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Encyclopedia > Southern University

Southern University

Image File history File links Southwestern University Seal File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Motto A People’s Institution Serving the State, the Nation, and the World
Established 1880
Type Public Coeducational
Chancellor Edward Jackson
President Ralph Slaughter
Staff 1,465[1]
Undergraduates 8,964
Postgraduates 1,400
Location Baton Rouge, Louisiana, U.S.
Campus Urban
Sports teams Jaguars
Colors Blue & Gold
Mascot Lacumba the Jaguar
Website www.subr.edu
For other Southern University campuses, see Southern University System.

Southern University and A&M College is one of the most well-known historically black colleges and universities. Southern is located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in the United States. The concept of Southern University was put forth by P. B. S. Pinchback, T. T. Allain, and Henry Demas as an institution "for the education of persons of color" at the 1879 Louisiana State Constitutional Convention. In April 1880, the Louisiana General Assembly chartered Southern University, originally located in New Orleans. Southern opened its doors on 1881-03-07 with twelve students. One of the original locations of the early campus was the former Israel Sinai Temple Synagogue on Calliope Street, between St. Charles and Camp streets in New Orleans. Southern became a land grant school in 1890, and an Agricultural and Mechanical department was established. Due to continued growth and a lack of land for expansion, the university relocated to what was then Scotlandville, along Scott's Bluff facing the Mississippi River in 1914. A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Capitol Building Baton Rouge is the capital of Louisiana, a state of the United States of America. ... Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... For other uses, see Jaguar (disambiguation). ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on a Web server, usually accessible via the Internet or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML, that is almost always accessible... The Southern University System is a system of universities in the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... Nickname: Motto: Authentic Louisiana at every turn Coordinates: , Country United States State Louisiana Parish East Baton Rouge Parish Founded 1699 Incorporated 16 January 1817 Government  - Mayor Melvin Kip Holden (D) Area  - City  79. ... Pinckney Benton Stewart Pinchback (May 10, 1837 – December 21, 1921) was the first African-American to become governor of a U.S. State. ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties/Parishes/Boroughs, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... A constitutional convention is a gathering of delegates for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A legislature is a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ... Nickname: Location in the State of Louisiana and the United States Coordinates: , Country United States State Louisiana Parish Orleans Founded 1718 Government  - Mayor Ray Nagin (D) Area  - City  350. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... March 7 is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A synagogue (from ancient Greek: , transliterated synagogÄ“, assembly; Hebrew: beit knesset, house of assembly; Yiddish: , shul; Ladino: , esnoga) is a Jewish house of worship. ... A land grant is a gift of land made by the government for projects such as roads, railroads, or especially academic institutions. ... 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ... Mechanical engineering is an engineering discipline that involves the application of principles of physics for analysis, design, manufacturing, and maintenance of mechanical systems. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

Contents

The "New" Southern University

The new president and first president of what is now known as Southern University at Baton Rouge was Dr. Joseph Samuel Clark. Clark, an outstanding citizen in the Baton Rouge African American community, presided over Baton Rouge College and the Louisiana Colored Teachers Association. The Louisiana Constitutional Convention of 1921 authorized the reorganization and expansion of Southern University; and Legislative Act 100 of 1922 provided that the institution be reorganized under the control of the State Board of Education. Clark presided over Southern University during a transitionary period for the institution. The student enrollment grew from forty-seven students to 500 students and many of the school's early buildings were built during this time. Clark presided until his retirement in 1938, at which time the position was given to his son, Dr. Felton Grandison Clark, a renowned speaker and gentleman. Under his tenure, the university underwent tremendous growth. About 33 of 114 current buildings were erected in his 30 years at the university. The student enrollment grew from 500 to nearly 10,000 students and between him and his father, the treasury grew from $14,000 to $10,000,000. Due to the reluctance of LSU Law School to admit African Americans into its law program, a special Louisiana Convention allowed a law program to come to Southern University in 1947. The university was one of the first historically black colleges to receive a visit from a First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt, in 1943. Also during Clark's tenure, Southern University at New Orleans (SUNO) (1956) and Southern University at Shreveport/Bossier City (SUSLA) (1964) were founded. They were later incorporated into the Southern University System in 1974. Capitol Building Baton Rouge is the capital of Louisiana, a state of the United States of America. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College at Baton Rouge, generally known as Louisiana State University or LSU, is a public, coeducational university located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the main campus of the Louisiana State University System. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies, from left, Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ... Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American political leader who used her stature as First Lady of the United States from 1933 to 1945 to promote her husbands (Franklin D. Roosevelts) New Deal, as well as civil rights. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... , : Port City , River City , Rachet City : The Next Great City of the South United States Louisiana Caddo 117. ... Bossier City is a city in Bossier Parish, Louisiana, USA. As of the 2000 Census, the city had a total population of 56,461. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... The Southern University System is a system of universities in the U.S. state of Louisiana. ...


In 1969, the university saw a changing of the guard, when Felton Clark retired and Dr. Leon G. Netterville took over the reins of leadership. On November 16, 1972, two students involved with "Students United", a student protest group on the campus, Denver Smith and Leonard Brown, were shot and killed outside the Old Auditorium (now the Southern University Museum of Art). The murder, apparently committed by a patrolman, has never been solved. Nevertheless, the institution continued to grow and in 1974 a special session in the Louisiana Legislature established the Southern University System. The Southern University System consists of Southern University and A&M College, Baton Rouge, (SUBR); Southern University, New Orleans (SUNO); Southern University, Shreveport (SUSLA is a two-year, commuter college) Southern University Law Center and The Southern University Agricultural Center. November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... In a legislature, a special session is a period when the body convenes outside of the normal legislative schedule. ... The Southern University System is a system of universities in the U.S. state of Louisiana. ...


Southern University and its northern Louisiana rival, Grambling State University, participate in the Bayou Classic Football Game and other festivities (pageant, job fairs, street festival, concerts, Greek/Step Show and Battle Of The Bands) annually on the Thanksgiving Day weekend in New Orleans. The Classic is considered the "Grandfather" of all the college football classics that it has spawned in recent years. The game attracts upwards of over 400,000 alumni, students, fans and other revelers to New Orleans each year and has contributed hundreds of millions of dollars to New Orleans' economy since its inception in 1974. It is believed to be the largest gathering of African-Americans annually in the US. Due to Hurricane Katrina and subsequent damage to the Superdome in 2005, the game was moved to Houston, Texas, but it returned to New Orleans in 2006. It is the only historically black college or Division I-AA football game that is televised on a major network. NBC has carried the game live for over 15 years and each year it has become the highest rated college football telecast among African-Americans for the network. In addition, sports broadcaster ESPN chose the 2005 Bayou Classic as its highly sought-after locale for its most popular presentation, College GameDay with Lee Corso. It is the only time in the show's twenty year history that it was broadcast from a game involving teams from two historically black universities or Division I-AA schools. “Grambling” redirects here. ... The State Farm Bayou Classic is the annual college football game between the Grambling State University Tigers and the Southern University Jaguars, first held in 1974 at Tulane Stadium in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ... Superdome can stand for: Louisiana Superdome HP Superdome server ... Nickname: Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: Country United States State Texas Counties Harris County Fort Bend County Montgomery County Incorporated June 5, 1837 Government  - Mayor Bill White Area  - City  601. ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... NBC (a former acronym for National Broadcasting Company) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... College GameDay is an ESPN show covering college football. ... Lee Corso (born 1936) is an American sports broadcaster and football analyst. ... In the United States, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) (a type of Minority Serving Institution or MSI) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African-American community. ...


The highly acclaimed Southern University A&M Colege "Human Jukebox" is internationally recognized as if not the top, one of the top marching bands in all of the world. Being Led by he greatest Band Director of all times Dr. Issac Greggs who turned what was once known as the original Marching 100's along with the Southern Bells, into The Human Jukebox, and the beautiful and talented Dancing Dolls. Dr. Greggs who is affectionately known as "Doc". served the band program for almost 51 years until he turned it over to Mr. Jackson at the end of 2005. Doc was known for his slogan "Often Imitated never ever duplicated".In addition to being featured in many television commercials, the Human Jukebox has been invited to participate in the annual Rose Parade in Pasadena, Californiaone of America's most popular parades,a few Presidential Inauguration ceremonies and several Super Bowl halftime presentations. USA Today named the band the number one marching band in the United States so many consecutive times till the magazine ceased from naming top marching bands. For many years, the band was one of the only bands in the U.S. that did not have any female members, but that has changed in recent years. Currently there are over 20 female members. There is also the Roses Tournament in England Perhaps one of the United States of Americas most important annual festivities, The Tournament of Roses Parade is the 114-year-old traditional parade generally held on New Years Day in Pasadena, California. ... Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... Inauguration Day is the day on which the President of the United States is sworn in and takes office. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ...


The first season of the reality television series College Hill on BET premiered in 2004 with the Southern University campus as its locale. College Hill is a reality television series that visits historically black colleges. ... Bet may refer to: Look up bet in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The university is currently in the midst of a major campus facelift with the recent completion of several new dormitories, on campus apartments,renovation of on-campus A.W. Mumford Stadium and plans for construction of other infrastructure.


Notable Student Organizations

Jno G. Lewis Jr. Ldge. 261 Is the only African American Prince Hall F&AM Lodge founded on an Historical Black College and Universities campus historically black universities. This lodge was founded on March 21, 1981 with 37 young men who wanted to hold Masonic discourse while in school for their enlightenment, while being separated from their own home state lodges. Having come from different areas of the United States and teachings of Masonry varying to some degree, they wanted to study together for communication. Hungry for secular and Masonic education while at Southern University, efforts were made to have a lodge established on the campus. This was the dream that became reality for Bro. Isadore E. Tansil, Sr., who is the founder of JNO. G. LEWIS, JR., LODGE 261 and the first Worshipful Master. Last year te lodge celebrated its 25th anniversary and held its annual "Jazzin with the G" which is a fundraiser for the Bro. Isadore E. Tansil, Sr. Scholarship Fund. There are various community service activities and social events that this lodge participates in the Greater Baton Rouge area. Members of this lodge range within various fields and levels of occupational leadership, that impact not only the Metro area of Baton Rouge, but also throughout the world. Infobox Jno G. Lewis Jr. ... In the United States, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) (a type of Minority Serving Institution or MSI) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African-American community. ...


The Presidents of Southern University

Early Southern University

  • A.R. Gourrier, 1881
  • George Fayerweather, 1881-2
  • Rev. C.H. Thompson, 1882-3
  • Rev. J.H. Harrison, 1883-6
  • George W. Bathwell, 1886-7
  • H.A. Hill, 1887-1899

Modern Southern University

  • Dr. Joseph S. Clark, 1914-1938
  • Dr. George L. Netterville, 1969-1974
  • Dr. Jesse N. Stone 1974-1981
  • Dr. James J. Prestage 1982-1985
  • Dr. Joffre T. Whisenton, 1985-1988
  • Dr. Dolores Spikes, 1988-1996 (First female head of any college system in the U.S.)
  • Dr. Leon Tarver II, 1997-2005
  • Dr. Edward Jackson, (interim) 2005-2006
  • Dr. Ralph Slaughter 2006-

Colleges within the University

  • Honors College
  • University College
  • College of Agriculture, Family, and Consumer Sciences
  • College of Arts and Humanities
  • College of Business
  • College of Education
  • College of Engineering
  • College of Sciences
  • School of Architecture
  • School of Nursing
  • The Nelson Mandela School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs

All Southern University programs are accredited and also are monitored by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) is a regional accreditor for over 13,000 public and private educational institutions ranging from preschool to college level in the Southern United States. ...


Athletics

Southern University's mascot is the Jaguar

Southern's sports teams participate in the Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) which is a part of the NCAA Division I system. (Football teams in the SWAC are in Division I-AA.) Southern University's colors are columbia blue and gold and their mascot is the Jaguar. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) is a college athletic conference made up of historically black universities in the southern United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Columbia blue is a light blue tertiary color. ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ... For other uses, see Jaguar (disambiguation). ...


Southern plays its archrival Grambling Tigers in the annual Bayou Classic in New Orleans at the Louisiana Superdome, telecast on NBC every Thanksgiving weekend. Due to Hurricane Katrina, this game was played in Reliant Stadium in Houston in 2005. “Grambling” redirects here. ... The State Farm Bayou Classic is the annual college football game between the Grambling State University Tigers and the Southern University Jaguars, first held in 1974 at Tulane Stadium in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Superdome redirects here. ... NBC (a former acronym for National Broadcasting Company) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... The First Thanksgiving, painted by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris (1863-1930). ... Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ... Reliant Stadium is a football stadium in Houston, Texas. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2006, Southern's Mens basketball team played Duke University in the first round of the NCAA Tournament in Greensboro, North Carolina. The Jaguars played a closely contested game until Duke finally pulled away midway through the second half, eventually winning 70-54. This was Coach Rob Spivery's first season with the school and he was named SWAC coach of the year after winning both the regular season title and conference tournament. In 1993, unheralded Southern University added lore to the NCAA Tournament by defeating fourth-seeded Georgia Tech, one of the biggest upsets in the tournament's history. Avery Johnson, former NBA star who won a title with the San Antonio Spurs, graduated from Southern in 1988. Johnson is currently head coach of the Dallas Mavericks and was named NBA Coach Of The Year in 2006. Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five active players each try to score points against one another by throwing a ball through a 10-foot high hoop (the basket) under organized rules. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ... // Final four redirects here. ... Greensboro Skyline Greensboro redirects here. ... // Final four redirects here. ... Georgia Institute of Technology The Georgia Institute of Technology, or Georgia Tech, is located in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A. With over 16,000 students, Georgia Tech is one of four public research universities in the University System of Georgia. ... Halo series of games, see Sergeant Major A.J. Johnson. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... The San Antonio Spurs are an American professional basketball team based in San Antonio, Texas. ... } The Dallas Mavericks (also known as the Mavs) are an NBA basketball team based in Dallas, Texas. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ...


The 2005-2006 Women's basketball team also claimed a share of the SWAC regular season title and won the SWAC women's basketball tournament. This was Coach Sandy Pugh's third appearance in the NCAA tournament with the university. Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five active players each try to score points against one another by throwing a ball through a 10-foot high hoop (the basket) under organized rules. ...


The university's baseball team is a perennial power in the SWAC and has won more regular season championships than any other SWAC member. The first college player selected in the 2003 MLB draft was Southern star Rickie Weeks. Weeks went from obscurity coming out of high school in Florida to become the nation's top collegiate player. The Milwaukee Brewers made him their No. 1 pick, the highest a second baseman has ever been drafted in MLB Draft history. Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... Rickie Weeks (born 13 September 1982 in Daytona Beach, Florida) is a professional baseball player for the Milwaukee Brewers. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... Major league affiliations National League (1998–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 4, 19, 34, 42, 44 Name Milwaukee Brewers (1970–present) Seattle Pilots (1969) Ballpark Miller Park (2001–present) County Stadium (1970-2000) Sicks Stadium (Seattle) (1969) Major league titles World Series titles (0) None... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ...


Often accompanying the S.U. athletic teams is The legendary Southern University Human Jukebox, one of the top marching bands in the nation, with a rich tradition of entertaining millions of fans every year with their precision drills and powerful sound and having performed at several Super Bowls, Yankee Stadium, foreign countries, Bowl games, Presidential Inaugurations, Radio City Music Hall, television commercials and music videos, just to name a few. An American college marching band on the field (University of Texas) A marching band is a group of instrumental musicians who generally perform outdoors, and who incorporate movement â€“ usually some type of marching â€“ with their musical performance. ... This is about the stadium the New York Yankees currently play in. ... Radio City Music Hall at Christmas 2005 Radio City Music Hall is an entertainment venue located in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ...


Notable alumni

Sports figures

Melvin Carnell Blount (Born April 10, 1948 in Vidalia, Georgia) was a 5-time All Pro-Bowl defensive back with the Pittsburgh Steelers. ... City Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Team colors Black and Gold Head Coach Mike Tomlin Owner Dan Rooney General manager Kevin Colbert League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1933–present) Eastern Division (1933–1943; 1945–1949) Western Division (1944) American Conference (1950–1952) Eastern Conference (1953–1969) Century Division (1967–1969) American Football... The National Football League Players Association, or NFLPA, is the labor union of players in footballs National Football League. ... Louis Clark Lou Brock (born June 18, 1939, El Dorado, Arkansas) is an American former player in Major League Baseball. ... Major league affiliations National League (1892–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 6, 9, 14, 17, 20, 42, 42, 45, 85 Name St. ... Harold Carmichael (born September 22, 1949 in Jacksonville, Florida) is a former American football player. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... William (Willie) Davenport (June 8, 1943 – June 17, 2002) was an American athlete, born in Troy, Alabama. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Lee Haney (born November 11, 1959) is a former American IFBB professional bodybuilder most famous for being the current joint world record holder for winning the most Mr. ... Mr. ... Trenidad Aviel Hubbard (born May 11, 1966, in Chicago, Illinois) was a Major League Baseball journeyman outfielder. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in North American professional baseball. ... Halo series of games, see Sergeant Major A.J. Johnson. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... } The Dallas Mavericks (also known as the Mavs) are an NBA basketball team based in Dallas, Texas. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... Tyrone Jones, born August 31, 1961 in St. ... Lions Stampeders Eskimos Roughriders Blue Bombers Tiger-Cats Argonauts Alouettes The Canadian Football League (CFL), also known by its French name, Ligue canadienne de football (LCF), is a professional sports league located in Canada that plays Canadian football, and is the second most popular sports league in Canada. ... Then Prime Minister Joe Clark presents the 1979 Grey Cup to victorious Edmonton Eskimos Danny Kepley and Tom Wilkinson. ... Robert “Butterbean” Love (born December 8, 1942, in Bastrop, Louisiana) is a former professional basketball player who spent the prime of his career with the NBAs Chicago Bulls. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... Rodney Milburn, Jr. ... The 1972 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XX. Olympiad, were held in Munich, West Germany, from 26 August to 11 September 1972. ... Bobby Phills (1969-2000) Bobby Ray Phills II (December 20, 1969-January 12, 2000) was a professional basketball player for the National Basketball Associations Cleveland Cavaliers and Charlotte Hornets (now called the New Orleans Hornets). ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... Charlotte Hornets may refer to several sports teams based in Charlotte, North Carolina: The NBAs New Orleans/Oklahoma City Hornets, formerly based in Charlotte (1988-2002). ... Isiah Butch Robertson (Born in 1949) is a former professional American Football player who played linebacker for the Los Angeles Rams (1971-1978) and the Buffalo Bills (1979-1982). ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... The St. ... Rickie Weeks (born 13 September 1982 in Daytona Beach, Florida) is a professional baseball player for the Milwaukee Brewers. ... Major league affiliations National League (1998–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 4, 19, 34, 42, 44 Name Milwaukee Brewers (1970–present) Seattle Pilots (1969) Ballpark Miller Park (2001–present) County Stadium (1970-2000) Sicks Stadium (Seattle) (1969) Major league titles World Series titles (0) None... Aeneas Williams is a former American NFL cornerback and free safety, who last played with the St. ... City Glendale, Arizona Other nicknames The Cards, The Birds, Big Red Team colors Cardinal Red, Black, and White Head Coach Ken Whisenhunt Owner Bill Bidwill General manager Rod Graves Mascot Big Red League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1920–present) Western Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952) Eastern Conference... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Entertainers

Alvin Batiste is a jazz/avant garde clarinetist born in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... David Banner (born Levell Crump in Jackson, Mississippi in c. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... AMERICAN IDOL HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO DEATH OF SIMON ... Branford Marsalis. ...

Politicians

Cleo Fields Cleo Fields (born November 22, 1962) is a lawyer and politician. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... Melvin L. Kip Holden (born August 12, 1952) is the Democratic Mayor-President of East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. ... William Jennings Jefferson (born March 14, 1947) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ...

Military commanders

  • Retired Brigadier General Sherian Grace Cadoria, First Black Female General in U.S. Army.
  • Lt. Gen Russel L. Honoré, commander of the efforts to revitalize the Gulf Coast after Hurricane Katrina and Rita.

Russel L. Honoré Lieutenant General Russel L. Honoré (pronounced ON-or-ay) (born 1947), also known as The Ragin Cajun (although actually of Louisiana Creole background), is the commanding general of the U.S. First Army in Fort Gillem, Georgia, and current commander of Joint Task Force Katrina responsible for... Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ... Lowest pressure 895 mbar (hPa)[1] Damages $10 billion (2005 USD)[1] Fatalities 7 direct, 113 indirect Areas affected Bahamas, Florida, Cuba, Yucatán Peninsula, Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas Part of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane Rita is the fourth-most intense Atlantic hurricane ever recorded and the most...

Notes

  1. ^ 2005-06 Fact Book. Southern University (2005). Retrieved on 2006-09-12.

Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Louisiana's official site]


  Results from FactBites:
 
Southern University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1361 words)
In April of 1880 Southern University was charted by the General Assembly of the State of Louisiana, and was originally located in New Orleans.
Southern University became a land grant school in 1890, and an Agricultural and Mechanical Department was established.
Southern University sports teams participate in the Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) which is a part of the NCAA Division I system.
Southern Cross University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1064 words)
Southern Cross University is a University based on the far north coast of New South Wales, Australia.
In 1992, the Board of Governors of the University issued a submission to state and Commonwealth Ministers recommending the establishment of an advisory group to consider the implications of the proposal that the Network University of New England be dismantled.
A barrage of legislation, such as the "Southern Cross University Act 1993", and the "University of New England Act 1993" was passed by the NSW Parliament in October of the same year.
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