FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
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Encyclopedia > Southern Democrats

Southern Democrats are members of the U.S. Democratic Party who reside in the U.S. South. The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... The U.S. Southern states or the South, also known colloquially as Dixie, constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ...

Contents

Early history

The Democrats have their beginnings in the South, going back to the founding of the Democratic-Republican Party in 1793 by Thomas Jefferson, a Virginian. The party was formed from former Anti-Federalist elements opposed to the policies of the Federalists. After being the dominant party in U.S. politics from 1800 to 1829, the Democratic-Republicans split into two factions in 1833: the federalist Whigs, and the Democrats. Democrats of the day were kept united only by their opposition to the Whigs and fear of encroachment of the federal government. However, by the 1850s, with the crumbling of the Whigs, infighting which was kept at bay for years burst out. Northern Democrats were in serious opposition to Southern Democrats on the issue of slavery; Northerners opposed it, and Southerners fiercely defended it. Meanwhile, remaining and former elements of the Whig party were bolting to the newly formed anti-slavery Republican Party, which was rapidly gaining influence. In the 1860 election, the Republicans nominated Abraham Lincoln, but the divide among Democrats led to the nomination of two candidates: John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky represented Southern Democrats, and Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois represented Northern Democrats. This splitting of the Democratic vote led to the election of Lincoln and the demise of the Democrat's antebellum grip on national power. The Democratic-Republican party was a United States political party, which evolved early in the history of the United States. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 N.S. – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–1809), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... The Anti-Federalist Party was an unoffical coalition in late 18th Century American politics. ... The label Federalist refers to two major groups in the history of the United States of America: (1. ... The Federal Government of the United States was established by the United States Constitution. ... 1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... Obverse of the Great Seal of the United States. ... // Events and Trends Technology Production of steel revolutionised by invention of the Bessemer process Benjamin Silliman fractionates petroleum by distillation for the first time First transatlantic telegraph cable laid First safety elevator installed by Elisha Otis Science Charles Darwin publishes The Origin of Species, putting forward the theory of evolution... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was an American politician who served as the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (April 23, 1813 – June 3, 1861), known as the Little Giant, was an American politician from the frontier state of Illinois, and was one of two Democratic Party nominees for President in 1860, along with John C. Breckenridge. ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ...


American Civil War

After the election of Lincoln, Southern Democrats led the charge to secede from the Union and form the Confederate States of America. The Congress was dominated by Republicans, save for Andrew Johnson of Tennessee, the only Southern senator of a state in rebellion to reject secession. The states of Missouri, Kentucky, and Delaware, despite being Southern Democratic slave states, did not approve secession, and thus remained in the Union. The state of Maryland, dominated by Southern Democrats and days away from approving secession, was forced[citation needed] to remain in the Union, and so its delegation to Congress did not leave. Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until 29 May 1861) Richmond, Virginia (29 May 1861–2 April 1865) Danville, Virginia (from 3 April 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Government Republic... Andrew Johnson (December 29, 1808 – July 31, 1875) was the seventeenth President of the United States (1865–1869), succeeding to the presidency upon the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) None Capital Dover Largest city Wilmington Area  Ranked 49th  - Total 2,491 sq mi (6,452 km²)  - Width 30 miles (48 km)  - Length 100 miles (161 km)  - % water 21. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Many Northern Democrats fled the party to join the Republicans. When the war was over, and the Confederacy destroyed, a deep resentment among Southern citizens towards Republicans helped propel the Democratic Party to a majority in Congress by the 1870s and bring an end to Reconstruction. The Democrats were now the party of states rights, the party of the South, and would remain that way until the 1960s. Their dominance in Southern politics would give rise to the phrase "Solid South". // Reconstruction was a period in United States history, 1863–1877, that resolved the issues of the American Civil War when both the Confederacy and its system of slavery were destroyed. ... In American politics and constitutional law, states rights are guaranteed by the Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, (i. ... The phrase Solid South describes the electoral support of the Southern United States for Democratic Party candidates for almost a century after the Reconstruction era, 1876-1964. ...


Post-Reconstruction to modern times

At the beginning of the 20th century the Democrats, led by the dominant Southern wing, had the majority in both houses of Congress. In 1912 incumbent Republican W. Howard Taft was defeated in an electoral landslide, losing to Woodrow Wilson, a Democrat from New Jersey (Though he was Southern and thus a parachute candidate). And from 1912 through 1918, the three branches of government were controlled by the Democratic Party. However when the U.S. entered World War I in 1917, and with isolationism running high, the Republicans ran the 1918 elections on a platform of pacifism and rejection of the internationalist sentiment favored by Wilson. (See U.S. House election, 1918 and U.S. Senate election, 1918) The Democrats lost the Congress, and in 1920, Warren Harding was elected president in a landslide, which was widely viewed as a repudiation of Wilson's policies. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was an American politician, the 27th President of the United States, the 10th Chief Justice of the United States, a leader of the progressive conservative wing of the Republican Party in the early twentieth century, a chaired professor at Yale Law... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... A parachute candidate, also known as a carpetbagger in the United States, is a political term for an election candidate who does not live in the area he is running to represent. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Combatants Allied Powers: British Empire France Italy Russia United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary Bulgaria Germany Ottoman Empire Commanders Ferdinand Foch Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Armando Diaz Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Herbert Henry Asquith Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Wilhelm II Paul... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Isolationism is a foreign policy which combines a non-interventionist military and a political policy of economic nationalism (protectionism). ... Pacifism is the opposition to war or violence as a means of settling disputes. ... Internationalism is a political movement which advocates a greater economic and political cooperation between nations for the benefit of all. ... The U.S. House election, 1918 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1918 which occurred in the middle of President Woodrow Wilsons second term. ... The 1918 U.S. Senate election occured on November 5, coinciding with the midpoint of Woodrow Wilsons second term as President of the United States. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 3 - Babe Ruth is traded by the Boston Red Sox to the New York Yankees for $125,000, the largest sum ever paid for a player at that time. ... Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 - August 2, 1923) was the 29th (1921-1923) President of the United States and the sixth President to die in office. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


From 1918 until 1932, the Democrats were relegated to second place status in politics, controlling no branch of the government. However, with the Stock Market Crash of 1929, Republicans lost the Congress in 1930 and the White House in 1932 by huge margins. By this time, however, the Democratic Party leadership began to change its tone somewhat. With the Great Depression gripping the nation, and with the lives of most Americans disrupted, the assisting of African-Americans in American society was seen as necessary by the new government. 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... The 1929 stock market crash devastated economies worldwide The Wall Street Crash refers to the stock market crash that occurred on October 29, 1929, when share prices on the New York Stock Exchange collapsed, leading eventually to the Great Depression. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ... 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... The Great Depression an economic downturn which started in 1929 (although its effects were not fully felt until late 1930) and lasted through most of the 1930s. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ...


This new tone irked many Southern loyalists. This was the beginning of the change of the party. Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal program would unite the different party factions for over three decades, but Southerners began to see the change. Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: New Deal For other uses of New Deal and The New Deal, see New Deal (disambiguation). ...


After World War II, the civil rights movement took hold. A new wave of young, liberal Democrats were changing the face of the party, and Southerners were feeling alienated. However, most still voted loyally for their party. The old conservative stalwarts were trying to resist the changes that were sweeping the nation. With the signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, it was the final straw for many Southern Democrats, who began voting against Democratic incumbents for GOP candidates. The Republicans carried many Southern states for the first time since before the Great Depression. Combatants Major Allied powers: United Kingdom Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Major Axis powers: Nazi Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Harry Truman Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead... This article is becoming very long. ... President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... The Great Depression an economic downturn which started in 1929 (although its effects were not fully felt until late 1930) and lasted through most of the 1930s. ...


When Richard Nixon courted voters with his Southern Strategy, many Democrats became Republicans and the South became fertile ground for the GOP, which conversely was becoming more conservative as the Democrats were becoming more liberal. However, Democratic incumbents still held sway over voters in many states, especially those of the Deep South. In fact, until the 1980s, Democrats still had much control over Southern politics. It wasn't until the 1990s that Democratic control collapsed, starting with the elections of 1994, in which Republicans gained control of both houses of Congress, through the rest of the decade. Southern Democrats of today are mostly urban liberals, while rural residents tend to be Republicans, although there are a sizable number of conservative Democrats. Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... In American politics, the Southern strategy refers to the focus of the Republican party on winning U.S. Presidential elections by securing the electoral votes of the U.S. Southern states through its racial appeals to white southerners. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The 1980s refers to the years of 1980 to 1989. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ...


A huge portion of Representatives, Senators, and voters who were referred to as Reagan Democrats in the 1980s were conservative Southern Democrats. President Ronald Reagan. ...


An interesting exception to this trend is Arkansas, where to this day nearly all statewide elected officials are Democrats (although the state has given its electoral votes to the GOP in the past two Presidential elections). A plausible explanation for this is that the political prominence of Arkansas Democrat Bill Clinton in the 1990s shielded Arkansas from the Republican takeover that was going on in the rest of the South. Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,732 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...


The Democratic Party still has a strong presence in Louisiana also, though Republicans have made notable progress there in recent years, most notably with the election of Senator David Vitter in 2004. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... David Bruce Vitter (born May 3, 1961), American politician, is a Senator from Louisiana. ...


Notable modern and former Southern Democrats

Huey Pierce Long (August 30, 1893–September 10, 1935), known as The Kingfish, was an American politician; he was governor of Louisiana (1928–1932), Senator (1932–1935) and a presidential hopeful before his assassination. ... Earl Kemp Long (August 26, 1895 – September 5, 1960) was an American politician and three-time Governor of Louisiana. ... Blaze Starr (born 1932) was an American stripper and burlesque star. ... Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the finance minister of the Federal Government of the United States. ... Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808–December 6, 1889) was an American statesman and advocate for American slavery and for States Rights. ... James Oliver Eastland (November 28, 1904–February 19, 1986) was an American politician from Mississippi who served in the U.S. Senate briefly in 1941 and again from 1943 to 1978. ... John Reid Edwards (born June 10, 1953), was the Democratic 2004 nominee for Vice President, and a one-term former Democratic Senator from North Carolina who is considered a potentially strong Democratic candidate for the 2008 Presidential election. ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 N.S. – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–1809), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... United States Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is the 1776 statement by which the United Colonies in North America declared themselves independent of the Great Britain as the new nation, The Declaration, written chiefly by Thomas Jefferson, explained the justifications for breaking away. ... Daniel Robert Graham (born November 9, 1936) is an American politician. ... Richard Russell can refer to several people: Richard Russell, Sr. ... Lawton Chiles in an official picture taken during his first term as governor of Florida. ... The issue of Time Magazine in which Kefauvers victory in the New Hampshire primary was reported. ... Paul E. Patton Paul E. Patton (born May 26, 1937) served as Democratic governor of Kentucky from 1995 to 2003. ... James William Fulbright (April 9, 1905–February 9, 1995) was a well-known member of the United States Senate representing Arkansas. ... Portrait of Sam Rayburn Samuel Taliaferro Rayburn (January 6, 1882 – November 16, 1961) was a United States politician from Texas. ... Sam Nunn Samuel Augustus Nunn (born September 8, 1938) is co-chairman and chief executive officer of the NTI (Nuclear Threat Initiative), a charitable organization working to reduce the global threats from nuclear, biological and chemical weapons. ... Joseph Maxwell Cleland (born August 24, 1942) is an American politician from Georgia. ... James Hovis Hodges (born November 19, 1956) is a United States Democratic Party politician from South Carolina. ... Ernest Frederick Fritz Hollings (born January 1, 1922) was a Democratic United States Senator from South Carolina from 1966 to January 3, 2005. ... John Cornelius Stennis (August 3, 1901 - April 23, 1995) was a Senator from the state of Mississippi. ... John L. McClellan. ... Spessard Lindsey Holland (July 10, 1892–November 6, 1971) was an American politician. ... Reubin ODonovan Askew (born September 11, 1928) is an American politician. ... Philip Norman Phil Bredesen (born November 21, 1943) is the 48th Governor of Tennessee, having served since 2003. ... Kathleen Babineaux Blanco (born December 15, 1942) is an American politician. ... Roy Eugene Barnes (born March 11, 1948) was the governor of the U.S. state of Georgia from January 1999 until January 2003. ... Blanche Lambert Lincoln (born September 30, 1960) is a Democratic United States Senator from the State of Arkansas. ... Mark Lunsford Pryor (born January 10, 1963) is a politician in Arkansas. ... David Hampton Pryor David Hampton Pryor (born August 29, 1934) was a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives and United States Senator from the State of Arkansas. ... credited to the United States Senate Historical Office Dale Leon Bumpers (born 12 August 1925) was a Democratic member of the United States Senate from the State of Arkansas, from 1975 until his retirement in January, 1999; and was governor of Arkansas from 1971 to 1975. ... Alben William Barkley (November 24, 1877–April 30, 1956) was a Representative and a Senator from Kentucky and the thirty_fifth Vice President of the United States. ... John Bennett Johnston, Jr. ... Mary Loretta Landrieu (born November 23, 1955) is the senior Democratic United States Senator for the state of Louisiana. ... John Berlinger Breaux (last name pronounced Bro) (born March 1, 1944) was a United States Senator from Louisiana from 1987 until 2005. ... Edwin Honest Ed Edwards (born August 7, 1927) served as the Democratic governor of Louisiana for four terms (1972 - 1980, 1984 - 1988, and 1992 - 1996), more terms than any other Louisiana governor. ... Zell Bryan Miller (born February 24, 1932) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Terry Sanford James Terry Sanford (August 20, 1917 – April 18, 1998) was a Southern Democratic politician. ... Office: Senior Senator, Alabama Political party: Republican Term of office: January, 1987–Present Preceded by: Jeremiah Denton Succeeded by: Incumbent (2011) Date of birth: May 6, 1934 Place of birth: Birmingham, Alabama Marriage: Annette Nevin Shelby Richard Craig Dick Shelby (born May 6, 1934) is an American politician. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902–June 26, 2003) represented South Carolina in the United States Senate from 1954 to April 1956 and November 1956 to 1964 as a Democrat and from 1964 to 2003 as a Republican. ... Mark Robert Warner (born December 15, 1954) is an American Democratic politician and the current Governor of Virginia. ... Lawrence Douglas Wilder Lawrence Douglas Wilder (born January 17, 1931) is an American politician. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States. ... Texas politician Ralph Yarborough Ralph Webster Yarborough (June 8, 1903 – January 27, 1996) was a Texas Democratic politician who served in the United States Senate (1957 until 1971) and was a leader of the progressive or liberal wing of the Democratic Party in Texas in his many races for statewide... George Ervin Sonny Perdue III (born December 20, 1946) is the current governor of the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Robert C. Byrd Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is a West Virginia Democrat serving in the United States Senate. ... For other people named Bill Nelson, see Bill Nelson (disambiguation). ...

Fictional Southern Democrats

Speaker of the House Nathan Templeton, as portrayed by Donald Sutherland Nathan Templeton, played by Donald Sutherland, is the fictional Speaker of the House on the political television drama Commander in Chief. ... Commander in Chief is a television drama focusing on the presidential administration and family of Mackenzie Allen (portrayed by Geena Davis), the first female President of the United States(Higly unlikely), who ascends to the role after the previous chief executive, Teddy Bridges (played by Will Lyman), dies in office...

See also


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Democratic Candidates Face Southern Voters (1585 words)
Southern voters are a little more apt to describe themselves as conservative (44% to 37% elsewhere), conversely, more outside the south than in it say they are liberal (19% vs. 15% in the south).
Southern Democrats are 17 percentage points more likely to agree that schools should have the right to fire teachers who are known homosexuals.
Southern Democrats are nearly 20 percentage points more likely to say that they frequently use their religious beliefs to help them make decisions in their daily lives – 57% say this in the South, 38% elsewhere.
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