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Encyclopedia > South Carolina State University
South Carolina State University
Image:SCSUlogo.jpg

Motto: Scientia, Officium, Honos (Knowledge, Duty, Honor)
Established March 4, 1896
Type: Public Land Grant School
President: Dr. Andrew Hugine Jr.
Staff: 550
Undergraduates: 4,525
Postgraduates: 886
Location Orangeburg, SC, U.S.
Campus: 446 acres (160 acres (0.6 km²) at Orangeburg campus, 286 additional acres at Camp Harry Daniels in Elloree, South Carolina)
Mascot: Bulldog
Colors: Garnet and Blue
Website: http://www.scsu.edu/

South Carolina State University (also known as SCSU, State College among the older alumni members, or simply State), is a historically black university located in Orangeburg, South Carolina. It is the only state funded, historically black land-grant institution in South Carolina and is a member school of the Thurgood Marshall Scholarship Fund. Founded in 1896, its current enrollment is 4,525 students, with 550 faculty members. Its nickname is the Bulldogs with the school colors being garnet and blue, the school's campus size is 160 acres (0.6 km²), with an additional 286 acres (1.2 km²) at Camp Harry Daniels in Elloree, South Carolina, and its current president is Dr. Andrew Hugine Jr. Image File history File links SCSUlogo. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Dr. Andrew Hugine Jr. ... This article is about work. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Downtown Orangeburg, South Carolina downtown Orangeburg Orangeburg City Hall/Stevenson Municipal Auditorium Orangeburg, also known as The Garden City, is the largest city and county seat of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Elloree is a town located in Orangeburg County, South Carolina. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... Downtown Orangeburg, South Carolina downtown Orangeburg Orangeburg City Hall/Stevenson Municipal Auditorium Orangeburg, also known as The Garden City, is the largest city and county seat of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Thurgood Marshall successfully argued the 1954 landmark case Brown v. ... Country of origin United Kingdom Classification Breed standards (external links) FCI, AKC, ANKC KC(UK), NZKC, UKC The English Bulldog, often called simply the Bulldog, is a medium-sized dog breed, originally used for bullbaiting, in which trained bulldogs attacked and killed tied-up bulls for sport during the 17th... Elloree is a town located in Orangeburg County, South Carolina. ... Dr. Andrew Hugine Jr. ...

Contents

History (early years)

Under the 1862 Morrill Land Grant Act, the South Carolina General Assembly created the Colored, Normal, Industrial, Agricultural, and Mechanical College of South Carolina on March 3, 1896. The new school, separated from nearby Claflin College, established (now Claflin University) after 24 years, operated in one building, Morrill Hall, which held classrooms, the library, dormitories, and the president's office and residence. The first president was Congressman and Lincoln University, PA AlumnusThomas E. Miller who served from 1896-1911. The South Carolina General Assembly, also called the South Carolina Legislature, is the legislative branch of South Carolina and consists of the South Carolina House of Representatives and the South Carolina Senate. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Claflin University is located in Orangeburg, South Carolina. ... Lincoln University in Pennsylvania is a four-year university on 350 acres in southern Chester County and a Center for Graduate Studies in Philadelphia. ... Thomas Ezekiel Miller (1849 - 1938, a Representative from South Carolina; born in Ferrebeville, Beaufort County, South Carolina, June 17, 1849; moved with his parents to Charleston, South Carolina, in 1851; attended the public schools in Charleston, South Carolina, and in Hudson, New York; employed as a newsboy on a railroad...


1920s - 1950s

Academic programs received more attention as the student population increased, but other programs, such as the university's high school, were forced to close due to the Great Depression. Fortunately, the New Deal Programs were used to create, among other things, Wilkinson Hall, the university's first separate library building (now home to Admissions and Financial Aid). For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... The New Deal was the title President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave to the series of programs he initiated between 1933 and 1938 with the goal of providing relief, recovery, and reform (3 Rs) to the people and economy of the United States during the Great Depression. ...


1940s - 1950s

The college's campus grew, as it purchased over 150 acres (0.6 km²) for agricultural learning. After World War II, many students flocked to the college, creating a classroom shortage problem for the school. In 1947, the United States Army created an ROTC detachment, in which all male students were required to enroll until mandatory enrollment ended in 1969. The school's name changed, as well, as the South Carolina General Assembly renamed the school South Carolina State College in 1954. Because of the "separate but equal" laws in the state, the legislature gave the college large sums of money to build new academic facilities and dormitories, some of which still stand on the campus today, including the Student Union (1954), and Turner Hall (1956). This was done in order to give black students an environment of "equal" education. Also, the legislature created a law program for the college, mainly to prevent black students from attending the law school at the then-segregated University of South Carolina. The law program folded in 1966 after the University of South Carolina integrated. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... The Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) is a training program of the United States armed forces present on college campuses to recruit and educate commissioned officers. ... The University of South Carolina, Columbia (USC, SC, or Carolina) is a public, co-educational, research university located in Columbia, South Carolina, United States. ...


1960s - 1980s

During the height of the Civil Rights Movement, many students participated in marches and rallies aimed at ending segregation. The struggle came to a climax on the night on February 8, 1968, when three students were killed and 27 others were wounded by state policemen at the height of a protest that opposed the segregation of a nearby bowling alley. The tragedy, known as the Orangeburg Massacre, is commemorated by a memorial plaza near the front of the campus. From the late-1960s to the mid-1980s, under the leadership of Dr. M. Maceo Nance, the campus experienced unprecendented growth in the form of new academic buildings, such as Nance Hall (1974) and Belcher Hall (1986), new residence halls, such as Sojourner Truth Hall (1972), which, at 14 stories, is the tallest building in Orangeburg County, and a new library building (1968), not to mention enlargements and renovations of existing facilities. The school also opened the I.P. Stanback Museum & Planetarium, which is the only facility of its kind on a historically black university campus in the United States. After Dr. Nance's retirement in 1986, Dr. Albert Smith assumed the office of the school's president and, among other achievements, created an honors college in 1988. Martin Luther King is perhaps most famous for his I Have a Dream speech, given in front of the Lincoln Memorial during the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom This article is about the civil rights movement following the Brown v. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pre-dating the Kent State shootings and Jackson State killings, the Orangeburg massacre was marked by the killing of three students by local policemen who fired into a crowd of people who were protesting segregation in 1968 at a bowling alley in Orangeburg, South Carolina. ... Sojourner Truth (c. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ...

South Carolina State University Administration Building, Orangburg, SC
South Carolina State University Administration Building, Orangburg, SC

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1843 × 1229 pixel, file size: 1 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Domna Administration Building (in front), Lowman Hall (background). ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1843 × 1229 pixel, file size: 1 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Domna Administration Building (in front), Lowman Hall (background). ...

1990 - 2002

During the tenure of Dr. Smith, the school also gained university status from the South Carolina General Assembly, becoming South Carolina State University in February of 1992. In 1993, Dr. Barbara Hatton became the school's first female president and created many improvements for the campus, such as the 1994 renovation of Oliver C. Dawson Bulldog Stadium, constructing new suites and a larger press box, as well as increasing its capacity to 22,000. Hatton also spearheaded the creation of a plaza which resides in front of the Student Union and passes by several dorms and buildings in the central portion of the campus. Under SC State's next president, Dr. Leroy Davis, South Carolina State University celebrated its 100th anniversary in 1996, and the school constructed a Fine Arts Center in 1999, giving the art and music departments a new home.


2003 - present

Under the leadership of Dr. Andrew Hugine Jr., since 2003, the school constructed a new 771-bed residence hall, which is the largest dormitory in South Carolina. The first four buildings in Phase One opened on August 26, 2006, and the last two in the first phase opened on September 10, 2006. With the opening of the new dorms, SC State will close five dorms, Bethea (freshmen male), Miller (female), Earle (female), Bradham (female), and Manning (female) Halls. Both Bradham and Manning Halls had been used since the World War I era, Miller Hall is being closed due to fire alarm system malfunctions, and Bethea is being closed after 50 years of service due to numerous building and health problems. Bethea Hall will be torn down to make way for a new $33 million complex for the School of Engineering. Dr. Andrew Hugine Jr. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The dining halls, both Washington Dining Hall and "The Pitt", located in the Student Union, received major facelifts, and the dining hall inside Truth Hall will soon be renovated into a cyber cafe. The university is also working to renovate Lowman Hall, which, when refurbished, will be the new administration building. South Carolina State recently broke ground on the new James E. Clyburn University Transportation Center (UTC), which will be home to the only UTC in South Carolina, one of only three among Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), and one of only 33 total UTCs in the nation. James Enos Jim Clyburn (born July 21, 1940) is an American politician and a member of the United States House of Representatives for the 6th District of South Carolina. ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ...

  • South Carolina State hosted the first debate of the 2008 Democratic Party Presidential candidate debate series. This event, which took place on April 26, 2007 at the Martin Luther King Auditorium, was televised nationally on MSNBC. This debate made SC State the first Historically Black University to host a Presidential Candidate debate on its campus.

Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For the news website, see msnbc. ...

Colleges, departments, and schools

  • College of Business and Applied Professional Sciences
    • Department of Accounting, Agribusiness, and Economics
    • Department of Business Administration
    • Department of Family & Consumer Sciences
    • Department of Health Sciences
    • Department of Military Sciences
  • College of Education, Humanities, and Social Sciences
    • Department of Education
    • Department of English and Modern Languages
    • Department of Human Services
    • Department of Visual and Performing Arts
  • College of Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Technology
    • Department of Biological and Physical Sciences
    • Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering Technology
    • Department of Mathematics and Computer Sciences
  • School of Graduate Studies

Facts and figures - state and nation

  • Only undergraduate Environmental Sciences Field in the nation
  • Only undergraduate Nuclear Engineering Program in the state
  • Only Doctor of Education degree in the state
  • Only Masters of Science Degree in Transportation
  • Of 2,443 higher education institutions, South Carolina State ranks:
    • 1st in minority degrees granted in mathematics
    • 1st in minority degrees granted in Biology
    • 1st in minority degrees granted in all disciplines
    • 1st in minority degrees granted in Education
    • 1st in minority degrees granted in Computer and Information Science
    • 1st in minority degrees granted in the Master's level
  • Three buildings, Lowman Hall, Hodge Hall, and Dukes Gymnasium were placed in the South Carolina State College Historic District, making all three buildings National Historical Landmarks.

The Washington Monthly is a magazine based in Washington DC which covers American politics and government. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Catholic[4] institution located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated section of St. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ...

In the ROTC

  • Commissioned over 1,900 officers to date
  • Produced the highest number of minority officers in the country
  • 12 graduates have achieved the rank of general

This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Athletics

South Carolina State is a charter member of the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) and participates in NCAA Division I (I-AA for college football). The school sponsors basketball, bowling, golf, soccer, volleyball, softball, cross country, track, and tennis for women, and basketball, bowling, tennis, track, golf, cross country, and football for men. The Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) is a collegiate athletic conference which consists of historically black colleges in the southeastern United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... This article is about the sport. ... A bowler releases the ball. ... This article is about the sport. ... Soccer redirects here. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport popular around the world but especially in the United States. ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sport. ... A bowler releases the ball. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ...


The school's football team has won more conference championships than any other school in the MEAC, with wins in 1974, [1975 (shared title with North Carolina A&T), 1976 (shared title with Morgan State University), 1977, 1978, 1980, 1981, 1982 (shared title with Florida A&M), 1983, 1994, and in 2004, when it shared the title with Hampton University. The team also has three Black College Football National Championship titles, with the most recent title won in 1994. North Carolina A&T State University North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University (NC A&T) is a land-grant doctoral/research intensive university located in Greensboro, North Carolina. ... Morgan State University, formerly Centenary Biblical Institute (1867-1890), Morgan College (1890 -1975), is located in residential Baltimore, Maryland. ... Name Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University Address Town Tallahassee, FL 32307 Established 1887 Community Type Public coeducational Classification Historically black Agricultural and mechanical Religion Secular Enrollment Faculty President Dr. Castell V. Bryant Accreditation Nickname Rattlers Mascot Rattler Colors Orange and light green Motto Head, heart, hand, field Newspaper The Famuan... Hampton University (formerly Hampton Institute) is an American University located in Hampton, Virginia. ...


South Carolina State is renowned in the black college football world for its loyal and enthusiastic fans, and for many of those fans, the most successful and magical season in Bulldog football history was in 1994, when legendary head coach Willie Jeffries led the team to a 10-2 record and defeated Grambling State University and its legendary coach Eddie Robinson in the Heritage Bowl by a score of 31-27, which crowned South Carolina State the 1994 Black College Football National Champions. As of December 5, 2005, the football team is ranked 16th in the NCAA I-AA football rankings, but in neither 2004 or 2005, did the Buddy Pough-coached team make the NCAA tournament. ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... Grambling redirects here. ... There are a number of noted individuals named Eddie Robinson: Eddie Robinson, a former American football coach, legendary for his tenure at Grambling State University in Louisiana Eddie Robinson, an American soccer player Eddie Robinson, an American basketball player Eddie Robinson, an American baseball player This is a disambiguation page... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Notable alumni

Bold textItalic text Ernest Everett Just Ernest Everett Just (August 14, 1883 – October 27, 1941) was a pioneering black U.S. biologist. ... The Spingarn Medal is awarded annually by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) for outstanding achievement by a Black American. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Harry Carson (born November 26, 1953) is a former American football inside linebacker who played his entire career for the New York Giants in the NFL(1976-1988). ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... James Enos Jim Clyburn (born July 21, 1940) is an American politician and a member of the United States House of Representatives for the 6th District of South Carolina. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... David D. Deacon Jones (born December 9, 1938) nicknamed Secretary of Defense is an American athlete and actor. ... The St. ... Chargers redirects here. ... For other uses, see Redskins (disambiguation). ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Dr. Benjamin Elijah Mays ( August 1, 1894 (?) – March 28, 1984) was an African-American minister, educator, scholar, social activist and the president of Morehouse College in Atlanta. ... Morehouse College is a private, four-year, all-male, historically black liberal arts college in Atlanta, Georgia. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... Robert Porcher (born July 30, 1969) was an American football player. ... City Detroit, Michigan Team colors Honolulu Blue, Silver, and Black Head Coach Rod Marinelli Owner William Clay Ford, Sr. ... Richard G. Shaw (born July 25, 1943), generally known as Rick Shaw, served as Insurance Commissioner for the State of West Virginia from 1977-1985, under incumbent Governor Jay Rockefeller. ... Donnie Shell (born 1952) is a former American Football strong safety for the Pittsburgh Steelers in the National Football League between 1974 and 1987. ... Steelers redirects here. ... City Foxborough, Massachusetts Other nicknames The Pats Team colors Nautical Blue, New Century Silver, Red, and White Head Coach Bill Belichick Owner Robert Kraft General manager Bill Belichick (de facto) Mascot Pat Patriot League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–69) Eastern Division (1960–69) National Football League (1970–present... Brigader General Amos M. Gailliard Jr. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Essie Mae Washington-Williams (born on October 12, 1925) is the oldest known daughter of the United States Senator Strom Thurmond. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... Kenny Bynum is a former National Football League running back who played for the San Diego Chargers. ... NFL redirects here. ... P.J. Daniels was a star running back for Georgia Tech from 2002-2005. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Major General Abraham J. Turner is in the United States Army and serving in Fort Monroe, Virginia. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Lieutenant General Henry Doctor Jr. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Tuskegee University is a private university located in Tuskegee, Alabama and is a member school of the Thurgood Marshall Scholarship Fund. ... The St. ...

External links


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