long time residents. This has created tension in the community.


There are some residents who feel the area should be labeled "SpaHa" because of similarities with SoHo and TriBeCa that are emerging in Spanish Harlem. The views of the East River and Queens, and easy access to Central Park is just as convenient, if not more, than areas south. The formal gardens in Central Park, located on 110th and Fifth, are a hidden gem within the park, as well as the less crowded uptown Ice-Skating Rink.


Land use and terrain

Spanish Harlem is dominated by public housing complexes of various types. There is a high concentration of older tenement buildings between these developments. Newly constructed apartment buildings have been constructed on vacant lots in the area. The neighborhood contains the highest geographical concentration of low income public housing projects in the United States. The total land area is 2.2 square miles.


Low income public housing projects

There are twenty-two NYCHA developments located in Spanish Harlem.[15]

  1. 335 East 111th Street; one, 6-story building.
  2. East 120th Street Rehab; one, 6-story rehabilitated tenement building.
  3. East River Houses; ten buildings, 6, 10 and 11-stories tall.
  4. Edward Corsi Houses; one, 16-story building.
  5. Gaylord White Houses; one, 20-story building.
  6. George Washington Carver Houses; 13 buildings, 6 and 15-stories tall.
  7. Governor Dewitt Clinton Houses; six buildings, 9 and 18-stories tall.
  8. Jackie Robinson Houses; one, 8-story building.
  9. James Weldon Johnson; ten, 14-story buildings.
  10. Lexington Houses; four, 14-story buildings.
  11. Metro North Plaza; three buildings, 7, 8, and 11-stories tall.
  12. Metro North Rehab; seventeen, 6-story rehabilitated tenement buildings.
  13. Milbank-Frawley; two rehabilitated tenement buildings 5 and 6-stories tall.
  14. Park Avenue-East 122nd, 123rd Streets; two, 6-story buildings.
  15. President Abraham Lincoln; fourteen buildings, 6 and 14-stories tall.
  16. President George Washington Houses; fourteen buildings, 12 and 14-stories tall.
  17. President Thomas Jefferson Houses; eighteen buildings, 7, 13 and 14-stories tall.
  18. President Woodrow Wilson Houses; three, 20-story buildings.
  19. Senator Robert A. Taft; nine, 19-story buildings.
  20. Senator Robert F. Wagner, Sr.; twenty-two buildings, 7 and 16-stories tall.
  21. U.P.A.C.A. (Upper Park Avenue Community Association) Site 6; one, 12-story building.
  22. U.P.A.C.A.. (Upper Park Avenue Community Association) U.R.A. Site 5; one, 11-story building.

See also

  • East Side (Manhattan)

The East Side of Manhattan refers to the side of Manhattan Island which abuts the East River and faces Brooklyn and Queens. ...

External links

Further reading

  • Thomas, Piri. Down These Mean Streets. Random House (Vintage). 1967
  • Quiñonez, Ernesto. Bodega Dreams. Random House (Vintage). 2000
  • Bourgois, Philippe. In Search of Respect: Selling Crack in El Barrio. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 1995 (2002)
  • Davila, Arlene. Barrio Dreams: Puerto Ricans, Latinos and the Neoliberal City. University of California Press. 2004
  • Cayo-Sexton, Patricia. 1965. Spanish Harlem: An Anatomy of Poverty. New York: Harper and Row.
  • Davila, Arlene. Barrio Dreams: Puerto Ricans, Latinos and the Neoliberal City. University of California Press. 2004.
  • Mencher, Joan. 1989. Growing Up in Eastville, a Barrio of New York. New York: Columbia University Press.
  • Padilla, Elena. 1992. Up From Puerto Rico. New York: Columbia University Press.
  • Salas, Leonardo. "From San Juan to New York: The History of the Puerto Rican". America: History and Life. 31 (1990).
  • Constantine, Consuela. “Political Economy of Puerto Rico, New York.” The Economist. 28 (1992).
  • Grosfoguel, Ramón (2003). Colonial Subjects: Puerto Ricans in a Global Perspective (Berkeley: University of California Press).
  • Heine, Jorge (ed.) (1983). Time for Decision: The United States and Puerto Rico (Lanham, MD: The North-South Publishing Co.).
  • Jennings, James, and Monte Rivera (eds) (1984). Puerto Rican Politics in Urban America (Westport: Greewood Press).
  • Moreno Vega, Marta (2004). When the Spirits Dance Mambo: Growing Up Nuyorican in El Barrio (New York: Three Rivers Press).
  • Zentella, Ana Celia (1997). Growing Up Bilingual: Puerto Rican Children in New York (Blackwell Publishers).

References

  1. ^ Hinds, Michael DeCourcy. "BATTLING TO CONTROL E. 96TH GROWTH", The New York Times, May 13, 1984. Accessed December 5, 2007. "EAST 96TH STREET is not just a dead piece of real estate - it is a socially important corridor, said August Heckscher. With El Barrio to the north and Yorkville to the south, it could be the meeting place of two cultures, a river into which both flow."
  2. ^ Lee, Denny. "NEIGHBORHOOD REPORT: EAST HARLEM; A 'Museo' Moves Away From Its Barrio Identity", The New York Times, July 21, 2002. Accessed December 5, 2007. "The neighborhood north of East 96th Street is sometimes called East Harlem or Spanish Harlem, but local Puerto Ricans affectionately call it El Barrio."
  3. ^ Manhattan Community District 11
  4. ^ Article on the Charlie Palmieri Memorial Piano Scholarship at Boricua.com
  5. ^ "Going to Market: New York City's Neighborhood Grocery Store and Supermarket Shortage
  6. ^ [ibid.]<ref></ref>. Supermarkets in Harlem are 30 percent less common, and that only 3 percent of bodegas in Harlem carry leafy green vegetables as compared to 20 percent on the Upper East Side.<ref>[http://www.nyc.gov/portal/site/nycgov/menuitem.c0935b9a57bb4ef3daf2f1c701c789a0/index.jsp?pageID=mayor_press_release&catID=1194&doc_name=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nyc.gov%2Fhtml%2Fom%2Fhtml%2F2007b%2Fpr467-07.html&cc=unused1978&rc=1194&ndi=1]</li> <li id="cite_note-6">'''[[#cite_ref-6|^]]''' [http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VHT-4JFF050-9/1/454aff0c39b9414160f4d2d1fa4d5441 Kimberly Morland, Ana V. Diez Roux, Steve Wing, Supermarkets, Other Food Stores, and Obesity: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Volume 30, Issue 4, April 2006, Pages 333-339.]</li> <li id="cite_note-7">'''[[#cite_ref-7|^]]''' [http://www.wkkf.org/Default.aspx?tabid=90&CID=383&ItemID=5000437&NID=5010437&LanguageID=0]</li> <li id="cite_note-23rd-8">^ [[#cite_ref-23rd_8-0|<sup>'''''a'''''</sup>]]&#32;[[#cite_ref-23rd_8-1|<sup>'''''b'''''</sup>]] [http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/downloads/pdf/crime_statistics/cs023pct.pdf 23rd Precinct CompStat Report]</li> <li id="cite_note-25th-9">'''[[#cite_ref-25th_9-0|^]]''' [http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/downloads/pdf/crime_statistics/cs025pct.pdf 25th Precinct CompStat Report]</li> <li id="cite_note-10">'''[[#cite_ref-10|^]]''' [http://www.gothamgazette.com/article/fea/20060320/202/1792 NYC Dropout Rates]</li> <li id="cite_note-11">'''[[#cite_ref-11|^]]''' [http://home2.nyc.gov/html/ceo/images/misc/chart_5.jpg Poverty Concentrations in New York City]</li> <li id="cite_note-12">'''[[#cite_ref-12|^]]''' [http://weact.org.dnnmax.com/Programs/SustainableDevelopment/GoGreenEastHarlem/tabid/212/Default.aspx]</li> <li id="cite_note-13">'''[[#cite_ref-13|^]]''' [http://momandpopnyc.blogspot.com/2008/04/east-harlem-supermarket-task-force.html]</li> <li id="cite_note-14">'''[[#cite_ref-14|^]]''' [http://www.nyc.gov/html/nycha/html/home/home.shtml NYCHA]</li></ol></ref>
Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 221 KB) Summary The top floors of the Chrysler building seen from the east on 42nd Street in morning light. ... Community Boards of Manhattan are local government bodies in the New York City borough of Manhattan, which are appointed by the Borough President. ... The Manhattan Community Board 1 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhoods of Tribeca and Lower Manhattan in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 2 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhoods of Greenwich Village, West Village, NoHo, SoHo, Lower East Side, Chinatown, and Little Italy in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 3 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhoods of Tompkins Square, East Village, Lower East Side, Chinatown and Two Bridges, in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 4 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhoods of Clinton and Chelsea in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 5 is a local government unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Midtown in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 6 is a local government unit of the City of New York, encompassing the East Side of Manhattan from 14th to 59th Streets. ... The Manhattan Community Board 7 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Manhattan Valley, Upper West Side, and Lincoln Square in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 8 is a local government unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Upper East Side, LenoxHill, Yorkville, and Roosevelt Island in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 9 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Hamilton Heights, Manhattanville, and Morningside Heights in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 10 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Harlem and Polo Grounds in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 11 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of East Harlem, El Barrio/Spanish Harlem, Wards and Randalls Island in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 12 is a local government unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Inwood and Washington Heights in the borough of Manhattan. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Harlem Heritage Tours || Historical walking and bus tours through Harlem, New York City. Take an informative, ... (532 words)
Considered a stronghold of Latino pride, Spanish Harlem evolved from an immigrant enclave to a multi-cultural treasure trove of sights, sounds, tastes and cultural expressions.
The heartbeat of the Nuyorican soul, Spanish Harlem is the birthplace of many of Latin music's most favored artists, such as Tito Puente, Eddie and Charlie Palmieri, Ray Barretto and the home of others from international composer Rafael Hernandez to the great Machito.
Spanish Harlem; where political candidates since LaGuadia have launched their campaigns from its "lucky corner" on 116th Street.
Spanish Harlem - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (784 words)
Spanish Harlem, also known as El Barrio or East Harlem, is a neighborhood in north-eastern part of the borough of Manhattan and one of the largest predominantly Latino communities in New York City.
Spanish Harlem was one of the hardest hit areas in the 1960s and 1970s as New York City struggled with deficits, race riots, urban flight, drug abuse, crime and poverty.
Spanish Harlem is home to many artists and writers, including James De La Vega, whose murals and street drawings decorate the neighborhood and Piri Thomas whose autobiography "Down These Mean Streets" became a best-seller in 1967.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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