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Encyclopedia > Space opera
Classic pulp space opera cover, with the usual cliché elements.
Classic pulp space opera cover, with the usual cliché elements.

Space opera is a subgenre of speculative fiction or science fiction that emphasizes romantic, often melodramatic adventure, set mainly or entirely in space, generally involving conflict between opponents possessing powerful (and sometimes quite fanciful) technologies and abilities. Perhaps the most significant trait of space opera is that settings, characters, battles, powers, and themes tend to be very large-scale. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Planetstoriesclichecover. ... Image File history File links Planetstoriesclichecover. ... There are a number of things named Space Opera: Space opera is subgenre of science fiction that emphasizes romantic adventure, faster-than-light travel and space battles where the main storyline is interstellar conflict and character drama. ... Speculative fiction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... As a literary genre, romance or chivalric romance refers to a style of heroic prose and verse narrative current in Europe from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. ...

Contents

History of space opera

In 1941, science fiction fan Bob Tucker (who would later become writer Wilson Tucker) coined the term "space opera" (by analogy to "horse opera" and "soap opera") to describe what he characterized as "the hacky, grinding, stinking, outworn space-ship yarn, or world-saving [story] for that matter."[1] "Space opera" is sometimes used in this negative sense, but it can also be used to describe a particular science fiction genre, without any value judgment. Wilson Tucker (born 1914) is an American science fiction writer and fan. ... Horse opera is a term of disparagement or affection for a western movie or TV series. ... The first TIME magazine cover devoted to soap operas, dated January 12, 1976. ...


Space opera in its most familiar form was a product of 1930s-40s pulp magazines. Like early science fiction in general, space opera borrowed extensively from established adventure, crime, and thriller genres. Notable influences included stories that described adventures on exotic or uncivilized frontiers, e.g. the American West, Africa, or the Orient. The imagined future of space opera included immense space liners, intrepid explorers of unknown worlds, pirates of the spaceways, and tough but incorruptible space police. This article is about inexpensive fiction magazines. ... The Western United States, also referred to as the American West or simply The West, traditionally refers to the region constituting the westernmost states of the United States (see geographical terminology section for further discussion of these terms). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Elements of space opera can be found in late Victorian and Edwardian science fiction, for example, in the works of Garrett P. Serviss, George Griffith, and especially in Robert W. Cole's The Struggle for Empire: A Story of the Year 2236.[2] But it was not until the 1920s that the space opera proper appeared in the pulp magazines Weird Tales and Amazing Stories. Unlike earlier stories of space adventure, which either related the invasion of Earth by extraterrestrials, or concentrated on the invention of a space vehicle by a genius inventor, pure space opera simply took space travel for granted (usually by setting the story in the far future), skipped the preliminaries, and launched straight into tales of derring-do among the stars. Garrett Putnam Serviss (1851-1929) was an astronomer, popularizer of astronomy, and early science fiction writer. ... George Griffith (full name George Chetwyn Griffith-Jones; (1857–1906)) was a British science fiction writer and noted explorer who wrote during the turn of the century. ... This page is about the fantasy and horror fiction pulp magazine and its heirs. ... First issue of Amazing Stories, art by Frank R. Paul Amazing Stories magazine, sometimes retitled Amazing Science Fiction, was first published in April 1926 in New York City, thereby becoming the first magazine devoted exclusively to publishing stories in the genre presently known as science fiction (SF). ...


The first stories of this type were J. Schlossel's The Second Swarm (Spring 1928) in Amazing Stories Quarterly and Edmond Hamilton's Crashing Suns (August-September 1928) and The Star Stealers (February 1929) in Weird Tales. Similar stories by other writers followed through 1929 and 1930; by 1931 the space opera was well-established as a dominant sub-genre of science fiction. Edmond Hamilton (November 21, 1904 - February 1, 1977) began writing science fiction with the story The Monster God of Mamurth in 1928. ... This page is about the fantasy and horror fiction pulp magazine and its heirs. ...


The transition from the older space-voyage story to the space opera can be seen in the works of E. E. Smith. His first published work, The Skylark of Space (August-October 1928, Amazing Stories), merges the traditional tale of a scientist inventing a space-drive with planetary romance in the style of Edgar Rice Burroughs; but by the time of the sequel, Skylark Three (August-October 1930, Amazing Stories) which introduces the spacefaring race of the Fenachrone, Smith had moved closer to a space opera mode. This article is about the author. ... The Skylark of Space is one of the earliest novels of interstellar travel. ... First issue of Amazing Stories, art by Frank R. Paul Amazing Stories magazine, sometimes retitled Amazing Science Fiction, was first published in April 1926 in New York City, thereby becoming the first magazine devoted exclusively to publishing stories in the genre presently known as science fiction (SF). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Sword and Planet. ... Edgar Rice Burroughs Edgar Rice Burroughs (September 1, 1875 – March 19, 1950) was an American author, best known for his creation of the jungle hero Tarzan, although he also produced works in many genres. ...


E. E. Smith's later Lensman series and the works of Edmond Hamilton, John W. Campbell, and Jack Williamson in the 1930s and 1940s were popular with readers and much imitated by other writers. By the early 1940s, the repetitiousness and extravagance of some of these stories led to objections from some fans and the coining of the term in its original, pejorative sense. The Lensman series is a serial science fiction space opera by E. E. Smith. ... Edmond Hamilton (November 21, 1904 - February 1, 1977) began writing science fiction with the story The Monster God of Mamurth in 1928. ... The cover of , volume 1, with a picture of Campbell drawn by Frank Kelly Freas John Wood Campbell, Jr. ... John Stewart Williamson (April 29, 1908 – November 10, 2006), who wrote as Jack Williamson (and occasionally under the pseudonym Will Stewart) was a U.S. writer considered by many the Dean of Science Fiction. [1] // Williamson spent his early childhood in western Texas. ...


Eventually, though, a fondness for the best examples of the genre led to a reevaluation of the term and a resurrection of the subgenre's traditions. Writers such as Poul Anderson and Gordon R. Dickson had kept the large-scale space adventure form alive through the 1950s, followed by (to name only a few examples) M. John Harrison and C. J. Cherryh in the 1970s and Iain M. Banks, Lois McMaster Bujold, and Paul J. McAuley in the 1980s. By this time, "space opera" was for many readers no longer a term of insult but a simple description of a particular kind of science fiction adventure story. Poul William Anderson (November 25, 1926–July 31, 2001) was an American science fiction author of the genres Golden Age. ... Gordon Dickson lecturing. ... Michael John Harrison (July 26, 1945, Warwickshire ), is a UK science fiction author, fantasy author and literary fiction author, who writes as M. John Harrison. // Biography and writing career Harrisons first story was published in 1966. ... C. J. Cherryh (born September 1, 1942) is the slightly modified working name of United States science fiction and fantasy author Carolyn Janice Cherry, the sister of artist David A. Cherry. ... Iain Menzies Banks (born on February 16, 1954 in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland) writes mainstream novels as Iain Banks and science fiction as Iain M. Banks. ... Lois McMaster Bujold (November 2, 1949, Columbus, Ohio) is an American author of science fiction and fantasy works. ... Paul McAuley (born April 23, 1955), a British botanist, award-winning author, and self-described science junkie. ...


In the 1970s, a number of mostly British writers began to reinvent space opera. Significant events in this process include the publication of M. John Harrison's The Centauri Device in 1975; a "call to arms" editorial by David Pringle and Colin Greenland in Interzone[3]; and the financial success of Star Wars, which closely follows many traditional space opera conventions. This new space opera, which evolved around the same time cyberpunk emerged and was influenced by it, is darker, moves away from the "triumph of mankind" template of space opera, involves newer technologies, and has stronger characterization than the space opera of old. While it does retain the interstellar scale and scope of traditional space opera, it can also be scientifically rigorous. Among the practitioners of the new space opera are Neal Asher, Iain M. Banks, Stephen Baxter, Simon Green, Peter F. Hamilton, M. John Harrison, Paul J. McAuley, Ken MacLeod, Alastair Reynolds, Charles Stross, Vernor Vinge, Walter Jon Williams, and John C. Wright. Michael John Harrison (July 26, 1945, Warwickshire ), is a UK science fiction author, fantasy author and literary fiction author, who writes as M. John Harrison. // Biography and writing career Harrisons first story was published in 1966. ... Interzone is a British science fiction and fantasy magazine, published since 1982. ... This article is about the series. ... Berlins Sony Center reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ... Neal Asher (born 1961 in Billericay, Essex, England) is an English science fiction writer. ... Iain Menzies Banks (born on February 16, 1954 in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland) writes mainstream novels as Iain Banks and science fiction as Iain M. Banks. ... Stephen Baxter (born in Liverpool, 13 November 1957) is a British hard science fiction author. ... For other uses, see Simon Green (disambiguation). ... Peter F. Hamilton Peter F. Hamilton Peter F. Hamilton (born 1960, Rutland, England), is a British science fiction author. ... Michael John Harrison (July 26, 1945, Warwickshire ), is a UK science fiction author, fantasy author and literary fiction author, who writes as M. John Harrison. // Biography and writing career Harrisons first story was published in 1966. ... Paul McAuley (born April 23, 1955), a British botanist, award-winning author, and self-described science junkie. ... Ken MacLeod (born August 2, 1954), an award-winning Scottish science fiction writer, lives near Edinburgh. ... Alastair Reynolds (born in 1966 in Barry, South Wales) is a Welsh science fiction author. ... Charles David George Charlie Stross (born Leeds, October 18, 1964) is a writer based in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Vernor Steffen Vinge (IPA: ) (born February 10, 1944) is a mathematician, computer scientist and science fiction author who is best known for his Hugo award-winning novels A Fire Upon the Deep and A Deepness in the Sky, as well as for his 1993 essay The Technological Singularity, in which... Walter Jon Williams (born 15 October 1953) is an American writer, primarily of science fiction. ... John Charles Wright (born 1961) is a retired attorney, newspaperman and newspaper editor. ...


A more recent movement of American space opera writers, many writing for the Baen books imprint, developed during the 1990s and 2000s. This new wave of space opera authors include David Drake, Lois McMaster Bujold, Eric Flint, Elizabeth Moon, S.M. Stirling, John Ringo and David Weber. This branch of space opera follows more military themes than the British branch and usually features tales of war on an interstellar scale. Baen Books logo Baen Books is an American publishing company established in 1983 by SF publishing industry long-timer Jim Baen (1943–2006). ... David Drake David Drake (born September 24, 1945) is a successful author of science fiction and fantasy literature. ... Lois McMaster Bujold (November 2, 1949, Columbus, Ohio) is an American author of science fiction and fantasy works. ... Eric Flint (born California, USA, 1947) is an American science fiction and fantasy author and editor. ... At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Elizabeth Moon, born 1945 March 7, is an American science fiction and fantasy author. ... Stephen Michael Stirling is a Canadian-American science fiction and fantasy author. ... // John Ringo is a popular American science fiction and fantasy author who writes full time. ... Honor Harrington from Honor Among Enemies cover, by David Mattingly. ...


Other older, more established writers such as James H. Schmitz and Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle, among others, had produced space opera and were often reprinted by Baen during this same period, as part of an effort by the publisher to reestablish the market for more military-themed space opera. James Henry Schmitz (October 15, 1911 - 1981) was an American writer born in Germany of American parents. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Jerry Eugene Pournelle, Ph. ...


Random House's Del Rey division, which had never totally gone out of the space opera business, also increased their output of space opera books during the 1990s and 2000s, including their own versions of military space opera. Stories such as David Sherman and Dan Cragg's StarFist series became increasingly common. // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ... Del Rey Books is a branch of Ballantine Books, which is owned by Random House. ... David Sherman David Sherman is an American novelist who deals overwhelmingly with military themes at the small-unit tactical level. ... Dan Cragg Dan Cragg (born September 6, 1939, in Rochester, NY) is an American soldier, essayist, and science-fiction author. ... StarFist is a series of military science-fiction novels set in the 25th century and written from the viewpoint of the men and women of the Confederation of Marine Corps 34th FIST (Fleet Initial Strike Team) and later in the spin-off series Starfist: Force Recon. ...


Definitions by contrast

Space opera and planetary romance

Some critics distinguish between space opera and planetary romance.[4] Where space opera grows out of both the Western and sea adventure traditions, the planetary romance grows out of the lost world or lost civilization tradition. Both feature adventures in exotic settings, but space opera emphasizes space travel, while planetary romances focus on alien worlds. In this view, the Martian-, Venusian-, and lunar-setting stories of Edgar Rice Burroughs would be planetary romances (and among the earliest), as would be Leigh Brackett's Burroughs-influenced Eric John Stark stories. Other writers who have produced planetary romances include Jack Vance (the Tschai tetralogy and Durdane trilogy), Philip José Farmer (The Green Odyssey), Robert Silverberg (the Majipoor series), and Frank Herbert (the first three Dune novels). It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Sword and Planet. ... Edgar Rice Burroughs Edgar Rice Burroughs (September 1, 1875 – March 19, 1950) was an American author, best known for his creation of the jungle hero Tarzan, although he also produced works in many genres. ... Leigh Brackett (December 7, 1915, in Los Angeles, California – March 18, 1978) was a writer of science fiction, mystery novels and — best known to the general public — Hollywood screenplays, most notably The Big Sleep (1945), Rio Bravo (1959), The Long Goodbye (1973) and The Empire Strikes Back (1980). ... Erik John Stark is a fictional character created by science fiction author Leigh Brackett. ... John Holbrook Vance (born August 28, 1916 in San Francisco, California) is generally described as an American fantasy and science fiction author, though Vance himself has reportedly objected to such labels. ... The Durdane series are a trilogy of science fiction books written by Jack Vance between 1971 and 1973, and detail the political and social adventures of Gastel Etzwane on the world Durdane. ... Philip José Farmer (born January 26, 1918) is an American author, principally known for his science fiction and fantasy novels and short stories. ... The Green Odyssey is an American science fiction novel written by Philip José Farmer. ... At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Robert Silverberg (January 15, 1935, Brooklyn, New York) is a prolific American author best known for writing science fiction, a multiple winner of both the Hugo and Nebula Awards. ... The Majipoor series is a series of novels and stories by Robert Silverberg, set on the planet Majipoor. ... Frank Patrick Herbert (October 8, 1920 – February 11, 1986) was a critically acclaimed and commercially successful American science fiction author. ... Dune is a science fiction novel written by Frank Herbert and published in 1965. ...


Space opera and hard science fiction

Space opera can also be contrasted with "hard science fiction", in which the emphasis is on the effects of technological progress and inventions, and where the settings are carefully worked out to obey the laws of physics, cosmology, mathematics, and biology. There is, however (according to some), no sharp division between hard science fiction and true space opera. Many of Robert A. Heinlein's young adult novels, such as Starship Troopers, are seen by his fans to qualify as both. Hard science fiction is a category of science fiction characterized by an emphasis on scientific or technical detail, or on scientific accuracy, or on both. ... Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... For other uses, see Starship Troopers (disambiguation). ...


Space opera and military science fiction

One subset of space opera overlaps with military science fiction, concentrating on large-scale space battles with futuristic weapons (example: Honor Harrington series by David Weber). In such stories, the military tone and weapon system technology may be taken very seriously. At one extreme, the genre is used to speculate about future wars involving space travel, or the effects of such a war on humans; at the other it consists of the use of military fiction plots with some superficial science fiction trappings. Starship Troopers by Robert A. Heinlein is a well-known example of military science fiction. ... Honor Stephanie Harrington is a fictional character, the eponymous heroine of a series of science fiction books set in the Honorverse, written by David Weber and published by Baen Books. ... Honor Harrington from Honor Among Enemies cover, by David Mattingly. ...


Parodies

Fredric Brown's What Mad Universe has as its protagonist a sober-headed science fiction magazine editor who suddenly finds himself transported to an alternate history timeline where all the Space opera clichés (a larger-than-life space hero fighting evil aliens who are totally bent on humanity's destruction, etc.) are concrete, daily life realities. Image File history File links Billthegalacticherocover. ... Image File history File links Billthegalacticherocover. ... Fredric Brown (October 29, 1906, Cincinnati – March 11, 1972) was a science fiction and mystery writer. ... What Mad Universe is a science-fiction novel, written in 1949 by the American author, Fredric Brown. ... Alternative history or alternate history can be: A History told from an alternative viewpoint, rather than from the view of imperialist, conqueror, or explorer. ...


Harry Harrison's Bill, the Galactic Hero and Star Smashers of the Galaxy Rangers, and Douglas Adams's The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy parody the conventions of classic space opera. The 1987 film Spaceballs, directed and co-written by Mel Brooks, is a Star Wars parody with many space opera characteristics. The American animated television series Futurama, created by Matt Groening, plays with the space opera genre from time to time, for example in the over-the-top military officer Zapp Brannigan. Stephen Colbert, in his character as host of the Colbert Report, is the author of a so-called "un-published and shopping it around to publishers" epic novel called Alpha Squad 7: Lady Nocturne: A Tek Jansen Adventure. He occasionally reads excerpts from the novel, and later aired several animated shorts based on them, and it then was spun off to a comic book series by Oni Press. At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Harry Harrison (born Henry Maxwell Dempsey, March 12, 1925 in Stamford, Connecticut) is an American science fiction author who has lived in many parts of the world including Mexico, England, Denmark and Italy. ... Bill, the Galactic Hero is a satirical science fiction novel by Harry Harrison, first published in 1965. ... Star Smashers of the Galaxy Rangers (1973) is a comic science fiction novel by Harry Harrison. ... Douglas Noël Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English author, comic radio dramatist, and musician. ... The cover of the first novel in the Hitchhikers series, from a late 1990s printing. ... Bold text Spaceballs is a 1987 science fiction parody film co-written, directed by, and starring Mel Brooks. ... Mel Brooks (born June 28, 1926) is an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, comedian, actor and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies. ... This article is about the series. ... This article is about the television series. ... Matthew Abram Groening is an American cartoonist (Life in Hell) and the Emmy Award-winning creator of the animated series, The Simpsons and Futurama. ... Major General Webelo Zapp Brannigan is a fictional character in the television series Futurama. ... This article is about Stephen Colbert, the actor. ... Stephen Colbert, star of The Colbert Report The Colbert Report (, or possibly Colbert Réport) is a television program announced by Comedy Central that will star Stephen Colbert, currently best-known as a correspondent for The Daily Show. ... Tek Jansen, as seen in the animated series. ... Oni Press (founded 1997) is an independent comic book publisher based in Portland, Oregon. ...


In the comic strip world, the adventures of Spaceman Spiff, the alter ego of Calvin, eponymous hero of Calvin and Hobbes, parodied many space opera conventions. This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... Alter Ego has multiple meanings: Alter Ego is a game for the Commodore 64 computer. ... Calvin in a yelling mood. ... Listen to this article (3 parts) (info) Part 1ʉۢ Part 2ʉۢ Part 3 This audio file was created from an article revision dated 2006-01-29, and may not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ...


The Buzz Lightyear character in the 1995 film Toy Story is a parody of a typical space opera hero. Buzz Lightyear (created May 26, 1995) is a fictional character that first appeared in the full-length CGI animated film Toy Story, and its sequel Toy Story 2. ... Toy Story is an Academy-award-winning CGI animated feature film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures and Buena Vista Distribution in the United States on November 22, 1995, and Australia on December 7, 1995, as well as in the United Kingdom on 22 March...


Examples

In all media below are listed the best-known examples of space opera. Where a * is noted there are multiple types of media for a franchise. Such examples of multimedia franchises include Star Trek or Star Wars, both of which include films, television series, novels, and comics. All other examples of space opera can be found under category:space operas. This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... This article is about the series. ...


Literature

Novels & Series
Anthologies & Collections
Short Fiction
  • "Buck Rogers" series by Anthony Rogers, USA *
  • "The Swordsman of Varnis" by Clive Jackson (1950), USA; a story important to the redefinition of the term Space Opera in the 1950s
  • "The Prince of Space" (1931) by Jack Williamson, USA
  • "The Mountains of Mourning" by Lois McMaster Bujold, USA

Crest of the Stars (Japanese: 星界の紋章 Seikai no Monshō) is a trilogy of space opera (some parts could classify as military science fiction/military space opera) science fiction novels written by Morioka Hiroyuki. ... Banner of the Stars ) (literally Battle Flag of the Stars) is a series of anime based on novels written by Morioka Hiroyuki which serve as sequels to Crest of the Stars. ... Hiroyuki Morioka ) (born March 2, 1962, Hyōgo Prefecture, Japan) is a Japanese sci-fi novelist. ... The Culture is a fictional anarchic, socialistic and utopian society created by the Scottish writer Iain Banks and described by him in several of his novels and shorter fictions. ... Iain Menzies Banks (born on February 16, 1954 in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland) writes mainstream novels as Iain Banks and science fiction as Iain M. Banks. ... The fictional Dune universe, or Duniverse, is the political, scientific, and social setting of author Frank Herberts six-book Dune series of science fantasy novels. ... Frank Patrick Herbert (October 8, 1920 – February 11, 1986) was a critically acclaimed and commercially successful American science fiction author. ... Brian Patrick Herbert (born 1947) is a best selling American author who lives in Washington state. ... Kevin J. Anderson is a prolific science fiction author. ... Known Space is the fictional setting of several science fiction novels and short stories written by author Larry Niven. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Ender Series is a series of science fiction books by Orson Scott Card, started with the Enders Game short story, later expanded into a novel with the same title. ... Orson Scott Card (born August 24, 1951)[1] is a bestselling American author, as well as being a critic, political writer, and speaker. ... Hari Seldons holographic image, pictured on a paperback edition of Foundation, appears at various times in the First Foundations history, to guide it through the social and economic crises that befall it. ... Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920?[1] – April 6, 1992), pronounced , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов [1], was a Russian-born American author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful writer, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ... Hyperion The Hyperion Cantos form a tetralogy of science fiction novels by Dan Simmons. ... Ilium/Olympos is a science fiction duology by Dan Simmons. ... Dan Simmons (born April 4, 1948 in Peoria, Illinois) is an American author most widely known for his Hugo Award-winning science fiction novel Hyperion and its sequel The Fall of Hyperion. ... Legend of the Galactic Heroes ) is a series of science fiction novels by Yoshiki Tanaka. ... Dr. Yoshiki Tanaka (田中 芳樹 Tanaka Yoshiki, born October 22, 1952) is a famous novelist in Japan. ... The Revelation Space universe is a fictional universe which was created by Alastair Reynolds and used as the setting for a number of his novels and stories. ... Alastair Reynolds (born in 1966 in Barry, South Wales) is a Welsh science fiction author. ... The Saga of Seven Suns is a series of science fiction novels written by Kevin J. Anderson as of November 2006. ... |200px| ]] Pseudonym: Gabriel Mesta Born: March 27, 1962 ) Oregon, Wisconsin, U.S. Occupation: Author Genres: Science fiction Debut works: Resurrection, Inc Influences: The War of the Worlds Kevin J. Anderson (born March 27, 1962) is a prolific American science fiction author. ... The Skolian Empire, or Skolian Imperiliate, is one of the major empires in the science fiction novel series by Catherine Asaro. ... Photo by Hugh Talman Catherine Asaro (born 1955) is an American science fiction and fantasy author. ... The Uplift Universe is a fictional universe created by science fiction writer David Brin. ... Glen David Brin, Ph. ... The Vorkosigan Saga is a series of science fiction novels and short stories by Lois McMaster Bujold, most of which concern Miles Vorkosigan, a disabled aristocrat from the planet Barrayar who heads his own private mercenary fleet at the age of just seventeen. ... Lois McMaster Bujold (November 2, 1949, Columbus, Ohio) is an American author of science fiction and fantasy works. ... British author Peter F. Hamiltons The Nights Dawn Trilogy consists of three epic science fiction novels: The Reality Dysfunction (1996), The Neutronium Alchemist (1997), and The Naked God (1999). ... The Commonwealth Saga is a series of science fiction novels by British science fiction writer Peter F. Hamilton. ... The Void Trilogy is a science fiction series by British SF writer Peter F. Hamilton. ... Peter F. Hamilton Peter F. Hamilton Peter F. Hamilton (born 1960, Rutland, England), is a British science fiction author. ... Brian Aldiss at 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Brian Wilson Aldiss (OBE) (born August 18, 1925 in East Dereham, Norfolk) is a prolific English author of both general fiction and science fiction. ... Leigh Brackett (December 7, 1915, in Los Angeles, California – March 18, 1978) was a writer of science fiction, mystery novels and — best known to the general public — Hollywood screenplays, most notably The Big Sleep (1945), Rio Bravo (1959), The Long Goodbye (1973) and The Empire Strikes Back (1980). ... Edmond Hamilton (November 21, 1904 - February 1, 1977) began writing science fiction with the story The Monster God of Mamurth in 1928. ... The Kzin (plural Kzinti) are a fictional, very warlike and bloodthirsty race of felinoid aliens in Larry Nivens Known Space series. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Colin Greenland (b. ... The Space Opera Renaissance is an anthology of short science fiction that fits the definition of space opera: adventure stories of grand vision, where the majority of the action happens somewhere other than Earth. ... David Geddes Hartwell is an editor of science fiction and fantasy. ... Kathryn Elizabeth Cramer (April 16, 1962) is a science fiction author, editor, and literary critic. ... The New Space Opera (2007, ISBN 978-0060846756) is a science fiction anthology edited by Gardner Dozois and Jonathan Strahan. ... Gardner Dozois (born July 23, 1947) is an American science fiction author and editor. ... Jonathan Strahan (1964 in Belfast - ) is an editor and publisher of science fiction. ... Buck Rogers is a fictional pulp character who first appeared in 1928 as Anthony Rogers, the hero of two novellas by Philip Francis Nowlan published in the magazine Amazing Stories. ... John Stewart Williamson (April 29, 1908 – November 10, 2006), who wrote as Jack Williamson (and occasionally under the pseudonym Will Stewart) was a U.S. writer considered by many the Dean of Science Fiction. [1] // Williamson spent his early childhood in western Texas. ... Lois McMaster Bujold (November 2, 1949, Columbus, Ohio) is an American author of science fiction and fantasy works. ...

Film

An activated Stargate, the central object of the fictional Stargate universe, here depicted in the SG-1 television series. ... Roland Emmerich on the set of Independence Day Roland Emmerich (born November 10, 1955) is a German film director, writer, and producer. ... This article is about the series. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... The Chronicles of Riddick is a science fiction series, spanning three films and two video games. ... David Neil Twohy (18 October 1955—) is an American movie director and screenwriter. ... Serenity is a 2005 science fiction space western/epic film written and directed by Joss Whedon. ... Joss Hill Whedon (born Joseph Hill Whedon[3] on June 23, 1964 in New York) is an Academy Award-nominated American writer, director, executive producer, and creator of the well-known television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, and Firefly. ... This article is about the 1997 film. ... Luc Besson (IPA: ) (born March 18, 1959) is a French film director, writer and producer. ...

Television

Gene Roddenberrys Andromeda is an American science fiction television series, based on unused material by Gene Roddenberry developed by Robert Hewitt Wolfe, and produced posthumously by his widow, Majel Roddenberry. ... Eugene Wesley Gene Roddenberry, (August 19, 1921 – October 24, 1991) was an American screenwriter and producer. ... Robert Hewitt Wolfe is an American television producer and scriptwriter. ... Babylon 5 is an epic American science fiction television series created, produced, and largely written by J. Michael Straczynski. ... Joseph Michael Straczynski (born July 17, 1954) is an award-winning American writer/producer of television series, novels, short stories, comic books, and radio dramas. ... This article is about the original television series; for other versions, see the main Battlestar Galactica page or Battlestar Galactica (disambiguation). ... Glen A. Larson (born 1937) is a television writer and producer. ... This article is about the 2004 television series. ... For other persons named Ronald Moore, see Ronald Moore (disambiguation). ... Blakes 7 is a British science fiction television series made by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) for their BBC 1 channel. ... Terry Nation (August 8, 1930 – March 9, 1997) was a British television screenwriter and is probably best known for creating the villainous Daleks for the long-running science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Farscape (1999–2003) is a science fiction television series, featuring a present-day astronaut who accidentally travels through a wormhole to a distant part of the galaxy. ... Rockne S. OBannon (born January 12, 1955) is a television producer and writer. ... Firefly is a science fiction television series, which was first aired in the United States and Canada on September 20, 2002. ... Joss Hill Whedon (born Joseph Hill Whedon[3] on June 23, 1964 in New York) is an Academy Award-nominated American writer, director, executive producer, and creator of the well-known television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, and Firefly. ... This article is about the anime series. ... Yoshiyuki Tomino , born November 5, 1941) is a Japanese anime creator, director, screenwriter and novelist. ... Sunrise logo Founded in 1972, Sunrise Inc. ... Legend of the Galactic Heroes ) is a series of science fiction novels by Yoshiki Tanaka. ... Dr. Yoshiki Tanaka (田中 芳樹 Tanaka Yoshiki, born October 22, 1952) is a famous novelist in Japan. ... The Super Dimension Fortress Macross (Japanese: 超時空要塞マクロス, Chou Jikuu Yousai Macross) is an anime television series. ... Shoji Kawamori , born February 2, 1960), is a renowned Japanese anime creator and designer, having created or co-created such notable series as The Vision of Escaflowne, Earth Girl Arjuna, Genesis of Aquarion, and nearly every chapter of the Macross series. ... Robotech science fiction and anime universe. ... Carl Macek is an American writer and anime producer of the 1980s and 1990s. ... Harmony Gold is a television production and distribution company established in 1983. ... Space: Above and Beyond was a short-lived 1990s American science fiction television show, created and written by Glen Morgan and James Wong. ... Glen Morgan is an American television producer, writer and director, best known for his work on The X-Files, Millennium, Space: Above and Beyond, Willard (2003 film), and The One (film) He is often credited along with long-time writing partner, James Wong. ... James Wong may refer to: James Wong Jim - a Hong Kong Cantopop lyricist and writer. ... Starblazers redirects here. ... Leiji Matsumoto (松本 零士 Matsumoto Reiji) is a well-known creator of several anime and manga series. ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ... Eugene Wesley Gene Roddenberry, (August 19, 1921 – October 24, 1991) was an American screenwriter and producer. ... Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagann , lit. ... Hiroyuki Imaishi (b. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

Comics

Barbarellas comic book cover. ... Jean-Claude Forest, born September 11, 1930 in Le Perreux-sur-Marne and died December 30, 1998 in Paris was a French author of comics. ... If you are looking for the variant on the mohawk hairstyle, please go here: deathhawk. ... Star Rangers #1, cover art by Dave Dorman Star Rangers was a four-issue American comic book series created and written by Mark Ellis and penciled by artist Jim Mooney. ... Mark Ellis is an American novelist who resides in Newport, Rhode Island with his wife of 27 years, Melissa Martin. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For other uses, see Flash Gordon (disambiguation). ... Alex Raymond (October 2, 1909- September 6, 1956) was an American comic strip artist, best known for his work on Flash Gordon. ... Adam Strange is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... The cover of Brave and the Bold #28, 1960, featuring the first appearance of the Justice League and art by Mike Sekowsky. ... Alexandro Jodorowsky, born on February 7, 1929. ...

Stage

Starstruck was originally an off-Broadway stage play written by Elaine Lee, Norfleet Lee and Dale Place. ... Elaine Lee is an American actor, playwright, comic book colorist and comic book writer. ...

Pen & Paper or Board Games

BattleTech is a wargaming and science fiction franchise, launched by FASA Corporation and currently owned by WizKids. ... Jordan Weisman is an American game designer and serial entrepreneur who has founded four major game design companies, each in a different game genre and segment of the industry. ... Fading Suns is a science fiction space opera role-playing game published by Holistic Design. ... Bill Bridges is a RPG developer and author. ... Andrew Greenberg is a game designer of both pen-and-paper role-playing games and computer games. ... Star*Drive is a science fiction campaign setting that was published in 1998 by TSR, Inc. ... Richard Baker is the name of several well-known people, including: Richard Baker (chronicler) (1568–1645), English chronicler Richard Baker (broadcaster) (born 1925), BBC broadcaster Richard Baker (composer/conductor) (born 1972), British composer and conductor Richard Baker (politician) (b. ... Traveller is a series of related science fiction role-playing games, first published in 1977 by Game Designers Workshop. ... Marc W. Miller (born 1947) is an American game designer. ... Warhammer 40,000 (informally known as Warhammer 40K, WH40K, W40K or just 40K) is a science fantasy game produced by Games Workshop. ... Rick Priestly is a game designer for Games Workshop. ...

Computer/Video Games

Elite is a seminal space trading computer game, originally published by Acornsoft in 1984 for the BBC Micro and Acorn Electron computers. ... David Braben is a computer programmer, known for writing the Elite series of hugely popular computer games of space exploration and space trade and also for making Zarch for the Acorn Archimedes (considered to be the first true solid 3D game of all time). ... Ian Bell can refer to: Ian Bell, computer programmer and co-writer of the game Elite Ian Bell, English cricketer. ... For other senses of this term, see escape velocity (disambiguation). ... Ambrosia Software is a predominantly Macintosh software company located in Rochester, New York. ... EVE Online is a persistent world multiplayer online game set in space. ... Photo of CCP at work CCP (Crowd Control Productions) is known for the MMORPG game EVE_Online. ... Freelancer is a space simulation computer game developed by Digital Anvil and published by Microsoft. ... Digital Anvil was a computer game company. ... Volition, Inc. ... GalCiv for OS/2 Galactic Civilizations is a turn-based strategy computer game developed by Stardock and released in March, 2003 for Windows—an earlier version was released for OS/2 in 1994. ... Stardock Corporation is a software development company founded in 1991 and incorporated in 1993 as Stardock Systems, later known as Stardock. ... Halos protagonist, the Master Chief, in Halo: Combat Evolved. ... Bungie is an American video game developer founded in May 1991 under the name Bungie Software Products Corporation (more popularly shortened to Bungie Software) by two undergraduate students at the University of Chicago, Alex Seropian and Jason Jones. ... This article is about the computer game named Homeworld. ... Relic Entertainment is a game development company that specializes in 3D real-time strategy games and has released a number of innovative PC games. ... This article is about the video game. ... BioWare Corp. ... Master of Orion (MOO or MoO) is a turn-based science fiction computer strategy game designed by by Steve Barcia, developed by Barcias company Simtex and published by Microprose in 1993. ... Simtex was a video game developer established by Steve Barcia in 1988. ... Nexus: The Jupiter incident is a science fiction themed computer game developed by the Hungarian based Mithis Entertainment. ... Mithis Entertainment is a Hungarian video game developer. ... Rogue Galaxy ) is a science fiction console role-playing game developed by Level-5 and published by Sony Computer Entertainment for the PlayStation 2. ... Level 5 is a third-party video game developer based in Chuo-ku, Fukuoka, and founded in October 1998. ... The Star Control series is a trilogy of computer games with a cult following. ... Toys For Bob is a small video game developer founded in 1989 by Paul Reiche III and Fred Ford. ... “Starcraft” redirects here. ... Blizzard Entertainment, a division of Vivendi Games, is an American computer game developer and publisher headquartered in Irvine, California. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... SQUARE ENIX (Japanese: スクウェア・エニックス) is a Japanese producer of popular video games and manga. ... Wing Commander I title screen Wing Commander is a media franchise consisting of space combat simulation computer games from Origin Systems, Inc. ... Origin Systems, Inc. ... Ingame shot of X3: Reunion, the latest X game X is a science fiction space simulator series created by German Developer Egosoft. ... Egosoft is a game company based in Würselen, Germany. ... It has been suggested that List of Xenosaga cast members be merged into this article or section. ... Monolith Soft or MLSI is an entertainment company (not to be confused with Monolith Productions) in Japan, specializing in creating video games for various consoles like the PlayStation 2, Nintendo GameCube, Nintendo DS and cellphones. ...

Online Projects

A constructed world or conworld is a fictional world, often created for a novel, video game, or role-playing game, but sometimes for its own sake. ... Orions Arm (or OA for short) is an online science fiction world-building project, founded by M. Alan Kazlev. ...

See also

Overlapping genres

Hard science fiction is a category of science fiction characterized by an emphasis on scientific or technical detail, or on scientific accuracy, or on both. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Sword and Planet. ... Soft science fiction, or soft SF, like its complementary opposite hard science fiction, is a descriptive term that points to the role and nature of the science content in a science fiction story. ... Space Opera Noir is one of the new schools of the more classic Space Opera subgenre of speculative fiction or science fiction that evolved during the early 21st century. ... Space Western is a subgenre of science fiction, primarily grounded in film and television, that transposes themes of American Western books and film to a backdrop of futuristic space frontiers; it is the complement of the science fiction Western, which transposes science fiction themes onto an American Western setting. ... Starship Troopers by Robert A. Heinlein is a well-known example of military science fiction. ... The New Weird is an avant-garde literary movement or literary genre that may or may not be presently in progress. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ...

Editors and publishers

James Patrick Jim Baen (b. ... Judy Lynn and Lester Del Rey at Minicon 8 in 1974 Judy-Lynn del Rey née Benjamin (January 26, 1943–February 20, 1986) was a science fiction editor. ... Lester del Rey (Ramon Felipe Alvarez-del Rey) (June 2, 1915 - May 10, 1993) was an American science fiction author and editor. ...

Themes and ideas

Science fiction has depicted transhumanism in various forms for many years. ... The exploration of politics in science fiction is arguably older than the identification of the genre. ... Overview of religious themes in science fiction Science fiction (SF) works often present explanations, commentary or use religious themes to convey a broader message. ... Hubbard said that the galactic ruler Xenu transported his victims to Earth in interstellar space planes which looked exactly like Douglas DC-8s. ... A broadcast of the long-running and popular British science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... There is a small (but growing) number of operas with subject-matter that fits in or near the science fiction genre. ...

References

  1. ^ Tucker, Wilson (January 1941). "Suggestion Dept". Le Zombie 4 (1 (36)): 9. 
  2. ^ See E. F. Bleiler, Science Fiction, the Early Years, Kent State University Press, 1990, pp. 147-48.
  3. ^ See Paul J. McAuley, "Junkyard Universes," Locus, August 2003
  4. ^ SF Citations for OED, "Planetary romance"

Wilson Tucker (born 1914) is an American science fiction writer and fan. ...

Articles

David Langford David Langford (born April 10, 1953, in Newport, Monmouthshire) is a British science fiction author and critic. ... David Geddes Hartwell is an editor of science fiction and fantasy. ... Kathryn Elizabeth Cramer (April 16, 1962) is a science fiction author, editor, and literary critic. ... John [Frederick] Clute is a Canadian born author and critic who lives in Britain. ... Peter Nicholls may refer to: Peter Nicholls (writer) - critic and co-editor of The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction Peter Nicholls (musician) - lead singer with the bands IQ and Niadems Ghost, also an album cover artist Different spelling Peter Nichols - author of A Day in the Death of Joe Egg... Farah Mendlesohn is a British academic and writer on science fiction. ... The headquarters of the Cambridge University Press, in Trumpington Street, Cambridge. ...

External links

Atom Squad was a live science-fictional 15-minute TV series broadcast by the NBC network, July 6, 1953 to January 22, 1954, Monday-Friday, 5:00 to 5:15 PM EST. The Atom Squad was a secret government agency which dealt with Cold War threats to US security involving... Buck Rogers is a fictional pulp character who first appeared in 1928 as Anthony Rogers, the hero of two novellas by Philip Francis Nowlan published in the magazine Amazing Stories. ... The Video Ranger and Captain Video in space suits at the controls of the X-9 Captain Video and His Video Rangers was an American science fiction television series. ... Captain Z-Ro (pronounced Zero, not to be confused with the rapper of the same name) was a childrens television show that ran in one form or another from 1951 to 1955. ... Steve Holland as Flash Gordon Flash Gordon is a television show based on the characters of the Alex Raymond comic strip (of the same name), but featured its own storyline. ... Secretary Drake briefs Rocky on his next mission in Escape into Space Rocky Jones, Space Ranger was a syndicated science fiction television serial originally broadcast in 1954. ... Rod Brown of the Rocket Rangers was a 30-minute, weekly CBS-TV network outer space adventure series, broadcast live Saturdays from April 18, 1953 to May 29, 1954. ... Space Patrol was a science fiction adventure, aimed at juvenile audiences of the early 1950s via television, radio, and comic books. ... Tom Corbett is the main character in a series of Tom Corbett — Space Cadet stories that were depicted in television, radio, books, comic books, comic strips, coloring books, punch-out books and View-Master reels in the 1950s. ... Buck Rogers is a fictional pulp character who first appeared in 1928 as Anthony Rogers, the hero of two novellas by Philip Francis Nowlan published in the magazine Amazing Stories. ... Buck Rogers (1939) is a Universal movie serial based on the Buck Rogers comic strip. ... For other uses, see Flash Gordon (disambiguation). ... Flash Gordon is a 1936 film serial which tells the story of three people from Earth who travel to the planet Mongo to fight the evil Emperor Ming the Merciless. ... Flash Gordons Trip to Mars is a 1938 film serial of 15 episodes, based on the comic strip Flash Gordon. ... Flash Gordon Conquers the Universe is a 1940 twelve episode serial film about Flash Gordon. ... Commando Cody in RADAR MEN FROM THE MOON! Commando Cody was the hero in a 12-episode science-fiction serial made in 1952 by Republic Pictures entitled Radar Men from the Moon, and a followup 1953 set of 12 short-subjects (or 12 cliffhangerless serial chapters) collectively called the adventures... Radar Men from the Moon (Republic Studios, 1952) was the first Commando Cody serial, in 12 chapters, starring newcomer George Wallace (1917-2005) as Cody and Aline Towne as his sidekick Joan Gilbert, with serial veteran Roy Barcroft as the evil Retik, the Ruler of the Moon. ... The Purple Monster Strikes (1945) is a Republic Movie serial. ... Brick Bradford (1947) is a Columbia movie serial based on the comic strip Brick Bradford. ... King of the Rocket Men is a 1949 Republic Movie serial, in 12 chapters, important for introducing the Rocketman Character who reappeared under a variety of names in later serials Radar Men from the Moon, Zombies of the Stratosphere and the semi-serial Commando Cody: Sky Marshal of the Universe. ... Flying Disc Man from Mars (1950) is a Republic Movie serial. ... Zombies of the Stratosphere (Republic Studios, 1952) was intended as the second serial featuring new hero Commando Cody and the third 12-chapter serial featuring the rocket-powered flying suit introduced in King of the Rocketmen (1949). ... The Lost Planet is a 1953 Columbia Pictures 15-chapter serial which has the distinction of being the last interplanetary-themed sound serial ever made. ... Buck Rogers is a fictional pulp character who first appeared in 1928 as Anthony Rogers, the hero of two novellas by Philip Francis Nowlan published in the magazine Amazing Stories. ... Dan Dare is a classic British science fiction comic hero, created by illustrator Frank Hampson for the Eagle comic story Dan Dare, Pilot of the Future in 1950 which was also carried in serial format several times a week on Radio Luxembourg. ... For other uses, see Flash Gordon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Flash Gordon (disambiguation). ... Space Patrol was a science fiction adventure, aimed at juvenile audiences of the early 1950s via television, radio, and comic books. ... Tom Corbett is the main character in a series of Tom Corbett — Space Cadet stories that were depicted in television, radio, books, comic books, comic strips, coloring books, punch-out books and View-Master reels in the 1950s. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Sword and Planet. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Article: Interstellar Conflict Across Time, by Derryl Murphy (7141 words)
Space opera is still about confronting the "mysterious vastness" (3) that Joe Sanders refers to, although even the idea of what constitutes something vast or immense enough to astonish the star-spanning denizens of the far future has changed over the years.
Sanders narrows the definition of space opera somewhat, allowing that it "may be defined as the subgenre [sic] of sf stories whose action is centered on characters who find a way to express their effective relationship with immensity" (3).
Space opera can also present itself as this sort of observation, in the cases of the three books examined here their relation to how those in control of our society create the proper justification for either war or a war-like stance.
space: Definition, Synonyms and Much More from Answers.com (2651 words)
Currently, the standard space interval, called a standard meter or simply meter, is defined as the distance traveled by light in a vacuum during a time interval of 1/299792458 of a second (exact).
The way in which space is perceived is an area which psychologists first began to study in the middle of the 19th century, and it is now thought by those concerned with such studies to be a distinct branch within psychology.
A contrasting view is that space is part of a fundamental abstract mathematical conceptual framework (together with time and number) within which we compare and quantify the distance between objects, their sizes, their shapes, and their speeds.
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