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Encyclopedia > South Dakota
State of South Dakota
Flag of South Dakota State seal of South Dakota
Flag of South Dakota Seal
Nickname(s): The Mount Rushmore State (official),
The Sunshine State
Motto(s): Under God the people rule
Official language(s) English
Demonym South Dakotan
Capital Pierre
Largest city Sioux Falls
Area  Ranked 17th in the US
 - Total 77,116[1] sq mi
(199,905 km²)
 - Width 210 miles (340 km)
 - Length 380 miles (610 km)
 - % water 1.6
 - Latitude 42° 29′ N to 45° 56′ N
 - Longitude 96° 26′ W to 104° 03′ W
Population  Ranked 46th in the US
 - Total 781,919 (2006 est.)[2]
 - Density 9.9/sq mi 
3.84/km² (46th in the US)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Harney Peak[3]
7,242 ft  (2,209 m)
 - Mean 2,200 ft  (670 m)
 - Lowest point Big Stone Lake[3]
966 ft  (295 m)
Admission to Union  November 2, 1889 (40th)
Governor M. Michael Rounds (R)
Lieutenant Governor Dennis Daugaard (R)
U.S. Senators Tim Johnson (D)
John Thune (R)
Congressional Delegation Stephanie Herseth Sandlin (D) (list)
Time zones  
 - eastern half Central: UTC-6/-5
 - western half Mountain: UTC-7/-6
Abbreviations SD US-SD
Website www.sd.gov

South Dakota (IPA: /ˌsɑʊθdəˈkoʊtə/) is a state located in the Midwestern region of the United States of America. It is named after the Lakota and Dakota (Sioux) American Indian tribes. South Dakota was admitted to the Union on November 2, 1889. (North Dakota was admitted simultaneously.) Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Dakota. ... South Dakota state seal Source http://usa. ... Flag of South Dakota Former flag of South Dakota The flag of South Dakota consists of the state seal surrounded by rays on a blue field. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_SD.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): South Dakota ... The United States does not have an official language, but English is spoken by about 82% of the population as a native language. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... Location in South Dakota Coordinates: County Hughes County Founded 1880 Government  - Mayor Dennis Eisnach Area  - City 33. ... Nickname: Motto: Gateway to the Plains Location in Minnehaha County and the state of South Dakota Counties (metropolitan area) Government  - Mayor Dave Munson Area  - City 178. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... “km” redirects here. ... Map of states populations (2007) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2007, according to the 2007 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... Harney Peak is the highest mountain in South Dakota, located in Black Hills National Forest. ... Big Stone Lake is a long, narrow freshwater lake and reservoir forming the border between western Minnesota and northeastern South Dakota. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Marion Michael Mike Rounds (born October 24, 1954) is an American politician. ... This is a complete and current List of United States Lieutenant Governors. ... Dennis and Linda Daugaard Dennis M. Daugaard (born June 11, 1953) is the current Lieutenant Governor of South Dakota. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Timothy Peter Johnson (born December 28, 1946) is the senior United States Senator from South Dakota, and a member of the Democratic Party. ... John Randolph Thune (born January 7, 1961) is the junior U.S. Senator from the state of South Dakota. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Stephanie Herseth Sandlin (born December 3, 1970) is an American lawyer and Democratic politician, currently serving as the sole member of the House of Representatives from South Dakota. ... These are tables of congressional delegations from South Dakota to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Standard Time Zone (CST) is a geographic region in the Americas that keeps time by subtracting six hours from UTC (UTC-6). ... ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... MST is UTC-7 The Mountain Standard Time Zone (MST) is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting seven hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), resulting in UTC-7. ... ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Eddie Plenty Holes, a Sioux Indian photographed about 1899. ... The Sioux (pronounced ) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... The Sioux (pronounced ) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ...


Located in the north-central United States, South Dakota is bisected by the Missouri River, dividing the state into two socially and economically distinct halves, known to residents as "West River" and "East River."[4] In the southwestern portion of the state rise the Black Hills, a group of low, pine-covered mountains. A region of great religious importance to local American Indians as well as a major draw for the state tourism industry, the Black Hills are also the location of Mt. Rushmore, probably the best-known location in the state and a widely-used symbol of South Dakota. The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... This article is about the place in South Dakota. ... A Sioux in traditional dress including war bonnet, about 1908 Native Americans â€“ also Indians, American Indians, First Nations, First Peoples, Indigenous Peoples of America, Aboriginal Peoples, Aboriginal Americans, Amerindians, Amerind, Native Canadians (or of other nations) â€“ are those peoples indigenous to the Americas, living there prior to European colonization and... Tourist redirects here. ... The faces of (left to right) George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln Air Force One flying over Mount Rushmore. ...


Historically dominated by an agricultural economy and a rural lifestyle, South Dakota has recently sought to diversify its economy in an effort to attract and retain residents. The state is still largely rural, though, with one of the lowest population densities in the United States.[5] The centrally-located city of Pierre serves as the state capital, and Sioux Falls, with 150,000 people, is the largest city in the state. Location in South Dakota Coordinates: County Hughes County Founded 1880 Government  - Mayor Dennis Eisnach Area  - City 33. ... Photo of the waterfall in Sioux Falls Sioux Falls is the largest city located in South Dakota. ...

Contents

Geography

Main article: Geography of South Dakota

South Dakota is situated in the north-central United States, and is usually considered to be a part of the Midwest, although the Great Plains region also covers the state. Additionally, South Dakota is at times considered to be a part of the West. The Missouri River runs through the central part of South Dakota. To the east of the river lie low hills and lakes formed by glaciers. Fertile farm country covers the area. To the west of the river the land consists of deep canyons and rolling plains. South Dakota has a total land area of 77,116 sq. miles (199,905 km²), making the state the 17th largest in the Union.[1] South Dakota is bordered to the north by North Dakota; to the south by Nebraska; to the east by Iowa and Minnesota; and to the west by Wyoming and Montana. The geographical center of the U.S. is 17 miles west of Castle Rock in Butte County.[6] The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... Perito Moreno Glacier Patagonia Argentina Aletsch Glacier, Switzerland Icebergs breaking off glaciers at Cape York, Greenland This article is about the geological formation. ... Grand Canyon, Arizona Noravank Monastery complex and canyon in Armenia. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... For other uses, see Nebraska (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Butte County is a county located in the state of South Dakota. ...


Regions

South Dakota has four major land regions: the Drift Prairie, the Dissected Till Plains, the Great Plains, and the Black Hills. The Drift Prairie is a geographic region of North Dakota. ... The Dissected Till Plains are a land region of the United States, located in southern and western Iowa, northeastern Kansas, the southwestern corner of Minnesota, northern Missouri, eastern Nebraska, and southeastern South Dakota. ... For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... This article is about the place in South Dakota. ...


The Drift Prairie covers most of eastern South Dakota. This is the land of low hills and glacial lakes. This area was called Coteau des Prairies (Prairie Hills) by early French traders. In the north, the Coteau des Prairies is bordered on the east by the Minnesota River Valley and on the west by the James River Basin. The James River Basin is mostly flat land, following the flow of the James River through South Dakota from north to south. The Mendota Bridge crossing the Minnesota River, just above its mouth View of the Minnesota River from Memorial Park; southeast of Granite Falls, MN. The Minnesota River is a tributary of the Mississippi River, approximately 332 miles (534 km) long, in the state of Minnesota in the United States. ... The James River in North and South Dakota The James River (also known as the Jim River or the Dakota River) is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 710 mi (1,143 km) long, in the U.S. states of North Dakota and South Dakota. ...


The Dissected Till Plains lie in the southeastern corner of South Dakota. This area of rolling hills is criss-crossed by many streams.

Geographic and political features of South Dakota
Geographic and political features of South Dakota

The Great Plains cover most of the western two-thirds of South Dakota. The Coteau de Missouri hills and valleys lie between the James River Basin of the Drift Prairie and the Missouri River. West of the Missouri River the landscape becomes more rugged and consists of rolling hills, plains, canyons, and steep flat-topped hills called buttes. These buttes sometimes rise 400 to 600 feet (120 to 180 m) above the plains. In the south, east of the Black Hills, lie the South Dakota Badlands. File links The following pages link to this file: South Dakota Categories: National Atlas images | South Dakota maps ... File links The following pages link to this file: South Dakota Categories: National Atlas images | South Dakota maps ... Butte near Sedona, Arizona A butte is an isolated hill with steep sides and a small flat top. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Badlands National Park, in southwest South Dakota, preserves 242,756 acres (982 km²) of sharply eroded buttes, pinnacles and spires blended with the largest protected mixed grass prairie in the United States. ...


The Black Hills are in the southwestern part of South Dakota and extend into Wyoming. This range of low mountains covers 6,000 square miles (15,500 km².) with mountains that rise from 2,000 to 4,000 feet (600 to 1,200 m) above their bases. The highest point in South Dakota, Harney Peak (7,242 ft or 2,207 m above sea level), is in the Black Hills.[3] This is the highest point in the United States east of the Rocky Mountains.[6] The Black Hills are rich in minerals such as gold, silver, copper, and lead. The Homestake Mine, one of the largest gold mines in the United States, is located in the Black Hills. A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... Harney Peak is the highest mountain in South Dakota, located in Black Hills National Forest. ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... This article is about the chemical element. ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... General Name, Symbol, Number lead, Pb, 82 Chemical series Post-transition metals or poor metals Group, Period, Block 14, 6, p Appearance bluish gray Standard atomic weight 207. ... The Homestake Mine is a deep underground gold mine located near Lead, South Dakota. ...


South Dakotans also divide the state at the Missouri River into two general regions, known as West River and East River. The river serves as a somewhat stark boundary in terms of geographic, social and political differences between the two regions. West River features a more arid landscape, an economy largely based on tourism and ranching, and, aside from the Indian Reservations, a very conservative political climate. East River, on the other hand, is more densely populated, agriculture there is based more on farming than ranching, and the region is more politically moderate.[4][7]


The Missouri River is the largest and longest river in the state. Other major South Dakota rivers include the Cheyenne, the James, the Big Sioux, and the White. South Dakota has many natural lakes, mostly occurring in the eastern part of the state. Additionally, dams on the Missouri River create four large reservoirs: Lake Oahe, Lake Sharpe, Lake Francis Case, and Lewis and Clark Lake. The Cheyenne River, highlighted in a map of the Missouri River watershed The Cheyenne River is a tributary of the Missouri River in the U.S. states of Wyoming and South Dakota. ... The Big Sioux River is a tributary of the Missouri River in the upper Midwest of the United States. ... The White River The White River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 507 mi (816 km) long, in the U.S. states of Nebraska and South Dakota. ... This article is about structures for water impoundment. ... ... The Oahe Dam is a major man-made dam along the Missouri River, just north of Pierre, South Dakota. ... Lewis and Clark Lake is an impoundment on the Missouri River above Gavins Point Dam, near Yankton, South Dakota. ...


Ecology

Much of South Dakota, with the notable exception of the Black Hills, is dominated by a temperate grasslands biome.[8] Although grasses and crops cover most of this region, deciduous trees such as cottonwoods, elms, and willows are common near rivers and in shelter belts.[9] Mammals in this area include bison, deer, pronghorn, coyotes, and prairie dogs.[10] The state bird, the ring-necked pheasant, has adapted particularly well to the area after being introduced from China, and growing populations of bald eagles are spread throughout the state, especially near the Missouri River.[11][12] Rivers and lakes of the grasslands support populations of walleye, carp, pike, and bass, along with other species.[10] The Missouri River also contains the pre-historic paddlefish.[13] Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Binomial name Antilocapra americana Ord, 1815 Subspecies The Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) is the only surviving member of the family Antilocapridae, and the fastest mammal in North America running at speeds of 58 mph (90 km/h). ... Wind Cave National Park is a United States national park 10 miles (18 km) north of the town of Hot Springs in western South Dakota. ... An Inner Mongolia Grassland. ... A biome is a climate and geographical area of ecologically similar communities of plants, animals, and soil organisms, often referred to as ecosystems. ... For other uses, see Deciduous (disambiguation). ... Species Populus deltoides L. Populus fremontii [[]] Populus nigra L. This article is about the poplar species. ... Species See Elm species, varieties, cultivars and hybrids Elms are deciduous and semi-deciduous trees making up the genus Ulmus, family Ulmaceae, found throughout the Northern Hemisphere from Siberia to Indonesia, Mexico to Japan. ... Species About 350, including: Salix acutifolia - Violet Willow Salix alaxensis - Alaska Willow Salix alba - White Willow Salix alpina - Alpine Willow Salix amygdaloides - Peachleaf Willow Salix arbuscula - Mountain Willow Salix arbusculoides - Littletree Willow Salix arctica - Arctic Willow Salix atrocinerea Salix aurita - Eared Willow Salix babylonica - Peking Willow Salix bakko Salix barrattiana... Aerial view of field windbreaks in North Dakota. ... Orders Subclass Monotremata Monotremata Subclass Marsupialia Didelphimorphia Paucituberculata Microbiotheria Dasyuromorphia Peramelemorphia Notoryctemorphia Diprotodontia Subclass Placentalia Xenarthra Dermoptera Desmostylia Scandentia Primates Rodentia Lagomorpha Insectivora Chiroptera Pholidota Carnivora Perissodactyla Artiodactyla Cetacea Afrosoricida Macroscelidea Tubulidentata Hyracoidea Proboscidea Sirenia The mammals are the class of vertebrate animals primarily characterized by the presence of mammary... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... This article is about the ruminent animal. ... Binomial name Antilocapra americana Ord, 1815 Subspecies The Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) is the only surviving member of the family Antilocapridae, and the fastest mammal in North America running at speeds of 58 mph (90 km/h). ... Binomial name Canis latrans Say, 1823 A coyote (Canis latrans) is a member of the Canidae (the dog family) and a relative of the domestic dog. ... Species Cynomys gunnisoni Cynomys leucurus Cynomys ludovicianus Cynomys mexicanus Cynomys parvidens The prairie dog (Cynomys) is a small, burrowing rodent native to the grasslands of North America. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Common Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), otherwise known as the Ring-necked Pheasant or Chinese Pheasant is a gamebird in the pheasant family Phasianidae of the order Galliformes, gallinaceous birds. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1766) Bald Eagle range  Resident, breeding Summer visitor, breeding Winter visitor On migration only Star: accidental records Subspecies (Linnaeus, 1766) Southern Bald Eagle (Audubon, 1827) Northern Bald Eagle Synonyms Falco leucocephalus Linnaeus, 1766 The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is a bird of prey found in North America... Binomial name (Mitchill, 1818) Subspecies S. v. ... Genera Abramis Aristichthys Barbodes Carassius Cirrhinus Ctenopharyngodon Cyprinus Epalzeorhynchos Henicorhynchus Hypophthalmichthys Labeo Mylopharyngodon and others Carp is a common name for various freshwater fish of the family Cyprinidae, a very large group of fishes originally from Eurasia and southeast Asia. ... Species  E. americanus –       grass and redfin pickerels  E. lucius – northern pike  E. masquinongy – muskellunge  E. niger – chain pickerel   – Amur pike Esox Linnaeus, 1758, is a genus of freshwater fish, the only member of the pike family (family Esocidae) of order Esociformes. ... Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) Bass (IPA /bæs/) is a name shared by many different species of popular game fish. ... Binomial name Polyodon spathula (Walbaum in Artedi, 1792) The American Paddlefish (Polyodon spathula), also called the Mississippi Paddlefish or Spoonbill, lives in slow-flowing waters of the Mississippi River drainage system. ...


Due to higher elevation and precipitation, the ecology of the Black Hills differs significantly from that of the plains. The mountains are thickly blanketed by various types of pine, mostly of the ponderosa and spruce varieties.[14] Black Hills mammals include mule deer, elk (wapiti), bighorn sheep, mountain goats, and mountain lions, while the streams and lakes contain several species of trout.[10][15][16] Subgenera Subgenus Strobus Subgenus Ducampopinus Subgenus Pinus See Pinus classification for complete taxonomy to species level. ... Binomial name Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex C. Lawson Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa) is a widespread and very variable pine native to western North America. ... Species About 35; see text. ... Binomial name (Rafinesque, 1817) The mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) is a deer whose habitat is in the western half of North America. ... For other uses, see Elk (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Shaw, 1804 Synonyms Desmarest Cuvier[1] Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis)[2] is one of three species of mountain sheep in North America and Siberia; the other two species being Ovis dalli, that includes Dall Sheep and Stones Sheep, and the Siberian Snow sheep Ovis nivicola. ... Rocky Mountain Goat and Mountain Goats redirect here. ... Binomial name Puma concolor (Linnaeus, 1771) The puma (Puma concolor) is a type of large cat found in North, Central and South America. ... For other uses, see Trout (disambiguation). ...


Climate

South Dakota has a continental climate with four very distinct seasons ranging from typically very cold winters and hot summers. During the summers, the average high temperature throughout the state is close to 90 °F , although it often cools down to close to 60 °F at night. It is not unusual for South Dakota to have severe hot, dry spells in the summer with the temperature climbing above 100 °F for the high temperature for days or weeks at a time. Winters are cold with high temperatures in January averaging below freezing and low temperatures averaging below 10 °F in most of the state. Regions containing a continental climate exist in portions of Northern Hemisphere continents, and also at higher elevations in certain other parts of the world. ...


The precipitation of the state ranges from semi-arid, in the northwestern part of the state (around 15 inches of annual precipitation) to semi-humid around the southeast portion of the state (around 25 inches of annual precipitation), although a small area centered around Lawrence County has the highest precipitation at nearly 30 inches per annum. Lawrence County is a county located in the state of South Dakota. ...


South Dakota summers bring frequent thunderstorms which can be severe with high winds, thunder, and hail. The eastern part of the state is often considered part of tornado alley,[17] and South Dakota experiences an average of 23 tornadoes per year.[18] Winters are somewhat more stable, although severe weather in the form of blizzards and ice storms can occur during the season.
A rolling thundercloud over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... An outline of Significant Tornado Alley in the United States, where the highest percentage of violent tornadoes occur Tornado Alley is a colloquial term most often used in reference to the area of the United States in which tornadoes are most frequent. ... This article is about the winter storm condition. ... Ice storm could refer to: A type of winter storm characterized by freezing rain. ...

Monthly Normal High and Low Temperatures For Various South Dakota Cities
City Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Aberdeen 21/1 28/9 40/21 57/33 70/46 79/55 85/60 84/57 73/46 59/34 39/20 26/6
Rapid City 34/11 39/16 47/23 57/32 67/43 77/52 86/58 86/57 75/46 62/35 45/22 36/13
Sioux Falls 25/3 32/10 44/21 59/32 71/45 81/54 86/60 83/58 74/48 61/35 42/21 29/8
[5]

National Parks and Monuments

South Dakota contains several sites that are protected by the National Park Service. Two national parks have been established in South Dakota, both of which are located in the southwestern part of the state. Badlands National Park was created in 1978.[19] The park features a highly eroded, brightly-colored landscape surrounded by semi-arid grasslands.[20] Wind Cave National Park, established in 1903 in the Black Hills, contains an extensive cave network as well as a large herd of bison.[21] Mount Rushmore National Memorial in the Black Hills was established in 1925. The well-known attraction features a mountain carved by sculptor Gutzon Borglum to resemble four former U.S. presidents.[22] Other areas managed by the National Park Service include Jewel Cave National Monument near Custer, the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, the Minuteman Missile National Historic Site, which features a decommissioned nuclear missile silo, and the Missouri National Recreational River.[23] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1932x2580, 3012 KB) Badlands National Park 07/26/2005 taken by Colin Faulkingham, I am gifting it to the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1932x2580, 3012 KB) Badlands National Park 07/26/2005 taken by Colin Faulkingham, I am gifting it to the public domain. ... Badlands National Park, in southwest South Dakota, preserves 242,756 acres (982 km²) of sharply eroded buttes, pinnacles and spires blended with the largest protected mixed grass prairie in the United States. ... Image File history File links Mountrushmore. ... Image File history File links Mountrushmore. ... The faces of (left to right) George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln Mount Rushmore National Memorial, located in Keystone, South Dakota, memorializes the birth, growth, preservation and development of the United States of America. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... This article is about national parks. ... Badlands National Park, in southwest South Dakota, preserves 242,756 acres (982 km²) of sharply eroded buttes, pinnacles and spires blended with the largest protected mixed grass prairie in the United States. ... Semi-arid generally describes regions that receive low annual rainfall (25 to 50 cm /10 to 20 in) and generally have scrub or grass vegetation. ... Wind Cave National Park is a United States national park 10 miles (18 km) north of the town of Hot Springs in western South Dakota. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... For the 1960s rock band, see Mount Rushmore (band). ... Sculptor redirects here. ... Mt Rushmore, Black Hills, South Dakota (John) Gutzon Borglum (March 25, 1867 –March 6, 1941). ... Jewel Cave National Monument contains Jewel Cave, currently the second longest cave in the world, with about 135 miles (217 km) of mapped passageways. ... Custer is a city in Custer County, South Dakota, United States. ... In 1804, Meriwether Lewis & William Clark began a voyage of discovery with 45 men, a keelboat, two pirogues,and a dog. ... Our arms must be mighty, ready for instant action, so that no potential aggressor may be tempted to risk his own destruction. ... The cupola of an underground R-12U launching silo in PlokÅ¡tinÄ—s missile base, Lithuania A crew works on a Minuteman II in its silo. ... The Missouri National Recreational River is located on the border between Nebraska and South Dakota. ...


History

Main article: History of South Dakota

Human beings have lived in what is today South Dakota for at least several thousand years. French and other European explorers in the 1700s encountered a variety of groups including the Omaha and Arikara (Ree), but by the early 1800s the Sioux (Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota) were dominant. In 1743, the LaVerendrye brothers buried a plate near the site of modern day Pierre, claiming the region for France as part of greater Louisiana.[24] The European peoples are the various nations and ethnic groups of Europe. ... The Omaha tribe is a Native American tribe that currently reside in northeastern Nebraska and western Iowa, United States. ... It has been suggested that Arikara language be merged into this article or section. ... Lough Ree (Loch Rí in Irish) is a lake in the midlands of Ireland, the second of the three major lakes on the River Shannon. ... The Sioux (pronounced ) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... The Sioux (pronounced ) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... Eddie Plenty Holes, a Sioux Indian photographed about 1899. ... The Lakota (friends or allies, sometimes also spelled Lakhota) are a Native American tribe, also known as the Sioux (see Names). ... Louis-Joseph Gaultier de La Vérendrye, (b. ... Flag In 1803, the United States concluded the Louisiana Purchase (green area) with France. ...


In 1803, the United States purchased the Louisiana Territory from Napoleon, and President Thomas Jefferson organized a group commonly referred to as the "Lewis and Clark Expedition" to explore the newly-acquired region.[25][26] In 1817, an American fur trading post was set up at present-day Fort Pierre, beginning continuous American settlement of the area.[27] In 1855, the U.S. Army bought Fort Pierre but abandoned it the following year in favor of Fort Randall to the south.[27] Settlement by Americans and Europeans was by this time increasing rapidly, and in 1858 the Yankton Sioux signed the 1858 Treaty, ceding most of present-day eastern South Dakota to the United States.[28] The United States in 1810, following the Louisiana Purchase. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Lewis and Clark redirects here. ... Fort Pierre is a city located in Stanley County, South Dakota. ... Categories: Stub | South Dakota history ... The Sioux (also Dakota) are a Native American tribe. ... This is a list of treaties to which the United States has been a party or which have had direct relevance to U.S. history. ...

Deadwood, like many other Black Hills towns, was founded after the discovery of gold
Deadwood, like many other Black Hills towns, was founded after the discovery of gold

Land speculators founded two of eastern South Dakota's largest present-day cities: Sioux Falls in 1856 and Yankton in 1859. In 1861, Dakota Territory was established by the United States government (this initially included North Dakota, South Dakota, and parts of Montana and Wyoming).[29] Settlers from Scandinavia, Germany, Ireland, and Russia, as well as elsewhere in Europe and from the eastern U.S. states increased from a trickle to a flood, especially after the completion of an eastern railway link to the territorial capital of Yankton in 1872, and the discovery of gold in the Black Hills in 1874 during a military expedition led by George A. Custer. This expedition took place despite the fact that the western half of present day South Dakota had been granted to the Sioux by the Treaty of Fort Laramie (1868) as part of the Great Sioux Reservation. The Sioux declined to grant mining rights or land in the Black Hills, and war broke out after the U.S. failed to stop white miners and settlers from entering the region. The Sioux were eventually defeated and settled on reservations within South Dakota and North Dakota.[27] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1156x1327, 283 KB) A photograph of Deadwood in 1876. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1156x1327, 283 KB) A photograph of Deadwood in 1876. ... A photograph of Deadwood in 1876. ... This article is about the place in South Dakota. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... Photo of the waterfall in Sioux Falls Sioux Falls is the largest city located in South Dakota. ... Yankton is a city in Yankton County, South Dakota, USA. The population was 13,528 at the 2000 census. ... Dakota Territory was the name of the northernmost part of the Louisiana Purchase of the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This article is about the place in South Dakota. ... George Armstrong Custer George Armstrong Custer (December 5, 1839 - June 25, 1876) was an American cavalry commander in the Civil War and the Indian Wars who is best remembered for his defeat and death at the Battle of the Little Bighorn against a coalition of Native American tribes, led by... Treaty signing by William T. Sherman and the Sioux at Fort Laramie, Wyoming. ... The Great Sioux Reservation was established in the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868, and includes all of modern Western South Dakota (commonly known as West River South Dakota) and modern Boyd County, Nebraska. ... This article is about mineral extractions. ...


An increasing population caused Dakota Territory to be divided in half and a bill for statehood for North Dakota and South Dakota (as well as Montana and Washington) titled the Enabling Act of 1889 was passed on February 22, 1889 during the Administration of Grover Cleveland. It was left to his successor, Benjamin Harrison, to sign proclamations formally admitting North and South Dakota to the Union on November 2, 1889. Harrison directed his Secretary of State James G. Blaine to shuffle the papers and obscure from him which he was signing first and the actual order went unrecorded.[30][31] A bill is a proposed new law introduced within a legislature that has not been ratified, adopted, or received assent. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... The Enabling Act of 1889 is a United States law enabling North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, and Washington to form state governments and to gain admission as states of the union. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837–June 24, 1908), was the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States. ... For other persons named Benjamin Harrison, see Benjamin Harrison (disambiguation). ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830 – January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. ...


On December 29, 1890, the Wounded Knee Massacre occurred on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Commonly cited as the last major armed conflict between the United States and the Sioux Nation, the massacre resulted in the deaths of an estimated 300 Sioux, many of them women and children. 25 U.S. soldiers were also killed in the conflict.[32] is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Belligerents Sioux United States Commanders Big Foot† James W. Forsyth Strength 120 men 230 women and children 500 men Casualties and losses 178 killed 89 wounded 150 missing 25 killed 39 wounded For other uses, see Wounded Knee (disambiguation). ... Oglala Sioux tribal flag Pine Ridge Indian Reservation (Oglala Oyanke in Lakota) is an Oglala Sioux Native American reservation located in the U.S. state of South Dakota. ...

A South Dakota farm during the Dust Bowl, 1936
A South Dakota farm during the Dust Bowl, 1936

During the 1930s, several economic and climatic conditions combined with disastrous results for South Dakota. A lack of rainfall, extremely high temperatures and over-cultivation of farmland produced what was known as the Dust Bowl in South Dakota and several other plains states. Fertile topsoil was blown away in massive dust storms, and several harvests were completely ruined.[33] The experiences of the Dust Bowl, coupled with local bank foreclosures and the general economic effects of the Great Depression resulted in many South Dakotans leaving the state. The population of South Dakota declined by more than seven percent between 1930 and 1940. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2400 × 1800 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2400 × 1800 pixel, file size: 1. ... Dust storm approaching Stratford, Texas in 1935 Buried machinery in barn lot. ... Dust storm approaching Stratford, Texas in 1935 Buried machinery in barn lot. ... Topsoil is the uppermost layer of soil, usually the top six to eight inches. ... Foreclosure is the equitable proceeding in which a bank or other secured creditor sells or repossesses a parcel of real property (immovable property) due to the owners failure to comply with an agreement between the lender and borrower called a mortgage or deed of trust. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ...


Economic stability returned with the U.S. entry into World War II in 1941, when demand for the state's agricultural and industrial products grew as the nation mobilized for war. In 1944, the Pick-Sloan Plan was passed as part of the Flood Control Act of 1944 by the U.S. Congress, resulting in the construction of six large dams on the Missouri River, four of which are at least partially located in South Dakota. Flood control, hydroelectricity and recreational opportunities such as boating and fishing are provided by the dams and their reservoirs.[34] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Pick-Sloan Plan for Missouri River Basin, 1992 Categories: Stub ... The Flood Control Act of 1944 (P.L. 78-534), enacted by the 78th Congress, authorized the construction of thousands of dams and levies across the United States. ... Hydroelectricity is electricity produced by hydropower. ...


In recent decades, South Dakota has transformed from a state dominated by agriculture to one with a more diversified economy. The tourism industry has grown considerably since the completion of the interstate system in the 1960s, with the Black Hills being especially impacted. The financial service industry began to grow in the state as well, with Citibank moving its credit card operations from New York to Sioux Falls in 1981, a move that has since been followed by several other financial companies.[35] In 2007, the site of the recently-closed Homestake gold mine near Lead was chosen as the location of a new underground research facility.[36] Despite a growing state population and recent economic development, many rural areas have been struggling over the past 50 years with locally declining populations and the emigration of educated young adults to larger South Dakota cities, such as Rapid City or Sioux Falls, or to other states.[37] Citibank is a major international bank, founded in 1812 as the City Bank of New York. ... The Homestake Mine is a deep underground gold mine located near Lead, South Dakota. ... Lead is a city located in Lawrence County, South Dakota. ...


Demographics

Main article: Demographics of South Dakota
South Dakota Population Density Map
South Dakota Population Density Map
Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1860 4,837
1870 11,776 143.5%
1880 98,268 734.5%
1890 348,600 254.7%
1900 401,570 15.2%
1910 583,888 45.4%
1920 636,547 9.0%
1930 692,849 8.8%
1940 642,961 -7.2%
1950 652,740 1.5%
1960 680,514 4.3%
1970 665,507 -2.2%
1980 690,768 3.8%
1990 696,004 0.8%
2000 754,844 8.5%
Est. 2007[38] 796,214 5.5%

Image File history File links South_Dakota_population_map. ... Image File history File links South_Dakota_population_map. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...

Population

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, as of 2005, South Dakota has an estimated population of 775,933, which is an increase of 5,312, or 0.7%, from the prior year and an increase of 21,093, or 2.8%, since the year 2000. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 19,199 people (that is 56,247 births minus 37,048 deaths) and an increase due to net migration of 3,222 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 3,957 people, and migration within the country produced a net loss of 735 people. 6.8% of South Dakota's population were reported as under 5, 26.8% under 18, and 14.3% were 65 or older. Females made up approximately 50.4% of the population. The center of population of South Dakota is located in Buffalo County, in the unincorporated county seat of Gannvalley.[39] The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Center of population is a subject of study in the field of demographics. ... Buffalo County is a county located in the U.S. state of South Dakota. ... Gann Valley is an unincorporated community located in Buffalo County, South Dakota. ...


Race and ethnicity

In 2005, the Census Bureau estimated that 88.5% of South Dakotans were White, 8.8% were American Indian or Alaskan Native, 2.1 were Hispanic (of any race), 0.8% were Black, 0.7% were Asian, while 2.1% belonged to more than one race.[2] The five largest ancestry groups in South Dakota are: German (40.7%), Norwegian (15.3%), Irish (10.4%), Native American (8.3%), and English (7.1%). German-Americans are the largest ancestry group in most parts of the state, especially in the east, although there are also large Scandinavian populations in some counties. American Indians, largely Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota (Sioux) are predominant in several counties. South Dakota has the fourth highest proportion of Native Americans of any state, behind Alaska, Oklahoma, and New Mexico. Whites redirects here. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Alaskan Natives are Aboriginal Americans who live in Alaska. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... Though most indigenous Africans possess relatively dark skin, they exhibit much variation in physical appearance. ... Asian people[1] is a demonym for people from Asia. ... The terms multiracial, biracial and mixed-race describe people whose ancestors are not of a single race. ... German Americans (German Deutschamerikaner) are citizens of the United States of ethnic German ancestry and currently form the largest ancestry group in the United States, accounting for 17% of the U.S. population. ... Norwegian Americans or (Norwegian norskamerikaner) are an ethnic group in the United States. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... British Americans are Americans whose ancestry stems, either wholly or in part, from one of the four constituent nations of the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ...

South Dakota has a number of large Indian reservations (shown in pink).

As of the 2000 census, 1.90% of the population aged 5 or older speak German at home, while 1.51% speak Dakota, and 1.43% Spanish.[40] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article is about Native Americans. ... Lakota or Lakhota (as it is also commonly spelled) is the largest of the five major dialects of the Sioux language. ...

Growth and rural flight

South Dakota, in common with five other Midwest states (Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, North Dakota, and Iowa), is experiencing a trend of falling populations in rural counties, despite an overall increase in population for all of these states except North Dakota. 89% of the total number of cities in these six states have fewer than 3,000 people; hundreds have fewer than 1000. Between 1996 and 2004, almost half a million people, nearly half with college degrees, left the six states. "Rural flight" as it is called has led to offers of free land and tax breaks as enticements to newcomers. For other uses, see Nebraska (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


The effect of rural flight has not been spread evenly through South Dakota, however. Although most rural counties and small towns have lost population, the Sioux Falls area and the Black Hills have gained population. In fact, Lincoln County, near Sioux Falls, is the ninth-fastest growing county (by percentage) in the United States.[41] The growth in these areas has compensated for losses in the rest of the state, and South Dakota's total population continues to increase steadily, albeit at a slower rate than the national average.[2] Lincoln County is a county located in the state of South Dakota. ...


Religion

According to a 2001 survey, 86% of South Dakotans described themselves as being members of a Christian denomination, while 8% said that they were not religious and 3% claimed faith in a non-Christian religion. The largest Christian denomination was Lutheran (27%), followed closely by Roman Catholic at 25%. Other Christian denominations mentioned included Methodist (13%), Baptist (4%), Presbyterian (4%), Pentecostal (2%), Congregational (2%), Episcopal/Anglican (1%), and Seventh-day Adventist (1%). 7% responded either as a non-denominational Christian or a Protestant, while 2% refused to answer.[42] For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... The Pentecostal movement within Protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... The Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in the nations capital is the national cathedral of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America. ... The Seventh-day Adventist (abbreviated Adventist[3]) Church is a Protestant Christian denomination which is distinguished mainly by its observance of Saturday, the seventh day of the week, as the Sabbath. ... A non-denominational church (usually Christian) is a religious organization which does not necessarily align its mission and teachings to an established denomination. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ...


Economy

A B-1B Lancer lifts off from Ellsworth Air Force Base, one of South Dakota's largest employers
A B-1B Lancer lifts off from Ellsworth Air Force Base, one of South Dakota's largest employers

The current-dollar gross state product of South Dakota was $32.3 billion as of 2006.[43] The per capita personal income was $26,894 in 2004, the 37th highest in the nation and 13.08 percent below the national average. 13.2% of the population is below the poverty line. As of July 2007, South Dakota's unemployment rate was 3.0%, the fifth-lowest jobless rate in the nation.[44] The Boeing IDS (formerly Rockwell) B-1B Lancer is a long-range strategic bomber in service with the USAF. Together with the B-52 Stratofortress, it is the backbone of the United Statess long-range bomber force. ... Ellsworth Air Force Base is a United States Air Force base near Rapid City, South Dakota and is home to the B-1B Lancer. ... Gross state product is a measurment of the economic output of a U.S. state or an Australian state. ... Unemployment rates in the United States. ...


The service industry is the largest economic contributor in South Dakota. This sector includes the retail, finance, and health care industries. Government spending is another important segment of the state's economy, providing over ten percent of the gross state product.[45] Ellsworth Air Force Base, near Rapid City, is the second-largest single employer in the state.[46] The tertiary sector of industry, also called the service sector or the service industry, is one of the three main industrial categories of a developed economy, the others being the secondary industry (manufacturing and primary goods production such as agriculture), and primary industry (extraction such as mining and fishing). ... Drawing of a self-service store. ... The field of finance refers to the concepts of time, money and risk and how they are interelated. ... A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ... Ellsworth Air Force Base is a United States Air Force base near Rapid City, South Dakota and is home to the B-1B Lancer. ...

Agriculture has historically been a key component of the South Dakota economy. Although other industries have expanded rapidly in recent decades, agricultural production is still very important to the state's economy, especially in rural areas. The five most valuable agricultural products in South Dakota are cattle, corn (maize), soybeans, hogs, and wheat.[47] Agriculture-related industries such as meat packing and ethanol production also have a considerable economic impact on the state. South Dakota is one of the top five ethanol-producing states in the nation.[48] Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Grain alcohol redirects here. ... Turner County is a county located in the U.S. state of South Dakota. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... This article is about the maize plant. ... Binomial name Glycine max Soybeans (US) or soya beans (UK) (Glycine max) are a high-protein legume (Family Fabaceae) grown as food for both humans and livestock. ... For other uses, see Pig (disambiguation). ... Species T. aestivum T. boeoticum T. dicoccoides T. dicoccon T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta T. sphaerococcum T. timopheevii References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 Wheat Wheat For the indie rock group, see Wheat (band). ... ... Grain alcohol redirects here. ...


Another important sector in South Dakota's economy is tourism. Many travel to view the attractions of the state, particularly those of the Black Hills region such as historic Deadwood, Mt. Rushmore, and the nearby state and national parks. One of the largest tourist events in the state is the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. The three-day event drew over 450,000 attendants in 2006, significant considering the state has a population of only 750,000.[49] In 2006, tourism provided an estimated 33,000 jobs in the state and contributed over two billion US$ to the economy of South Dakota.[50] A photograph of Deadwood in 1876. ... Motorcycles lined up on Main Street during the Sturgis motorcycle rally. ...


State taxes

As of 2005, South Dakota has the lowest per capita total state tax rate in the United States.[51] The state does not levy personal or corporate income taxes,[52] inheritance taxes,[53] or taxes on intangible personal property. The state sales tax rate is 4 percent.[54] Various localities have local levies so that in some areas the rate is 6 percent. The state sales tax does not apply to sales to Indians on Indian Reservations, but many reservations have a compact with the state. Businesses on the reservation collect the tax and the state refunds to the Indian Tribes the percentage of sales tax collections relating to the ratio of Indian population to total population in the county or area affected. Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Personal property is a type of property. ... A sales tax is a consumption tax charged at the point of purchase for certain goods and services. ... BIA map of Indian reservations in the continental United States. ...


Ad valorem property taxes are local taxes and are a large source of funding for school systems, counties, municipalities and other local government units. Their administration is a local responsibility. The state revenue department does not collect or use property taxes, but it does centrally assess the property of large companies. The legislature sets some standards by general acts. The South Dakota Special Tax Division regulates some taxes including cigarette and alcohol related taxes.[55] An ad-valorem tax (Latin: by value) is a tax based on the value of real estate or personal property. ... Property tax, millage tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the property being taxed. ...


Transportation

A rest stop "tipi" is a frequent sight on a trip across the state
A rest stop "tipi" is a frequent sight on a trip across the state

South Dakota has a total of 83,609 miles of highways, roads, and streets, along with 679 miles of interstate highways.[56] Two major interstates pass through South Dakota: Interstate 90, which runs east and west; and Interstate 29, running north and south in the eastern portion of the state. The counties and towns along Interstate 29 make up what is locally referred to as "the I-29 corridor." This area features generally higher rates of population and economic growth than areas in eastern South Dakota that are further from the interstate. Interstate 90, being a major route between western national parks and large cities to the east, brings many out-of-state travelers through South Dakota, thus helping to boost the tourism and hospitality industries. Also located in the state are the shorter interstates 190, a spur into central Rapid City, and 229, a loop around eastern and southern Sioux Falls. Several major U.S. highways pass through the state. U.S. routes 12, 14, 16, 18, and 212 travel east and west, while U.S. routes 81, 83, 85 and 281 run north and south. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 438 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (837 × 1144 pixel, file size: 181 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A rest stop along Interstate 90 in South Dakota, United States. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 438 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (837 × 1144 pixel, file size: 181 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A rest stop along Interstate 90 in South Dakota, United States. ... Rest stop redirects here. ... A tipi of the Nez Perce tribe, circa 1900. ... A typical rural stretch of Interstate highway, with two lanes in each direction separated by a large grassy median, and with cross-traffic limited to overpasses and underpasses. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 90 Interstate 90 (abbreviated I-90) is the longest interstate highway in the United States at nearly 3,100 miles (5,000 kilometers). ... Interstate 29 (abbreviated I-29) is an interstate highway in the Midwestern United States. ... South Dakota I-190 runs for about two miles south, from I-90 to downtown Rapid City, South Dakota. ... A spur route in the United States Interstate highway system refers to a branch off of a primary interstate that connects with a destination away from the primary interstate. ... Interstate 229 (abbreviated I-229) in South Dakota runs approximately 10 miles (16 km) mostly within the city limits of Sioux Falls, the largest city in the state. ... A loop route is a highway or other major road that extends out from a typically longer, more important parents road to enter and (usually) circle a large city. ... Current U.S. Highway shield The United States Highway System is an integrated system of roads in the United States numbered within a nationwide grid. ... U.S. Route 12, or US 12, is an east-west United States highway running from downtown Detroit almost 2500 miles (4000 km) to Grays Harbor on the Pacific Ocean in the state of Washington. ... U.S. Route 14 (U.S. 14), an east-west route, is one of the original United States highways of 1926. ... U.S. Highway 16 is an east-west United States highway between Rapid City, South Dakota and Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. ... U.S. Highway 18 (US 18), an east-west route, is one of the original United States highways of 1926. ... U.S. Highway 212 is a spur of U.S. Highway 12 (though it never actually intersects US-12). ... U.S. Highway 81 is a north-south United States highway. ... U.S. Highway 83 is one of the longest north-south U.S. Highways in the United States, at 1885 miles. ... U.S. Highway 85 is a north-south United States highway that runs for 1,479 miles (2,380 km) from the Canadian border in North Dakota to the Mexican border in El Paso, Texas. ... U.S. Highway 281 is a north-south United States highway. ...


South Dakota contains two National Scenic Byways. The Peter Norbeck National Scenic Byway is located in the Black Hills, while the Native American Scenic Byway runs along the Missouri River in the north-central part of the state. Other scenic byways include the Badlands Loop Scenic Byway, the Spearfish Canyon Scenic Byway, and the Wildlife Loop Road Scenic Byway.[57] A National Scenic Byway is a road recognized by the United States Department of Transportation for its archeological, cultural, historic, natural, recreational, and/or scenic qualities. ... Peter Norbeck (August 27, 1870 – December 20, 1936) served as a South Dakota State Senator from Spink County, as Lieutenant Governor of South Dakota, as the nineth Governor of South Dakota, and as United States Senator. ...


Railroads are another important means of transporting freight in South Dakota. While 4,420 miles of track have been built in the state, all prior to 1948, only 1,839 miles of railroad are currently operational.[58] BNSF Railway is the largest railroad operating in South Dakota, with the Dakota, Minnesota, and Eastern Railroad being another important carrier.[59][60] Rail transportation in the state is confined only to freight, however, as South Dakota is one of the few states without any Amtrak service.[61] Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The BNSF Railway (AAR reporting marks BNSF), headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas, is one of the four remaining transcontinental railroads and one of the largest railroad networks in North America (only one competitor, the Union Pacific Railroad, is larger in size). ... The Dakota, Minnesota and Eastern Railroad (DM&E, AAR reporting mark DME) is a Class 2 railroad operating across South Dakota and southern Minnesota in the northern plains of the United States. ... The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ...


South Dakota license plates are numbered by county, with the first digit referring to the county of origin. Such a numbering system allows one to easily determine where the vehicle was registered. Counties 1–9 are ranked by 1950 population [6], and counties 10–64 are numbered alphabetically. // Introduction A license plate, number plate or registration plate (often referred to simply as a plate, or colloquially tag) is a small metal or plastic plate attached to a motor vehicle for official identification purposes. ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... There are many different numbering schemes for assigning numbers to entities. ...

Current common carriers Amtrak (AMTK) Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway (BNSF) Canadian Pacific Railway (CP) D&I Railroad Dakota Short Line Dakota Southern Railway Dakota, Minnesota and Eastern Railroad (DME) Dakota, Missouri Valley and Western Ellis and Eastern Company Sisseton Milbank Railroad Sunflour Railroad Twin Cities and Western Railroad (TCW...

Law and government

The state of South Dakota has three branches of government: executive, legislative, and judicial. This article is about the government and politics of the U.S. state of South Dakota // State capitol building in Pierre The state of South Dakota has three branches of government: executive, legislative, and judicial. ... Image File history File links PierreSD_Capitol. ... Image File history File links PierreSD_Capitol. ... South Dakota State Capitol The South Dakota State Capitol is the state capitol building of the U.S. state of South Dakota. ... Location in South Dakota Coordinates: County Hughes County Founded 1880 Government  - Mayor Dennis Eisnach Area  - City 33. ... A legislatureis a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to ratify laws. ... In the law, the judiciary or judicial system is the system of courts which administer justice in the name of the sovereign or state, a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ...


The current governor is M. Michael Rounds. Governors of South Dakota Arthur C. Mellette Republican 1889-1893 Charles H. Sheldon Republican 1893-1897 Andrew E. Lee Populist 1897-1901 Charles N. Herreid Republican 1901-1905 Samuel H. Elrod Republican 1905-1907 Coe I. Crawford Republican 1907-1909 Robert S. Vessey Republican 1909-1913 Frank M. Byrne Republican... Marion Michael Mike Rounds (born October 24, 1954) is an American politician. ...


Currently, there are 35 members of the state Senate and 70 members of the House of Representatives. The state is composed of 35 legislative districts. Voters elect one senator and two representatives from each district. The legislature meets for a thirty day session starting on the second Tuesday in January, and also if the governor calls a special session.


The state Supreme Court is the highest court in South Dakota and the court of last resort for state appellate actions. The chief justice and four justices comprise the South Dakota Supreme Court. South Dakota is divided into seven judicial circuits. There are 39 circuit judges serving in the seven circuits. Circuit courts are the state's trial courts of general jurisdiction. There are 12 full-time and three part-time magistrate judges in the seven circuits. Magistrate courts assist the circuit courts in disposing of misdemeanor criminal cases and minor civil actions. These courts of limited jurisdiction make the judicial system more accessible to the public by providing a means of direct court contact for the average citizen. Circuit courts previously were United States federal courts established in each federal judicial district. ... Limited jurisdiction, or special Jurisdiction, is the courts jurisdiction only on certain types of cases such as bankruptcy, family matters, etc. ... A misdemeanor, or misdemeanour, in many common law legal systems, is a lesser criminal act. ...


South Dakota is represented at the federal level by Senator Tim Johnson, Senator John Thune, and Representative Stephanie Herseth Sandlin.[62] Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Timothy Peter Johnson (born December 28, 1946) is the senior United States Senator from South Dakota, and a member of the Democratic Party. ... John Randolph Thune (born January 7, 1961) is the junior U.S. Senator from the state of South Dakota. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Stephanie Herseth Sandlin (born December 3, 1970) is an American lawyer and Democratic politician, currently serving as the sole member of the House of Representatives from South Dakota. ...


Politics

Presidential elections results
Year Republican Democratic
2004 59.91% 232,584 38.44% 149,244
2000 60.3% 190,700 37.56% 118,804
1996 46.49% 150,543 43.03% 139,333
1992 40.66% 136,718 37.14% 124,888
1988 52.85% 165,415 46.51% 145,560
1984 63.0% 200,267 36.53% 116,113
1980 60.53% 198,343 31.69% 103,855
1976 50.39% 151,505 48.91% 147,068
1972 54.15% 166,467 45.52% 139,945
1968 53.27% 149,841 41.96% 118,023
1964 44.39% 130,108 55.61% 163,010
1960 58.21% 178,417 41.79% 128,070

South Dakota politics are generally dominated by the Republican Party, and the state has not supported a Democratic presidential candidate since 1964 — especially notable when one considers that George McGovern, the Democratic nominee in 1972, was from South Dakota.[63][64] In 2004, George W. Bush won the state's three electoral votes with 59.9% of the vote.[65] Additionally, a Democrat has not won the governorship since 1978. As of 2006, Republicans hold a 10% voter registration advantage over Democrats and hold majorities in both the state House of Representatives and Senate.[66][67][68] All but one of the current statewide elected officers are Republicans. GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Presidential election results map. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The election was held on November 8, 1988. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, (born July 19, 1922) is a former United States Representative, Senator, and Democratic presidential nominee. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college which chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ...


Despite the state's general Republican and conservative leanings, Democrats have found success in various state-wide elections, most notably in those involving South Dakota's congressional representatives in Washington. Two of the three current members of the state's congressional delegation are Democrats, and until his electoral defeat in 2004 Senator Tom Daschle served as both senator for South Dakota as well as the senate minority (briefly majority) leader.[69] Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Thomas Andrew Daschle (born December 9, 1947) is a former U.S. Senator and Senate Majority Leader from South Dakota. ...


Contemporary political issues in South Dakota include the costs and benefits of the state lottery, South Dakota's relatively low rankings in education spending (particularly teacher pay), and recent legislative attempts to ban abortion in the state.[70][71][72] The South Dakota Lottery is run by the state of South Dakota. ... The Womens Health and Human Life Protection Act is a state law passed by the South Dakota State Legislature in 2006. ...

See also: Governor of South Dakota and List of United States Senators from South Dakota

Governors of South Dakota Arthur C. Mellette Republican 1889-1893 Charles H. Sheldon Republican 1893-1897 Andrew E. Lee Populist 1897-1901 Charles N. Herreid Republican 1901-1905 Samuel H. Elrod Republican 1905-1907 Coe I. Crawford Republican 1907-1909 Robert S. Vessey Republican 1909-1913 Frank M. Byrne Republican... The following is a list of United States Senators from South Dakota. ...

Notable cities and towns

Ten Largest[73] Cities By 2006 Population
Sioux Falls 142,396
Rapid City 62,715
Aberdeen 24,071
Watertown 20,526
Brookings 18,802
Mitchell 14,857
Pierre 14,095
Yankton 13,767
Huron 10,909
Vermilion 9,862
Aberdeen
Aberdeen
Sioux Falls, largest city
Sioux Falls, largest city
Further information: List of cities in South Dakota and List of South Dakota counties

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2016 × 1512 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2016 × 1512 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Aberdeen, a city and the county seat of Brown County, South Dakota, USA, about 125 mi (200 km) N.E. of Pierre. ... Northern State University is a university located in Aberdeen, South Dakota. ... Belle Fourche is a city located in Butte County, South Dakota. ... Brookings is a city in Brookings County, South Dakota, USA. The population was 18,504 at the 2000 census. ... South Dakota State University is home to Julia, the Alaskan. ... A photograph of Deadwood in 1876. ... This article is about the place in South Dakota. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... De Smet is the seat of Kingsbury County, South Dakota, United States. ... Laura Ingalls Wilder (February 7, 1867 – February 10, 1957) was an American author. ... Rose Wilder Lane Rose Wilder Lane (December 5, 1886, De Smet, Dakota Territory – October 30, 1968, Danbury, Connecticut) was an American journalist, travel writer, novelist, and political theorist. ... Huron is a city located in Beadle County, South Dakota. ... Lead is a city located in Lawrence County, South Dakota. ... The Homestake Experiment (sometimes referred to as the Davis Experiment) was an experiment headed by astrophysicists Raymond Davis, Jr. ... The Homestake Mine is a deep underground gold mine located near Lead, South Dakota. ... Madison is a city in Lake County, South Dakota, USA. The population was 6,540 at the 2000 census. ... Dakota State University Trojan Center Dakota State University is a public, four-year university, located in Madison, South Dakota. ... Mitchell is a city in Davison County, South Dakota, USA. The population was 14,558 at the 2000 census. ... The Corn Palace is a multi-purpose arena/facility located in Mitchell, South Dakota. ... Location in South Dakota Coordinates: County Hughes County Founded 1880 Government  - Mayor Dennis Eisnach Area  - City 33. ... Rapid City is a city located in the western part of South Dakota and is second largest city in the state of South Dakota after Sioux Falls. ... The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology (SDSM&T) was founded in 1885 as Dakota School of Mines, primarily as an institution to teach mining engineering and related disciplines. ... Nickname: Motto: Gateway to the Plains Location in Minnehaha County and the state of South Dakota Counties (metropolitan area) Government  - Mayor Dave Munson Area  - City 178. ... Spearfish is a city in Lawrence County, South Dakota, USA. The population was 8,606 at the 2000 census. ... Black Hills State University was founded in 1883 as Dakota Territorial Normal School for teacher training. ... Sturgis is a city in Meade County, South Dakota, USA. The population was 6,442 at the 2000 census. ... Motorcycles lined up on Main Street during the Sturgis motorcycle rally. ... Vermillion is a small town in the southeast corner of South Dakota, USA, and the tenth largest city in the state. ... The University of South Dakota is the state’s oldest university founded in 1862, although classes didnt start until 1882. ... Watertown welcome sign Watertown is a city in Codington County, South Dakota, USA. The population was 20,237 at the 2000 census. ... Yankton is a city in Yankton County, South Dakota, USA. The population was 13,528 at the 2000 census. ... Cities in South Dakota larger than 2,000 in population (according to the 2000 U.S. Census): Sioux Falls - 123,975 Rapid City - 59,607 Aberdeen - 24,658 Watertown - 20,237 Brookings - 18,504 Mitchell - 14,558 Pierre - 13,876 Yankton - 13,528 Huron - 11,893 Vermillion - 9,765 Spearfish... List of South Dakota counties: Aurora County Beadle County Bennett County Bon Homme County Brookings County Brown County Brule County Buffalo County Butte County Campbell County Charles Mix County Clark County Clay County Codington County Corson County Custer County Davison County Day County Deuel County Dewey County Douglas County Edmunds...

Education

As of 2006, South Dakota has a total primary and secondary school enrollment of 136,872, with 120,278 of these students being educated in the public school system.[74] There are 703 public schools in 168 school districts, giving South Dakota the highest number of schools per capita in the United States.[75][76][77] The current high school graduation rate is 89.9%, and the average ACT score is 21.8, slightly above the national average of 21.1.[78][79] South Dakota's average public school teacher salary of $34,040, compared to a national average of $47,674, is the lowest in the nation.[80] The ACT® test is a standardized achievement examination for college admissions in the United States produced by ACT, Inc. ...


The South Dakota Board of Regents, whose members are appointed by the governor, controls the six public universities in the state. South Dakota State University, in Brookings, is the largest university in the state, with an enrollment of 11,377.[81] The University of South Dakota, in Vermillion, is the state's oldest university, and has the only schools of law and medicine in South Dakota. South Dakota also has several private universities, the largest of which is Augustana College in Sioux Falls.[81] The South Dakota Board of Regents governs South Dakotas six public universities, Black Hills State University, Dakota State University, Northern State University, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, South Dakota State University, and the University of South Dakota. ... South Dakota State University is home to Julia, the Alaskan. ... Brookings is a city in Brookings County, South Dakota, USA. The population was 18,504 at the 2000 census. ... The University of South Dakota is the state’s oldest university founded in 1862, although classes didnt start until 1882. ... Vermillion is a small town in the southeast corner of South Dakota, USA, and the tenth largest city in the state. ... Augustana College is a private, liberal arts college affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and located on a rolling 100-acre (400,000 m²) campus in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. ...

See also: List of colleges and universities in South Dakota and List of high schools in South Dakota

See South Dakota state entry. ... // This is a list of high schools in the state of South Dakota. ...

Miscellaneous topics

South Dakota is home to the largest naturally heated indoor swimming pool in the world. Evans Plunge, heated from natural mineral springs, is in Hot Springs. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Hot Springs is a city located in Fall River County, South Dakota. ...


The Black Hills of South Dakota was one of the sites considered for the permanent home of the United Nations. This article is about the place in South Dakota. ... UN redirects here. ...


South Dakota has the largest U.S. population of Hutterites, who originally emigrated from Ukraine in 1874, left en masse for Canada in 1918 following persecution over their pacifist religious beliefs, and partially returned in the 1930s. Like the two best-known Anabaptist denominations, the Amish and the Mennonites, the Hutterites had their beginnings in the Radical Reformation of the 16th Century. ...


The largest and most complete fossil of Tyrannosaurus rex ever found was uncovered near Faith in 1990. Named "Sue," the remains are over 90% complete and are currently on display at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. Binomial name Tyrannosaurus rex Osborn, 1905 Synonyms Manospondylus gigas Dynamosaurus imperiosus Dinotyrannus megagracilis Nanotyrannus lancensis? Tyrannosaurus (IPA pronunciation or ; from the Greek τυραννόσαυρος, meaning tyrant lizard) is a genus of tyrannosaurid theropod dinosaur. ... Faith is a city in Meade County, South Dakota, United States. ... Species T. rex (type) Osborn, 1905 Synonyms Manospondylus Cope, 1892 Dynamosaurus Osborn, 1905  ?Nanotyrannus Bakker, Williams & Currie, 1988 Stygivenator Olshevsky, 1995 Dinotyrannus Olshevsky, 1995 Tyrannosaurus (pronounced IPA: , meaning tyrant lizard) is a genus of theropod dinosaur. ... Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago The Field Museum of Natural History, in Chicago, Illinois, USA, sits on Lake Shore Drive next to Lake Michigan, part of a scenic complex known as Museum Campus Chicago. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ...


The 1990 movie Dances with Wolves directed by and starring Kevin Costner as Lieutenant John Dunbar was filmed almost entirely in South Dakota. Dances with Wolves is a 1990 epic film which tells the story of a United States cavalry officer from the Civil War who travels into the Dakota Territory, near a Sioux tribe. ... Kevin Michael Costner (born January 18, 1955) is an Academy Award-winning American film actor, director and producer. ...


Three US Navy ships have been named USS South Dakota in honor of the state. USN redirects here. ... Three ships of the United States Navy have been named USS South Dakota in honor of the 40th state. ...


Five of South Dakota's counties lie entirely within Indian reservations. They are: Corson, Dewey, Shannon, Todd, and Ziebach. This article is about Native Americans. ... Corson County is a county located in the state of South Dakota. ... Dewey County is a county located in the state of South Dakota. ... Shannon County is a county located in the U.S. state of South Dakota. ... Todd County is a county located in the state of South Dakota. ... Ziebach County is a county located in the state of South Dakota. ...


Pierre is the second-smallest (in terms of population) state capital; only Montpelier, Vermont, has fewer people. Location in South Dakota Coordinates: County Hughes County Founded 1880 Government  - Mayor Dennis Eisnach Area  - City 33. ... Location of Montpelier in Washington County, Vermont Coordinates: , Country State County Washington County Government  - Mayor Mary Hooper Area  - City  10. ...


State symbols

Some of South Dakota's official state symbols include:[82]

South Dakota state quarter
South Dakota state quarter
State bird: Ring-neck Pheasant
State flower: American Pasque flower
State tree: Black Hills Spruce
State nicknames: Mount Rushmore State (official), Coyote state & Sunshine state (both unofficial)
State motto: "Under God, the people rule"
State slogan: "Great Faces. Great Places."
State mineral: Rose quartz
State insect: Honey bee - Apis mellifera L.
State animal: Coyote
State fish: Walleye
State gemstone: Fairburn agate
State jewelry: Black Hills Gold
State dessert: Kuchen
State drink: Milk
State bread: Fry bread
State grass: Western Wheat grass
State sport: Rodeo
State song: "Hail, South Dakota!"
State fossil: Triceratops
State soil: Houdek loam

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2000x2000, 1227 KB) The reverse side of the South Dakota State Quarter. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2000x2000, 1227 KB) The reverse side of the South Dakota State Quarter. ... Obverse of redesigned quarter The 50 State Quarters program is the release of a series of commemorative coins by the United States Mint. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Common Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), otherwise known as the Ring-necked Pheasant or Chinese Pheasant is a gamebird in the pheasant family Phasianidae of the order Galliformes, gallinaceous birds. ... This is a list of U.S. state flowers: List of U.S. state trees Lists of U.S. state insignia ^ State Flower of Alabama. ... Species Pulsatilla alpina Pulsatilla halleri Pulsatilla patens Pulsatilla vernalis Pulsatilla vulgaris et al Pasque flowers (or pasqueflowers) are deciduous perennials that are found in short clumps in meadows and prairies of North America and Eurasia. ... This List of U.S. state trees includes official trees of the following states and U.S. possessions: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia National Grove of State Trees External link USDA list of state trees and flowers Categories: | | ... Species About 35; see text. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... For the 1960s rock band, see Mount Rushmore (band). ... For other uses, see Coyote (disambiguation). ... Prism splitting light High Resolution Solar Spectrum Sunlight in the broad sense is the total spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation given off by the Sun. ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... // Not every state has an official state mineral, rock, stone or gemstone. ... For other uses, see Quartz (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that List of U.S. state butterflies be merged into this article or section. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Subspecies North-west of Europe South-west of Europe Middle East Africa Synonyms Apis mellifica Linnaeus, 1761 The Western honey bee or European honey bee (Apis mellifera) is a species of honey bee. ... A state animal is the official or representative animal of a U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Coyote (disambiguation). ... This is a list of official U.S. state fish: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Binomial name (Mitchill, 1818) Subspecies S. v. ... // Not every state has an official state mineral, rock, stone or gemstone. ... Fairburn is a town located in Custer County, South Dakota. ... For other uses, see Agate (disambiguation). ... Kuchen, the German word for cake, is used as the name for several different types of sweet desserts, pastries and gateau. ... This is a list of official state beverages:[1] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... A glass of cows milk. ... Fry bread (also called indian fry bread) is a native american treat that consists of bread fried in oil. ... This is a list of official U.S. state grass: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Wheatgrass is a young plant of the genus Agropyron, a relative of wheat. ... This is a list of official U.S. state sports: Rodeo Basketball This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... For other uses, see Rodeo (disambiguation). ... Forty-nine states of the United States (all except New Jersey) have one or more state songs, selected by the state legislature as a symbol of the state. ... Hail! South Dakota! Is the official state song of South Dakota. ... Though every state in the United States has a State Bird and a State Flower, not every state in the United States has a State Fossil. ... Species (type) Marsh, 1890 Triceratops (IPA: ) was a herbivorous genus of ceratopsid dinosaur that lived during the late Maastrichtian stage of the Late Cretaceous Period, around 68 to 65 million years ago (mya) in what is now North America. ... This is a list of official U.S. state soils: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... A 4-foot (1. ...

Famous South Dakotans

James Abourezk was the first Arab-American to serve in the U.S. Senate. ... George Lee Sparky Anderson (born February 22, 1934 in Bridgewater, South Dakota) is fifth on the all-time list for manager career wins in Major League Baseball (behind Connie Mack, John McGraw, Tony La Russa and Bobby Cox) and is the first manager to win the World Series while leading... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books in American childrens literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, better known today as simply... Mt Rushmore, Black Hills, South Dakota (John) Gutzon Borglum (March 25, 1867 –March 6, 1941). ... Thomas John Brokaw (born February 6, 1940 in Webster, South Dakota) is a popular American television journalist, Previously working on regularly scheduled news documentaries for the NBC television network, and is the former NBC News anchorman and managing editor of the program NBC Nightly News with Tom Brokaw. ... Seth Bullock (July 23, 1849 – September 23, 1919) was a western sheriff, hardware store owner and U.S. Marshal. ... David S. Collins (born October 20, 1952 in Rapid City, South Dakota) became manager of the Inland Empire 66ers in 2006. ... Shawn Colvin. ... Thomas Andrew Daschle (born December 9, 1947) is a former U.S. Senator and Senate Majority Leader from South Dakota. ... Writer Pete Dexter was recipient of the 1988 National Book Award for his novel A former newspaper reporter, Dexter was a columnist for the Philiadelphia Daily News and the Sacramento Bee. ... Harvey T. Dunn (1884 - 1952) was a famous painter from Manchester, South Dakota. ... Mark William Ellis (born June 6, 1977 in Rapid City, South Dakota) is a second baseman for Major League Baseballs Oakland Athletics. ... Billy Etbauer is an American cowboy and rodeo rider. ... Myron Floren Myron Floren (born November 5, 1919 in Roslyn, South Dakota - died 23 July 2005 in Los Angeles County, California) is best known as being the accordionist on The Lawrence Welk Show between 1950 and 1982. ... Joseph Jacob Joe Foss (April 17, 1915 – January 1, 2003) was an American politician, an ace fighter pilot, and a recipient of the Medal of Honor in 1943. ... Terry Jon Tito Francona (born April 22, 1959, in Aberdeen, South Dakota) is a Major League Baseball manager. ... Mary GrandPré is an American illustrator, best known for her work on the American version of the Harry Potter books. ... Chad Greenway team picture. ... Rebecca Lynn Hammon (born March 11, 1977), better known as Becky Hammon is a Womens National Basketball Association player who plays for the San Antonio Silver Stars. ... Joseph Hansen (1923 - November 24, 2004) was an American mystery writer. ... Marys famous legs Mary Hart (born November 8, 1950) is an American television personality and a long-time host of the syndicated gossip and entertainment round-up program Entertainment Tonight. ... Not to be confused with William Wild Bill Hickok, American football player. ... For other uses, see Crazy Horse (disambiguation). ... Oscar Howe (Mazuha Hokshina, engl. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... For the film, see Calamity Jane (1953 film) Calamity Jane at age 33. ... William John Bill Janklow (born September 13, 1939) is an American politician with the Republican Party. ... David Charles Jones (born 1921) was a U.S. air force general. ... Nicky Katt (born May 11, 1970 in South Dakota) is an American actor best known for his role on David E. Kelleys Fox drama Boston Public. ... Cheryl Jean Stoppelmoor (born July 12, 1951) is an American singer, author and actress, perhaps best known for her role as Kris Munroe in the 1970s television series Charlies Angels. ... Ernest Orlando Lawrence (August 8, 1901 - August 27, 1958) was an American physicist and Nobel laureate best known for his invention of the cyclotron. ... Frank Leahy Francis William Leahy (August 27, 1907–June 21, 1973) was an American collegiate football coach. ... Brock Edward Lesnar[4] (born July 12, 1977[3]) is an American mixed martial artist, former professional and amateur wrestler. ... Not to be confused with Lawrence Lessing. ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, (born July 19, 1922) is a former United States Representative, Senator, and Democratic presidential nominee. ... Russell Means (born November 10, 1939) is one of contemporary Americas best-known and prolific activists for the rights of American Indians. ... Michael Lloyd Mike Miller (born February 19, 1980 in Mitchell, South Dakota, United States) is a professional basketball player currently playing with the Memphis Grizzlies. ... Vernon C. Miller (August 26, 1896-November 29, 1933) was a freelance Prohibition gunman, bootlegger, bank robber and former sheriff in South Dakota who, as the only identified member of the Kansas City Massacre, was found shot to death shortly after the incident. ... For the Irish poet, see Billy Mills (poet) William Billy Mills (born June 30, 1938) is the only American ever to win an Olympic gold medal in the 10,000 m run which he did at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. ... Allen H. Neuharth (born 1924, American businessman, author, and columnist. ... Pat OBrien (born February 14, 1948 in Sioux Falls, South Dakota) is an American sports commentator and television show host, frequently referred to as The P.O.B.. He currently hosts the Entertainment Tonight spin-off, The Insider. ... Gary Owens (born Gary Altman on May 10, 1936) is a disc jockey and voice actor born in Mitchell, South Dakota. ... James Scotty Philip (30th April 1858 - 1911) was a South Dakota rancher, remembered as the Man who saved the Buffalo due to his role in helping to preserve the American Bison from extinction. ... Eric Todd Piatkowski (born September 30, 1970 in Steubenville, Ohio) is an NBA basketball player recently signed with the Phoenix Suns. ... Dorothy Provine born in South Dakota on January 20, 1937, is a singer, dancer, actress, and comedian. ... Rain-in-the-Face (also known as Ito-na-gaju or Exa-ma-gozua) (c. ... Red Cloud Red Cloud Standing:Red Bear, Young Man Afraid of his Horse, Good Voice, Ring Thunder, Iron Crow, White Tail, Young Spotted Tail. ... Terry Avon Redlin (born 11 July 1937) is an American artist. ... Joseph Joe Robbie (b. ... For the western film, see Sitting Bull (film). ... David Soul (born August 28, 1943 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American actor and British citizen and singer best known for his role as the seat-of-the-pants California police detective Ken Hutch Hutchinson (opposite co-star and long-time friend Paul Michael Glaser) in the cult television program... Jess Thomas (August 4, 1927, Hot Springs, South Dakota- October 11, 1993, San Francisco, California) was a lyric and Wagnerian tenor. ... Casey Duane Tibbs (1929 - 1990), was an American cowboy and actor. ... Norman Mack Norm Van Brocklin (March 15, 1926 – May 2, 1983), also known as The Dutchman, was an American football player and coach. ... Mamie Van Doren (born February 6, 1931 some sources say 1933) is an American actress and sex symbol. ... Thomas Vanek (born on January 19, 1984 in Baden bei Wien, Austria) is an Austrian ice hockey player. ... Adam Matthew Vinatieri (born December 28, 1972 in Yankton, South Dakota) is an American football placekicker currently playing for the Indianapolis Colts. ... Cover of the collected works of Abby Whiteside Abby Whiteside (1881-1956) was an influential and controversial piano teacher whose ideas are still much debated. ... Laura Ingalls Wilder (February 7, 1867 – February 10, 1957) was an American author. ... James Edward Zimmerman (February 19, 1923 – August 4, 1999) was born in Lantry, South Dakota. ... Korczak Ziółkowski (Boston, September 6, 1908 — October 20, 1982, Crazy Horse, South Dakota) was the American designer and sculptor of Crazy Horse Memorial. ...

See also

Badlands National Park, in southwest South Dakota, preserves 242,756 acres (982 km²) of sharply eroded buttes, pinnacles and spires blended with the largest protected mixed grass prairie in the United States. ... This article is about the place in South Dakota. ... The Corn Palace is a multi-purpose arena/facility located in Mitchell, South Dakota. ... The Coteau des Prairies: orange arrows indicate paths of the two lobes of the glacier around either side of the formation. ... The James River in North and South Dakota The James River (also known as the Jim River or the Dakota River) is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 710 mi (1,143 km) long, in the U.S. states of North Dakota and South Dakota. ... Jewel Cave National Monument contains Jewel Cave, currently the second longest cave in the world, with about 135 miles (217 km) of mapped passageways. ... This is a partial list of rivers in the state of South Dakota in the United States. ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... For the 1960s rock band, see Mount Rushmore (band). ... // Early history (1910-1950) Recent history (1950-1990) Scouting in South Dakota today There are four Boy Scouts of America local councils in South Dakota. ... The United States Census Bureau has defined one Combined Statistical Area (CSA),[1] three Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs),[2] and nine Micropolitan Statistical Areas (μSAs)[3] in the State of South Dakota. ... The South Dakota Highway Patrol is the highway patrol agency for South Dakota, which has jurisdiction anywhere in the state. ... Wall Drug - Free Ice Water Wall Drug is a drug store and gift shop that is perhaps one of the greatest self-designated tourist attractions in the United States. ... Wind Cave National Park is a United States national park 10 miles (18 km) north of the town of Hot Springs in western South Dakota. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Land and Water Area of States (2000). www.infoplease.com. Retrieved on 2007-09-03, 2007.
  2. ^ a b c State and County Quickfacts (South Dakota). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  3. ^ a b c Elevations and Distances in the United States. U.S Geological Survey (29 April 2005). Retrieved on November 7, 2006.
  4. ^ a b Hasselstrom, Linda: Roadside History of South Dakota, pages 2-4. Mountain Press Publishing Company, 1994
  5. ^ List of States by Population Density. www.answers.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-06.
  6. ^ a b Elevations and Distances in the United States. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved on 2007-12-01.
  7. ^ Johnson, Dirk. Gold Divides Dakotans as River Did [1] The New York Times. 9 October 1988. (accessed 14 February, 2008)
  8. ^ A Short Introduction to Terrestrial Biomes. www.nearctica.com. Retrieved on 2007-09-22.
  9. ^ South Dakota Flora. Northern State University. Retrieved on 2007-09-22.
  10. ^ a b c South Dakota Fauna. Northern State University. Retrieved on 2007-09-22.
  11. ^ Ring-Necked Pheasant. Northern State University. Retrieved on 2007-09-22.
  12. ^ Hetland, Cara. South Dakota bald eagles make a comeback [2] Minnesota Public Radio. 8 February 2007. (accessed 22 September, 2007)
  13. ^ Paddlefish. Northern State University. Retrieved on 2007-09-22.
  14. ^ Pines of South Dakota. Northern State University. Retrieved on 2007-09-22.
  15. ^ Mountain Goat. South Dakota Department of Game, Fish, and Parks. Retrieved on 2007-09-22.
  16. ^ General Facts About Mountain Lions. South Dakota Department of Game, Fish, and Parks. Retrieved on 2007-09-22.
  17. ^ Tornado Climatology. National Climatic Data Center. Retrieved on 2008-01-01.
  18. ^ Climate of South Dakota (CSV). National Climatic Data Center. Retrieved on 2008-01-01.
  19. ^ Frequenly Asked Questions (Badlands National Park). National Park Service. Retrieved on 2007-08-27.
  20. ^ Badlands. National Park Service. Retrieved on 2007-08-27.
  21. ^ Wind Cave History. National Park Service. Retrieved on 2007-08-28.
  22. ^ Carving History. National Park Service. Retrieved on 2007-08-27.
  23. ^ South Dakota. National Park Service. Retrieved on 2007-08-28.
  24. ^ Gaultier De La Verendrye, Louis-Joseph. Dictionary of Canadian Biography. Retrieved on 2007-04-09.
  25. ^ Louisiana Purchase. National Park Service. Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  26. ^ Teaching With Documents: The Lewis and Clark Expedition. The National Archives. Retrieved on 2007-12-16.
  27. ^ a b c Chronology of South Dakota History. South Dakota Historical Society. Retrieved on 2007-09-03.
  28. ^ 1858 "Treaty of Washington". Minnesota Historical Society. Retrieved on 2007-08-28.
  29. ^ Dakota Territory History. Union County Historical Society. Retrieved on 2007-09-03.
  30. ^ U.S. Mint Coin of the Month
  31. ^ Library of Congress, Dakota Territory and Statehood
  32. ^ Massacre at Wounded Knee, 1890. www.eyewitnesstohistory.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  33. ^ Drought in the Dust Bowl Years. National Drought Mitigation Center. Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  34. ^ Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin Program. www.answers.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  35. ^ Hetland, Cara. Sioux Falls 25 years after Citibank's arrival. [3] Minnesota Public Radio. 24 February 2006. (accessed 23 March, 2007)
  36. ^ Homestake Strikes Gold Again. South Dakota Science and Technology Authority. Retrieved on 2007-08-28.
  37. ^ Sweeping out the Plains. www.aliciapatterson.org. Retrieved on 2007-04-05.
  38. ^ Population Finder - South Dakota. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-02-23.
  39. ^ Population and Population Centers by State - 2000. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-08-18.
  40. ^ Most Spoken Languages in South Dakota. www.mla.org. Retrieved on 2007-08-18.
  41. ^ 100 Fastest Growing Counties. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  42. ^ American Religious Identification Survey. Exhibit 15. The Graduate Center, City University of New York. Retrieved on 2007-04-06.
  43. ^ Gross Domestic Product (GDP) By State (Table 5). Bureau of Economic Analyses. Retrieved on 2007-09-08.
  44. ^ Unemployment state by state. CNNMoney.com. Retrieved on 2007-09-08.
  45. ^ South Dakota GSP by component (CSV). Governor's Office of Economic Development (2007). Retrieved on 2007-09-08.
  46. ^ Reha, Bob. South Dakota's Ellsworth AFB to stay open. [4] Minnesota Public Radio. 26 August 2005. (accessed 8 September, 2007)
  47. ^ State Marketing Profiles : South Dakota. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved on 2008-01-18.
  48. ^ Ethanol Production By State. Nebraska Energy Office. Retrieved on 2007-06-30.
  49. ^ Sturgis Rally Attendance Statistics. www.sturgis.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-06.
  50. ^ South Dakota Tourism Statistics. South Dakota Department of Tourism. Retrieved on 2007-04-06.
  51. ^ States Ranked by Total State Taxes and Per Capita Amount: 2005. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  52. ^ New Business Information. South Dakota Department of Revenue & Regulation. Retrieved on 2008-01-27.
  53. ^ Inheritance/Estate Tax. South Dakota Department of Revenue & Regulation. Retrieved on 2008-01-27.
  54. ^ State Sales Tax Rates. Federation of Tax Administrators. Retrieved on 2007-12-18.
  55. ^ South Dakota Department of Revenue & Regulation. Special Tax Information. Retrieved on 2008-03-18.
  56. ^ General Information/Key Facts. South Dakota Department of Transportation. Retrieved on 2007-09-03.
  57. ^ South Dakota. National Scenic Byways Program. Retrieved on 2008-01-24.
  58. ^ Basic Mileage. South Dakota Department of Transportation. Retrieved on 2007-09-03.
  59. ^ BNSF. South Dakota Department of Transportation. Retrieved on 2007-09-03.
  60. ^ DM&E. South Dakota Department of Transportation. Retrieved on 2007-09-03.
  61. ^ Planning a Trip. www.frommers.com. Retrieved on 2007-09-03.
  62. ^ How to reach South Dakota's Congressional Delegation. State of South Dakota. Retrieved on 2008-01-22.
  63. ^ McGOVERN, George Stanley, (1922-). Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved on 2007-10-05.
  64. ^ Presidential General Election Graph Comparison - South Dakota. www.uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved on 2007-10-05.
  65. ^ 2004 Presidential General Election Results - South Dakota. www.uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved on 2007-04-09.
  66. ^ South Dakota Voter Registration Statistics. South Dakota Secretary of State. Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  67. ^ Official List of South Dakota Senators. State of South Dakota. Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  68. ^ Official List of South Dakota Representatives. State of South Dakota. Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  69. ^ Daschle Loses S.D. Senate Seat to Thune. www.foxnews.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  70. ^ South Dakota Lottery History. South Dakota Lottery. Retrieved on 2007-04-09.
  71. ^ Quality Counts 2000 - Who Should Teach?. Education Week. Retrieved on 2007-04-09.
  72. ^ "South Dakota Abortion Ban Rejected", USA Today, 2006-11-08. Retrieved on 2006-06-30. 
  73. ^ United States Census Bureau Population Estimates for all Incorporated Places in South Dakota: 2000-2006. Retrieved on 2007-06-29.
  74. ^ Student Demographics. South Dakota Department of Education. Retrieved on 2007-11-26.
  75. ^ School System By Type (2006-07). South Dakota Department of Education. Retrieved on 2007-11-26.
  76. ^ Schools & Personnel. South Dakota Department of Education. Retrieved on 2007-11-26.
  77. ^ Number of Schools (most recent) (per capita). www.statemaster.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-26.
  78. ^ South Dakota Graduation Rate. South Dakota Department of Education. Retrieved on 2007-11-26.
  79. ^ ACT Average Composite Score South Dakota vs. National. South Dakota Department of Education. Retrieved on 2007-11-26.
  80. ^ Teachers Take "Pay Cut" As Inflation Outpaces Salaries. National Education Association. Retrieved on 2007-11-26.
  81. ^ a b Doing Business in South Dakota (Public Universities). Governor's Office of Economic Development. Retrieved on 2007-11-26.
  82. ^ Signs and Symbols of South Dakota. State of South Dakota. Retrieved on 2008-01-03.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The comma-separated values (or CSV; also known as a comma-separated list or comma-separated variables) file format is a file type that stores tabular data. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The comma-separated values (or CSV; also known as a comma-separated list or comma-separated variables) file format is a file type that stores tabular data. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Coordinates: 44.5° N 100° W Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Nebraska (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ... This article is about the state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Federal districts are subdivisions of a federal system of government. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... Motto Samoa, Muamua Le Atua(Samoan) Samoa, Let God Be First Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner, Amerika Samoa Capital Pago Pago; Fagatogo (seat of government) Official languages English, Samoan Government  -  Governor Togiola Tulafono United States unincorporated territory  -  Treaty of Berlin 1899   -  Deed of Cession of Tutuila 1900   -  Deed of Cession... Anthem: Gi Talo Gi Halom Tasi(Chamorro) Satil Matawal Pacifiko(Carolinian) Capital Saipan Official languages English, Chamorro, Carolinian Government Presidential representative democracy  -  Governor Benigno R. Fitial  -  Lt. ... For the board game, see Puerto Rico (board game). ... Motto United in Pride and Hope Anthem Virgin Islands March Capital (and largest city) Charlotte Amalie Official languages English Government  -  Head of State George W. Bush  -  Governor John de Jongh Organized, unincorporated territory  -  Revised Organic Act 22 July 1954  Area  -  Total 346. ... The flag of the United States is used for all of the United States Minor Outlying Islands The United States Minor Outlying Islands, a statistical designation defined by ISO 3166-1, consists of nine insular United States possessions: All of these islands are in the Pacific Ocean except Navassa Island... Bajo Nuevo Bank, also called the Petrel Islands, is located in the western United States and Jamaica. ... Baker Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°13′N 176°31′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Howland Island Howland Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°48′N 176°38′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Jarvis Island (formerly also known as Bunker Island[1]) is an uninhabited 4. ... Johnston Atoll is a 130 km² atoll in the North Pacific Ocean at 16°45′N 169°30′W, about one-third of the way from Hawaii to the Marshall Islands. ... The flag of the US is used for Kingman Reef Kingman Reef Kingman Reef—NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Kingman Reef is a one-square-kilometer tropical coral reef located in the North Pacific Ocean, roughly half way between Hawaiian Islands and American Samoa at 6°24... Orthographic projection centred over Midway. ... Navassa Island map from The World Factbook Navassa Island - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Navassa Island (La Navase in French, Lanavaz in Haitian Kreyòl) is a small, uninhabited island in the Caribbean Sea. ... Palmyra Atoll - Landsat Image N-03-05_2000 (1:50,000) Palmyra Atoll - Marplot Map (1:50,000) Orthographic projection over Palmyra Atoll Palmyra Atoll, is an incorporated atoll administered by the United States government. ... Serranilla Bank is a western Caribbean island located about 210 miles north-northeast of Nicaragua. ... USGS Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite image of Wake Island. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Welcome to the State of South Dakota's Official Home Page! (1177 words)
South Dakota Connect is an information gateway for individuals to quickly find services and resources, without knowing the name of a certain program or which Department the program belongs to.
The South Dakota Quarter was unveiled and launched at Mount Rushmore on November 13, 2006.
The South Dakota Drought Task Force was activated in 2004 to closely monitor drought conditions and to implement proactive drought aid.
South Dakota Vacations - State Of South Dakota - South Dakota Hotels (0 words)
To the west of the Black Hills of South Dakota lies one of the last remaining Minuteman Missile launch sites in the United States, left over from the cold war.
Near Faith, South Dakota an amazing discovery of “Sue” the largest and most complete fossil of a Tyrannosaurus rex was discovered in 1990.
The Missouri River runs through the central part of the state and visitors interested in exploration are invited to take some of the same paths as early explorers Lewis and Clark as they embarked on their expedition to survey the country’s newly acquired regions.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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