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Encyclopedia > Southern Agrarians

The Southern Agrarians (also known as the Vanderbilt Agrarians or Nashville Agrarians) were a group of twelve American writers and poets with roots in the Southern United States who joined together to publish an agrarian manifesto, a collection of essays entitled I'll Take My Stand in 1930. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Historic Southern United States. ... Agrarianism is a social and political philosophy. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Southern Agrarians formed an important conservative branch of American populism, and contributed to the revial of Southern literature in the 1920s and 1930s known as the Southern Renaissance. They were mostly based out of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ... Southern literature (sometimes called the literature of the American South) is defined as American literature about the Southern United States or by writers from this region. ... The Southern Renaissance was the reinvigoration of American Southern literature that began in the 1920s and 1930s with the appearance of writers such as William Faulkner, Caroline Gordon, Katherine Anne Porter, Allen Tate, Tennessee Williams, and Robert Penn Warren, among others. ... Vanderbilt University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Nashville redirects here. ...

Contents

Members

The Southern Agrarians included:

Donald Grady Davidson (August 8, 1893 - April 25, 1968) was a U.S. poet, essayist, social and literary critic, and author. ... John Gould Fletcher (January 3, 1886 – May 20, 1950) was a Pulitzer Prize winning Imagist poet and author. ... Andrew Nelson Lytle (1902-December 12, 1995) was an American poet, dramatist, and professor of literature. ... Frank Lawrence Owsley (January 20, 1890—October 21, 1955) was an American historian and member of the Nashville agrarians. ... John Crowe Ransom (April 30, 1888, Pulaski, Tennessee- July 3, 1974, Gambier, Ohio) was an American poet, essayist, social and political theorist, man of letters, and academic. ... John Orley Allen Tate (November 19, 1899 - February 9, 1979) was an American poet, essayist, and social commentator, and Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress, 1943 - 1944. ... John Donald Wade (September 28, 1892-October 9, 1963) was an American biographer, author, essayist, and teacher. ... Robert Penn Warren Robert Penn Warren (April 24, 1905 – September 15, 1989) was an American poet, novelist, and literary critic, and was one of the founders of The New Criticism. ... Richard Malcolm Weaver, Jr (March 3, 1910 – April 1, 1963) was an American scholar who taught English at the University of Chicago. ... Stark Young Stark Young (October 11, 1881 - January 6, 1963) was an American teacher, playwright, novelist, painter, literary critic, and essayist. ...

Beliefs

The Agrarians evolved from a philosophical discussion group known as the "Fugitives" or "Fugitive Poets". Their studies of poetic modernism and of H. L. Mencken's stinging critique of Southern culture led them to confront the effect of modernity on Southern culture and tradition. The informal leader of the Fugitives and the Agrarians was John Crowe Ransom, though he formally repudiated agrarianism in a 1945 essay. The most eloquent exponent of the Agrarian philosophy eventually proved to be Ransom's student and Donald Davidson's friend, Richard M. Weaver. Unlike the others, Weaver taught at a Northern institution, the University of Chicago. The Fugitives were a group of poets and literary scholars who came together at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee around 1920. ... H. L. (Henry Louis) Mencken (September 12, 1880, Baltimore – January 29, 1956, Baltimore), was a journalist, essayist, magazine editor, satirist, acerbic critic of American life and culture, and a student of the American English. ... John Crowe Ransom (April 30, 1888, Pulaski, Tennessee- July 3, 1974, Gambier, Ohio) was an American poet, essayist, social and political theorist, man of letters, and academic. ... Richard Malcolm Weaver, Jr (March 3, 1910 – April 1, 1963) was an American scholar who taught English at the University of Chicago. ... For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ...


The Agrarians bemoaned the loss of traditional Southern culture. Their manifesto was an attack on modern industrial America. It posited an alternate direction based on a return to traditional American values. In historical context The factual accuracy of this section of this article is disputed. ...


Seward Collins, editor of The American Review, which published some essays by Agrarians in 1933, praised Benito Mussolini and Adolf Hitler for thwarting a communist revolution in Germany. In 1936, however, Allen Tate published a critique of fascism in The New Republic, to distance the Agrarians from Collins. Seward Bishop Collins (April 22, 1899 – December 8, 1952) graduated from Princeton University and entered New Yorks literary life in 1926 as a bon vivant. ... The American Review has been the name of more than one publication. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mussolini redirects here. ... Hitler redirects here. ... This article is about the form of society and political movement. ... John Orley Allen Tate (November 19, 1899 - February 9, 1979) was an American poet, essayist, and social commentator, and Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress, 1943 - 1944. ... For other uses, see New Republic. ...


Robert Penn Warren eventually emerged as the most accomplished of the Agrarians, but he also largely repudiated their views.[citation needed] He became a major American poet and novelist, winning the Pulitzer Prize for his 1946 All the King's Men. He acted as a mentor to the African-American author Ralph Ellison, among many others in his career, and supported him for awards and memberships in prestigious cultural organizations. Warren left the Agrarians behind as his political and social views evolved, particularly his liberal political philosophy and support for racial integration. Robert Penn Warren Robert Penn Warren (April 24, 1905 – September 15, 1989) was an American poet, novelist, and literary critic, and was one of the founders of The New Criticism. ... This article is about the book. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... Children at a parade in North College Hill, Ohio Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation...


I'll Take My Stand was originally criticized as a reactionary and romanticized defense of the Old South. It was viewed as little more than nostalgia. In recent years, scholars such as Carlson, Scotchie, Genovese and others have taken a second look at this book, in light of the problems of modern industrial society and its effect on the human condition and the environment. Reactionary (or reactionist) is a political epithet, generally used as a pejorative, originally applied in the context of the French Revolution to counter-revolutionaries who wished to restore the real or imagined conditions of the monarchical Ancien Régime. ... Geographically, Old South is a subregion of the American South, differentiated from the Deep South as being the Southern States represented in the original thirteen American colonies, as well as a way of describing the former lifestyle in the Southern United States. ... Look up nostalgia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Today, the Southern Agrarians are lauded regularly in the pro-South Southern Partisan. Their philosophy has been refined and updated by scholars such as Allan C. Carlson and the writer Wendell Berry. It has been explored in books published by ISI Books, the book imprint of the Intercollegiate Studies Institute. Southern Partisan is a controversial neo-confederate magazine. ... Allan C. Carlson (born Des Moines, Iowa, 1949) is a scholar of the family, and is the president of the Howard Center, a director of the Family in America Studies Center, and editor of the Family in America newsletter. ... Wendell Berry (born August 5, 1934, Henry County, Kentucky) is an American man of letters, academic, cultural and economic critic, and farmer. ... The Intercollegiate Studies Institute, Inc. ...


Vanderbilt University

Many of the Southern Agrarians and Fugitive poets were connected to Vanderbilt University, either as students or as faculty members. Davidson, Lytle, Ransom, Tate, and Warren all attended the university; Davidson and Ransom later joined the faculty, along with Owsley. Vanderbilt University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in Nashville, Tennessee. ...


Bibliography

  • Bingham, Emily, and Thomas A Underwood, eds., 2001. The Southern Agrarians and the New Deal: Essays After I'll Take My Stand.
  • Carlson, Allan, 2004. The New Agrarian Mind: The Movement Toward Decentralist Thought in Twentieth-Century America.
  • Morton, Clay, 2007. "Southern Orality and 'Typographic America': I'll Take My Stand Reconsidered" in Themes of Conflict in the Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Literature of the American South.
  • Murphy, Paul V., 2001. The Rebuke of History: The Southern Agrarians and American Conservative Thought.
  • Scotchie, Joseph, "Agrarian Valhalla: The Vanderbilt 12 and Beyond" Southern Events.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Southern Agrarians - definition of Southern Agrarians in Encyclopedia (382 words)
The Southern Agrarians or 'Vanderbilt Agrarians' were a group of 12 American Traditionalist writers and poets from the Southern United States who joined together to publish the Agrarian manifesto, a collection of essays entitled I'll Take My Stand in 1930.
The Agrarians evolved from a philosophical discussion group known as 'The Fugitives' or 'Fugitive Poets' whose studies of poetic modernism and H.L. Mencken led them to confront the effect of modernity on Southern culture and tradition.
The Agrarians were opposed to unbridled Modernism and Industrialism and bemoaned the loss of traditional Southern culture.
Encyclopedia: Agrarianism (1155 words)
Agrarianism is not identical with the back to the earth movement, but it can be helpful to think of it in those terms.
The agrarian philosophy is not to get people to reject progress, but rather to concentrate on the fundamental goods of the earth, communities of more limited economic and political scale than in modern society, and on simple living--even when this shift involves questioning the "progressive" character of some recent social and economic developments.
The name "agrarian" is properly applied to figures from Horace and Virgil through Thomas Jefferson, Transcendentals like Emerson and Thoreau, the Southern Agrarians movement of the 1920s and 1930s (also known as the Vanderbilt Agrarians) and present-day authors Wendell Berry, Alan Carlson, and Victor Davis Hanson.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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