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Encyclopedia > South Carolina
State of South Carolina
Flag of South Carolina State seal of South Carolina
Flag of South Carolina Seal
Nickname(s): The Palmetto State
Motto(s): Dum spiro spero (While I breathe, I hope) and
Animis opibusque parati (Ready in soul and resource)
Official language(s) English
Capital Columbia
Largest city Columbia
Largest metro area Columbia
Area  Ranked 40th
 - Total 34,726 sq mi
(82,965 km²)
 - Width 200 miles (320 km)
 - Length 260 miles (420 km)
 - % water 6
 - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N
 - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83° 21′ W
Population  Ranked 24th
 - Total 4,012,012
 - Density 133.2/sq mi 
51.45/km² (21st)
 - Median income  $39,326 (39th)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Sassafras Mountain[1]
3,560 ft  (1,085 m)
 - Mean 350 ft  (110 m)
 - Lowest point Atlantic Ocean[1]
0 ft  (0 m)
Admission to Union  May 23, 1788 (8th)
Governor Mark Sanford (R)
U.S. Senators Lindsey Graham (R)
Jim DeMint (R)
Congressional Delegation List
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Abbreviations SC US-SC
Web site www.sc.gov

South Carolina (IPA: /ˌsɑʊθˌkɛrəˈlaɪnə/) is a state in the southeastern region of the United States of America. The Province of South Carolina was one of the 13 colonies that declared independence from the British Crown during the American Revolution. It was the first state to secede from the Union and was part of the Confederate States of America. The state is named after King Charles II of England, as Carolus is Latin for Charles. According to 2005 estimates by the U.S. Census Bureau, the state's population is 4,321,249. Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Carolina. ... South Carolina state seal Source http://usa. ... The flag of South Carolina The flag of South Carolina is believed to have been originally designed in 1775 for use by South Carolinian troops during the American Revolutionary War. ... The South Carolina State Seal was adopted in 1776. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Dum spiro spero (Latin While I breathe, I hope) is a motto of various places and families. ... Animis opibusque parati (Latin prepared in mind and resources) is one of the state mottos of South Carolina. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_SC.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): South Carolina ... // Although the United States currently has no official language, it is largely monolingual with English being the de facto national language. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A kilometer (Commonwealth spelling: kilometre), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1,000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ... Map of states populations (2006) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2006, according to the 2005 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... For information on the income of individuals, see Personal income in the United States. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... Sassafras Mountain is the highest point in the state of South Carolina, USA, with a summit elevation of 3560 feet (1085 meters) above mean sea level. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Marshall Mark Clement Sanford, Jr. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Lindsey Olin Graham (born July 9, 1955) is an American politician from South Carolina. ... James Warren DeMint (born September 2, 1951) has been a U.S. Senator from South Carolina since 2005. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... These are tables of congressional delegations from South Carolina to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ... EST is UTC-5 The North American Eastern Standard Time Zone (abbreviated EST) is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) resulting in UTC-5. ... ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... The US Southeast is the eastern portion of the Southern United States, but the Census Bureau does not provide a standard definition of a Southeast region of the United States, and organizations that need to subdivide the US are free to define a Southeast region to fit their needs. ... A map of the Province of Carolina. ... Betsy Ross purportedly sewed the first American flag with 13 stars and 13 stripes representing each of the 13 colonies. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...

Contents

Geography

Map of South Carolina
Map of South Carolina

South Carolina is bounded to the north by North Carolina; to the south and west by Georgia, located across the Savannah River; and to the east by the Atlantic Ocean. File links The following pages link to this file: South Carolina Categories: South Carolina maps | National Atlas images ... File links The following pages link to this file: South Carolina Categories: South Carolina maps | National Atlas images ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... For the Department of Energy facility, see Savannah River Site The Savannah River is a major river in the southeastern United States, forming most of the border between the states of South Carolina and Georgia. ...


South Carolina is composed of four geographic areas, whose boundaries roughly parallel the northeast/southwest Atlantic coastline. The lower part of the state is the Coastal Plain, also known as the Lowcountry, which is nearly flat and composed entirely of recent sediments such as sand, silt, and clay. Areas with better drainage make excellent farmland, though some land is swampy. The coastline contains many salt marshes and estuaries, as well as natural ports such as Georgetown and Charleston. An unusual feature of the coastal plain is a large number of Carolina bays, the origins of which are uncertain, though one prominent theory suggests that they were created by a meteor shower. The bays tend to be oval, lining up in a northwest to southeast orientation. This article is about marsh, a type of wetland. ... An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water which has a free connection with the open sea and within which sea water mixes with fresh water. ... Location of Georgetown in South Carolina Coordinates: Country United States State South Carolina County Georgetown Government  - Mayor Lynn Wood Wilson Area  - City 7. ... Carolina Bay which made up of small oval shape wetlands. ...

Palmetto State
State Capital: Columbia
State Mottos: Dum spiro spero
(While I breathe, I hope)
and Animis opibusque parati
(Prepared in Mind and Resources)
State Songs: "Carolina" and
"South Carolina On My Mind"
State Tree: Sabal palmetto
State Flower: Yellow Jessamine
State Bird: Carolina Wren
State Wild Game Bird: Wild Turkey
State Dog: Boykin Spaniel
State Animal: White-tailed Deer
State Reptile: Loggerhead Sea Turtle
State Amphibian: Spotted Salamander
State Fish: Striped Bass
State Insect: Carolina Mantid
State Butterfly: Eastern tiger swallowtail
State Fruit: Peach[2]
State Beverage: Milk[3]
State Hospitality
Beverage
:
Tea[4]
State Gemstone: Amethyst
State Stone: Blue Granite
State Popular Music: Beach Music
State Dance: Shag
State Snack: Boiled peanuts[5]
State Craft: Sweetgrass Basket weaving

Just west of the coastal plain is the Sandhills region, which is thought to contain remnants of old coastal dunes from a time when the land was sunken or the oceans were higher. Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Dum spiro spero (Latin While I breathe, I hope) is a motto of various places and families. ... Animis opibusque parati (Latin prepared in mind and resources) is one of the state mottos of South Carolina. ... Forty-nine states of the United States (all except New Jersey) have one or more state songs, selected by the state legislature as a symbol of the state. ... Carolina is the official state song of South Carolina. ... South Carolina On My Mind is a song written and recorded by native South Carolinians Hank Martin and Buzz Arledge. ... This List of U.S. state trees includes official trees of the following states and U.S. possessions: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia National Grove of State Trees External link USDA list of state trees and flowers Categories: | | ... Binomial name Sabal palmetto (Walt. ... This is a list of U.S. state flowers: List of U.S. state trees Lists of U.S. state insignia ^ State Flower of Alabama. ... Yellow Jessamine (also known as evening trumpetflower or Carolina Jessamine; Gelsemium sempervirens, [L.] St. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name Thryothorus ludovicianus (Latham, 1790) Subspecies The Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) is a common species of wren resident in the eastern half of the USA, the extreme south of Ontario and Quebec, Canada, and the extreme northeast of Mexico. ... Binomial name Meleagris gallopavo Linnaeus, 1758 For other uses, see Wild Turkey (disambiguation). ... The Boykin Spaniel is a medium sized breed of dog and a member of the Spaniel family. ... A state animal is the official or representative animal of a U.S. state. ... Binomial name Zimmermann, 1780 The White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), also known as the Virginia deer, or simply as the whitetail, is a medium-sized deer found throughout most of the continental United States, southern Canada, Mexico, Central America and northern portions of South America as far south as Peru. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Loggerhead Sea Turtle (Caretta caretta) is a sea turtle and the only member of the genus Caretta. ... Binomial name (Shaw, 1802) The Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) is a mole salamander common in the eastern United States and Canada. ... This is a list of official U.S. state fish: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Binomial name Morone saxatilis (Walbaum, 1792) The striped bass Morone saxatilis is a member of the temperate bass family native to North America but widely introduced elsewhere. ... It has been suggested that List of U.S. state butterflies be merged into this article or section. ... Binomial name Stagmomantis carolina Johannson, 1763 The Carolina mantis or mantid (Stagmomantis carolina) is the state insect of South Carolina. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into List of U.S. state insects. ... Binomial name Papilio glaucus Linnaeus, 1758 The eastern tiger swallowtail, Papilio glaucus (literally meaning bright/sparkling butterfly, Papilio meaning butterfly and glaucus meaning bright or sparkling), is a large (12 cm wingspan) swallowtail butterfly. ... This is a list of official U.S. state foods: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Binomial name (L.) Batsch Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... This is a list of official state beverages:[1] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... A glass of cows milk. ... This is a list of official state beverages:[1] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... For other uses, see Tea (disambiguation). ... // Not every state has an official state mineral, rock, stone or gemstone. ... For other uses, see Amethyst (disambiguation). ... // Not every state has an official state mineral, rock, stone or gemstone. ... For other uses, see granite (disambiguation). ... For the novel, see Beach Music (novel). ... This is a list of official U.S. state dances:[1] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... The Shag is a form of swing dancing that evolved from the jitterbug and jump blues of the big band jazz era and originated at Carolina Beach, North Carolina during the 1940s. ... This is a list of official U.S. state foods: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Boiled peanuts are popular in many places where beer is. ... Binomial name Hierochloe odorata (L.) P. Beauv. ... A woman weaves a basket in Cameroon. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Piedmont (Upstate) region contains the roots of an ancient, eroded mountain chain. It tends to be hilly, with thin, stony clay soils, and contains few areas suitable for farming. Much of the Piedmont was once farmed, with little success. It is now reforested. At the southeastern edge of the Piedmont is the fall line, where rivers drop to the coastal plain. The fall line was an important early source of water power. Mills built to harness this resource encouraged the growth of several cities, including the capital, Columbia. The larger rivers are navigable up to the fall line, providing a trade route for mill towns. The James River winds its way among piedmont hills in central Virginia. ... The fall line has meanings in both geographical features and the sport of alpine skiing. ...


The northwestern part of the Piedmont is also known as the Foothills. The Cherokee Parkway is a scenic driving route through this area. This is where Table Rock State Park is located. The Cherokee Foothills National Scenic Highway (S.C. 11) winds its way through South Carolina’s northwest corner. ... Table Rock State Park is a 3,083 acre at the edge of the Blue Ridge Mountains[1]. It is in the northern section of Pickens County, South Carolina. ...


Highest in elevation is the Upstate, containing an escarpment of the Blue Ridge Mountains, which continue into North Carolina and Georgia, as part of the southern Appalachian chain. Sassafras Mountain, South Carolina's highest point at 3,560 feet (1,085 m) is located in this area.[1] Also located in the Upcountry is Table Rock State Park and Caesars Head State Park. The Chattooga River, located on the border between South Carolina and Georgia, is a favorite whitewater rafting destination. Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ... The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... Sassafras Mountain is the highest point in the state of South Carolina, USA, with a summit elevation of 3560 feet (1085 meters) above mean sea level. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Table Rock State Park is a 3,083 acre at the edge of the Blue Ridge Mountains[1]. It is in the northern section of Pickens County, South Carolina. ... Caesars Head State Park is located in northern Greenville County, SC, only three miles (5km) from the North Carolina border. ... Note: There is also a Chattooga River in Chattooga County, Georgia and Cherokee County, Alabama. ... Rafting is a recreational activity utilizing a raft to navigate a river or other body of water. ...


Areas under the management of the National Park Service include: The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ...

See: List of South Carolina counties. Charles Pinckney National Historic Site preserves a portion of Charles Pinckneys Snee Farm. ... Mount Pleasant is a town located in Charleston County, South Carolina, in the United States. ... Located in South Carolina, the 34 mi² (89 km²) Congaree National Park is the largest tract of old growth bottomland hardwood forest left in the United States but one of the smallest national parks. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Cowpens National Battlefield is a unit of the National Park Service near Chesnee, South Carolina. ... Chesnee is a city located in South Carolina. ... Fort Moultrie is the name of a series of forts on Sullivans Island, South Carolina, built to protect the city of Charleston, South Carolina. ... Sullivans Island is a town located in Charleston County, South Carolina. ... Before the attack Map detailing the location of Fort Sumter Fort Sumter, located in Charleston, South Carolina harbor, was named after General Thomas Sumter. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... Kings Mountain National Military Park is a National Military Park near Blacksburg, South Carolina, close to the North Carolina border. ... Blacksburg is a town located in Cherokee County, South Carolina. ... Ninety Six National Historic Site is a United States National Historic Site located about 60 miles (96 kilometers) south of Greenville, South Carolina. ... Ninety Six is a town located in Greenwood County, South Carolina. ... The Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail (OVHT) is part of the U.S. National Trails System. ... List of South Carolina counties Categories: Lists of U.S. counties | South Carolina counties ...


Climate

South Carolina has a humid subtropical climate (Koppen climate classification Cfa), although high elevation areas in the "Upstate" area have less subtropical characteristics than areas on the Atlantic coastline. In the summer, South Carolina is hot and humid with daytime temperatures averaging between 86-92 °F (30-33 °C) in most of the state and overnight lows over 70 °F (21 °C) on the coast and in the high 60s°F (near 20 °C) further inland. Winter temperatures are much less uniform in South Carolina. Coastal areas of the state have very mild winters with high temperatures approaching an average of 60 °F (16 °C) and overnight lows in the 40s°F (5-8 °C). Further inland in the higher country, the average January overnight low can be below freezing. While precipitation is abundant the entire year in almost the entire state, near the coast tends to have a slightly wetter summer, while inland March tends to be the wettest month. The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ... The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ...


Snowfall in South Carolina is not very excessive with coastal areas receiving less than an inch (2.5 cm) on average. It isn't uncommon for areas on the coast (especially the southern coast) to receive no recordable snowfall in a given year, although it usually receives at least a small dusting of snow annually. The interior receives a little more snow, although nowhere in the state averages more than 6 inches (15 cm) of snow a year.


The state is prone to tropical cyclones. This is an annual concern during hurricane season, which is from June-November. The peak time of vulnerability for the southeast Atlantic coast is from early August to early October when the Cape Verde hurricane season lasts. South Carolina averages around 50 days of thunderstorm activity a year, which is less than some of the states further south, and it is slightly less vulnerable to tornadoes than the states which border on the Gulf of Mexico. Still, some notable tornadoes have struck South Carolina and the state averages around 14 tornadoes annually.[6] This article is about weather phenomena. ... A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... For other uses of Tornado, see Tornado (disambiguation). ...

Monthly Normal High and Low Temperatures For Various South Carolina Cities
City Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Charleston 59/37 62/39 69/46 76/52 83/61 88/68 91/72 89/72 85/67 77/55 70/46 62/39
Columbia 55/34 60/36 67/44 76/51 83/60 89/68 92/72 90/71 85/65 76/52 67/43 58/36
Greenville 50/31 55/34 63/40 71/47 78/56 85/64 89/69 87/68 81/62 71/50 61/41 53/34
[2]

History

The colony of Carolina was settled by English settlers, mostly from Barbados, sent by the Lords Proprietors in 1670, followed by French Huguenots. Most immigrants in the colonial period were African slaves, who constituted a majority of the colony's population throughout the period. The Carolina upcountry was settled largely by Scots-Irish migrants from Pennsylvania and Virginia, following the Great Wagon Road. The formal colony of "The Carolinas" split into two in 1712. South Carolina became a royal colony in 1729. The state declared its independence from Great Britain and set up its own government on March 15, 1776. On February 5, 1778, South Carolina became the first state to ratify the first constitution of the United States - the Articles of Confederation. The current United States Constitution was proposed for adoption by the States on September 17, 1787, and South Carolina was the 8th state to ratify it, on May 23, 1788. South Carolina is one of the original states of the United States of America, and its history has been remarkable for an extraordinary commitment to political independence, whether from overseas or federal control. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... Lord Proprietor was a colonial title for the rulers of certain British colonies in America, such as Maryland or Carolina. ... Year 1670 (MDCLXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, or historically as the French Calvinists. ... World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... Scots-Irish Americans are descendants of the Scots-Irish immigrants who came to North America in the late 17th and 18th centuries. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Great Wagon Road, which ran from Pennsylvania to Georgia, was one of the most heavily traveled major routes for settlers in all America. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1778 (MDCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, commonly known as the Articles of Confederation, was the first governing document, or constitution, of the United States of America. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


South Carolina was the first state to secede from the Union on December 20, 1860. On April 12, 1861, Confederate batteries began shelling Fort Sumter and the American Civil War began. Charleston was effectively blockaded and the Union Navy seized the Sea Islands, driving off the plantation owners and setting up an experiment in freedom for the ex-slaves. South Carolina troops participated in the major Confederate campaigns, but no major battles were fought inland. General William Tecumseh Sherman marched through the state in early 1865, destroying numerous plantations, and captured the state capital of Columbia on February 17. Fires began that night and by next morning, most of the central city was destroyed. In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The Sea Islands are an archipelago in the Atlantic Ocean. ... “General Sherman” redirects here. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


After the war, South Carolina was reincorporated into the United States during Reconstruction. Under presidential Reconstruction (1865-66) Freedmen (former slaves) were given limited rights. Under Radical reconstruction (1867-1877), a Republican coalition of Freedmen, Carpetbaggers and Scalawags were in control, supported by Union army forces. The withdrawal of Union soldiers as part of the Compromise of 1877 ended Reconstruction and brought an era where conservative white "Redeemers" and pro-business Bourbon Democrats were in control. The state became a hotbed of racial and economic tensions during the Populist and Agrarian movements of the 1890s. Blacks were disfranchised in 1890, and "Pitchfork Ben Tillman" controlled state politics from the 1890s to 1910 with a base among poor white farmers. For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... American usage In the United States, the negative term carpetbagger was used to refer to a Northerner who traveled to the South after the American Civil War, through the late 1860s and the 1870s, during Reconstruction. ... The term scalawag or scallywag traces its origin to the post-Civil War era in the South of the United States. ... A drawing by Joseph Keppler depicts Roscoe Conkling as Mephistopheles, as Rutherford B. Hayes strolls off with a woman labeled as Solid South. The caption quotes Goethe: Unto that Power he doth belong / Which only doeth Right while ever willing Wrong. ... We dont have an article called Redeemers Start this article Search for Redeemers in. ... Bourbon Democrats was a term used in the United States from 1876 to 1904 to refer to conservative or reactionary members of the Democratic Party, especially those who supported President Grover Cleveland in 1884-1896 and Alton B. Parker in 1904. ... Benjamin Ryan Tillman (August 11, 1847 - July 3, 1918) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina from 1890 to 1894 and as a United States Senator from 1895 until his death. ...


20th century

In the 20th century, South Carolina developed a thriving textile industry. By 2007, textile employment had dropped significantly. The state also converted its agricultural base from cotton to more profitable crops, attracted large military bases and, most recently, attracted European manufacturers.


Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1790 249,073
1800 345,591 38.8%
1810 415,115 20.1%
1820 502,741 21.1%
1830 581,185 15.6%
1840 594,398 2.3%
1850 668,507 12.5%
1860 703,708 5.3%
1870 705,606 0.3%
1880 995,577 41.1%
1890 1,151,149 15.6%
1900 1,340,316 16.4%
1910 1,515,400 13.1%
1920 1,683,724 11.1%
1930 1,738,765 3.3%
1940 1,899,804 9.3%
1950 2,117,027 11.4%
1960 2,382,594 12.5%
1970 2,590,516 8.7%
1980 3,121,820 20.5%
1990 3,486,703 11.7%
2000 4,012,012 15.1%
Est. 2006 4,321,249 [7] 7.7%
See also: SC historical demographics
South Carolina Population Density Map
South Carolina Population Density Map

South Carolina's center of population is located in Richland County, in the city of Columbia [3]. The United States Census of 1790 was the first Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1800 was the second Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1810 was the third Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1820 was the fourth Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Beginning in 1790, the United States Census Bureau collected the population statistics of South Carolina. ... Image File history File links South_Carolina_population_map. ... Image File history File links South_Carolina_population_map. ... Center of population is a subject of study in the field of demographics. ... Richland County is a county located in the U.S. state of South Carolina. ...


According to the U.S. Census Bureau, as of 2005, South Carolina has an estimated population of 4,255,083, which is an increase of 57,191, or 1.4%, from the prior year and an increase of 243,267, or 6.1%, since the year 2000. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 97,715 people (that is 295,425 births minus 197,710 deaths) and an increase due to net migration of 151,485 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 36,401 people, and migration within the country produced a net increase of 115,084 people. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Net migration rates for 2006: positive (blue), negative (orange) and stable (green). ...

Demographics of South Carolina (csv)
By race White Black AIAN Asian NHPI
AIAN is American Indian or Alaskan Native   -   NHPI is Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander
2000 (total population) 68.88% 30.01% 0.69% 1.13% 0.10%
2000 (Hispanic only) 2.05% 0.26% 0.05% 0.03% 0.02%
2005 (total population) 69.12% 29.68% 0.69% 1.31% 0.10%
2005 (Hispanic only) 2.95% 0.27% 0.06% 0.04% 0.02%
Growth 2000-2005 (total population) 6.43% 4.89% 6.09% 23.49% 13.76%
Growth 2000-2005 (non-Hispanic only) 5.01% 4.87% 4.61% 23.16% 10.36%
Growth 2000-2005 (Hispanic only) 52.78% 7.64% 23.97% 34.25% 26.89%

The five largest ancestry groups in South Carolina are African American (29.5%), American (13.9%), English (8.4%), German (8.4%) and Irish (7.9%). For most of South Carolina's history, African slaves, and then their descendants, made up a majority of the state's population. Whites became a majority in the early 20th century, when tens of thousands of blacks moved north in the Great Migration. Most of the African-American population lives in the Lowcountry (especially the inland Lowcountry) and the Midlands; areas where cotton, rice, and indigo plantations once dominated the landscape. 6.6% of South Carolina's population were reported as under 5 years old, 25.2% under 18, and 12.1% were 65 or older. It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The states in blue had the ten largest net gains of African-Americans during the Great Migration, while the states in red had the ten largest net losses[1]. The Great Migration was the movement of over 1 million[1] African Americans out of the rural Southern United States from... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... Indigo is the color on the spectrum between about 450 and 420 nm in wavelength, placing it between blue and violet. ...


Females made up approximately 51.4% of the population in 2000.


Religion

South Carolina, like most other Southern states, is overwhelmingly Protestant Christian, and has a significantly lower percentage of non-religious people than the national average. The religious affiliations of the people of South Carolina are as follows:

Interestingly, Sephardic Jews have over a 300 year history in South Carolina [4] [5] [6], especially in and around Charleston [7]. South Carolina had, until around 1830, the largest colony of Jews in North America. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States cooperative ministry agency serving missionary Baptist churches around the world. ... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... Presbyterianism is a tradition shared by a large number of Christian denominations which is most prevalent within the Reformed branch of Protestant Western Christianity. ... Roman Catholicism in the United States has grown dramatically over the countrys history, from being a tiny minority faith during the time of the Thirteen Colonies to being the countrys largest profession of faith today. ... In the strictest sense, a Sephardi (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew Səfardi, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Səfardim, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardîm) is a Jew original to the...


Economy

As of 2004, according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, South Carolina’s gross state product was $136 billion. As of 2000, the per capita income was $24,000, which was 81% of the national average. Download high resolution version (1106x1105, 253 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Major agricultural outputs of the state are: tobacco, poultry, cattle, dairy products, soybeans, and hogs. Industrial outputs include: textile goods, chemical products, paper products, machinery, and tourism.

Gossypium hirsutumMature cotton almost ready to pickManning, South Carolina
Gossypium hirsutum
Mature cotton almost ready to pick
Manning, South Carolina

The state sales tax is 6% for non-grocery goods and 3% for grocery goods. Counties have the option to impose an additional 2% sales tax. [8] Citizens 85 or older get a one-percent exclusion from the state's sales tax. Property tax is administered and collected by local governments with assistance from the South Carolina Department of Revenue. Both real and personal property are subject to tax. Approximately two-thirds of county-levied property taxes are used for the support of public education. The passage of a recent state law will replace local property tax funding of education with a statewide 1% sales tax increase. Sales tax on groceries has been reduced to 3%. Municipalities levy a tax on property situated within the limits of the municipality for services provided by the municipality. The tax is paid by individuals, corporations and partnerships owning property within the state. South Carolina imposes a casual excise tax of 5% on the fair market value of all motor vehicles, motorcycles, boats, motors and airplanes transferred between individuals. The maximum casual excise tax is $300. In South Carolina, intangible personal property is exempt from taxation. There is no inheritance tax. Cotton almost ready to pick. ... Cotton almost ready to pick. ... Manning is a city in Clarendon County, South Carolina, United States. ... A sales tax is a consumption tax charged at the point of purchase for certain goods and services. ... Property tax, millage tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the property being taxed. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Personal property is a type of property. ... An excise is an indirect tax or duty levied on items within a country. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


Even though the State of South Carolina does not allow legalized casino gambling, it did allow the operation of Video Poker Machines throughout the state with approximately $2 billion dollars per year deposited into the state's coffers. However, at Midnight on July 1, 2000 a new law took effect which outlawed the operation, ownership and possession of Video Poker Machines in the state with machines required to be shut-off at that time and removed from within the state's borders by July 8 or owners of such machines would face criminal prosecution.[8][9] is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Transportation

Map of South Carolina

Major interstate highways passing through the state include: I-20 which runs from Florence in the east through Columbia to the southwestern border near Aiken; I-26 which runs from Charleston in the southeast through Columbia to the northern border in Spartanburg County; I-77 which runs from York County in the north to Columbia; I-85 which runs from Cherokee County in the north through Greenville to the southwestern border in Oconee County; I-385 which runs from Downtown Greenville and intersects with I-26 near Laurens; and I-95 which runs from the northeastern border in Dillon County to the southern border in Jasper County. The City of Myrtle Beach has a free shuttle bus that runs up and down Ocean Boulevard in front of the hotels and to many tourist areas. Image File history File links South_Carolina_USA_Map. ... Image File history File links South_Carolina_USA_Map. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Interstate 26 is an interstate highway in the southeastern United States. ... Interstate 77 is an interstate highway in the eastern United States. ... Interstate 85 is an interstate highway in the southeastern United States. ... Interstate 385 is an interstate highway located in upstate South Carolina. ... Interstate 26 is an interstate highway in the southeastern United States. ... Interstate 95 is a major interstate highway, running along the East Coast of the United States from Florida to Maine. ...


Amtrak passes through Columbia, Greenville, Spartanburg, Florence, and Charleston. The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... The Greenville Amtrak Station, located in Greenville, South Carolina, is served by the passenger train. ... The Spartanburg Amtrak Station, located in Spartanburg, South Carolina, is served by the passenger train. ... Other information Code FLO Traffic Passengers (2006) 41,643 25. ... The Charleston Amtrak station is a train station in North Charleston, South Carolina, United States served by Amtrak, the national railroad passenger system. ...


Commercial airports are located in Columbia, Charleston, Greenville/Spartanburg, Florence, Myrtle Beach, and Hilton Head Island. Charleston International Airport (IATA: CHS, ICAO: KCHS) is an airport located nine miles (14 km) northwest of the city of Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina, USA. The airport has two runways which it shares with Charleston Air Force Base. ... Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport is an airport in Greer, South Carolina, USA, near Greenville, South Carolina and Spartanburg, South Carolina. ... Florence Regional Airport (IATA: FLO, ICAO: KFLO) is a public airport located a few miles east of Florence, South Carolina. ... Myrtle Beach International Airport (IATA: MYR, ICAO: KMYR) is a public airport located 3 miles (5 km) southwest of the city of Myrtle Beach in Horry County, South Carolina, USA. Myrtle Beach International Airport is located on the former Myrtle Beach Air Force Base. ... Hilton Head Airport (IATA: HXD, ICAO: KHXD) is a public airport located in northeastern Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. ...


Law and government

South Carolina's state government consists of the Executive, Legislative, and Judicial branches. The governor is elected for a four-year term and may serve two consecutive terms. He heads the Executive branch (some officers of which are elected). The current governor is Republican Mark Sanford. He is currently serving his second term. The bicameral South Carolina General Assembly consists of the 46-member Senate and the 124-member House of Representatives. The two bodies meet in the South Carolina State House. The Judicial Branch consists of the Supreme Court, the Court of Appeals, the Circuit Court, Family Court, and other divisions. Download high resolution version (1200x900, 806 KB)SC statehouse from near the corner of Garvais and Assembly Streets Image copyleft: Image taken by me, released under GFDL, Pollinator 04:18, Dec 31, 2004 (UTC) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert... Download high resolution version (1200x900, 806 KB)SC statehouse from near the corner of Garvais and Assembly Streets Image copyleft: Image taken by me, released under GFDL, Pollinator 04:18, Dec 31, 2004 (UTC) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert... South Carolina State House South Carolina State House The South Carolina State House is the State Capitol building of the U.S. state of South Carolina. ... GOP redirects here. ... Marshall Mark Clement Sanford, Jr. ... The South Carolina General Assembly, also called the South Carolina Legislature, is the legislative branch of South Carolina and consists of the South Carolina House of Representatives and the South Carolina Senate. ... South Carolina State House South Carolina State House The South Carolina State House is the State Capitol building of the U.S. state of South Carolina. ...


See also: List of Governors of South Carolina A list of South Carolina Governors. ...


Judicial branch

The Family Court deals with all matters of domestic and family relationships, as well as generally maintaining exclusive jurisdiction over cases involving minors under the age of seventeen, excepting traffic and game law violations. Some criminal charges may come under Circuit Court jurisdiction.


The Circuit Court is the general jurisdiction court for South Carolina. It comprises the Civil Court, the Court of Common Pleas, and the Court of General Sessions, which is the criminal court. The court maintains limited appellate jurisdiction over the Probate Court, Magistrate's Court, Municipal Court, and the Administrative Law Judge Division. The state has sixteen judicial circuits, each with at least one resident circuit judge.


The Court of Appeals handles Circuit Court and Family Court appeals, excepting appeals that are within the seven classes of exclusive Supreme Court jurisdiction. The Court of Appeals is selected by the General Assembly for staggered, six-year terms. The court comprises a chief judge, and eight associate judges, and may hear cases as the whole court, or as three panels with three judges each. The court may preside in any county.


The Supreme Court is South Carolina's highest court. The Chief Justice and four Associate Justices are elected to ten year terms by the General Assembly. Terms are staggered, and there are no limits on the number of terms a justice may serve, but there is a mandatory retirement age of 72. The overwhelming majority of vacancies on the Court occur when Justices reach this age, not through the refusal of the General Assembly to elect a sitting Justice to another term. The South Carolina Supreme Court is the highest court in the state of South Carolina. ...


South Carolina Constitution

The South Carolina Constitution contains provisions which, when compared to the Constitutions of other States, are unusual. For example, a constitutional amendment must be approved by two-thirds of each house of the legislature, approved by the people in an election, and then ratified by a majority of each house of the legislature. If the legislature fails to ratify it, the amendment does not take effect, even though it has been approved by the people. See S.C. Const. art. XVI, s. 1.


Prior to April 15, 1949, Article XVII, Section 3, of the South Carolina Constitution prohibited divorce for any reason. Since that date, South Carolina permits divorce for certain reasons. It is believed that South Carolina is the only State in the Union that lists the grounds for divorce in its Constitution. The effect of doing so is that the Legislature is prohibited from creating additional grounds for divorce beyond those specified in the South Carolina Constitution. See S.C. Const. art. XVII, Section 3. is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Law enforcement agencies

The South Carolina Department of Public Safety exists to ensure the safety of South Carolinas citizens and visitors. ... The South Carolina Highway Patrol is a division of the South Carolina Department of Public Safety responsible for enforcing the traffic laws of the state of South Carolina. ... The South Carolina State Transport Police Division of the South Carolina Department of Public Safety is primarily responsible for enforcing state and federal laws governing commercial motor vehicles. ...

Federal politics

Like the Southern states, South Carolina consistently voting Democratic Party (United States) in the late 19th century and half of 20th century as a Solid South. The Republican Party became competitive in the 1960 Presidential Election when Richard Nixon narrowly lost the state to John F. Kennedy by just two percentage points. In 1964, Barry Goldwater making first Republican to win the state since Reconstruction. Since then, South Carolina has voted for a Republican in every presidential election from 1964 to forward with exception of 1976 when Jimmy Carter, a Southerner, was the last Democrat to win the state. George W. Bush won the state with 58% of the statewide vote in 2004 over Senator John Kerry. Republicans now control the governorate, eight of nine statewide offices, both houses of legislature, both US Senators and four of six members of the US House of Representatives. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The phrase Solid South describes the electoral support of the Southern United States for Democratic Party candidates for almost a century after the Reconstruction era, 1876-1964. ... GOP redirects here. ... Nixon redirects here. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for president in the 1964 election. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ...


State politics

In the 110th United States Congress, the South Carolina delegation to U.S. Senate are Senators Lindsey Graham and Jim DeMint, both Republicans. In the U.S. House of Representatives, U.S. Representatives are Republicans Henry E. Brown, Jr. of 1st District, Joe Wilson of 2nd District, J. Gresham Barrett of 3rd District, and Bob Inglis of 4th District, and Democrats John M. Spratt, Jr. of 5th District and James Clyburn of 6th District. The One Hundred Tenth United States Congress is the current meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the Senate and the House of Representatives. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Lindsey Olin Graham (born July 9, 1955) is an American politician from South Carolina. ... James Warren DeMint (born September 2, 1951) has been a U.S. Senator from South Carolina since 2005. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Henry Edward Brown, Jr. ... Addison Graves Wilson, Sr. ... James Gresham Barrett (born February 14, 1961) is an American politician from the Republican Party and a U.S. Representative from South Carolina, representing the 3rd Congressional district (map) in the northwestern part of the state. ... Robert Bob Durden Inglis, Sr. ... John McKee Spratt, Jr. ... James Enos Jim Clyburn (born July 21, 1940) is an American politician and a member of the United States House of Representatives for the 6th District of South Carolina. ...

This historic home is at "The Battery," a neighborhood/park area at the Downtown Historic District of Charleston - a well-known historical city in South Carolina. "The Battery" is also known as White Point Gardens.
This historic home is at "The Battery," a neighborhood/park area at the Downtown Historic District of Charleston - a well-known historical city in South Carolina. "The Battery" is also known as White Point Gardens.

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ... For other uses, see Antique (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Home (disambiguation). ... The Battery, which includes a park known as White Point Gardens, is a landmark promenade in Charleston, South Carolina. ... A neighbourhood or neighborhood (see spelling differences) is a geographically localised community located within a larger city or suburb. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Central business district. ... A historic district in the United States is a group of buildings, properties or sites that have been designated by one of several entites on different levels as historically or architecturally significant. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... The Battery, which includes a park known as White Point Gardens, is a landmark promenade in Charleston, South Carolina. ... The Battery, which includes a park known as White Point Gardens, is a landmark promenade in Charleston, South Carolina. ...

Important cities and towns

Coastal towns and cities often have hurricane resistant Live oaks overarching the streets in historic neighborhoods, such as these on East Bay Street, Georgetown.

The capital and largest city in the state is Columbia, with an estimated population in the mid-2000's of around 120,000. The other two major centers in the state are Charleston in the Lowcountry (100,000) and Greenville (57,000) in the Upstate. Other notable incorporated cities are Anderson, Aiken, Beaufort, Florence, Georgetown, Greenwood, Hilton Head Island, Moncks Corner, Mount Pleasant, Myrtle Beach, Newberry, North Charleston, Orangeburg, Rock Hill, Spartanburg, North Augusta, Lexington and Sumter. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2200x1467, 2759 KB) Summary Most of the older neighborhoods have Live oaks overarching the streets, such as these on East Bay Street. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2200x1467, 2759 KB) Summary Most of the older neighborhoods have Live oaks overarching the streets, such as these on East Bay Street. ... Binomial name Quercus virginiana Mill. ... Location of Georgetown in South Carolina Coordinates: Country United States State South Carolina County Georgetown Government  - Mayor Lynn Wood Wilson Area  - City 7. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... Greenville is a mid-sized city located in the upstate of South Carolina. ... Anderson is a city located in Anderson County, South Carolina. ... Aiken is a city in Aiken County, South Carolina and is part of the CSRA. The population was 25,337 at the 2000 census. ... Beaufort is a city in Beaufort County, South Carolina, United States, situated on the Beaufort River. ... This article is about a city in the US state of South Carolina. ... Location of Georgetown in South Carolina Coordinates: Country United States State South Carolina County Georgetown Government  - Mayor Lynn Wood Wilson Area  - City 7. ... Greenwood is a city in Greenwood County, South Carolina, in the United States. ... Location of Hilton Head Island in South Carolina Coordinates: , Country United States State South Carolina County Beaufort County Incorporated (town) 1983 Government  - Mayor Tom Peeples  - Town manager Steve Riley  - Fire chief Tom Fieldstead Area  - Town  55. ... Moncks Corner is the county seat of Berkeley County, South Carolina. ... For other uses, see Mount Pleasant. ... Myrtle Beach is a city and in Horry County, South Carolina, United States. ... Newberry is a town in Newberry County, South Carolina, 43 miles (69 km) west -northwest of Columbia. ... North Charleston is a city located in South Carolina. ... Orangeburg is the name of two places in the United States: Orangeburg in New York Orangeburg in South Carolina This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Rock Hill is the largest city in York County, South Carolina, and a satellite city of Charlotte, North Carolina. ... Spartanburg is the largest city and the county seat of Spartanburg CountyGR6 in South Carolina, and is the second-largest city of the three primary cities in the Upstate region of South Carolina. ... North Augusta is a city located in Aiken County, South Carolina on the north bank of the Savannah River. ... Lexington is a town in Lexington County, South Carolina, United States. ... Sumter (IPA: or ) is a city located in Sumter County, South Carolina. ...


It is interesting to note that, due to extremely strict annexation laws passed by the General Assembly in 1976, incorporated municipalities in South Carolina are usually much smaller in area and population than those elsewhere in the fast-growing Southeast. However, when a South Carolina city's proximal suburbs that would otherwise be annexed into their city limits are blended in with its core population, they exhibit similar sizes and rates of growth as many municipalities in neighboring states, such as Georgia and North Carolina. This takes many first-time visitors to South Carolina's main cities by surprise, as many are expecting much less urbanization in what has historically been thought of as an almost completely rural state.


Education

Institutions of higher education

(In order of foundation date)


South Carolina has a long and proud tradition of higher education that is intertwined with its rich and complex history. For a relatively small state, South Carolina hosts a disproportionately large and diverse cohort of institutions of higher education, from large state-funded research universities to small colleges that cultivate a liberal arts, religious or military tradition.


In addition to its status as the oldest college or university in South Carolina, founded in 1770 and chartered in 1785, the College of Charleston (C of C) is the 13th oldest institution of higher learning in the United States and the first municipal college in the country. The College is in company with the Colonial Colleges as one the original and foundational institutions of higher education in the United States. Its founders include three signers of the United States Declaration of Independence and three signers of the United States Constitution. The College's historic campus, which is listed on the U.S. Department of the Interior's National Register of Historic Places, forms an integral part of Charleston's colonial-era urban center. As one of the leading institutions of higher education in the Southeastern United States, the College of Charleston is celebrated nationally for its focus on undergraduate education with strengths in Marine Biology, Classics, Art History and Historic Preservation. The Graduate School of the College of Charleston, offers a number of degree programs and coordinates support for its nationally recognized faculty research efforts. According to the Princeton Review, C of C is one of the nation's best institutions for undergraduate education and U.S. News and World Report regularly ranks C of C among the best masters level universities in the South. C of C presently enrolls approximately 10,000 undergraduates and 2,000 graduate students. The College of Charleston (C of C) is a public university located in historic downtown Charleston, South Carolina. ... A municipal college is a city supported institution of higer learning. ... The colonial colleges are nine institutions of higher education chartered in the American Colonies before the American Revolution (1775–1783). ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages and conserves most federally-owned land. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... The US Southeast is the eastern portion of the Southern United States, but the Census Bureau does not provide a standard definition of a Southeast region of the United States, and organizations that need to subdivide the US are free to define a Southeast region to fit their needs. ...


The University of South Carolina is a public, co-educational, research university located in Columbia, South Carolina, United States. The University's campus covers over 359 acres (1.5 km²) in the urban core less than one city block from the South Carolina State House. The institution was founded in 1801 as South Carolina College in an effort to promote harmony between the Lowcountry and the Upstate. The College became a symbol of the South in the antebellum period as its graduates were on the forefront of secession from the Union. From the Civil War to World War II, the institution lacked a clear direction and was constantly reorganized to meet the needs of the political power in office. In 1957, the University expanded its reach through the University of South Carolina System and rapidly became the state's preeminent and most popular institution of higher education, a status it retains to this day. The University of South Carolina, Columbia (USC, SC, or Carolina) is a public, co-educational, research university located in Columbia, South Carolina, United States. ... For alternate meanings see state university (disambiguation). ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... This article is about the concept. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... South Carolina State House South Carolina State House The South Carolina State House is the State Capitol building of the U.S. state of South Carolina. ... The University of South Carolina, Columbia (USC or Carolina) is a public, co-educational, research university located in Columbia, South Carolina, United States. ... The South Carolina Low Country is a term used to describe the states coastal counties, generally south of Charleston. ... For other uses, see Upstate. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The University of South Carolina is the largest institution of higher learning in the state of South Carolina. ...

Main article: History of the University of South Carolina

Furman University is a private, coeducational, non-sectarian, liberal arts university in Greenville, South Carolina. Founded in 1826, Furman enrolls approximately 2,600 undergraduate and 500 graduate students. Furman is the oldest, largest and most selective private institution in South Carolina. The university is primarily focused on undergraduate education (only two departments, education and chemistry, offer graduate degrees). This History of the University of South Carolina began in the 1700s when intersectional differences arose between the Lowcountry and the Upstate. ... The Bell Tower Furman University is a private, coeducational, non-sectarian university in Greenville, South Carolina, United States. ...


The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, is a state-supported, comprehensive college located in Charleston, South Carolina. Founded in 1842, the college is best known for its undergraduate Corps of Cadets military program for men and women, which combines academics, physical challenges and military discipline. In addition to the cadet program, civilian programs are offered through the Citadel's College of Graduate and Professional Studies with its evening undergraduate and graduate programs. The Citadel enrolls almost 2,000 undergraduate cadets in its residential military program and 1,200 civilian students in the evening programs. The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, is a state-supported, comprehensive college located in Charleston, South Carolina. ...


Presbyterian College is a private liberal arts college in Clinton, South Carolina, USA. Presbyterian College, or PC, is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church USA, and enrolls around 1300 undergraduate students. Founded in 1880, PC has 84 full-time professors, offers 30 majors, and provides Cooperative and Dual-Degree Programs in Engineering (with Auburn, Clemson, and Vanderbilt Universities), Forestry/Environmental Science (with Duke University) and Religion (with Union Theological Seminary). They also have eight pre-professional programs. Presbyterian College is a liberal arts college in Clinton, South Carolina, USA. Presbyterian College, or PC, is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church USA. Presbyterian College has around 1300 students and runs on an endowment of around $75 million. ...


Founded as the Clemson Agricultural College of South Carolina in 1889, Clemson University is now a public, coeducational, land-grant research university located in Clemson, South Carolina. Clemson The University currently enrolls more than 17,000 students from all 50 states and from more than 70 countries. Clemson University is a public, coeducational, land-grant, research university located in Clemson, South Carolina, United States. ...


For full listings See List of colleges and universities in South Carolina See South Carolina state entry. ...


Secondary education

According to a survey of recent studies conducted by the University of South Carolina's Institute for Public Service and Policy Research South Carolina ranks at or near the bottom of the United States in terms of secondary school graduation rates.While Woodruff, South Carolina ranks in the top 10 in the nation for highest scores and meeting the No Child Left Behind Act every year.[10] Woodruff is a city located in Spartanburg County, South Carolina. ... President Bush signing the bipartisan No Child Left Behind Act at Hamilton H.S. in Hamilton, Ohio. ...


Sports in South Carolina

  • Though there are no major league franchises based in South Carolina, there are numerous minor league teams that are either based in the state, or play much of their schedule within its borders. The highest level of minor league sports played in South Carolina is the AAA-level baseball team, the Charlotte Knights who, though being officially affiliated with the city of Charlotte, North Carolina and develop players for the Chicago White Sox, actually play their home games at the Knight's Castle stadium near the Charlotte Bobcats facilities in Fort Mill. Currently, only Greenville, Myrtle Beach, and Charleston still boast any other level (in each case single-A) of professional baseball. Curiously enough, for a state where natural ice is a rarity, professional ice hockey has been popular in a number of areas of the state since the 1990s. Though 4 teams competed at one time in South Carolina, the East Coast Hockey League (ECHL) currently oversees operations of only two franchises, one, the Columbia Inferno, the other, the South Carolina Stingrays (who play in North Charleston). According to the league, however, Myrtle Beach is slated to receive a franchise when their new arena is completed in 2008/9.
  • College sports in particular are very big in South Carolina. Clemson University's Tigers and the University of South Carolina's Gamecocks regularly draw more than 80,000 spectators at the schools' home football games. Smaller universities located in South Carolina also have very competitive sports programs, including the Citadel, Presbyterian College, Furman, Coastal Carolina, Wofford, College of Charleston, Winthrop, North Greenville University, Lander University, Southern Wesleyan University, and SC State.
  • NASCAR racing was born in the South, and South Carolina has in the past hosted some very important NASCAR races, mainly at the Darlington Raceway. Darlington Raceway still has the one NASCAR race weekend, usually Mother's Day weekend. All four of NASCAR's series come to Darlington including Feather light, Craftsman Trucks, Busch Cars, and NEXTEL Cup cars.
  • South Carolina is known as a golfing paradise. Myrtle Beach/Grand Strand has more than a hundred golf courses. Myrtle Beach has more public golf courses per capita than any other place in the country.[11] Some have hosted PGA and LGPA events in the past, but most have been designed for the casual golfer. Hilton Head & Kiawah Island has several very nice golf courses and hosts professional events every year. The upstate of South Carolina also has many nice golf courses, most of the nicer courses are private including the Cliff's courses and Cross Creek Plantation (the Cliff's courses host the annual BMW PRO/AM that brings many celebrities and professionals to South Carolina. Cross Creek Plantation located in Seneca, also private hosted a PGA Qualifier in the 90's). Oconee Country Club also in Seneca, is an extremely nice course, very well-kept, and is open to the public. In 2007, "The Ocean Course" On Kiawah Island was ranked #1 in Golf Digest Magazine's "America's 50 Toughest Golf Courses"[12] and #38 on their "America's 100 Greatest Golf Courses".[13]
  • Watersports are also an extremely popular activity in South Carolina. With a large coast line, South Carolina has many different beach activities such as surfing, boogie boarding, deep sea fishing, and shrimping. The Pee Dee region of the state offers exceptional fishing. Some of the largest catfish ever caught were caught in the Santee Lakes. The Upstate of South Carolina also offers outstanding water activities. The Midlands region also offers water-based recreation revolving around Lakes Marion and Murray and such rivers as the Congaree, Saluda, Broad, and Edisto.
  • While there are no race tracks with betting in South Carolina there is significant horse training activity, particularly in Aiken and Camden, which hold steeplechase races.

NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... City Charlotte, North Carolina Other nicknames The Cardiac Cats Team colors Black, Carolina Blue, and Silver Head Coach John Fox Owner Jerry Richardson General manager Marty Hurney Mascot Sir Purr League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1995–present) National Football Conference (1995-present) NFC West (1995-2001) NFC South (2002... Charlotte redirects here. ... The Carolinas is a collective term used in the United States to refer to the states of North and South Carolina together. ... Clemson is a city located in South Carolina, a state of the United States of America. ... Wofford College is a small liberal arts college located in Spartanburg, South Carolina. ... Spartanburg is the largest city and the county seat of Spartanburg CountyGR6 in South Carolina, and is the second-largest city of the three primary cities in the Upstate region of South Carolina. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... The Charlotte Bobcats are a professional basketball team based in Charlotte, North Carolina. ... Fort Mill is a town located in York County, South Carolina. ... York County may refer to one of several counties: in the United States York County, Maine York County, Nebraska York County, Pennsylvania York County, South Carolina York County, Virginia in Canada: York County, New Brunswick York County, Ontario in the United Kingdom a former administrative county based around York. ... This article is about the sport. ... Class-Level Triple-A (1993-Present) Double-A (1976-1992) Minor League affiliations International League South Division Southern League (1976-1992) Major League affiliation Chicago White Sox (1998-Present) Florida Marlins (1996-1997) Cleveland Indians (1993-1995) Chicago Cubs (1989-1992) Baltimore Orioles (1976-1988) Name Charlotte Knights (1989-Present... Charlotte redirects here. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72 Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) Other nicknames The Sox, The South Siders, The ChiSox, The Pale Hose, The Good Guys, The Go-Go Sox, The... Edward Eager attended Harvard University, was a childhood fan of L. Frank Baums Oz series, and started writing childrens books when he could not find stories he wanted to read to his own young son. ... The Charlotte Bobcats are a professional basketball team based in Charlotte, North Carolina. ... Fort Mill is a town located in York County, South Carolina. ... Greenville is the name of several places: In Liberia: Greenville, Liberia In the United States of America: Greenville, Alabama Greenville, California Greenville, Delaware Greenville, Florida Greenville, Georgia Greenville, Illinois Greenville, Indiana Greenville, Jersey City, New Jersey Greenville, Kentucky Greenville, Maine Greenville, Massachusetts Greenville, Michigan Greenville, Mississippi Greenville, New Hampshire Greenville... Myrtle Beach is a city located in Horry County, South Carolina. ... Charleston may refer to: Charleston (dance) USS Charleston, the name of several ships of the United States Navy Charleston, novel by Alexandra Ripley Charleston (Texas Navy), a ship built for the Texas Navy In New Zealand: Charleston, New Zealand In Scotland: Charleston, Dundee, an area of Dundee Charleston, Angus, near... This article is about the sport. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The ECHL (formerly the East Coast Hockey League) is a professional ice hockey league based in Princeton, New Jersey, with teams scattered across the United States and Canada, generally regarded as a tier below the American Hockey League. ... The Columbia Inferno are an ECHL team based in Columbia, South Carolina. ... The South Carolina Stingrays are an ECHL team based in North Charleston, South Carolina, a suburb of the metropolitan area of Charleston, South Carolina and have become one of the longest established teams in the ECHL. Since 2004, the team has been affiliated with the Washington Capitals of the National... North Charleston is a city located in South Carolina. ... Myrtle Beach is a city located in Horry County, South Carolina. ... Clemson University is a public, coeducational, land-grant, research university located in Clemson, South Carolina, United States. ... The University of South Carolina, Columbia (USC, SC, or Carolina) is a public, co-educational, research university located in Columbia, South Carolina, United States. ... The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, is a state-supported, comprehensive college located in Charleston, South Carolina. ... Presbyterian College is a liberal arts college in Clinton, South Carolina, USA. Presbyterian College, or PC, is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church USA. Presbyterian College has around 1300 students and runs on an endowment of around $75 million. ... The Bell Tower Furman University is a private, coeducational, non-sectarian university in Greenville, South Carolina, United States. ... Image:Coastal Carolina Univerisity. ... Wofford College is a small liberal arts college located in Spartanburg, South Carolina. ... The College of Charleston (C of C) is a public university located in historic downtown Charleston, South Carolina. ... , Winthrop University (formerly Winthrop College) is an American public, four-year liberal arts college in Rock Hill, South Carolina, within the Charlotte, North Carolina metropolitan area. ... North Greenville University is a university governed by the South Carolina Baptist Convention. ... Lander University is a public university located in Greenwood, South Carolina. ... Southern Wesleyan University is a four-year Christian college in the town of Central, South Carolina. ... South Carolina State University (also known as SCSU, State College among the older alumni members, or simply State), is a historically black university located in Orangeburg, South Carolina. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... In geopolitics, the term The South is often used to refer to the poorer, less technologically advanced nations of the world as opposed to The North, which is richer and more developed. ... Darlington Raceway during the 2006 Dodge Charger 500. ... This article is about several worldwide days celebrating motherhood. ... The NEXTEL Cup Series is NASCARs top racing series. ... Kiawah Island is a town located in Charleston County, South Carolina. ... Lake Marion is the largest lake in South Carolina, with a 315 mile shoreline and covering nearly 110,000 acres of land. ... Lake Murray is a lake in South Carolina, USA. It is approximately 50,000 acres (200 km²) in size, and has roughly 500 miles of shoreline. ... Congaree River at the fall line, Columbia, South Carolina The Congaree River is a short but wide river in South Carolina in the United States. ... // The Saluda River is a principal tributary of the Congaree River, about 200 mi (320 km) long, in northern and western South Carolina in the United States. ... The Broad River is a tidal channel, in Beaufort and Jasper County, South Carolina. ... The Edisto River is the longest completely undammed / unleveed blackwater river in North America, flowing 206 meandering miles from its source in Saluda County, to its Atlantic Ocean mouth at Edisto Beach, SC. It rises in two main tributaries (North Fork & South Fork) from springs under the Sand Hills region... Aiken can refer to: Aiken County, South Carolina Aiken, South Carolina, Aiken Countys county seat The University of South Carolina Aiken See also Aiken (surname) This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Camden is a city in Kershaw County, South Carolina, United States. ...

National Parks

Located in South Carolina, the 34 mi² (89 km²) Congaree National Park is the largest tract of old growth bottomland hardwood forest left in the United States but one of the smallest national parks. ...

National Monuments

Fort Moultrie is the name of a series of forts on Sullivans Island, South Carolina, built to protect the city of Charleston, South Carolina. ... Before the attack Map detailing the location of Fort Sumter Fort Sumter, located in Charleston, South Carolina harbor, was named after General Thomas Sumter. ...

Miscellaneous topics

Famous people from South Carolina

James William Anderson III (born November 1, 1937 in Columbia, South Carolina) is an American country music singer and songwriter. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pink Anderson and son (Little Pink Anderson) 1960s Pink Anderson (February 12, 1900–October 12, 1974) was a blues singer and guitarist, born on February 12, 1900 in Laurens, South Carolina. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Gateway Park, located on U.S. 221 at Laurens St. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... Major Rudolph Anderson, Jr. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Greenville is a mid-sized city located in the upstate of South Carolina. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... The Cuban Missile Crisis was a tense confrontation between the Soviet Union and the United States over the Soviet deployment of nuclear missiles in Cuba. ... Charlotta Amanda Bass (14th February, 1874-12th April, 1969), born in Sumter, South Carolina, USA, published the California Eagle from 1912 until 1951. ... Sumter (IPA: or ) is a city located in Sumter County, South Carolina. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Shelton Benjamin[2] (born July 9, 1975)[2] is an American professional wrestler and former amateur wrestler signed to World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) working on its RAW brand as one half of The Worlds Greatest Tag Team with Charlie Haas. ... Downtown Orangeburg, South Carolina downtown Orangeburg Orangeburg City Hall/Stevenson Municipal Auditorium Orangeburg, also known as The Garden City, is the largest city and county seat of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, United States. ... For the video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... FILA Greatest Wrestler of 20th Century (Greco-Roman) Alexander Karelin throws Olympian Jeff Blatnick with his Karelin Lift. Amateur wrestling is the most widespread form of sport wrestling. ... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... WWE Raw is the Monday night professional wrestling television program for World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) and is the primary broadcast of the RAW brand. ... Ben Shalom Bernanke[1] (born December 13, 1953) (pronounced ber-NAN-kee, bÉ™r-nan-kÄ“ or ), is an American economist and current Chairman of the Board of Governors of the United States Federal Reserve. ... Dillon is a city in Dillon County, South Carolina, United States. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Squalltoonix (born March 6, 1926 in New York City) is an American economist and was Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve of the United States from 1987 to 2006. ... The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central banking system of the United States. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Brooks (born June 23, 1970) is a former American Football wide receiver who played for the Green Bay Packers (1992-1998) and the Denver Broncos (2000). ... Greenwood is a city in Greenwood County, South Carolina, in the United States. ... James Anthony Brown (born in Columbia, South Carolina) is an American comedian, actor and radio personality. ... For other persons named James Brown, see James Brown (disambiguation). ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Barnwell is a city in Barnwell County, South Carolina, United States. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, showing Lake Erie in the background The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum is a museum in Cleveland, Ohio, United States, dedicated, as the name suggests, to recording the history of some of the best-known and most influential rock and... James Francis Byrnes (May 2, 1879 – April 9, 1972) was an American politician from the state of South Carolina. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Year 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... FDR redirects here. ... A list of South Carolina Governors. ... Associate Justice or Puisne (pronounced puny) Justice is the title for a member of a judicial panel who is not the Chief Justice. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century, at the center of the foreign policy and financial disputes of his age and best known as a spokesman for... Abbeville Opera House Abbeville is a city in Abbeville County, South Carolina, 86 miles (138 km) west of Columbia. ... Harry Carson (born November 26, 1953) is a former American football inside linebacker who played his entire career for the New York Giants in the NFL(1976-1988). ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 7 - President Harry S. Truman announces the United States has developed a hydrogen bomb. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chubby Checker is the stage name of Ernest Evans (born October 3, 1941), an American Rock and Roll singer best known for popularizing the dance The Twist with his 1960 song The Twist. He was born in Spring Gulley, South Carolina,[1] and raised in South Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and attended... Stephen Euin Cobb (born February 3, 1955) is a US science fiction author specializing in hard science fiction (fiction with a high degree of scientific accuracy). ... The Future And You is a talk-show style podcast in which its host (the science fiction author Stephen Euin Cobb) interviews an assortment of authors, scientists, celebrities and pioneers of the future as to what they believe both the near future and distant future will be like for individuals... Downtown Orangeburg, South Carolina downtown Orangeburg Orangeburg City Hall/Stevenson Municipal Auditorium Orangeburg, also known as The Garden City, is the largest city and county seat of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, United States. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about Stephen Colbert, the actor. ... The Colbert Report (IPA ) is an American satirical television program that airs from 11:30 p. ... The Daily Show (currently The Daily Show with Jon Stewart) is a Peabody and Emmy Award-winning American satirical television program produced by and airing on Comedy Central. ... External Links Porter-Gaud School Categories: Stub ... For other uses, see Favorite Son. ... Monique Adrienne Coleman (born November 13, 1980) is an American actress and singer from South Carolina. ... For other uses, see High School Musical (disambiguation). ... Downtown Orangeburg, South Carolina Website: www. ... Pat Conroy (born October 26, 1945 in Atlanta, Georgia) is a New York Times bestselling author who has written such acclaimed works as The Lords of Discipline, Beach Music, The Great Santini, The Prince of Tides, The Water is Wide, The Boo, My Losing Season, and Conroys stories have... Beaufort is a city in Beaufort County, South Carolina, United States, situated on the Beaufort River. ... Beaufort High School is a 4 year secondary school in Beaufort, South Carolina. ... The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, is a state-supported, comprehensive college located in Charleston, South Carolina. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... Daufuskie Island is a residential sea island between Savannah, Georgia and Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. ... Hilton Head Island is a town located in Beaufort County, South Carolina. ... Fripp Island is a 3,200 acre (13 km²) island just off the South Carolina coast, located along the Atlantic Ocean about halfway between Charleston, South Carolina and Savannah, Georgia. ... Angell Conwell as Tamika in the 2004 movie Soul Plane Angell Conwell (centre) on the cover of the film What About Your Friends Angell Conwell (born 2nd August 1983 in Orangeburg, South Carolina) is an African-American actress and model. ... Downtown Orangeburg, South Carolina downtown Orangeburg Orangeburg City Hall/Stevenson Municipal Auditorium Orangeburg, also known as The Garden City, is the largest city and county seat of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, United States. ... Reverend Gary Davis also Blind Gary Davis ( April 30, 1896 – May 5, 1972) was an African American blues and gospel singer as well as a renowned guitarist. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Clinton is a city located in Laurens County, South Carolina. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Sex and the City is a popular American cable television program. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for an encyclopedia. ... For details on this station, see Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station. ... Andrew R. Dick[1] (born December 21, 1965) is an American comedian and actor best known for his roles in the popular sitcoms NewsRadio and Less Than Perfect. ... Lawrence Eugene Larry Doby (December 13, 1923 – June 18, 2003) was an American professional baseball player in the Negro Leagues and Major League Baseball. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... Jack Roosevelt Jackie Robinson (January 31, 1919 – October 24, 1972) became the first African-American major league baseball player of the modern era in 1947. ... Camden is a city in Kershaw County, South Carolina, United States. ... Lilian Ellison [1], better known by her ring name The Fabulous Moolah (born July 22, 1923), is a female professional wrestler who is marketed by World Wrestling Entertainment for holding the record for the longest title reign by any athlete in any professional sport. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Lilian Ellison [1], better known by her ring name The Fabulous Moolah (born July 22, 1923), is a female professional wrestler who is marketed by World Wrestling Entertainment for holding the record for the longest title reign by any athlete in any professional sport. ... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... Alex English (born January 5, 1954 in Columbia, South Carolina), is a former University of South Carolina and Denver Nuggets basketball forward. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... Micheal C. Flessas (born June 2, 1959 in Miami, Florida), is the birth name of actor Michael Flessas. ... Palme dOr The Palme dOr (Golden Palm) is the highest prize given to a film at the Cannes Film Festival. ... Dancer in the Dark is an award-winning musical film drama released in 2000. ... The Cannes Film Festival (French: le Festival de Cannes), founded in 1939, is one of the worlds oldest, most influential and prestigious film festivals. ... The University of South Carolina, Columbia (USC, SC, or Carolina) is a public, co-educational, research university located in Columbia, South Carolina, United States. ... For the Major League Baseball player and manager, see Joe Frazier (baseball) Joseph William Smokin Joe Frazier (born January 12, 1944 in Beaufort, South Carolina) is a former world heavyweight boxing champion, active mostly in the 1960s and 1970s. ... For other persons named Muhammad Ali, see Muhammad Ali (disambiguation). ... Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City, United States. ... Beaufort is a city in Beaufort County, South Carolina, United States, situated on the Beaufort River. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... David du Bose Gaillard (1859-1913) was a U.S. Army engineer instrumental in the construction of the Panama Canal. ... Two Panamax running the Miraflores Locks Te Panama Canal (Spanish: ) is a major ship canal that traverses the Isthmus of Panama in Central America, connecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. ... Manning is a city in Clarendon County, South Carolina, United States. ... A brain tumor is any intracranial tumor created by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division, normally either in the brain itself (neurons, glial cells (astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells), lymphatic tissue, blood vessels), in the cranial nerves (myelin-producing Schwann cells), in the brain envelopes (meninges), skull, pituitary and pineal gland, or... Kevin Garnett (born May 19, 1976) is an American professional basketball player for the NBAs Boston Celtics. ... NBA redirects here. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Mauldin is a city in Greenville County, South Carolina, United States. ... Leeza Kim Gibbons (born March 26, 1957) is an American talk show host. ... ... Irmo is a small town or municipality located 12 miles outside of Columbia, South Carolina. ... Althea Gibson (August 25, 1927 – September 28, 2003) was an American sportswoman who, on August 22, 1950, became the first African-American woman to be a competitor on the world tennis tour. ... The Championships, Wimbledon, commonly referred to as Wimbledon, is the oldest major championship in tennis and is widely considered to be the most prestigious. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... For other persons named William Gibson, see William Gibson (disambiguation). ... Berlins Sony Center reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Location of Conway in South Carolina Coordinates: Country United States State South Carolina County Horry Mayor Gregory K. Martin Area    - City 34. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Australian cricketer nicknamed Dizzy, see Jason Gillespie. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Trumpeter redirects here. ... Historic Town Hall in downtown Cheraw. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Lancaster is a city in Lancaster County, South Carolina which is in the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Combatants United Kingdom United States Commanders Sir Alexander Cochrane Sir Edward M. Pakenham† John Keane John Lambert Andrew Jackson William Carroll John Coffee Strength 8,000 men 3,500-4,000 men Casualties 385 killed 1,186 wounded 484 captured 13 killed 58 wounded 30 captured The Battle of New... Jesse Louis Jackson, Sr. ... Greenville is a mid-sized city located in the upstate of South Carolina. ... Shoeless Joe Jackson, 1919 Joseph Jefferson Shoeless Joe Jackson (July 16, 1889, in Pickens County, South Carolina – October 5, 1951, in Greenville, South Carolina) was a left fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Athletics, Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. ... This article is about the sport. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ... Rogers Hornsby (April 27, 1896 in Winters, Texas - January 5, 1963 in Chicago, Illinois), nicknamed The Rajah, was a Major League Baseball second baseman and manager. ... Greenville is a mid-sized city located in the upstate of South Carolina. ... James Lee Jamerson (January 29, 1938 - August 2, 1983) was an American musician. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Jay Jenkins (born September 28, 1977 in Columbia, South Carolina) formerly known as Lil J currently known as Young Jeezy, is an American rapper. ... Jasper Johnss Map, 1961 Jasper Johnss Flag, Encaustic, oil and collage on fabric mounted on plywood,1954-55 Detail of Flag (1954-55). ... Allendale is a town located in Allendale County, South Carolina. ... Orlando Jones (born April 10, 1968) is an American comedian and film and television actor. ... Mauldin is a city in Greenville County, South Carolina, United States. ... Eartha Kitt (born Eartha Mae Keith on January 17, 1927),[1] is an American actress, singer, and cabaret star. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An Emmy Award. ... North is a town in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, United States. ... James Longstreet (January 8, 1821 – January 2, 1904) was one of the foremost Confederate generals of the American Civil War, the principal subordinate to General Robert E. Lee, who called him his Old War Horse. ... Edgefield County is a county located in the state of South Carolina. ... Francis Marion (February 26, 1732–February 27, 1795) was a lieutenant colonel in the Continental Army and later brigadier general in the South Carolina Militia during the American Revolutionary War. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... This article is about military actions only. ... Location of Georgetown in South Carolina Coordinates: Country United States State South Carolina County Georgetown Government  - Mayor Lynn Wood Wilson Area  - City 7. ... Edwin McCain (born January 20, 1970 in Greenville, South Carolina) is an alternative and indie rock guitar player. ... Andie MacDowell (born Rosalie Anderson MacDowell on April 21, 1958 in Gaffney, South Carolina) is an American screen actress. ... Gaffney is a city in Cherokee County, South Carolina, United States. ... , Winthrop University (formerly Winthrop College) is an American public, four-year liberal arts college in Rock Hill, South Carolina, within the Charlotte, North Carolina metropolitan area. ... Burnet Rhett Maybank (March 7, 1899 to September 1, 1954) was a U.S. Senator and governor of South Carolina, and Charleston mayor. ... Ronald Erwin McNair, Ph. ... Location of Lake City in South Carolina Coordinates: Country United States State South Carolina County Florence Area  - City 4. ... Space Shuttle Challenger (NASA Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-099) was NASAs second Space Shuttle orbiter to be put into service, Columbia being the first. ... Merritt Island and Kennedy Space Center (shown in white). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Kary Banks Mullis (b. ... Lenoir is a city located in Caldwell County, North Carolina. ... Nancy Humphries ODell (born February 25, 1966 in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina) is an American television host and entertainment journalist. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Myrtle Beach is a city and in Horry County, South Carolina, United States. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... Jermaine L. ONeal (born October 13, 1978, in Columbia, South Carolina) is an American National Basketball Association player who currently plays for the Indiana Pacers. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... NBA redirects here. ... Amelia Bedelia is a series of childrens books written by Peggy Parish, and illustrated by Fritz Siebel. ... Amelia Bedelia is the protagonist and title character of a series of childrens books written by Peggy Parish, and initially illustrated by Fritz Siebel. ... Manning is a city in Clarendon County, South Carolina, United States. ... Kathleen Parker is an award-winning columnist whose columns frequently focus on family and sex roles. ... Mary-Louise Parker (born August 2, 1964) is an American actress. ... This article is about the current U.S. Army post. ... William Perry (born December 16, 1962 in Aiken, South Carolina) is a former professional football player and brother of former professional football player Michael Dean Perry. ... City Chicago, Illinois Other nicknames Da Bears, The Monsters of the Midway Team colors Navy Blue and Orange Head Coach Lovie Smith Owner Virginia Halas McCaskey Chairman Michael McCaskey General manager Jerry Angelo Fight song Bear Down, Chicago Bears Mascot Staley Da Bear League/Conference affiliations Independent (1919) National Football... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... Clemson University is a public, coeducational, land-grant, research university located in Clemson, South Carolina, United States. ... Aiken is a city in Aiken County, South Carolina and is part of the CSRA. The population was 25,337 at the 2000 census. ... John Phillips in the sixties. ... The Mamas & the Papas were a leading vocal group of the 1960s, and one of the few American groups to maintain widespread success during the British Invasion, along with The Beach Boys. ... Parris Island is a census-designated place located in Beaufort County, South Carolina. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the Lauryn Hill single, see Doo Wop (That Thing). ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... The Drifters are a long-lived American doo wop/R&B vocal group, originally formed by Clyde McPhatter (of Billy Ward & the Dominoes) in 1953. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dalzell is a census-designated place located in Sumter County, South Carolina. ... Melvin Purvis Melvin Horace Purvis, Jr. ... John Dillinger (June 22, 1903 – July 22, 1934) was an American bank robber, considered by some to be a dangerous criminal, while others idealized him as a latter-day Robin Hood. ... Timmonsville is a town located in Florence County, South Carolina. ... James Edward Jim Rice (born March 8, 1953, in Anderson, South Carolina) is a former baseball player who was with the American Leagues Boston, Red Sox from 1974 to 1989. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... Anderson is a city located in Anderson County, South Carolina. ... For other persons named Robert Jordan, see Robert Jordan (disambiguation). ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about a fantasy series. ... For other persons named Robert Jordan, see Robert Jordan (disambiguation). ... An undergraduate degree (sometimes called a first degree or simply a degree) is the most common and primary academic degree available and is normally studied at a higher education institution, such as a university. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, is a state-supported, comprehensive college located in Charleston, South Carolina. ... For the American actress, see Julia Roberts. ... Lancaster is a city in Lancaster County, South Carolina which is in the United States. ... Christopher Julius Rock III[5] (born February 7, 1965)[6][7] is an Emmy Award winning American comedian, actor, screenwriter, television producer, film producer and director. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Andrews is a town located in South Carolina. ... Darius Rucker performing in 2004 Darius Rucker (born May 13, 1966 in Charleston, South Carolina) is the lead singer and rhythm guitarist of the band Hootie & the Blowfish. ... Blue Sky is the legal name (formerly Warren Edward Johnson) of an American painter and sculptor best known for his mural, Tunnelvision. ... Robert Smalls (April 5, 1839 - February 23, 1915) was an African American slave who became a naval hero at the same time he freed himself and his family in May 1862 from slavery. ... Shawnee Smith (b. ... Orangeburg is the name of two places in the United States: Orangeburg in New York Orangeburg in South Carolina This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... W. Thomas Smith Jr. ... Angie Stone (born Angela Laverne Brown on January 30, 1961) is an American R&B, soul, and neo soul singer, songwriter, keyboardist, record producer, and occasional actress. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Melanie Thornton live in Leipzig on 24. ... La Bouche is a Eurodance/Dance-pop duo formed by Frank Farian in Germany in 1994, consisting of Melanie Thornton and Lane McCray. ... For other uses of Zurich, see Zurich (disambiguation). ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... Edgefield is a town located in Edgefield County, South Carolina. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Aaron Tippin (born July 3, 1958) is an American country music singer-songwriter, record producer, and occasional bodybuilder. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Charles Hard Townes (born July 28, 1915) is an American Nobel Prize-winning physicist and educator. ... The Bell Tower Furman University is a private, coeducational, non-sectarian university in Greenville, South Carolina, United States. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... A professor is a senior teacher and researcher, usually in a college or university. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... Josh Otis Turner (born November 20, 1977 in Hannah, South Carolina) is an American country music singer. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Hannah is a community in Florence County, South Carolina,United States. ... John Broadus Watson (January 9, 1878–September 25, 1958) was an American psychologist who established the psychological school of behaviorism, after doing research on animal behavior. ... A psychologist is an expert in psychology, the systematic investigation of the human mind, including behavior, cognition, and affect. ... Behaviorism (also called learning perspective) is a philosophy of psychology based on the proposition that all things which organisms do — including acting, thinking and feeling—can and should be regarded as behaviors. ... Shawn Nichols Weatherly (born July 24, 1959 in Sumter, South Carolina) is a beauty queen and entertainer from South Carolina who won the titles Miss USA and Miss Universe. ... Miss Universe is an annual international female beauty contest, and the title for the winner of the contest, founded in 1952 by California clothing company Pacific Mills. ... Baywatch was a popular American television series about the Los Angeles County Lifeguards who patrol the crowded beaches of Los Angeles County, California. ... William C. Westmoreland (March 26, 1914 – July 18, 2005) was an American General who commanded American military operations in the Vietnam War at its peak from 1964 to 1968 and who served as US Army Chief of Staff from 1968 to 1972. ... Spartanburg County is a county located in the state of South Carolina. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Flag of the Chief of Staff of the United States Army The Chief of Staff of the United States Army (CSA) is the professional head of the United States Army who is responsible for ensuring readiness of the Army. ... Vanna White (born Vanna Marie Rosich on February 18, 1957 is a American television personality, best known as the hostess and puzzle board operator on the long-running game show Wheel of Fortune. ... North Myrtle Beach is a city located in Horry County, South Carolina. ... Paul Randall Wight, Jr. ... Aiken is a city in Aiken County, South Carolina and is part of the CSRA. The population was 25,337 at the 2000 census. ... For the video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... FILA Greatest Wrestler of 20th Century (Greco-Roman) Alexander Karelin throws Olympian Jeff Blatnick with his Karelin Lift. Amateur wrestling is the most widespread form of sport wrestling. ... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... This article is about the WWE brand. ... Maurice Williams & the Zodiacs was a singing group, active in the late 1950s and early 1960s. ... Bill Buckners error in Game 6 of the 1986 World Series. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Bamberg is a town located in Bamberg County, South Carolina. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) East Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Toronto Blue Jays (1977–present) Other nicknames The Jays Ballpark Rogers Centre (1989–present) a. ... Marian Wright Edelman (born June 6, 1939) is the president and founder of the Childrens Defense Fund. ... Bennettsville is a city located in Marlboro County, South Carolina. ... Joanne Gignilliat Trimmier Woodward (born February 27, 1930) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Emmy award winning American actress. ... Thomasville is a city in Thomas County, Georgia, United States. ... Greenville is a large city and county seat located in Greenville County6 in South Carolina. ... Reginald Laverne Reggie Sanders (born December 1, 1967) is currently the starting left fielder for the Kansas City Royals baseball team. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Downtown Orangeburg, South Carolina downtown Orangeburg Orangeburg City Hall/Stevenson Municipal Auditorium Orangeburg, also known as The Garden City, is the largest city and county seat of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, United States. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ...

Alcohol laws

Prohibition was a major issue in the state's history. Voters endorsed prohibition in 1892 but instead were given the "Dispensary System" of state-owned liquor stores, They soon became symbols of political corruption controlled by Ben Tillman's machine and were shut down in 1907. Today, most counties in South Carolina do not allow the sale of alcohol on Sunday, but counties and cities can apply referendums to overturn this. Six counties currently allow Sunday alcohol sales; Richland County, Lexington, Georgetown, Charleston, Beaufort and Horry. Cities and towns that have passed laws allowing Sunday alcohol sales include Spartanburg, Greenville, Aiken, Rock Hill, Summerville, Santee, Daniel Island and Tega Cay. The term Prohibition, also known as A Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ... Benjamin Ryan Tillman (August 11, 1847 - July 3, 1918) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina from 1890 to 1894 and as a United States Senator from 1895 until his death. ...


While there are no dry counties in South Carolina, certain counties enforce time restrictions for alcohol sales in stores (e.g., no sales after 2 AM in Pickens County) while others do not (in-store alcohol sales are allowed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week in Charleston, excluding liquor which must be purchased before 7 PM). Columbia, the state's capital and largest city and the home of the University of South Carolina, takes one of the more relaxed stances on alcohol sales in bars. Many bars, especially those catering to younger crowds in the busy Five Points district, serves alcohol until sunrise, and it is not unheard of for bars and clubs to serve alcohol until 6 AM, although the per-se legality of this practice is debatable. A dry county is a county in the United States whose government forbids the sale of alcoholic beverages. ...


Before 2006, South Carolina was infamous amongst tourists and residents alike for being the last state in the nation to require cocktails and liquor drinks to be mixed using minibottles, like those found on airplanes, instead of from free-pour bottles. The original logic behind this law was twofold: it made alcohol taxation simpler and allowed bar patrons to receive a standardized amount of alcohol in each drink. However, minibottles contain 1.75 OZ (52 ml) of alcohol, approximately 30% more than the typical 1.2 OZ (35 ml) found in free-pour drinks, with the obvious result of overly strong cocktails and inebriated bar customers. The law was changed in 2006 to allow both free-pour and minibottles in bars, and the vast majority of bars quickly eschewed minibottles in favor of free-pour.[14]


Patron Saint of South Carolina's Catholic Church

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Charleston, the Roman Catholic Church in South Carolina has as its patron saint, St. John the Baptist. The Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist The Roman Catholic Diocese of Charleston is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in the southern United States and is comprised of the entire state of South Carolina,[1] with Charleston as its see city. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... John the Baptist (also called John the Baptizer or John the Dipper) is regarded as a prophet by at least three religions: Christianity, Islam, and Mandaeanism. ...


South Carolina singularities

  • Adjutant general: The head of the state's national guard, the adjutant general, is a statewide elected official.[15]
  • Driving Under the Influence: South Carolina is the only state in the nation with mandatory videotaping by the arresting officer of the DUI arrest and breath test.[16]
  • Fire Safety Regulations: South Carolina is the only state that allows fire officials to sidestep a federal regulation requiring that for every employee doing hazardous work inside a building, one must be outside.[17]
  • School Buses: South Carolina is the only state in the nation that owns and operates its own school bus fleet.[18][19]
  • Strokes: South Carolina has the highest rate of stroke deaths in the nation.[20]
  • Black Water River: With the Edisto River, South Carolina has the longest completely undammed / unleveed blackwater river in North America.[21]
  • Outdoor Sculpture: South Carolina is home to the world's largest collection of outdoor sculpture located at Brookgreen Gardens.[22]
  • Landscaped Gardens: South Carolina is home to the oldest landscaped gardens in the United States, at Middleton Place near Charleston.[23]
  • Public Museum: The first public museum in the Americas was the Charleston Museum, founded in 1773.[24]
  • Opera: The first opera performed in the Americas was performed in Charleston on February 18, 1735.[25]

Sister States

Slogan or Nickname: Sunshine State, Smart State Motto(s): Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Anna Bligh (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd... The Rhenish Palatinate (Rheinpfalz, sometimes Lower Palatinate or Niederpfalz) occupies rather more than a quarter of the German Bundesland (federal state) of Rhineland-Palatinate (Rheinland-Pfalz) and contains the towns of Ludwigshafen, Kaiserslautern, Neustadt an der Weinstrasse, Pirmasens, Landau and Speyer. ... Small street (via della Noca) leading to città alta. ...

See also

It has been suggested that Poverty in Appalachia be merged into this article or section. ... // Early history (1910-1950) Until 1948, some southern councils of the Boy Scouts of America were racially segregated. ... The United States Census Bureau has defined 4 Combined Statistical Areas (CSAs),[1] 10 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs),[2] and 13 Micropolitan Statistical Areas (μSAs)[3] in the State of South Carolina. ... The South Carolina Highway Patrol is a division of the South Carolina Department of Public Safety responsible for enforcing the traffic laws of the state of South Carolina. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c Elevations and Distances in the United States. U.S Geological Survey (29 April 2005). Retrieved on November 7, 2006.
  2. ^ South Carolina, State of (1984), S.C. Code of Laws, SECTION 1-1-680. Official State fruit., <http://www.scstatehouse.net/code/t01c001.htm>. Retrieved on 2007-07-15
  3. ^ South Carolina, State of (1984), S.C. Code of Laws, SECTION 1-1-690. Official State beverage., <http://www.scstatehouse.net/code/t01c001.htm>. Retrieved on 2007-07-15
  4. ^ South Carolina, State of (1995), S.C. Code of Laws, SECTION 1-1-692. Official State hospitality beverage., <http://www.scstatehouse.net/code/t01c001.htm>. Retrieved on 2007-07-15
  5. ^ South Carolina, State of (2006), S.C. Code of Laws, SECTION 1-1-682. Official state snack food., <http://www.scstatehouse.net/code/t01c001.htm>. Retrieved on 2007-07-15
  6. ^ [1] NOAA National Climatic Data Center. Retrieved on October 24, 2006.
  7. ^ QuickFacts: South Carolina. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  8. ^ Video Poker Outlawed In South Carolina
  9. ^ Statement by the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division regarding the change of Video Poker Machine Laws
  10. ^ Young, Richard (May 2005). The High School Crisis in the United States and South Carolina: The Problems Related to Dropouts and Recommended Solutions (HTML). University of South Carolina College Arts and Sciences’ Institute for Public Service and Policy Research. Retrieved on 2007-05-22.
  11. ^ Myrtle Beach Golf.
  12. ^ GolfDigest.com - America's 50 Toughest Golf Courses
  13. ^ GolfDigest.com - America's 100 Greatest Golf Courses
  14. ^ "S.C. operators stand ready to toast new free-pour law",
  15. ^ Restructuring proposal threatens checks and balances
  16. ^ South Carolina DUI LAW
  17. ^ Officials Investigate South Carolina Fire Tragedy. AP
  18. ^ Parents Pummeled by South Carolina Legislators. School Reform News. The Heartland Institute.
  19. ^ A review of SC School Bus Operations. South Carolina Legislative Audit Council. October 2001.
  20. ^ SC Department of Health and Environmental Control
  21. ^ Edisto River
  22. ^ Brookgreen Gardens
  23. ^ Middleton Place
  24. ^ Charleston Museum
  25. ^ South Carolina State Library

is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Edisto River is the longest completely undammed / unleveed blackwater river in North America, flowing 206 meandering miles from its source in Saluda County, to its Atlantic Ocean mouth at Edisto Beach, SC. It rises in two main tributaries (North Fork & South Fork) from springs under the Sand Hills region...

Further reading

Textbooks and surveys

  • Bass, Jack. Porgy Comes Home: South Carolina After 300 Years,. Sandlapper, 1970. OCLC 724061ISBN 9999555071
  • Edgar, Walter. South Carolina: A History, University of South Carolina Press, 1998. ISBN 1-57003-255-6
  • Edgar, Walter, ed. The South Carolina Encyclopedia, University of South Carolina Press, 2006. ISBN 1-57003-598-2
  • George C. Rogers Jr. and C. James Taylor. A South Carolina Chronology, 1497-1992, 2nd Ed.,. University of South Carolina Press, Columbia, SC, 1994. ISBN 0-87249-971-5
  • Wallace, David Duncan. South Carolina: A Short History, 1520-1948 (1951) ISBN 0-87249-079-3
  • WPA. South Carolina: A Guide to the Palmetto State (1941) ASIN B000HM05WE
  • Wright, Louis B. South Carolina: A Bicentennial History' (1977) ISBN 0-393-05560-4

Scholarly secondary studies

  • Bass, Jack and Marilyn W. Thompson. Ol' Strom: An Unauthorized Biography of Strom Thurmond,. Longstreet Press, 1998.
  • Busick, Sean R. A Sober Desire for History: William Gilmore Simms as Historian., 2005. ISBN 1-57003-565-2.
  • Clarke, Erskine. Our Southern Zion: A History of Calvinism in the South Carolina Low Country, 1690-1990 (1996)
  • Channing, Steven. Crisis of Fear: Secession in South Carolina (1970)
  • Cohodas, Nadine. Strom Thurmond and the Politics of Southern Change,. Simon & Schuster, 1993.
  • Coit, Margaret L. John C. Calhoun: American Portrait (1950)
  • Crane, Verner W. The Southern Frontier, 1670-1732 (1956)
  • Ford Jr., Lacy K. Origins of Southern Radicalism: The South Carolina Upcountry, 1800-1860 (1991)
  • Hindus, Michael S. Prison and Plantation: Crime, Justice, and Authority in Massachusetts and South Carolina, 1767-1878 (1980)
  • Johnson Jr., George Lloyd. The Frontier in the Colonial South: South Carolina Backcountry, 1736-1800 (1997)
  • Jordan, Jr., Frank E. The Primary State - A History of the Democratic Party in South Carolina, 1876-1962, Columbia, SC, 1967
  • Keyserling, Harriet. Against the Tide: One Woman's Political Struggle. University of South Carolina Press, 1998.
  • Kantrowitz, Stephen. Ben Tillman & the Reconstruction of White Supremacy (2002)
  • Lau, Peter F. Democracy Rising: South Carolina And the Fight for Black Equality Since 1865 (2006)
  • Peirce, Neal R. The Deep South States of America: People, Politics, and Power in the Seven Deep South States; (1974)
  • Rogers, George C. Evolution of a Federalist: William Loughton Smith of Charleston (1758-1812) (1962)
  • Schultz Harold S. Nationalism and Sectionalism in South Carolina, 1852-1860 (1950)
  • Simon, Bryant. A Fabric of Defeat: The Politics of South Carolina Millhands, 1910-1948 (1998)
  • Simkins, Francis Butler. The Tillman Movement in South Carolina (1926)
  • Simkins, Francis Butler. Pitchfork Ben Tillman: South Carolinian (1944)
  • Simkins, Francis Butler, and Robert Hilliard Woody. South Carolina during Reconstruction (1932).
  • Sinha, Manisha. The Counterrevolution of Slavery: Politics and Ideology in Antebellum South Carolina (2000)
  • Smith, Warren B. White Servitude in Colonial South Carolina (1961)
  • Tullos, Allen Habits of Industry: White Culture and the Transformation of the Carolina Piedmont (1989)
  • Williamson Joel R. After Slavery: The Negro in South Carolina during Reconstruction, 1861-1877 (1965)
  • Wood, Peter H. Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 Through the Stono Rebellion (1996)

Local studies

  • Bass, Jack and Jack Nelson.The Orangeburg Massacre,. Mercer University Press, 1992.
  • Burton, Orville Vernon. In My Father's House Are Many Mansions: Family and Community in Edgefield, South Carolina (1985), social history
  • Carlton, David L. Mill and Town in South Carolina, 1880-1920 (1982)
  • Clarke, Erskine. Dwelling Place: A Plantation Epic (2005)
  • Danielson, Michael N. Profits and Politics in Paradise: The Development of Hilton Head Island,. University of South Carolina Press, 1995.
  • Doyle, Don H. New Men, New Cities, New South: Atlanta, Nashville, Charleston, Mobile, 1860-1910 (1990)
  • Huff, Jr., Archie Vernon. Greenville: The History of the City and County in the South Carolina Piedmont, University of South Carolina Press, 1995.
  • Moore, John Hammond. Columbia and Richland County: A South Carolina Community, 1740-1990, University of South Carolina Press, 1993.
  • Moredock, Will. Banana Republic: A Year in the Heart of Myrtle Beach,. Frontline Press, 2003.
  • Pease, William H. and Jane H. Pease. The Web of Progress: Private Values and Public Styles in Boston and Charleston, 1828-1843 (1985),
  • Robertson, Ben. Red Hills and Cotton,. USC Press (reprint), 1991.
  • Rose, Willie Lee. Rehearsal for Reconstruction: The Port Royal Experiment (1964)

Political science

  • Carter, Luther F. and David Mann, eds. Government in the Palmetto State: Toward the 21st century,. University of South Carolina, 1993.ISBN 0-917069-01-3
  • Graham, Cole Blease and William V. Moore. South Carolina Politics and Government. Univ. of Nebraska Press, 1994. ISBN 0-8032-7043-7
  • Tyer, Charlie. ed. South Carolina Government: An Introduction,. USC Institute for Public Affairs, 2002. ISBN 0-917069-12-9

Primary documents

  • Salley, Alexander S. ed. Narratives of Early Carolina, 1650-1708 (1911) ISBN 0-7812-6298-4
  • Woodmason Charles. The Carolina Backcountry on the Eve of the Revolution Edited by Richard J. Hooker. (1953), a missionary reports ISBN 0-8078-4035-1

The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... University of South Carolina Press (or USC Press), founded in 1944, is a university press that is part of University of South Carolina. ...

External links

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Preceded by
Maryland
List of U.S. states by date of statehood
Ratified Constitution on May 23, 1788 (8th)
Succeeded by
New Hampshire

Coordinates: 34° N 81° W Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Largest metro area Des Moines metropolitan area Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Federal districts are subdivisions of a federal system of government. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... Motto Samoa, Muamua Le Atua(Samoan) Samoa, Let God Be First Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner, Amerika Samoa Capital Pago Pago; Fagatogo (seat of government) Official languages English, Samoan Government  -  Governor Togiola Tulafono United States unincorporated territory  -  Treaty of Berlin 1899   -  Deed of Cession of Tutuila 1900   -  Deed of Cession... Anthem: Gi Talo Gi Halom Tasi(Chamorro) Satil Matawal Pacifiko(Carolinian) Capital Saipan Official languages English, Chamorro, Carolinian Government Presidential representative democracy  -  Governor Benigno R. Fitial  -  Lt. ... For the board game, see Puerto Rico (board game). ... Motto United in Pride and Hope Anthem Virgin Islands March Capital (and largest city) Charlotte Amalie Official languages English Government  -  Head of State George W. Bush  -  Governor John de Jongh Organized, unincorporated territory  -  Revised Organic Act 22 July 1954  Area  -  Total 346. ... The flag of the United States is used for all of the United States Minor Outlying Islands The United States Minor Outlying Islands, a statistical designation defined by ISO 3166-1, consists of nine insular United States possessions: All of these islands are in the Pacific Ocean except Navassa Island... Baker Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°13′N 176°31′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Howland Island Howland Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°48′N 176°38′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Jarvis Island (formerly also known as Bunker Island[1]) is an uninhabited 4. ... Johnston Atoll is a 130 km² atoll in the North Pacific Ocean at 16°45′N 169°30′W, about one-third of the way from Hawaii to the Marshall Islands. ... The flag of the US is used for Kingman Reef Kingman Reef Kingman Reef—NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Kingman Reef is a one-square-kilometer tropical coral reef located in the North Pacific Ocean, roughly half way between Hawaiian Islands and American Samoa at 6°24... Orthographic projection centred over Midway. ... Navassa Island map from The World Factbook Navassa Island - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Navassa Island (La Navase in French, Lanavaz in Haitian Kreyòl) is a small, uninhabited island in the Caribbean Sea. ... Palmyra Atoll - Landsat Image N-03-05_2000 (1:50,000) Palmyra Atoll - Marplot Map (1:50,000) Orthographic projection over Palmyra Atoll Palmyra Atoll, is an incorporated atoll administered by the United States government. ... USGS Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite image of Wake Island. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Image File history File links Confederate_National_Flag_since_Mar_4_1865. ... Historic Southern United States. ... The South Atlantic States form one of the nine divisions within the United States that are formally recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... The East South Central States constitute one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... The West South Central States form one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by the United States Census Bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
South Carolina tourism official site - South Carolina vacations (463 words)
South Carolina is not just one of the original American Colonies with a rich history and culture shaped by European, African and Caribbean influences.
South Carolina Golf has a new and improved course finder, a list of golf schools, and a fun trivia game.
South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism.
Colonial South Carolina (2191 words)
It was the shores of South Carolina that Ribault, under the direction of the great Coligny, had attempted to settle with a colony of Frenchmen, but failed, and now, after a hundred years had passed, it was left for the English to lay the permanent foundations for a commonwealth.
South Carolina differs from most of the colonies in not having had to battle against impending dissolution during its first years of existence, and from all the others in depending largely on slave labor from the beginning.
The earliest important product of South Carolina was rice, though it required a hundred years to bring the industry to perfection; to determine the best kind of soil and labor, and to invent the machinery for harvesting, threshing, and husking.
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