FACTOID # 7: The top five best educated states are all in the Northeast.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > South Carolina class battleship
South Carolina-class battleship
Class Overview
Class type: Battleship
Class name The State of South Carolina
Preceded by: Mississippi class
Succeeded by: Delaware class
Ships of the line: South Carolina (BB-26), Michigan (BB-27)
General characteristics (USS South Carolina)
Displacement: Standard:16,000 tons
Mean War Service:
Length: 452 ftin
Beam: 80 ft 2 in
Draft: 24 ft 5 in
Speed: 18.79  knots (trials - USS Michigan)
Complement: 51 officers and 881 enlisted
Max. cruising radius 6,950 nautical miles
Power: 16,500 ihp
Drive: Triple Expansion
Fuel: 900/2200 (Coal)
Armament: eight 12 inch, 22 three-inch, 2 × 21 in (533 mm) torpedo tubes
Armor Belt:11 - 9 in over mach and 12 - 10 in over mag (both 8 feet wide tapering uniformly from top to bottom. 10 - 8 in forward of forward magazine. 60 lb NS from belt forward (frame 8 to 17) and after from belt to stern (Frame 81 aft)
Casemates: 8 - 10 in
Bulkheads:
Barbettes:10 - 8 in
Turrets: 12 in / 2.5 in NS / 8 inch
Decks: 50 lb NS + 30 lb over mag, 30 lb structural + 30 lb structural over mach; 70 lb NS + 30 lb forward of Forward mag over forward belt; 40 lb NS + 20 lb to bow; 80 lb NS +30 lb abaft belt; 100 lb NS + 20 sloping to stern.

The United States Navy's South Carolina class consisted of two battleships; USS South Carolina and USS Michigan, both of which were launched in 1908. They were designed before HMS Dreadnought, and according to the same all-big-gun principle as that famous ship, but their construction proceeded so slowly that Dreadnought was commissioned before them (in 1906). The USS South Carolina Battleship, Public domain photo from history. ... The firepower of a battleship demonstrated by USS Iowa A battleship is a large, heavily-armored warship with a main battery consisting of the largest caliber of guns. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35°12N... The Mississippi-class battleships, USS Mississippi (BB-23) and USS Idaho (BB-24), served in the US Navy from 1908 to 1914. ... The Delaware-class battleships of the United States Navy were its first true Dreadnoughts, carrying a battery of ten 12-inch guns in five turrets, and capable of exceeding 20 knots. ... USS South Carolina (BB-26), the lead ship of her class of dreadnought battleship, was the fourth ship of the United States Navy to be named in honor of the eighth state. ... USS Michigan (BB-27), a South Carolina class battleship, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named in honor of the 26th state. ... Tonnage is a measure of the size or cargo capacity of a ship. ... Look up ton in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The beam of a ship is its width at the widest point, or a point alongside the ship at the mid-point of its length. ... The draft of a ships hull is the vertical distance from the bottom of the hull to the waterline. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A knot is a unit of speed abbreviated kt or kn. ... Armor or armour (see spelling differences) is protective clothing intended to defend its wearer from intentional harm in combat and military engagements, typically associated with soldiers. ... Belt armor is armor added to the hulls of battleships. ... A Casemate is a heavy duty structure originally a vaulted chamber in a fortress. ... Bulkhead may refer to the following: Bulkhead (partition), a wall within the hull of a ship, vehicle or container Bulkhead (barrier) Bulkhead line See also: Flatcar Bulkhead Category: ... A barbette is the fixed area underneath a rotating gun turret on a warship. ... Corbelled corner turrets at Newark Castle, Port Glasgow. ... A deck is a permanent covering over a compartment or a hull[1] of a ship. ... USN redirects here. ... The firepower of a battleship demonstrated by USS Iowa A battleship is a large, heavily-armored warship with a main battery consisting of the largest caliber of guns. ... USS South Carolina (BB-26), the lead ship of her class of dreadnought battleship, was the fourth ship of the United States Navy to be named in honor of the eighth state. ... USS Michigan (BB-27), a South Carolina class battleship, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named in honor of the 26th state. ... The sixth HMS Dreadnought of the Royal Navy was a revolutionary battleship which entered service in 1906. ...

Contents

Design

The all big gun Battleship had been discussed in "Proceedings" (The U.S. Naval Institute's official publication) as early as 1902. In design and characteristics, South Carolina represented an evolution of the preceding Connecticut class, rather than a revolutionary "clean sheet" design such as Dreadnought. Design characteristics common to all U.S. Battleships manifested themselves early in this design. One design mandate was that all U.S. Battleships have large operational ranges and that the coal storage be figured into the design. The class was severely constrained by 16,000-tonnage limitation imposed by Congress on the proceeding Connecticut class, the limit on battleship tonnage having just been raised by Congress. This left the C&R board to construct on 16,000 tons what foreign navies were having problems constructing at 18,000 tons. The class had to be reduced by one deck and the secondary was limited to 3" weapons and speed was limited to 18.5 knots. The ship class was a very "wet" design shipping water from quartering seas. The next class would show a rise of over 4000 tons to correct issues found with the South Carolina class.


Engineering

It was for operational range that the South Carolina Class used less powerful but more fuel-efficient VTE (vertical triple expansion) engine machinery instead of the newer and faster steam turbines in Dreadnought, a machinery arrangement which would be repeated on only four more U.S. battleships (the New York class battleships, USS Delaware and USS Oklahoma.) A steam turbine extracts the energy of dry pressurized superheated steam as mechanical movement. ... The New York class battleship was a series of two battleships of the United States Navy which served during World War I and World War II. There were two ships in this class: the USS New York and the USS Texas. ... The sixth USS Delaware (BB-28) of the United States Navy was a battleship launched in 1909 and scrapped in 1924, the lead ship of the Delaware class. ... USS Oklahoma (BB-37), a Nevada-class battleship was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the 46th state. ...


Armor Suite

The South Carolina class battleship armor suite provided better protection than HMS Dreadnought with thicker side armor and all magazines well away from the sides. That being said, this class of battleships would suffer the same lack of deck and turret roof armor that all early dreadnoughts suffered from. Six ships and one submarine of the Royal Navy have borne the name HMS Dreadnought in the expectation that they would dread nought but God. ...


Armament

The class was originally intended to be a modest modification, with single 12" guns replacing the dual 8" guns on the superstructure corners, and the poorly-performing 7" secondary removed, but the recoil proved to be too much of a problem and the 12" guns were reworked into superimposed (or "superfiring") turrets; South Carolina was the first battleship in the world to feature superfiring turrets and all subsequent US battleships would feature them. This allows all four turrets to fire on a broadside and conserve tonnage to allow the class to be built on the same tonnage as the preceding class while having the same broadside as the HMS Dreadnought with one less turret and avoiding turrets mounted near the sides of hull. While there was concern among some engineers about shock damage with the superfiring turret firing direct forward, there was not perceived as a problem with broadside fire. Testing on the old Monitor USS Florida was done for fire directly over the lower turret and was shown not to be a serious problem. The superfiring turrets turned out to be highly successful in service, and all future US battleships would feature them. British battleships would not add this design feature until HMS Orion in 1910. The sixth HMS Dreadnought of the Royal Navy was a revolutionary battleship which entered service in 1906. ... The fourth USS Florida (BM-9) was an Arkansas-class monitor in the United States Navy. ... HMS Orion was a battleship of the Royal Navy, launched in 1910, the lead ship of her class and the first super-dreadnought. In World War I she served in the 2nd Battle Squadron of the Grand Fleet based at Scapa Flow and fought at the battle of Jutland, 31...


Operations

During World War One, both battleships operated with Pre-Dreadnoughts due to their slow speed. Both battleships of the South Carolina class were scrapped under the terms of the Washington Treaty.


Source: U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History Norman Friedman ISBN 0-87021-715-1


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m