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Encyclopedia > Soylent Green
Soylent Green

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Richard Fleischer
Produced by Walter Seltzer
Russel Thacher
Written by Harry Harrison (novel)
Stanley R. Greenberg (screenplay)
Starring Charlton Heston
Leigh Taylor-Young
Edward G. Robinson
Distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release date(s) May 9, 1973
Running time 97 min
Language English
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

Soylent Green is a 1973 dystopian science fiction movie depicting a bleak future in which overpopulation, global warming, and the resulting severe damage to the environment have led to widespread unemployment and poverty. Real fruit, vegetables, and meat are rare, expensive commodities, and much of the population survives on processed food rations, including "soylent green" wafers. For the 1973 movie, see Soylent Green. ... Soilent Grün was a German punk band established in 1979 and disbanded in 1982, named after the film Soylent Green. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Richard Fleischer (born December 8, 1916) is an American film director. ... Walter Seltzer is a film producer who was born in 1914. ... At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Harry Harrison (born Henry Maxwell Dempsey, March 12, 1925 in Stamford, Connecticut) is an American science fiction author who has lived in many parts of the world including Mexico, England, Denmark and Italy. ... Charlton Heston (born October 4, 1924) is an US-american film actor, known for playing larger-than-life heroic roles such as Moses in The Ten Commandments, Colonel George Taylor in Planet of the Apes, and Judah Ben-Hur in Ben-Hur. ... Leigh Taylor-Young as Shirl in Soylent Green , 1973. ... Edward Goldenberg Robinson (born Emanuel Goldenberg, Yiddish: עמנואל גולדנברג; December 12, 1893 – January 26, 1973) was an American stage and film actor of Romanian origin. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article is about the philosophical concept and literary form. ... Poster for The Day the Earth Stood Still, an archetypal science fiction film. ... Map of countries by population density (See List of countries by population density. ... Global warming refers to the increase in the average temperature of the Earths near-surface air and oceans in recent decades and its projected continuation. ...


The film overlays the genres of science fiction and the police procedural as it depicts the efforts of New York City police detective Robert Thorn (Charlton Heston) and elderly police researcher Sol Roth (Edward G. Robinson) to investigate the brutal murder of a wealthy businessman named William R. Simonson (Joseph Cotten). Thorn and Roth uncover clues which suggest that it is more than simply a bungled burglary. The police procedural is a sub-genre of the mystery story which attempts to accurately depict the activities of a police force as they investigate crimes. ... The New York City Police Department (NYPD) , the largest police department in the United States, has primary responsibility for law enforcement and investigation within the five boroughs of New York City. ... Charlton Heston (born October 4, 1924) is an US-american film actor, known for playing larger-than-life heroic roles such as Moses in The Ten Commandments, Colonel George Taylor in Planet of the Apes, and Judah Ben-Hur in Ben-Hur. ... Edward Goldenberg Robinson (born Emanuel Goldenberg, Yiddish: עמנואל גולדנברג; December 12, 1893 – January 26, 1973) was an American stage and film actor of Romanian origin. ... Joseph Cheshire Cotten (May 15, 1905–February 6, 1994) was an American stage and screen actor. ...


The film, which is loosely based upon the 1966 science fiction novel Make Room! Make Room!, by Harry Harrison, won the Saturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film in 1973. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... Make Room! Make Room! is a 1966 science fiction novel written by Harry Harrison, and later used as the basis for the 1973 science fiction movie Soylent Green (although the movie changed the plot and theme). ... At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Harry Harrison (born Henry Maxwell Dempsey, March 12, 1925 in Stamford, Connecticut) is an American science fiction author who has lived in many parts of the world including Mexico, England, Denmark and Italy. ...

Contents

Plot

Set in the year 2022, Soylent Green depicts a dystopian future in which the population has grown to forty million in New York City alone. Most housing is dilapidated and overcrowded, and the impoverished homeless fill the streets. 2022 (MMXXII) will be a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the philosophical concept and literary form. ... Theoretical Human population increase from 10,000 BC – AD 2000. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...

Processed "Soylent Green" ration wafers
Processed "Soylent Green" ration wafers

Food as we know it today–including fruit, vegetables, and meat–is a rare and expensive commodity. Half of the world's population survives on processed rations produced by the massive Soylent Corporation (from soy(bean) + lent(il)), including Soylent Red and Soylent Yellow, which are advertised as "high-energy vegetable concentrates". The newest product is Soylent Green - a small green wafer which is advertised as being produced from "high-energy plankton". It is much more nutritious and palatable than the red and yellow varieties, but it is in short supply, which often leads to riots. Image File history File links SolyentGreen28d. ... Image File history File links SolyentGreen28d. ... Gasoline ration stamps being printed as a result of the 1973 oil crisis Rationing is the controlled distribution of resources and scarce goods or services. ... Binomial name Glycine max Soybeans (US) or soya beans (UK) (Glycine max) are a high-protein legume (Family Fabaceae) grown as food for both humans and livestock. ... This article is about the species Lens culinaris. ... This article is about the real-life under-sea organisms. ...


Robert Thorn (Charlton Heston) is a New York City police detective who lives in a dilapidated, cramped one-room apartment with his aged partner Sol Roth (Edward G. Robinson). Roth is a former professor who searches through the now-disordered remnants of written records and books to help Thorn's investigations. Roth and his like are euphemistically known as "books". He tells Thorn about the times before the ecological disaster and population crisis, when real food was plentiful, although Thorn is generally not interested in the "stories". Charlton Heston (born October 4, 1924) is an US-american film actor, known for playing larger-than-life heroic roles such as Moses in The Ten Commandments, Colonel George Taylor in Planet of the Apes, and Judah Ben-Hur in Ben-Hur. ... The New York City Police Department (NYPD) , the largest police department in the United States, has primary responsibility for law enforcement and investigation within the five boroughs of New York City. ... Edward Goldenberg Robinson (born Emanuel Goldenberg, Yiddish: עמנואל גולדנברג; December 12, 1893 – January 26, 1973) was an American stage and film actor of Romanian origin. ...


Thorn is assigned to investigate the murder of William R. Simonson (Joseph Cotten). When he goes to the crime scene, he finds Simonson lying in a pool of blood from being struck in the head. Instead of looking for clues, the poorly-paid detective helps himself to some of the wealthy man's food, liquor, soap, and books and romances Shirl (Leigh Taylor-Young), an attractive 24-year old prostitute (euphemistically known as "furniture") who comes with the luxury apartment. Thorn also meets Simonson's bodyguard, Tab Fielding (Chuck Connors), who claims that he was told to escort Shirl on a shopping trip when the attack took place. Joseph Cheshire Cotten (May 15, 1905–February 6, 1994) was an American stage and screen actor. ... Spirits redirects here. ... For other uses, see Soap (disambiguation). ... Leigh Taylor-Young as Shirl in Soylent Green , 1973. ... Prostitution is the sale of sexual services (typically manual stimulation, oral sex, sexual intercourse, or anal sex) for cash or other kind of return, generally indiscriminately with many persons. ... Chuck Connors (April 10, 1921 – November 10, 1992) was an American actor and a professional basketball and baseball player. ...


Returning to his apartment, he gives Sol two large books he took from Simonson's apartment, the two-volume Soylent Oceanographic Survey Report, 2015 to 2019. Thorn returns to work and talks to the Chief of Detectives, telling him that he suspects it may have been an assassination, since nothing was stolen from the apartment and the murder seemed professional. He finds it odd that the luxury apartment's sophisticated alarm and monitoring electronics happened to be inoperative on the night of the murder, and his bodyguard just happened to be out of the apartment at the time. Assassin and Assassins redirect here. ...


Thorn waits for Fielding to leave his apartment and then questions his "furniture," wandering about and discovering numerous signs of wealth, including "$150 a jar" strawberry jam. He returns to his own apartment to eat a meal of the purloined food, where Sol tells him that Simonson was a member of the board of directors of the Soylent Corporation, one of the most powerful corporations in the world. He then goes to question, and seduce, Shirl, who tells him that Simonson had become deeply troubled in the days before his death, even taking her to church. Thorn later attempts to question the priest about Simonson's confession, but the priest is almost catatonic and does not reveal anything. Fielding later murders the priest.


After Thorn begins to uncover evidence that Simonson may have been murdered, Governor Santini (Whit Bissell) instructs Thorn's superior officer, Lieutenant Hatcher (Brock Peters), to close the investigation. However, Thorn refuses, and continues his investigation into the murder. Later, when Thorn is on riot duty during the distribution of rations, Simonson's murderer fires several shots at Thorn, wounding him, but Thorn is able to push his attacker under a riot control vehicle and escapes. Murder is both a legal and a moral term, that are not always coincident. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Whit Bissell in the 1948 film He Walked by Night Whitner Nutting Bissell (25 October 1909 – 5 March 1996) was an American character actor. ... Brock Peters (July 2, 1927 – August 23, 2005) was an American actor, perhaps best known for the role in the 1962 film To Kill a Mockingbird of Tom Robinson, the black man unjustly convicted of raping a white girl. ...


In the meantime, Roth goes over oceanographic reports that Thorn took from Simonson's apartment with other intellectuals at the "supreme exchange," a library of old books. By piecing together the information, they begin to suspect that the Soylent Corporation may be covering up a horrific conspiracy. Unable to live with what he has uncovered, Roth opts for euthanasia (euphemistically known as "going home") at a government clinic. There, he is taken to a comfortable bed, is given a poison-laced beverage, and is shown panoramic views of an unspoiled pristine Earth as he dies. Thorn tries to intervene, but he is too late to prevent Roth from dying. Nevertheless, during Roth's final moments, he asks Thorn to find proof about the horrible truth that he suspects about Soylent Green. Thermohaline circulation Oceanographic frontal systems on the southern hemisphere Oceanography (from the greek words Ωκεανός meaning Ocean and γράφω meaning to write), also called oceanology or marine science, is the branch of Earth Sciences that studies the Earths oceans and seas. ... For mercy killings not performed on humans, see Animal euthanasia. ...


After Roth dies, Thorn sneaks into the basement of the euthanasia facility, where he sees corpses being loaded onto waste disposal trucks. He secretly hitches a ride on one of the trucks, which drives to a heavily guarded waste disposal plant. Once inside the plant, Thorn sees how the corpses are processed into Soylent Green wafers. After Thorn escapes from the plant and heads for the supreme exchange with the information, he is ambushed by Fielding and several other gunmen. In the shootout, Thorn kills some of the gunmen, but is himself wounded and retreats into a cathedral filled with homeless people. After a desperate fight, Thorn stabs and kills Fielding. When police backup arrives, the seriously wounded Thorn confides to Hatcher the horrible secret behind Soylent Green and urges him to spread the word. With regard to living things, a body is the integral physical material of an individual, and contrasts with soul, personality and behavior. ...


Film production

The screenplay was based on a 1966 novel Make Room! Make Room!, which is set in the year 1999, with the theme of overpopulation and overuse of resources leading to increasing poverty, food shortages, and social disorder as the next millennium approaches. While the book refers to "soylent steaks", it makes no reference to "Soylent Green", the processed food rations depicted in the film. The book's title was not used for the movie since it might have confused audiences into thinking it was a big-screen version of Make Room for Daddy.[1] Make Room! Make Room! is a 1966 science fiction novel written by Harry Harrison, and later used as the basis for the 1973 science fiction movie Soylent Green (although the movie changed the plot and theme). ... The Danny Thomas Show (also known as Make Room for Daddy for the first three seasons) was a comedy television series starring Danny Thomas, Jean Hagen, Rusty Hamer, Sherry Jackson and Louise Beavers. ...


The director Richard Fleischer, who began by shooting film noir thrillers after WWII, learned to do special effects in the 1950s and 1960s when he did a number of Walt Disney films such as 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea and Fantastic Voyage (1966). In the years before and after Soylent Green, Fleisher did films centering on famous serial killers and capital punishment (1968's The Boston Strangler and 1971's 10 Rillington Place) and the controversial and provocative Che Guevara biopic Che!(1969). Richard Fleischer (born December 8, 1916) is an American film director. ... Two silhouetted figures in The Big Combo (1955). ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... Front page of Vingt Mille Lieues Sous les Mers 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (or Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea) is a classic science fiction novel by Jules Verne, published in 1870 under the title Vingt mille lieues sous les mers. ... For other uses, see Fantastic Voyage (disambiguation). ... The Boston Strangler is the pseudonym given to Albert DeSalvo (September 3, 1930 - November 26, 1973), a serial killer active in Boston, Massachusetts (United States) in the early 1960s. ... 10 Rillington Place, Ladbroke Grove, Notting Hill, London, was the site of the crimes of John Reginald Christie, one of Britains most notorious serial killers, resulting in a miscarriage of justice which contributed towards the abolition of the death penalty in Britain. ... Che! (1969) is a film directed by Richard Fleischer. ...


This was the 101st and last movie in which Edward G. Robinson appeared. He died from cancer nine days after the shooting was done, on January 26, 1973. Robinson had previously worked with Heston in The Ten Commandments (1956). The female lead character, Shirl (Leigh Taylor-Young), is briefly seen playing a Computer Space arcade game, an early depiction of the 1970s pop culture phenomenon of videogames. Edward Goldenberg Robinson (born Emanuel Goldenberg, Yiddish: עמנואל גולדנברג; December 12, 1893 – January 26, 1973) was an American stage and film actor of Romanian origin. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... The Ten Commandments is a 1956 motion picture dramatizing the Biblical story of Moses, an Egyptian prince-turned deliverer of the Hebrew slaves. ... Leigh Taylor-Young as Shirl in Soylent Green , 1973. ... Computer Space is a video arcade game released in November, 1971 by Nutting Associates. ... Centipede by Atari is a typical example of a 1980s era arcade game. ... Popular culture, or pop culture, is the vernacular (peoples) culture that prevails in a modern society. ... A computer game is a game composed of a computer-controlled virtual universe that players interact with in order to achieve a defined goal or set of goals. ...


Music

In the film, after the aged Roth learns the truth about Soylent Green, he decides he can no longer deal with the world, and states that he is "going home". By this, he means that he is going to sign up for government-provided euthanasia. When Roth arrives at the clinic, he is asked to select a lighting scheme and a type of music for the euthanasia chamber. Roth selects orange-hued lights and "light Classical music." When he goes to the euthanasia chamber, a selection of Classical music plays through speakers and films are projected on large screens. For mercy killings not performed on humans, see Animal euthanasia. ...


The "going home" score in this part of the film was conducted by Gerald Fried and consists of the main themes from Symphony No. 6 ("Pathétique") by Tchaikovsky; Symphony No. 6 ("Pastoral") by Beethoven; "Morning Mood" and "Åse's Death" from the Peer Gynt Suite by Edvard Grieg. As the music plays, scenes of majestic natural beauty are projected on film screens: "deer in woods, trees and leaves, sunsets beside the sea, birds flying overhead, rolling streams, mountains, fish and coral, sheep and horses, and lots and lots of flowers — from daffodils to dogwoods". Amidst the music and the scenes of nature, Roth remembers the world as it once was, and peacefully takes his last breath. Gerald Fried (born February 13, 1928) is an American musician well known for his compositions in film and television. ... Excerpt from the fourth movement of Tchaikovskys Pathetique Symphony. ... “Tchaikovsky” redirects here. ... Ludwig van Beethovens Symphony No. ... “Beethoven” redirects here. ... Morning Mood (Norwegian: Morgenstemning; German: Morgenstimmung) is a composition belonging to Edvard Griegs Peer Gynt suite. ... ... Edvard Grieg Edvard Hagerup Grieg (15 June 1843 – 4 September 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist who composed in the romantic period. ... Species ????? Daffodils are a group of large flowered members of the genus Narcissus. ...


Analysis and impact

Thematic analysis

In the film, police detective Thorn is a "prophet of doom" who learns of the "most horrifying results" of the overpopulation and environmental disaster. In addition to being a prophet, "Thorn is a pioneer, a tragic hero willing to speak up and resist homogenizing forces as an individual." In the film's depiction of corporate corruption and police complicity in the cover-up, Thorn's "morality transcends all those around him" as he becomes the "sole voice of reason" as he "stands alone". After Thorn learns of the use of cadavers to make food rations, his main concern is with the future implications: that the Soylent food company will eventually "raise humans like cattle". After Thorn is shot by Soylent Corporation gunmen, he appears to be dying, and so his warnings about the horrors he witnessed in the Soylent plant "seem to be his last", making him a classic "tragic hero".[2]


In the film, Thorn's assistant Roth "serves as the reminder of better times." The aged researcher, a former professor, tells Thorn about the past, when "'real' food was plentiful and the natural environment thrived." Real food is a symbol of the past; as a result, when Thorn investigates the murder of Simonson, a Soylent board of directors member, Thorn takes "lettuce, tomatoes, apples, celery, onions, and even beef" from the wealthy man's luxury apartment. These rare and expensive luxuries were out of reach for all but the most powerful members of the society. When Thorn shows Roth the red filet of beef, Roth weeps at his realization of how much society has lost due to pollution and overpopulation. Now that most humans subsist on processed ration wafers, when Roth sees the "real" food, he asks “How did we come to this?”[2]


After Sol discovers that Soylent wafers are made from human flesh, and decides to end the horror by signing up for government-assisted euthanasia, Sol is shown a montage of beautiful natural images in the euthanasia chamber: flowers, deer, mountains, and rivers. When Thorn rushes to the euthanasia clinic to try to stop Sol, he is too late to save his friend, but he is able to share Sol's final moments. In Sol's last minutes alive, "Thorn shares Sol’s nostalgic moment" as Sol asks “Can you see it?” and “Isn’t it beautiful?”, which helps Thorn to realize "what he and the rest of the world has lost."[2]


Critical response

The film has a 73% fresh rating at Rotten Tomatoes and 7.0/10 in the Internet Movie Database. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ...


Scfi.com film reviewer Tamara Hladik calls the film a “basic, cautionary tale of what could become of humanity physically and spiritually" if humans do not take care of the planet. She points out that “[t]here is little in this film that has not been seen” in other films, such as the film's depiction of “faceless, oppressive crowds; sheep mentality; the corrosion of the soul, of imagination, [and] of collective memory.” While she notes that the director has a "tendency...to overuse Charlton Heston” in scenes depicting this beleaguered, futuristic dystopia, she admits that the film “often succeeds despite [the missteps of] its director".


Hladik argues that the “most powerful moments do not belong to Heston['s]" police detective character Thorn, who she calls a “dubious, ambiguous hero”. Instead, she claims that Robinson’s characterization of the aged police researcher Sol Roth are the “most moving passages”, which give the film “conscience and soul.” She acknowledges that the film has “imagery [that] is powerful and haunting”, such as the scenes in which riot control vehicles scoop up protesters with metal shovels, as if they were garbage. Overall, though, she states that “[m]ostly, though, the profundity of humanity's transformation [in the film] is dealt with in less than a masterful manner.”[3]


Reviewer Jeremiah Kipp claims that the plot of the film "trudges along" as the Heston's police detective character pursues the murder investigation in a meandering fashion.[4]


Impact on popular culture

Soylent Green was influenced by the environmental movement, which still influences popular culture films in the 2000s, such as 28 Days Later (2003) and The Day After Tomorrow (2004). The term "soylent green" and the last line "Soylent Green is people!" became catch phrases in English, in part due to a Saturday Night Live parody where comedian Phil Hartman mocked Heston's acting in the final scene of the movie.[4] Part of the AFI 100 Years. ... A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... SNL redirects here. ... Phil Hartman (September 24, 1948 – May 28, 1998) was a Canadian-American Emmy Award-winning writer as well as an actor, voice artist, comedian and graphic artist. ...


Soylent Green is referred to in a number of television series and other media, either for dramatic or comedic effect. The animated American sitcom Futurama, which is set in the year 3000, makes a number of references to the fictional "soylent"-based foods. The show, created by Matt Groening, depicts billboards that advertise a variety of "soylent" foods, including "soylent cola" (the taste of which, according to Leela, "varies from person to person"). Groening also makes references to soylent green food in several episodes of the animated comedy show The Simpsons, including in an episode which parodies the film by depicting a food shortage in an overcrowded elementary school detention hall. The animated series South Park parodied the "Going Home" euthanasia scene of Soylent Green in season 4, episode 414 "Helen Keller! The Musical" by depicting turkeys in a 'humane slaughter house'. Before the turkeys are killed, the lights are dimmed and calming visions of nature are shown, set to light classical music. An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... This article is about the television series. ... Matthew Abram Groening is an American cartoonist (Life in Hell) and the Emmy Award-winning creator of the animated series, The Simpsons and Futurama. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... This article is about the TV series. ... Helen Keller! The Musical is episode 61 of South Park. ...


In May 1997, the "Space" episode of NewsRadio, set in the future as a science fiction spoof, includes a newscast which is purportedly sponsored by Soylent Green, which is "made from the best stuff on Earth: people." The 1999 dark comedy, mockumentary format movie Drop Dead Gorgeous depicts a beauty pageant competitor using an excerpt from the film as a dramatic monologue. In the TV series Millennium, created by Chris Carter (producer of The X-Files), Frank Black's network password is the film's catchphrase. A 2001 episode of Disney's Lizzie McGuire called "Lizzie in the Middle" also references the famous end line of the movie. On the short-lived Australian comedy/variety series Micallef Tonight, host Shaun Micallef would often interrupt segments of his show and even his own monologues by yelling "Soylent Green is people!" while bathed a green spotlight. This is a detailed list of NewsRadio episodes from the third season. ... This article is about the sitcom. ... The term problem plays is applied to the three plays William Shakespeare wrote between the last of his pure comedies (Twelfth Night) and the first of his pure tragedies (Othello) They are Alls Well That Ends Well, Measure for Measure, Troilus and Cressida. ... Mockumentary (also known as a pseudo-documentary)[1], a portmanteau of mock and documentary, is a film and TV genre, or a single work of the genre. ... For other uses, see Drop Dead Gorgeous (disambiguation). ... Millennium is a grim, suspenseful American television series, produced by Chris Carter (creator of The X-Files), and set during the years leading up to the dawn of the new millennium. ... Chris Carter (born October 13, 1956) is an American Jewish screenwriter and producer, best known as the creator of The X-Files. ... Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ... Lizzie McGuire is a Disney Channel Original Series that aired on the Disney Channel from 2001 - 2004. ... Micallef Tonight was a short-lived Australian variety show that aired on the Nine Network in 2003. ... Shaun Patrick Micallef (born 18 July 1962) is an Australian comedian. ...


Several songs refer to the movie. Rudy Ratzinger of the German electro-industrial band Wumpscut created a song in 1993 named after the movie which contains audio samples from the German-dubbed version. In the 2000s, folk rock singer-songwriter Jonathan Coulton, whose quirky satirical songs often refer to science fiction and technology, penned a song entitled "Chiron Beta Prime" which refers to the film. Electronic body music (EBM) is a musical genre combining elements of industrial music and electronic dance music. ... Wumpscut (:Wumpscut: or :W:) is a well known EBM project from Germany. ... This article is about reusing existing sound recordings in creating new works. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... Jonathan Coulton is a folk rock singer-songwriter. ...


References

  1. ^ http://www.iol.ie/~carrollm/hh/soycann.htm
  2. ^ a b c Soylent Green's population explodes. Retrieved on 2008-03-27.
  3. ^ Review by Tamara I. Hladik for scifi.com. Retrieved on 2008-03-27.
  4. ^ a b Jeremiah Kipp. Retrieved on 2008-03-27.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

A twist ending or surprise ending is an unexpected conclusion or climax to a work of fiction, and which often contains irony or causes the audience to reevaluate the narrative or characters. ... This article is about megacities in general. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Awards
Preceded by
Slaughterhouse-Five
Saturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film
1973
Succeeded by
Rollerball
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Slaughterhouse-Five is a film adaptation of the Kurt Vonnegut novel of the same name. ... The following are a list of Saturn Award winners for Best Science Fiction Film: See also Science fiction film Categories: | ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Can Soylent Green save the world... and our climate? Welcome to the new biodiesel (1309 words)
Soylent green was the foodstuff of choice, and it was made of plankton.
Soylent Green fun fact: It was the last feature film with exteriors shot using the old MGM back lot.
Soylent Green not so fun fact(s): When Sol, played by Edward G. Robinson, is about to be euthanized, the background score is Beethoven's Symphony #6 -- which the Nazis used in a propaganda film entitled "The Führer grants the Jews a city," an attempt to put an upbeat spin on the Jewish ghettos.
Stomp Tokyo Video Reviews - Soylent Green (897 words)
Soylents red and yellow have been joined by a new flavor, soylent green, which is "made from the finest undersea growth.
Soylent Green is one of those terrific films in which one relatively clueless but decent person becomes embroiled in a plot much larger than he is. Ill-equipped to deal with such a conspiracy, Thorn must survive on instinct and guts in best film-noir fashion.
Soylent Green walks a fine line between melodramatic Seventies science fiction and a thoughtful examination of problems that began to surface in a decade of oil shortages, endangered species, and Sha Na Na.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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