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Encyclopedia > Soviet Navy
Military of the Soviet Union

Components
Strategic Rocket Forces
Army
Anti-Air Defense
Air Force
Navy
Ranks of the Soviet Military
Ranks and insignia of the Soviet military
History of the Soviet Military
Military history of the Soviet Union
History of Russian military ranks
Navies of Russia

Imperial Russia The Military of the Soviet Union was the Armed Forces of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics from their establishment, before the USSR itself was formed, by the Bolsheviks during the Russian Civil War in 1918, to the collapse of the Soviet Union in December 1991. ... Image File history File links Coat_of_arms_of_the_Soviet_Union. ... Image File history File links Red_Army_flag. ... The Strategic Rocket Forces of Russia (Russian: Ракетные войска стратегического назначения (РВСН), transliteration: Raketnye voyska strategicheskogo naznacheniya) are a major division of the Russian armed forces that controls Russias land-based ICBMs. ... Red Army flag The Workers and Peasants Red Army (Russian: Рабоче-Крестьянская Красная Армия, Raboche-Krestyanskaya Krasnaya Armiya; RKKA or usually simply the Red Army) were the armed forces first organized by the Bolsheviks during the Russian Civil War in 1918 and that, in 1922, became the army of the Soviet Union. ... Voyska PVO (Russian: Войска ПВО, or PVO Strany until 1981) was the air defense branch of the Soviet military. ... The Soviet Air Force, also known under the abbreviation VVS, transliterated from Russian: ВВС, Военно-воздушные силы (Voenno-Vozdushnye Sily), formed the official designation of the air force of the Soviet Union. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... Joseph Stalin and Kliment Voroshilov depicted saluting a military parade in Red Square above the message Long Live the Worker-Peasant Red Army— a Dependable Sentinel of the Soviet Borders! The military history of the Soviet Union began in the days following the 1917 October Revolution that brought the Bolsheviks... Modern Russian military ranks trace their roots to Table of Ranks established by Peter the Great. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ...


Navy (1696-1917) Russian Navy Jack Russian Navy Ensign The Imperial Russian Navy refers to the Navy of Imperial Russia, before the Soviet Union. ... The year 1696 had the earliest equinoxes and solstices for 400 years in the Gregorian calendar, because this year is a leap year and the Gregorian calendar would have behaved like the Julian calendar since March 1500 had it have been in use that long. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ...


Soviet Union Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Soviet_Union. ...


Soviet Navy (1917-1991) 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Russian Federation Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ...


Russian Navy (1991-Present) The Russian Navy (Russian: Военно-Морской Флот (ВМФ) - Voyenno- Morskoy Flot (VMF) or Military Maritime Fleet) is the naval arm of the Russian armed forces. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

The Soviet Navy (Russian: Военно-морской флот СССР, Voyenno-morskoy flot SSSR, literally "Naval military forces of the USSR") was the naval arm of the Soviet armed forces. Often referred to as the Red Fleet, the Soviet Navy would have been instrumental in any perceived Warsaw Pact role in an all-out war with NATO when it would have to stop the naval convoys bringing reinforcements over the Atlantic to the Western European theatre. Such a conflict never occurred, but the Soviet Navy still saw considerable action during the Cold War. The Soviet Navy was divided into several major fleets: Northern Fleet, the Pacific Ocean Fleet, the Black Sea Fleet, and the Baltic Fleet. The Caspian Flotilla was a semi-independent formation administratively under the Black Sea Fleet command while the Soviet Indian Ocean Squadron drew its units from and was under the jurisdiction of the Pacific Ocean Fleet. Other components included the Naval Aviation, Naval Infantry (the Soviet equivalent of marines) and coastal artillery. The Soviet Navy was reformed into the Russian Navy after the end of the Cold War in 1991. The multinational Combined Task Force One Five Zero (CTF-150) The British Grand Fleet, the supreme naval force of World War I A rare occurrence of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ... Soviet redirects here. ... The armed forces of a state are its government sponsored defense and fighting forces and organizations. ... Unofficial Seal of the Warsaw Pact Distinguish from the Warsaw Convention, which is an agreement about airlines financial liability and the Treaty of Warsaw (1970) between West Germany and the Peoples Republic of Poland. ... NATO 2002 Summit in Prague. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Red Banner Northern Fleet (Северный флот in Russian, or Severniy flot), a part of the Soviet Navy, created in 1933 for the purpose of defending Soviet territory beyond the Arctic circle (Заполярье, or Zapolyariye). ... Pacific Fleet (Тихоокеанский флот in Russian, or Tikhookeanskiy flot), a part of the Soviet Navy stationed in the Pacific Ocean, which secured the Far Eastern borders of the USSR. The fleet headquarters was located at Vladivostok. ... Black Sea Fleet sleeve ensign The Black Sea Fleet (Russian: Черноморский флот) is a large sub-unit of the Russian (and formerly Soviet) Navy, operating in the Black Sea and the Mediterranean Sea since the early 18th century. ... A sailor of the Baltic Fleet during World War II The Baltic Fleet (Russian: Балтийский флот, in the Soviet period - The Red Banner Baltic Fleet - Краснознамённый Балтийский флот) is located at the Baltic Sea and headquartered in Kaliningrad, the other major base is at Kronstadt, located in the Gulf of Finland. ... Caspian Flotilla (Каспийская флотилия in Russian, or Kaspiyskaya flotiliya), the oldest Russian military flotilla, which would later become part of the Soviet Navy. ... The Soviet Indian Ocean Squadron (SOVINDRON) was established by the Soviet Navy in 1968 after the British government announced its intention to withdraw its military forces east of the Suez Canal by 1971. ... Soviet Naval Aviation (Авиация военно-морского флота in Russian, or Aviatsiya Voenno-Morskogo Flota, literally aviation of the military sea fleet) was a part of the Soviet Navy. ... Russian Marines emblem and slogan Naval Infantry of Russia: Victory follows us! The Russian Marines, perhaps better translated as the Russian Naval Infantry, (Russian: Морская пехота ) are an elite force of the Russian Armed Forces. ... France Marines is the name of a commune in the département of Val dOise, France. ... 19th century coastal artillery guns preserved in Suomenlinna fortress in Helsinki Coastal artillery is the branch of armed forces concerned with operating mobile anti-ship artillery or fixed gun batteries in coastal fortifications. ... The Russian Navy (Russian: Военно-Морской Флот (ВМФ) - Voyenno- Morskoy Flot (VMF) or Military Maritime Fleet) is the naval arm of the Russian armed forces. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

History

The Soviet Naval ensign.
The Soviet Naval ensign.
The Soviet Naval jack.
The Soviet Naval jack.

Image File history File links Naval_Ensign_of_the_Soviet_Union. ... Image File history File links Naval_Ensign_of_the_Soviet_Union. ... Ensign of the Imperial Japanese Navy. ... Image File history File links Naval_Jack_of_the_Soviet_Union. ... Image File history File links Naval_Jack_of_the_Soviet_Union. ...

Early history

The Soviet Navy was formed in 1917 out of the remnants of the Imperial Russian Navy. Many vessels continued to serve after the October Revolution, albeit under different names. In fact, the first ship of the Soviet Navy could be considered to be the rebellious Imperial Russia and the cruiser Aurora, whose crew joined the Bolsheviks. A previous Bolshevik uprising in the fleet had occurred in 1905 involving the Potemkin, an Imperial Russian battleship. 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Russian Navy Jack Russian Navy Ensign The Imperial Russian Navy refers to the Navy of Imperial Russia, before the Soviet Union. ... For other uses, see October Revolution (disambiguation). ... Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start... USS Port Royal (CG-73), a Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser (really an uprated guided missile destroyer), launched in 1992. ... The Aurora (Russian: Авро́ра; English transliteration: Avrora) is a Russian protected cruiser, currently preserved as a museum ship in St. ... Bolshevik Party Meeting. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Russian battleship Potemkin. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Battleship Potemkin The Potemkin (Russian: , ‘Prince Potyomkin of Tauris’) was a pre-dreadnought battleship (Bronenosets) of the Russian Black Sea Fleet. ... The firepower of a battleship demonstrated by USS Iowa A battleship is a large, heavily-armored warship with a main battery consisting of the largest caliber of guns. ...

Aurora was unofficially the first Soviet Navy vessel, after it mutinied against Imperial Russia in 1917.
Aurora was unofficially the first Soviet Navy vessel, after it mutinied against Imperial Russia in 1917.

The Soviet Navy, established as the "Workers' and Peasants' Red Fleet" (Russian: Рабоче-Крестьянский Красный флот, Raboche-Krest'yansky Krasny Flot or RKKF) by 1918 Decree of the Soviet government, existed in a dilapidated state during the interwar years, possessing a few obsolescent battleships but no aircraft carriers. As the country's attentions were largely directed internally, the Navy did not see much in the way of funding or training. A telling indicator of the perceived threat of the Navy was that the Soviets were not invited to participate in the Washington Naval Treaty, which served to limit the size and capabilities of the most powerful navies. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Aurora (Russian: Авро́ра; English transliteration: Avrora) is a Russian protected cruiser, currently preserved as a museum ship in St. ... Mutiny is the act of conspiring to disobey an order that a group of similarly-situated individuals (typically members of the military; or the crew of any ship, even if they are civilians) is legally obliged to obey. ... Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start... Decrees (Russian: ) were legislative acts of the highest Soviet institutions, primarily of the Council of Peoples Commissars (the highest executive body) and of the Supreme Soviet or VTsIK (the highest legislative body), [1] issued between 1917 and 1924. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The firepower of a battleship demonstrated by USS Iowa A battleship is a large, heavily-armored warship with a main battery consisting of the largest caliber of guns. ... Four aircraft carriers, (bottom-to-top) Principe de Asturias, amphibious assault carrier USS Wasp, supercarrier USS Forrestal and light V/STOL carrier HMS Invincible, showing size differences of late 20th century carriers An aircraft carrier is a warship designed to deploy and recover aircraft — in effect acting as a sea... The Washington Naval Treaty limited the naval armaments of its five signatories: the United States, the British Empire, the Empire of Japan, the French Third Republic, and Italy. ...


However, in the 1930s, as the industrialization of the Soviet Union proceeded, plans were made to expand the Soviet Navy into one of the most powerful in the world. This force was to be built around a core of powerful Sovetsky Soyuz class battleships. This building program was in its initial stages by the time the German invasion in 1941 forced its suspension. Face The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... Sovetsky Soyuz class battleships (Project 23, Russian: , Soviet Union), also known as Stalins Republics, formed a class of battleships, laid down by the Soviet Union in the late 1930s, but never brought into service. ...


The Winter War in 1939-1940 saw some minor action on the Baltic Sea, limited mainly to artillery duels between Finnish forts and Soviet cruisers and battleships. Combatants Finland Soviet Union Commanders Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim Kliment Voroshilov, later Semyon Timoshenko Strength 250,000 men 30 tanks 130 aircraft[1][2] 1,000,000 men 3,000 tanks 3,800 aircraft[3][4] Casualties 26,662 dead 39,886 wounded 1,000 captured[5] 126,875 dead... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full year calendar). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Baltic Sea is located in Northern Europe, from 53°N to 66°N latitude and from 20°E to 26°E longitude. ... Artillery with Gabion fortification Cannons on display at Fort Point Continental Artillery crew from the American Revolution Firing of an 18-pound gun, Louis-Philippe Crepin, (1772 – 1851) A forge-welded Iron Cannon in Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu. ... Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ...


The Great Patriotic War

Soviet sailors on the 1945 Moscow Victory Parade.

After the beginning of the Great Patriotic War, many sailors and naval guns were sent to help the Red Army and these reassigned naval forces took part in every major action on the Eastern Front. Soviet naval personnel played especially significant land roles in the battles for Odessa, Sevastopol, Stalingrad, Novorossiysk, Tuapse, and Leningrad. Image File history File links Sborka_003_3. ... Image File history File links Sborka_003_3. ... The 1945 Victory parade was the first major Soviet event recorded on color film. ... Combatants Soviet Union,[1] Poland, Tannu Tuva (until 1944 incorporation with USSR), Mongolia Germany,[2] Italy (to 1943), Romania (to 1944), Finland (to 1944), Hungary, Slovakia, Croatia, Spain (to 1943, unofficial) Commanders Joseph Stalin, Aleksei Antonov, Ivan Konev, Rodion Malinovsky, Ivan Bagramyan, Kirill Meretskov, Ivan Petrov, Alexander Rodimtsev, Konstantin Rokossovsky... Red Army flag The Workers and Peasants Red Army (Russian: Рабоче-Крестьянская Красная Армия, Raboche-Krestyanskaya Krasnaya Armiya; RKKA or usually simply the Red Army) were the armed forces first organized by the Bolsheviks during the Russian Civil War in 1918 and that, in 1922, became the army of the Soviet Union. ... The Battle of Odessa was part of the Soviet-German War in 1941. ... Combatants Germany Romania Soviet Union Commanders Erich von Manstein Ivan Petrov Filipp Oktyabrskiy Strength 350,000+ 106,000 Casualties at least 100,000 killed, wounded or captured (Including Romanians) 95,000 captured, 11,000 killed The Battle of Sevastopol was fought from October 30, 1941 to July 4, 1942 between... Combatants Germany Italy Hungary Romania Slovakia Soviet Union Commanders Maximilian von Weichs Friedrich Paulus # Erich von Manstein Hermann Hoth Italo Garibaldi Gusztav Jany Petre Dumitrescu Constantin Constantinescu Vasiliy Chuikov Aleksandr Vasilyevskiy Georgiy Zhukov Semyon Timoshenko Konstantin Rokossovsky Rodion Malinovsky Strength German Sixth Army German Fourth Panzer Army Romanian Third Army... Novorossiysk (Russian Новороссийск) is a city in southern Russia, one of the main Russian ports on the Black Sea, in Krasnodar Krai. ... This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Combatants Germany Spanish Blue Division Soviet Union Commanders Wilhelm von Leeb Georg von Küchler Agustín Muñoz Grandes Kliment Voroshilov Georgiy Zhukov Strength 725,000 930,000 Casualties Unknown Red Army: 332,059 KIA 24,324 non-combat dead 111,142 missing 16,470 civilians 1 million civilians...


The composition of the Soviet fleet was very mixed, with some pre-WWI ships (Novik-class destroyers, some Cruisers, all Battleships), some modern ships built in Europe (like the Italian-built destroyer Tashkent,[1] pre-war built modern ships (4 Kirov-class cruisers, 46 Type 7 and Type 7U destroyers and so on), and about 300 submarines. During the war, many of them were destroyed (mainly by aircraft and mines), but also arriving were captured Romanian destroyers and lend-lease small crafts from the U.S., as well as old US Navy battleship and cruiser given in exchange for soviet part of Italian navy. The Tashkent Class were a group of destroyer leaders built for the Soviet Navy just before World War II. Only one ship was completed. ... The Kirov class cruisers were six vessels built between 1935-1944 for the Soviet Navy: Kirov, Voroshilov, Maxim Gorky, Molotov, Kalinin, and Kaganovich. ... The Genvny class were a group of destroyers built for the Soviet Navy in the late 1930s - early 1940s. ... The Soobrazitelny class were destroyers built for the Soviet Navy in the early 1940s. ... Polish wz. ... The Lend-Lease program was a program of the United States during World War II that allowed the United States to provide the Allied Powers with war material without becoming directly involved in the war. ...


In the Baltic Sea, after Tallinn's capture, surface ships were blockaded in Leningrad - Kronstadt by minefields, where they took part in anti-aircraft defense of the city and bombardment of German positions. One example of Soviet resourcefulness was the battleship Marat, an aging pre-WWI ship sunk at anchor in Kronstadt's harbor by German Stukas in 1941. For the rest of the war, the non-submerged part of the ship continued in use as a battery. Submarines, although suffering heavy losses due to German-Finish antisubmarine actions, played a major role in the war at sea by disrupting Axis navigation in the Baltic. 1888 map of Kronstadt bay Kronstadt (Russian: ), or Kronshtadt, Cronstadt, is a strongly fortified Russian seaport town, located on Kotlin Island, near the head of the Gulf of Finland, at , . It lies thirty kilometers west of Saint Petersburg, of which it is the chief port. ... American troops man an anti-aircraft gun near the Algerian coastline in 1943 Anti-aircraft warfare, or air defense, is any method of engaging military aircraft in combat from the ground. ... The Petropavlovsk (Russian: ) was a Russian battleship of the Gangut Class. ... Junkers Ju 87 G-2 (Royal Air Force Museum Hendon) Junkers Ju 87 G-2 (Royal Air Force Museum Hendon) Nazi propaganda image Air victory over Poland with an artistic vision of a Junkers Ju 87 The Junkers Ju 87 or Stuka was the best known Sturzkampfflugzeug (German: , literally plunging... The Kriegsmarine (or War Navy) was the name of the German Navy between 1935 and 1945, during the Nazi regime, superseding the Reichsmarine. ...


In the Black Sea, many ships were damaged by minefields and Axis aviation, but they helped defend naval bases and supply them under siege, as well as later evacuating them. Heavy naval guns and courageous sailors helped defend naval cities long after they were besieged by Axis armies. The German Luftwaffe was one of the most powerful, doctrinally advanced, and battle-experienced air forces in the world when World War II started in Europe in September 1939. ... Wehrmacht   (armed forces, literally defence force(s)) was the name of the armed forces of Nazi Germany from 1935 to 1945. ...


In the Arctic Ocean, Russian destroyers (Novik-class, Type 7, Type 7u) and smaller craft participated in the anti-aircraft and anti-submarine defense of Allied convoys with lend-lease cargo. Soviet submarine К-21 under the command of a Captain Lunin attacked the German battleship Tirpitz at 71° 22' 2"N, 24° 34' 3"E. [1] Results of that attack is discussed, as no german sources confirm damage of Tirpitz of any other ship, but in К-21 logbook two torpedo-burst was mentioned. Anti-submarine warfare (ASW or in older forms A/S) is a branch of naval warfare that uses surface warships, aircraft or other submarines to find, track and then damage or destroy enemy submarines. ... A convoy is a group of vehicles traveling together for mutual support. ... Tirpitz was the second Bismarck class battleship of the German Kriegsmarine, sistership of Bismarck. ...


In the Pacific Ocean, the Soviet Union was not at war with Japan before 1945, so some destroyers were transferred to the Northern Fleet.


From ruptured the hostilities,the Morskaya Aviatsiya the Soviet Navy Air Service,was providing air support to naval or land operations was implied Soviet Navy.such service was responsible to managed all shore-based Hydroplanes or long range maritime Flying Boats,catapult and vessel-based planes amongst the land-based aircraft in naval use. The Morskaya Aviatsiya (Soviet Naval Air Service) was the Russian Navy air service during WWII. such air unit provided air support to Voyenno-morskoy flot SSSR (Soviet Navy) in your theather of operations in Barents,Baltic and Black Sea amongst the Soviet Naval Detachment in Ohkostk Sea. ...


As post war spoils, the Soviets received several Italian warships.

Image File history File links Please see the file description page for further information. ... The Morskaya Aviatsiya (Soviet Naval Air Service) was the Russian Navy air service during WWII. such air unit provided air support to Voyenno-morskoy flot SSSR (Soviet Navy) in your theather of operations in Barents,Baltic and Black Sea amongst the Soviet Naval Detachment in Ohkostk Sea. ...

Cold War

A Whiskey Twin Cylinder class guided missile submarine, an important platform for launching anti-shipping strikes.
A Whiskey Twin Cylinder class guided missile submarine, an important platform for launching anti-shipping strikes.

After the war, the Soviets concluded that they needed to be able to compete with the West at all costs. They embarked upon a program to match the West, if not qualitatively, then at least quantitatively. The Soviet shipbuilding program kept yards busy constructing submarines based upon World War II German Kriegsmarine designs, and were launched with great frequency in the immediate post-war years. Afterwards, through a combination of indigenous research and technology obtained through espionage from Nazi Germany and the Western nations, the Soviets gradually improved their submarine designs, though they initially lagged a generation behind NATO countries. This is a picture of a Soviet submarine of the Whiskey Twin Cylinder class. ... This is a picture of a Soviet submarine of the Whiskey Twin Cylinder class. ... Whiskey class submarines (locally known as project 613, 644, and 665) are a class of military submarines that the Soviet Union built in the cold war period. ... SSGN is the United States Navy hull classification symbol for a cruise missile submarine. ... Alvin in 1978, a year after first exploring hydrothermal vents. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ...


The Soviets quickly caught up with their Western counterparts. The Soviets were quick to equip their surface fleet with missiles of various sorts. In fact, it became a hallmark of Soviet design to place gigantic missiles onto relatively small, and fast, missile boats. By contrast, in the West, such a move would never have been considered tactically feasible. Nevertheless the Soviet Navy also possessed several very large guided missile cruisers with awesome firepower, such as those of the Kirov class and the Slava class cruisers. Some of their submarines were considered superior to their American rivals. A missile (British English: miss-isle; U.S. English: missl) is, in general, a projectile—that is, something thrown or otherwise propelled. ... USS Port Royal (CG-73), a Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser (really an uprated guided missile destroyer), launched in 1992. ... Radars: Voskhod MR-800 (Top Pair) 3D search radar on foremast Fregat MR-710 (Top Steer) 3D search radar on main mast 2 × Palm Frond navigation radar on foremast Sonar Horse Tail VDS (Variable Deep Sonar) Fire control: 2 × Top Dome for SA-N-6 fire control 4 × Bass Tilt... The Slava class cruiser, Soviet designation Project 1164 Atlant, is a large conventionally-powered warship, currently operated by Russia and Ukraine. ... Alvin in 1978, a year after first exploring hydrothermal vents. ...


Carriers and aviation

Kiev, a helicopter carrier and the rest of her class constituted an important component of the Soviet anti-submarine warfare system.
Kiev, a helicopter carrier and the rest of her class constituted an important component of the Soviet anti-submarine warfare system.

The Soviet Navy generally placed less importance on aircraft carriers than their American rivals, however, it was felt that a carrier force of some form was needed. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 502 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1100 × 1313 pixel, file size: 403 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Soviet aircraft carrier (aviation cruiser) Kiev, Date Shot: 1 Oct 1985 Source: DVIC, Released to Public, ID: DNSN8600684 (cropped hi-res photo) File links The following... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 502 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1100 × 1313 pixel, file size: 403 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Soviet aircraft carrier (aviation cruiser) Kiev, Date Shot: 1 Oct 1985 Source: DVIC, Released to Public, ID: DNSN8600684 (cropped hi-res photo) File links The following... Aircraft carrier Kiev, USSR, 1975-1996 The aircraft carrier at Tianjin Binhai aircraft carrier theme park on 2004 May 1 The heavy aircraft carrying cruiser[1] Kiev served the Soviet and Russian navies from 1975 to 1996. ... The sixth HMS Ocean Jeanne dArc, French navy Helicopter carrier A type of Aicraft Carrier specifically designed to operate helicopters. ... Aircraft carrier Kiev, USSR, 1975-1996 The Kiev class carriers (also know as Project 1143 or as the Krechyet class) were the first class of fixed-wing aircraft carriers build in Russia. ... Anti-submarine warfare (ASW or in older forms A/S) is a branch of naval warfare that uses surface warships, aircraft or other submarines to find, track and then damage or destroy enemy submarines. ...


In 1968 and 1969 the Soviet Moskva class helicopter carriers appeared, followed by the first of four aircraft carriers of the Kiev class in 1973. Both of these classes were capable only of operating helicopters and V/STOL aircraft (eg. the Yak-38 'Forger'), and are thought to have been designed to operate primarily within range of land-based Soviet Naval Aviation aircraft. 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... Mosvka off the coast of Morocco in January, 1970. ... Four aircraft carriers, (bottom-to-top) Principe de Asturias, amphibious assault carrier USS Wasp, supercarrier USS Forrestal and light V/STOL carrier HMS Invincible, showing size differences of late 20th century carriers An aircraft carrier is a warship designed to deploy and recover aircraft — in effect acting as a sea... Aircraft carrier Kiev, USSR, 1975-1996 The Kiev class carriers (also know as Project 1143 or as the Krechyet class) were the first class of fixed-wing aircraft carriers build in Russia. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... V/STOL is an acronym for Vertical/Short Take-Off and Landing. ... The Yakovlev Yak-38 (NATO reporting name: Forger) was Soviet Naval Aviations first and only operational VTOL multi-role combat aircraft. ...


In the 1970s the Soviets undertook Project OREL with the stated purpose of creating a supercarrier capable of competing against American equivalents. However, the project was canceled while still on the drawing board when strategic priorities shifted once more. Project 1153 OREL (Cyrillic: Орёл) was a 1970s-era Soviet program to give the Soviet Navy a true blue water aviation capability. ... USS Enterprise, a supercarrier, and the conventionally-sized aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle A Supercarrier is a ship belonging to the largest class of aircraft carrier. ...


In the 1980s the Soviet Navy acquired its first true aircraft carrier, Tbilisi (subsequently renamed Admiral Kuznetsov).[2] A distinctive feature of Soviet carriers is their offensive missile armament (as well as a long-range AAW suite), reflecting an operational concept which placed less emphasis on escort vessels, compared with Western carrier operations. The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Four aircraft carriers, (bottom-to-top) Principe de Asturias, amphibious assault carrier USS Wasp, supercarrier USS Forrestal and light V/STOL carrier HMS Invincible, showing size differences of late 20th century carriers An aircraft carrier is a warship designed to deploy and recover aircraft — in effect acting as a sea... Admiral Flota Sovetskogo Soyuza Kuznetsov (originally named Tbilisi and then Leonid Brezhnev[1]) is an aircraft carrier (heavy aircraft carrying cruiser (TAVKR) in Russian classification) serving as the flagship of the Russian Navy. ... Admiral Flota Sovetskogo Soyuza Kuznetsov (originally named Tbilisi and then Leonid Brezhnev[1]) is an aircraft carrier (heavy aircraft carrying cruiser (TAVKR) in Russian classification) serving as the flagship of the Russian Navy. ...

Sailors of Soviet Baltic Fleet in the early 1970s.
Sailors of Soviet Baltic Fleet in the early 1970s.

In the late half of the 1980s, the Soviet Navy again began the construction of a supercarrier, Ulyanovsk, which would have carried such aircraft as the Sukhoi Su-33 'Flanker-D'. Though the vessel neared completion, the end of the Cold War and a major funding crunch ended the project. The incomplete Ulyanovsk hulk was later sold for scrap. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1026x1639, 1228 KB) Other versions Originally from en. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1026x1639, 1228 KB) Other versions Originally from en. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Ulyanovsk (Cyrillic: Улья́новск) was the first of a class of Soviet supercarriers which, for the first time, would have offered true blue water aviation capability for the Soviet Navy. ... An Su-33 preparing for take-off from the deck of the aircraft carrierKuznetsov To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...


In part to fill the role of aircraft carriers, the Soviet Navy deployed large numbers of strategic bombers in a maritime role, as part of Aviatsiya Voenno-Morskogo Flota (AV-MF, or Naval Aviation). Strategic bombers such as the Tupolev Tu-16 'Badger' and Tu-22M 'Backfire' were deployed with high-speed anti-shipping missiles. The primary role of these aircraft was the interception of NATO supply convoys traveling the sea lines of communication between Europe and North America, and thus countering Operation REFORGER. Boeing B-52 strategic bomber taking off A strategic bomber is a large aircraft designed to drop large amounts of ordnance on a distant target for the purposes of debilitating an enemys capacity to wage war. ... Soviet Naval Aviation (Авиация военно-морского флота in Russian, or Aviatsiya Voenno-Morskogo Flota, literally aviation of the military sea fleet) was a part of the Soviet Navy. ... Boeing B-52 strategic bomber taking off A strategic bomber is a large aircraft designed to drop large amounts of ordnance on a distant target for the purposes of debilitating an enemys capacity to wage war. ... Tupolev (Russian: Туполев) is a Russian aerospace and defence company. ... Tupolev Tu-16 3-view The Tupolev Tu-16 (NATO codename: Badger) was a twin-engine jet bomber used by the Soviet Union. ... The Tupolev Tu-22M (NATO reporting name Backfire) is a supersonic, swing-wing, long-range strategic bomber developed by the Soviet Union. ... An Anti-ship missile (AShM) is a military missile designed for use against naval surface ships. ... NATO 2002 Summit in Prague. ... A convoy is a group of vehicles traveling together for mutual support. ... Sea lines of communication (abbreviated as SLOC) is a term describing the primary maritime trade routes between ports. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Exercise REFORGER (REturn of FOrces to GERmany) was an annual exercise conducted, during the Cold War, by the United States Army. ...


Submarines

In some respects, including speed and reactor technology Soviet submarines were, and remain, some of the world's best. Their primary shortcomings were insufficient noise dampening (American boats were quieter) and sonar technology. The Soviets possessed numerous purpose-built guided missile submarines, such as the Oscar class, as well as many ballistic missile submarines and attack submarines. The Soviet navy's Typhoon class boats are the world's largest submarines. The Soviet attack submarine force was, like the rest of the navy, geared towards the interception of NATO convoys, but also targeted American aircraft carrier battle groups. The F70 type frigates (here, La Motte-Picquet) are fitted with VDS (Variable Depth Sonar) type DUBV43 or DUBV43C towed sonars SONAR (SOund Navigation And Ranging) â€” or sonar â€” is a technique that uses sound propagation under water (primarily) to navigate, communicate or to detect other vessels. ... SSGN is the United States Navy hull classification symbol for a cruise missile submarine. ... Oscar class submarine The Soviet Union’s Project 949 (Granit) and Project 949A (Antey) submarines are known in the West by their NATO reporting names: the Oscar-I and Oscar-II classes respectively. ... Diagram of V-2, the first ballistic missile. ... USS Los Angeles A submarine is a specialized watercraft that can operate underwater. ... The Typhoon-class submarine is a ballistic missile-carrying, nuclear-powered submarine (SSBN) deployed by the Soviet Navy in the 1980s. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Over the years, Soviet submarines suffered a number of accidents, most notably on several nuclear boats. The most famous incidents include the K-219, and Komsomolets, both lost to fire; and the far more menacing nuclear reactor leak on the K-19. Inadequate nuclear safety, poor damage control and quality control issues during construction (particularly on earlier submarines) were typical causes for accidents. On several occasions, mishaps were alleged to have stemmed from collisions with American submarines. This however has not been confirmed officially by the United States Navy, which maintains a policy of secrecy regarding nuclear incidents. K-219 was a Navaga-class ballistic missile submarine (NATO reporting name Yankee I) of the Soviet Navy. ... It has been proposed below that Soviet submarine K-278 be renamed and moved to Soviet submarine K-278 Komsomolets. ... K-19 was a Hotel class submarine which suffered various severe accidents. ... This diagram demonstrates the defense in depth quality of nuclear power plants. ... The United States Navy, also known as the USN or the U.S. Navy, is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for conducting naval operations. ...


Because of its "safety in numbers" philosophy, the Soviet Navy continued to operate many first-generation missile submarines, until the end of the Cold War in 1991. It was feared that in a time of war, Western submarines would be able to destroy many of their Soviet counterparts before they could launch. Questions regarding targeting precision may also have affected this decision.[citation needed] 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The end

After the fall of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War, the Soviet Navy went neglected once again, and was eventually divided among several former Soviet republics. The Black Sea Fleet, in particular, spent several years in limbo before an agreement was reached to divide it between Russia and Ukraine. The rise of Gorbachev Although reform stalled between 1964–1982, the generational shift gave new momentum for reform. ... Black Sea Fleet sleeve ensign The Black Sea Fleet (Russian: Черноморский флот) is a large sub-unit of the Russian (and formerly Soviet) Navy, operating in the Black Sea and the Mediterranean Sea since the early 18th century. ...


Commanders-in-Chief of the Soviet Naval Forces

Vasili Mikhailovich Altfater (Альтфатер, Василий Михайлович in Russian) (1883 — April 20, 1919), Russian-Soviet naval officer, first Commander-in-chief of the Soviet Navy. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Yevgeniy Andreyevich Berens (Russian: Евгений Андреевич Беренс) (November 11 (O.S. October 30), 1876, Tiflis - April 7, 1928, Moscow) was a Russian military leader, Commander-in-Chief of the Soviet Naval Forces from April of 1919 to February of 1920. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for full calendar). ... Eduard Samuilovich Pantserzhanskiy (Russian: Эдуард Самуилович Панцержанский) (October 12 (O.S. September 30), 1887 - September 26, 1937) was a Russian military leader, Commander-in-Chief of the Soviet Naval Forces from December of 1921 to December of 1924. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Vyacheslav Ivanovich Zof (Вячеслав Иванович Зоф in Russian) (December of 1889, Dubno - June 20, 1937) was a Soviet military figure and a statesman of Czech nationality. ... 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Romuald Adamovich Muklevich (Russian: Ромуальд Адамович Муклевич) (November 25, 1890 - February 9, 1938) was a Russian military figure and Commander-in-Chief of the Soviet Naval Forces from August of 1926 to July of 1931. ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... Vladimir Mitrofanovich Orlov (Russian: Владимир Митрофанович Орлов) (July 15, 1895 - July 28, 1938) was a Russian military leader and Commander-in-Chief of the Soviet Naval Forces from July of 1931 to July of 1937. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Mikhail Vladimirovich Viktorov (Russian: Михаил Владимирович Викторов) (December 24, 1893, Yaroslavl - August 1, 1938) was a Russian military leader and Commander-in-Chief of the Soviet Naval Forces from August of 1937 to January of 1938. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Mikhail Petrovich Frinovsky (Russian: Михаил Петрович Фриновский) (January of 1898 - February 4 or February 8, 1938 was a Russian NKVD figure (last position: 1st Deputy Peoples Comissar (=minister) Internal Affairs (=NKVD). ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full year calendar). ... Nikolai Kuznetsov as Admiral of the Fleet Nikolai Gerasimovich Kuznetsov (Russian: Николай Герасимович Кузнецов) (July 24, 1904–December 6, 1974) was a Soviet naval officer and Peoples Commissar of the Navy during World War II. // Kuznetsov was born in the village of Medvedki in the Kotlas district of the Arkhangelsk Oblast. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Ivan Stepanovich Yumashev (Russian: Иван Степанович Юмашев) (October 9 [O.S. September 27] 1895, Tbilisi - September 2, 1972, Leningrad) was a Soviet admiral (1943), Hero of the Soviet Union (September 14, 1945), and Commander-in-Chief of the Soviet Naval Forces from January of 1947 to July of 1951. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sergey Georgyevich Gorshkov (b. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Vladimir Nikolayevich Chernavin (Russian: Владимир Николаевич Чернавин; born 1928) was a Commander-in-Chief of the Soviet Navy and Admiral of the Fleet (since 1983). ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ...

See also

Soviet aircraft carrier Ulyanovsk Corvettes Grisha I class Nanuchka I class Nanuchka II class Grisha II class Nanuchka III class Nanuchka IV class Tarantul I class Grisha III class Tarantul II class Pauk I class Dergach class Pauk II class Parchim II class Grisha IV class Tarantul III class Grisha... The Morskaya Aviatsiya (Soviet Naval Air Service) was the Russian Navy air service during WWII. such air unit provided air support to Voyenno-morskoy flot SSSR (Soviet Navy) in your theather of operations in Barents,Baltic and Black Sea amongst the Soviet Naval Detachment in Ohkostk Sea. ...

References

  1. ^ http://flot.sevastopol.info/ship/lider/tashkent.htm reference
  2. ^ "The Self-Designing High-Reliability Organization: Aircraft Carrier Flight Operations at Sea." Rochlin, G. I.; La Porte, T. R.; Roberts, K. H. Footnote 39. Naval War College Review. Autumn, 1987, Vol. LI, No. 3.

The Naval War College Review is a quarterly publication of the United States Navys Naval War College for the discussion of public policy matters of interest to the maritime services, established in 1948. ...

Bibliography

  • Sontag, Sherry; Drew, Christopher; Drew, Annette Lawrence (1998). Blind Man's Bluff: The Untold Story of American Submarine Espionage. Harper. ISBN 0-06-103004-X.
  • Nilsen, Thomas; Kudrik, Igor; Nikitin, Aleksandr (1996). Report 2:1996: The Russian Northern Fleet. Oslo/St. Petersburg: Bellona Foundation. ISBN 82-993138-5-6. Chapter 8, "Nuclear submarine accidents".
  • Oberg, James (1988). Uncovering Soviet Disasters. New York, NY: Random House. ISBN 0-394-56095-7.
  • Goldstein, Lyle; Zhukov, Yuri (2004). A Tale of Two Fleets: A Russian Perspective on the 1973 Naval Standoff in the Mediterranean. Naval War College Review.
  • Goldstein, Lyle; John Hattendorf; Zhukov, Yuri. (2005) The Cold War at Sea : An International Appraisal. Journal of Strategic Studies. ISSN 0140-2390

The Bellona Foundation is an international environmental organization established in 1986 as a Norwegian organization and based in Oslo. ... James Edward Oberg (b. ... New York, New York redirects here. ... John B. Hattendorf is a professor and the chairman of the maritime history department at the United States Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Soviet Navy - Biocrawler (0 words)
The Soviet Navy (Russian: Военно-морской флот СССР, Voyenno-morskoy flot SSSR, literally "Naval military forces of the USSR") was the naval arm of the Soviet armed forces.
A telling indicator of the perceived threat of the Navy was that the Soviets were not invited to participate in the Washington Naval Treaty, which served to cap size and capabilities of the most powerful navies.
After the fall of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War, the Soviet Navy went neglected once again, and was eventually divided among several former Soviet republics.
Soviet Navy Information (0 words)
A telling indicator of the perceived threat of the Navy was that the Soviets were not invited to participate in the Washington Naval Treaty, which served to limit the size and capabilities of the most powerful navies.
The Soviet Navy generally placed less importance on aircraft carriers than their American rivals, however, it was felt that a carrier force of some form was needed.
The Soviet attack submarine force was, like the rest of the navy, geared towards the interception of NATO convoys, but also targeted American aircraft carrier battle groups.
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