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Encyclopedia > Southern literature

Southern literature (sometimes called the literature of the American South) is defined as American literature about the Southern United States or by writers from this region. Characteristics of Southern literature include a focus on a common Southern history, the significance of family, a sense of community and one’s role within it, the region's dominant religion (Christianity, See Protestantism) and the burdens/rewards religion often brings, issues of racial tension, land and the promise it brings, a sense of social class and place, and the use of the Southern dialect.[1] American literature refers to written or literary work produced in the area of the United States and Colonial America. ... This article is 88 kilobytes or more in size. ... Pre-Colonial America For details, see the main Pre-Colonial America article. ... a family of Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso in 1997 Family is a Western term used to denote a domestic group of people, or a number of domestic groups linked through descent (demonstrated or stipulated) from a common ancestor, marriage or adoption. ... A community is a social group of organisms sharing an environment, normally with shared interests. ... Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian... Racism in the United States has been a major issue in America since the colonial era. ... Social class refers to the hierarchical distinctions between individuals or groups in societies or cultures. ... Southern American English as defined by the monophthongization of to before obstruents (Labov, Ash, and Boberg 2006:126). ...

Modern definition The states in dark red are almost always included in modern day definitions of the South, while those in medium red are usually included. The striped states are sometimes/occasionally considered Southern[2][3]

Contents

Image File history File links US_map-South_Modern. ... Image File history File links US_map-South_Modern. ...

Overview of Southern literature

In its simplest form, Southern literature consists of writing about the American South, with the South either being defined as the Deep South states of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, North Carolina, Tennessee, Mississippi and Louisiana,and Arkansas or the extended South which includes the border states such as Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia,and Missouri and the peripheral Southern states of Florida,Texas,and Oklahoma. The U.S. Southern states or The South, known during the American Civil War era as Dixie, is a distinctive region of the United States with its own unique historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  Ranked 30th  - Total 52,419 sq mi (135,765 km²)  - Width 190 miles (306 km)  - Length 330 miles (531 km)  - % water 3. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... In this map:  Union states  Union territories  The border states  Kansas, which entered the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  Confederate states  Confederate territories The term border states refers to the five slave states of Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, and western Virginia which all had a... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,774 sq mi (110,785 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ...


In addition to the geographical component of Southern literature, certain themes have appeared because of the similar histories of the Southern states in regard to slavery, the American Civil War, and Reconstruction. The conservative culture in the South has also produced a strong focus within Southern literature on the significance of family, religion, community in one's personal and social life, the use of the Southern dialect,[4] and a strong sense of "place."[5] The South's troubled history with racial issues also continually appears in its literature.[6] Slave redirects here. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... Culture (Culture from the Latin cultura stemming from colere, meaning to cultivate,) generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... Southern American English is a dialect of the English language spoken throughout the Southern region of the United States, from central Kentucky and northern Virginia to the Gulf Coast and from the Atlantic coast to eastern Texas. ... In geopolitics, the term The South is often used to refer to the poorer, less technologically advanced nations of the world as opposed to The North, which is richer and more developed. ... This article is about race as an intraspecies classification. ...


Despite these common themes, what makes writers and their literature Southern is often debated. For example, Mark Twain, arguably the father of Southern literature, defined the characteristics that many people associate with Southern writing in his novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. He even referred to himself as a "Southern writer." Despite this, his birthplace of Missouri is not traditionally considered to be part of The South. In addition, many famous Southern writers headed to the Northern U.S. as soon as they were old enough to make it on their own. So while geography is a factor, the geographical birth of the author is not the defining factor in Southern writing. Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... Huckleberry Finn and Jim Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885) by Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) is commonly accounted as the first Great American Novel. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ...


History of Southern literature

Early and antebellum literature

During the 17th and 18th centuries, a number of writers either wrote about or were from the American South (such as Captain John Smith who wrote an account of his adventures in Virginia and his rescue by Pocahontas). However, this literature is not considered southern because it predates the formation of the United States. Statue at Jamestown VA, photo Aug 2007 Sir John Smith (1580–June 21, 1631), was an English soldier, sailor, and author. ... For other uses, see Pocahontas (disambiguation). ...


The South as a distinct culture began to come into existence in the early 1800s when cotton cultivation, and the expanded enslavement of Africans as farm labor, began to take hold. During this pre-Civil War Antebellum time period, a vibrant literary community was found in Charleston, South Carolina, then one of the largest cities in America. The writers of this period, such as poet Paul Hamilton Hayne, tended to produce lyrical and sentimental works. One noteworthy novel of this time, Clotel; or, The President's Daughter, was written in 1853 by a southern-born slave named William Wells Brown. This novel, based on what at that time were considered rumors about Thomas Jefferson fathering a daughter with his slave Sally Hemings, was the first novel written by an African American. Antebellum is a Latin word meaning before war(ante means before and bellum is war). ... Paul Hamilton Hayne (1830 - 1886) was an American poet. ... William Wells Brown (November 6, 1814 – November 6, 1884) was a prominent abolitionist lecturer, novelist, playwright, and historian. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Sally Hemings (Shadwell, Albemarle County, Virginia, circa 1773 or 1773 – Charlottesville, Virginia, 1835) was a quadroon slave owned by Thomas Jefferson. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


Another successful writer to come out of the American south was Professor William H. Peck. Born in 1830 in Augusta, Georgia he moved with his father Colonel Peck in 1843 to the Indian River Coloney in Central Florida. He later wrote descriptively about this area and his meeting with early pioneers such as lighthouse keeper Burnham of Cape Canaveral in the Florida Star Newspaper in 1887. He graduated from Harvard in 1853 and his writing career took off with submissions to Richard Bonner's New York Ledger. William Peck served as Professor of History at LSU and later moved to Atlanta, Georgia where he started "The Georgia Weekly". He later retired to the home of his youth in Merritt Island, Florida and died soon after his wife in 1892 in Jacksonville Florida. Professor William Henry Peck A successful southern novelist and writer. ... Nickname: Motto: We feel Good Location of the consolidated areas of Augusta and Richmond County in the state of Georgia. ... Cape Canaveral from space, August 1991 Cape Canaveral (Cabo Cañaveral in Spanish) is a strip of land in Brevard County, Florida, United States, near the center of that states Atlantic coast. ... Nickname: Location in Fulton and DeKalb counties in the state of Georgia Coordinates: , Country State Counties Fulton, DeKalb Government  - Mayor Shirley Franklin (D) Area  - City  132. ... Merritt Island is a census designated place in Brevard County, on the Atlantic coast of the U.S. state of Florida. ...


The "Lost Cause" years

In the second half of the 19th century, the South lost the Civil War and suffered through what many southerners considered a harsh occupation (called Reconstruction). In place of the Anti-Tom literature came poetry and novels about the "Lost Cause" of the South's Civil War fight. These writers idealized the defeated South and its lost culture. Prominent writers with this point of view included poets Henry Timrod and Sidney Lanier and fiction writer Thomas Nelson Page. Others, like African American writer Charles W. Chesnutt, dismissed this nostalgia by pointing out the racism and exploitation of blacks that happened during this time period in the South. For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... Henry Timrod Courtesy of CyberHymnal: http://www. ... Sidney Lanier (February 3, 1842 – September 7, 1881) was an American musician and poet. ... Thomas Nelson Page (b. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Charles W. Chesnutt at the age of 40 Charles Waddell Chesnutt (June 20, 1858 – November 15, 1932) was an African American author and political activist best known for novels and short stories from Fayetteville, North Carolina. ... One may feel nostalgic for the familiar routine of school, conveniently forgetting the painful experiences such as bullying. ... Racism is a belief or concept that inherent differences between people, in particular those upon which the concept of race is based, determine cultural or individual achievement, and may involve the idea that ones self-identified race or ethnic group or others race or ethnic group is superior. ...


In 1884, Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known by his pen name Mark Twain, published what is arguably the most influential southern novel of the 19th century, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Ernest Hemingway said of the novel, "All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn." This statement applies even more to southern literature because of the novel's frank dealings with issues such as race and violence. Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 - April 21, 1910), better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was a famous and popular American humorist, writer and lecturer. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... Huckleberry Finn and Jim Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885) by Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) is commonly accounted as the first Great American Novel. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ...


The Southern Renaissance

Main article: Southern Renaissance

In the 1920s and '30s, a renaissance in Southern literature began with the appearance of writers such as William Faulkner, Caroline Gordon, Tennessee Williams, Katherine Anne Porter, Allen Tate, and Robert Penn Warren. Because of the distance the Southern Renaissance authors had from the American Civil War and slavery, they were more objective in their writings about the South. Writers like Faulkner, who won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1949, also brought new techniques such as stream of consciousness and complex narrative techniques to their writings. For instance, his novel As I Lay Dying is told by changing narrators ranging from the deceased Addie to her young son. The Southern Renaissance was the reinvigoration of American Southern literature that began in the 1920s and 1930s with the appearance of writers such as William Faulkner, Caroline Gordon, Katherine Anne Porter, Allen Tate, Tennessee Williams, and Robert Penn Warren, among others. ... William Cuthbert Faulkner (September 25, 1897 – July 6, 1962) was an American novelist and poet whose works feature his native state of Mississippi. ... Caroline Ferguson Gordon 1895-1981 Her early novels of southern history: Penhally (1931), None Shall Look Back (1937), and The Garden of Adonis (1937). ... Thomas Lanier Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983), better known by the pseudonym Tennessee Williams, was a major American playwright and one of the prominent playwrights of the twentieth century. ... Katherine Anne Porter (15 May 1890 – 18 September 1980) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American journalist, essayist, short story writer, novelist, and political activist. ... John Orley Allen Tate (November 19, 1899 - February 9, 1979) was an American poet, essayist, and social commentator, and Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress, 1943 - 1944. ... Robert Penn Warren Robert Penn Warren (April 24, 1905 – September 15, 1989) was an American poet, novelist, and literary critic, and was one of the founders of The New Criticism. ... The Southern Renaissance was the reinvigoration of American Southern literature that began in the 1920s and 1930s with the appearance of writers such as William Faulkner, Caroline Gordon, Katherine Anne Porter, Allen Tate, Tennessee Williams, and Robert Penn Warren, among others. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Slave redirects here. ... Nobel Prize in Literature medal. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... In literary criticism, stream of consciousness is a literary technique which seeks to portray an individuals point of view by giving the written equivalent of the characters thought processes. ... As I Lay Dying is a novel written by the American author William Faulkner. ...


The late 1930s also saw the publication of one of the most well-known Southern novels, Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell. The novel, published in 1937, quickly became a bestseller and an equally famous movie. Southern literature became popular across genres; children's books like Ezekiel, published in 1937 by writer/illustrators like Elvira Garner, drew audiences outside the South. Face The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... Gone with the Wind, an American novel by Margaret Mitchell, was published in 1936 and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937. ... For the Canadian politician see Margaret Mitchell (politician) Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell (November 8, 1900 – August 16, 1949) was the American author, who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 for her immensely successful novel, Gone with the Wind, which was published in 1936. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gone with the Wind is a 1939 film adapted from Margaret Mitchells 1936 novel of the same name. ... Elvira Garner (birth, death) was a 20th Century Florida author and watercolor illustrator. ...


From the 1940s onward, Southern literature grew thematically as it embraced the social and cultural changes in the South resulting from the American Civil Rights Movement. In addition, more female and African American writers began to be accepted as part of Southern literature, including African Americans such as Zora Neale Hurston, Sterling Allen Brown, and Dori Sanders, along with women such as Eudora Welty, Flannery O'Connor, and Carson McCullers. Other well-known Southern writers of this period include Reynolds Price, James Dickey, and Walker Percy. One of the most highly praised Southern novels of the 20th century, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, won the Pulitzer Prize when it was published in 1960. Another famous novel of the 1960s is A Confederacy of Dunces, written by New Orleans native John Kennedy Toole in the 1960s but not published until 1980 -- it won the Pulitzer Prize in 1981 and has since become a cult classic. The civil rights movement in the United States has been a long, primarily nonviolent struggle to bring full civil rights and equality under the law to all citizens of United States. ... African American literature is the body of literature produced in the United States by writers of African descent. ... Zora Neale Hurston (January 7, 1891 – January 28, 1960) was an American folklorist and author during the time of the Harlem Renaissance, best known for the 1937 novel Their Eyes Were Watching God. ... Sterling Allen Brown (May 1, 1901 – January 13, 1989) was an African American teacher, and writer on folklore, of poetry and of literary criticism. ... Eudora Welty (b. ... Mary Flannery OConnor (b. ... Carson McCullers, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1959 Carson McCullers (February 19, 1917 – September 29, 1967) was an American writer. ... Reynolds Price Reynolds Price (born February 1, 1933, as Edward Reynolds Price) is a U.S. novelist, poet, dramatist, essayist and James B. Duke Professor of English at Duke University. ... James Dickey (February 2, 1923 – January 19, 1997) was a popular United States poet and novelist. ... Walker Percy (May 28, 1916 – May 10, 1990) was an American Southern author whose interests included philosophy and semiotics. ... To Kill a Mockingbird is a Southern Gothic bildungsroman novel by Harper Lee. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Harper Lee Nelle Harper Lee (born April 28, 1926) is an American novelist known for her Pulitzer Prize–winning 1960 novel To Kill a Mockingbird, her only major work to date. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... A Confederacy of Dunces is a novel written by John Kennedy Toole, published in 1980, 11 years after the authors suicide. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... John Kennedy Toole (December 17, 1937 – March 26, 1969) was an American novelist, from New Orleans, Louisiana, best known for his novel A Confederacy of Dunces. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded since 1948 for distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


Southern literature today

Today the American South is undergoing a number of cultural and social changes, including rapid industrialization and an influx of immigrants to the region. As a result, the exact definition of what constitutes southern literature is changing. Some critics specify that the previous definitions of southern literature still hold, with some of them suggesting, only somewhat in jest, that all southern literature must still contain a dead mule within its pages [1]. Still, the successful crime novels of James Lee Burke are not ashamed of making a point of their own southernness and their nationwide popularity has been attributed to their southern appeal [2]. James Lee Burke is an American author best known for his mysteries, particularly the Dave Robicheaux series. ...


Others, though, say that the very fabric of the South has changed so much that the old assumptions about southern literature no longer hold. For example, Truman Capote, born and raised in the Deep South, is best known for his novel In Cold Blood, a piece with absolutely none of the characteristics associated with "southern writing." Other southern writers, such as popular author John Grisham, rarely write about traditional southern literary issues at all. John Berendt, who wrote the popular Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, is not a Southerner. Truman Capote (pronounced ) (30 September 1924 – 25 August 1984) was an American writer whose non-fiction, stories, novels and plays are recognized literary classics, including the novella Breakfast at Tiffanys (1958) and In Cold Blood (1965), which he labeled a non-fiction novel. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... John Ray Grisham Jr. ... John Berendt is the author of the best-selling non-fiction book Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ...


Among the prominent southern writers today are Barry Hannah, Pat Conroy, Fannie Flagg, Randall Kenan, Ernest Gaines, John Grisham, Lee Smith, Tom Robbins, Tom Wolfe, Wendell Berry, Cormac McCarthy, Anne Rice, Edward P. Jones, Barbara Kingsolver, Willie Morris, Anne Tyler, Larry Brown and Kaye Gibbons. Barry Hannah (born 1942) is an American novelist and short story writer. ... Pat Conroy (born October 26, 1945 in Atlanta, Georgia) is a New York Times bestselling author who has written such acclaimed works as The Lords of Discipline, Beach Music, The Great Santini, The Prince of Tides, The Water is Wide, The Boo, My Losing Season, and Conroys stories have... Fannie Flagg (born September 21, 1944 in Birmingham, Alabama) is an American author and actress. ... Randall Kenan (b. ... Ernest J. Gaines (b. ... John Ray Grisham Jr. ... Lee Smith can refer to different people: Lee Smith (author) (born mid-20th century), American author Lee Smith (baseball) (born 1957), American pitcher Lee Smith (editor), film editor Lee Smith (musician) (born 1983), American drummer Lee Smith (meteorologist), cloud researcher Lee Smith, professional rugby league player Category: ... Tom Robbins at a reading of Wild Ducks Flying Backward in San Francisco on September 24, 2005 Thomas Eugene Robbins (born July 22, 1936 in Blowing Rock, North Carolina) is an American author. ... Thomas Kennerly Wolfe (born March 2, 1931 in Richmond, Virginia), known as Tom Wolfe, is a best-selling American author and journalist. ... Wendell Berry (born August 5, 1934, Henry County, Kentucky) is an American man of letters, academic, cultural and economic critic, and farmer. ... Cormac McCarthy, born Charles McCarthy,[1] July 20th, 1933 in Providence, Rhode Island, is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist who has authored ten novels in the Southern Gothic, western, and post-apocalyptic genres. ... Anne Rice (born on October 4, 1941) is a best-selling American author of gothic and later religious themed books. ... Edward P. Jones is an African American author and winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. ... Barbara Kingsolver (born April 8, 1955) is an American fiction writer. ... William Weaks Willie Morris (November 29, 1934 — August 2, 1999), was an American writer and editor born in Jackson, Mississippi, though his family later moved to Yazoo City, Mississippi, which he immortalized in his works of prose. ... Anne Tyler (born on October 25, 1941 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist. ... Larry Brown For other people of the same name, see Larry Brown (disambiguation). ... Kaye Gibbons (born 1960) is an American novelist. ...


Journals

  • Southern Literary Journal and Monthly Magazine (1835-1837)
  • Southern Literary Journal (1964-present)
  • Mississippi Quarterly — A refereed, scholarly journal dedicated to the life and culture of the American South, past and present.[3]
  • The Southern Review — The famous literary journal focusing on southern literature.[4]
  • storySouth — A journal of new writings from the American South. Features fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and more.[5]
  • Dead Mule School of Southern Literature — Showcases all aspects of southern writing from contemporary voices to cliched vernacular, from short fiction, poetry, and essays to photography.[6]
  • Southern Cultures — Journal from the Center for the Study of the American South[7]
  • Southern Literary Review — Book reviews, profiles of southern authors, and a directory of southern authors by state.[8]
  • Southern Scribe — News and reviews about southern literature (including a helpful calendar of pertinent events).[9]
  • Southern Spaces — Peer-Reviewed Internet journal examining the spaces and places of the American South.[10]

Southern Literary Journal and Monthly Magazine was a journal founded in 1835 by Daniel K. Whitaker and published until 1837 by J.S. Burges from Charleston, South Carolina. ... Southern Literary Journal was established in 1968 by editors Louis D. Rubin, Jr. ... The Southern Review is a publication of Louisiana State University. ... storySouth is an online quarterly literary magazine that publishes fiction, poetry, criticism, essays, and visual artwork, with a focus on the Southern United States. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline for Web content. ...

See also

Southern American English as defined by the monophthongization of to before obstruents (Labov, Ash, and Boberg 2006:126). ... Southern Gothic is a subgenre of the Gothic writing style, unique to American literature. ... The Southern Renaissance was the reinvigoration of American Southern literature that began in the 1920s and 1930s with the appearance of writers such as William Faulkner, Caroline Gordon, Katherine Anne Porter, Allen Tate, Tennessee Williams, and Robert Penn Warren, among others. ... The Fellowship of Southern Writers is a literary organization headquartered at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. ... Arkansas literature has an emerging consciousness, though it still lags behind other Southern states such as Mississippi and Georgia in the promotion of its literary culture. ... African American literature is the body of literature produced in the United States by writers of African descent. ... Anti-Tom literature refers to the 19th century pro-slavery novels and other literary works written in response to Harriet Beecher Stowes Uncle Toms Cabin. ... This article is about the word itself. ...

References

  1. ^ "Southern Literature: Women Writers" by Patricia Evans, accessed Feb. 4, 2007.
  2. ^ David Williamson. UNC-CH surveys reveal where the ‘real’ South lies. Retrieved on 22 Feb, 2007.
  3. ^ http://www.pfly.net/misc/GeographicMorphology.jpg
  4. ^ "Southern Literature: Women Writers" by Patricia Evans, accessed Feb. 4, 2007.
  5. ^ Remapping Southern Literature: Contemporary Southern Writers and the West by Kate Cochran and Robert Brinkmeyer, Jr., University of Georgia Press, 2000.
  6. ^ But Now I See: The White Southern Racial Conversion Narrative by Fred Hobson, Louisiana State University Press, 1999.

Further reading

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Library of Southern Literature: Humor in Literature (1190 words)
Southern humor, like much of the best southern writing in general, has been boisterous and physical, often grotesque, and generally realistic.
Southern humor fits fairly well into the chronological framework of four periods usually applied to American humor generally: (1) 1830 to 1860, (2) 1860 to 1925, (3) 1935 to 1945, and (4) 1945 to the present.
Southern humor—at least that written by southerners—would henceforth be a leaven in the hard brown bread of literature.
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