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Encyclopedia > South Australia

Coordinates: 30°0′S 135°0′E / -30, 135 Lyrics In South Australia I was born Heave away! Haul away! South Australia round Cape Horn And were bound for South Australia Haul away you rolling king Heave away! Haul away! All the way youll hear me sing And were bound for South Australia As I walked... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

South Australia
Flag Coat of Arms
Slogan or Nickname: Festival State

Other Australian states and territories
Capital Adelaide
Government Constitutional monarchy
Governor Kevin Scarce
Premier Mike Rann (ALP)
Federal representation
 - House seats 11
 - Senate seats 12
Gross State Product (2004-05)
 - Product ($m)  $59,819 (5th)
 - Product per capita  $38,838/person (7th)
Population (June 2007)
 - Population  1,584,500 (5th)
 - Density  1.61/km² (6th)
4.2 /sq mi
Area  
 - Total  1,043,514 km² (4th)
402,903 sq mi
 - Land 983,482 km²
379,725 sq mi
 - Water 60,032 km² (5.75%)
23,178 sq mi
Elevation  
 - Highest Mt. Woodroffe
1,435 m (4,708 ft)
 - Lowest Lake Eyre
-16 m (-52 ft)
Time zone UTC+9:30 (+10:30 DST)
Abbreviations  
 - Postal SA
 - ISO 3166-2 AU-SA
Emblems  
 - Faunal Hairy-Nosed Wombat
Lasiorhinus latifrons)
 - Bird Piping Shrike
 - Floral Sturt's Desert Pea
(Swainsona Formosa)
 - Aquatic Leafy Seadragon
(Phycodurus eques)
 - Gem Opal
 - Colour Red, Blue, Gold
Web site www.sa.gov.au

South Australia is a state of Australia in the southern central part of the country. It covers some of the most arid parts of the continent and with a total land area of 983,482 square kilometres (379,725 sq mi), it is the fourth largest of Australia's six states and two territories. It is bordered to the west by Western Australia, to the north by the Northern Territory and Queensland, to the east by Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria, and along the south by the Great Australian Bight and the Indian Ocean.[1] With 1.5 million people, the state comprises less than 10 per cent of the Australian population and ranks fifth in population among the states and territories. The majority of its people reside in the state capital, Adelaide, with most of the remainder settled in fertile areas along the south-eastern coast and River Murray. Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Australia. ... Image File history File links South_Australia_coa. ... Flag Ratio: 1:2 The current state flag of South Australia, a state of Australia, was officially adopted in 1904. ... The Coat-of-Arms of South Australia (1984) The Coat of arms of South Australia is the official symbol of the state of South Australia. ... The following is a list of Australian state and territory slogans. ... Image File history File links South_Australia_locator-MJC.png Summary Map of Australia highlighting South Australia Made in Adobe Illustrator by me and released under the GFDL Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The states and territories of Australia make up the Commonwealth of Australia under a federal system of government. ... Each jurisdiction of Australia has its own capital, where local judicial, administrative and legislative duties are centred. ... For other uses, see Adelaide (disambiguation). ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A constitutional monarchy or limited monarchy is a form of government established under a constitutional system which acknowledges an elected or hereditary monarch as head of state, as opposed to an absolute monarchy, where the monarch is not... See Governors of the Australian states for a description and history of the office of Governor. ... His Excellency Rear Admiral Kevin John Scarce, AO, CSC (born 4 May 1952) is a retired officer of the Royal Australian Navy and Governor of South Australia. ... This is a list of Premiers of South Australia. ... Michael David Rann (born 1953), Australian politician, is the 44th Premier of South Australia. ... ALP redirects here. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Representatives Senate Speaker of the House of Representatives David Hawker, Liberal Party since 16 November 2004 President of the Senate Alan Ferguson, Liberal Party since 14 August 2007 Members 226 (150 Representatives, 76 Senators) Political groups Liberal Party ALP National Party Country Liberal Party Greens... Type Lower house Speaker of the House David Hawker, Liberal since November 16, 2004 Members 150 Political groups ALP (85) Liberal Party (53) National Party (10) Last elections 24 November 2007 Meeting place Parliament House, Canberra, ACT Web site House of Representatives Entrance to the House of Representatives Judicial High... Type Upper house President Alan Ferguson, Liberal since 14 August 2007 Members 76 Political groups Coalition (39) ALP (28) Green (4) Democrat (4) FFP (1) Last elections 9 October 2004 Meeting place Parliament House, Canberra, ACT Web site Senate Entrance to the Senate Judicial High Court Lower Courts Constitution State... This is a list of Australian States and Territories by Gross State Product. ... By population By area By population density Category: ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... ĝMedia:Example. ... This is a list of Australian states and mainland territories by ranking. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... Mount Woodroffe () is South Australias highest peak, at 1,435 metres. ... This article is about a foot as a unit of length. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... ISO 3166-2 is the second part of the ISO 3166 standard. ... For other uses, see Wombat (disambiguation). ... Flag of South Australia featuring the Piping Shrike The Piping Shrike is the emblematic bird that appears on South Australias flag, State Badge and Coat of Arms. ... Binomial name Swainsona formosa (G. Don) Joy Thomps. ... Binomial name Phycodurus eques (Günther, 1865) The leafy sea dragon, Phycodurus eques, is a marine fish related to the seahorse. ... For other uses, see Opal (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The states and territories of Australia make up the Commonwealth of Australia under a federal system of government. ... Slogan or Nickname: Wildflower State or the Golden State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Ken Michael Premier Alan Carpenter (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 15  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2005-06)  - Product ($m)  $107,910 (4th)  - Product per capita  $53,134/person... For similar terms, see Northern Territories (disambiguation) Slogan or Nickname: The Territory, The NT, The Top End Motto(s): none Other Australian states and territories Capital Darwin Government Constitutional monarchy Administrator Ted Egan Chief Minister Clare Martin (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 2  - Senate seats 2 Gross Territorial Product (2004... Slogan or Nickname: Sunshine State, Smart State Motto(s): Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Anna Bligh (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd... NSW redirects here. ... VIC redirects here. ... The Great Australian Bight is a large bight, or open bay, encompassing an area of the Southern Ocean located off the central and western portions of the southern coastline of mainland Australia. ... For other uses, see Adelaide (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Murray River (disambiguation). ...


The state's origins were unique in Australia as a freely-settled, planned British province rather than a convict settlement. Official settlement began on 28 December 1836 when the state was proclaimed at The Old Gum Tree by Governor Hindmarsh. The first city/town to be established, was Kingscote, Kangaroo Island established in 1836. The guiding principle behind settlement was that of systematic colonisation, a theory espoused by Edward Gibbon Wakefield that was later employed by the New Zealand Company. The aim was to establish the province as a centre of civilisation for free immigrants, promising civil liberties and religious tolerance. Although its history is marked by economic hardship, South Australia has remained politically innovative and culturally vibrant. Today, the state is known as a state of festivals, and of fine wine. is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Old Gum Tree. ... Captain John Hindmarsh, KH, RN was the first Governor of South Australia, from 28 December 1836 to 16 July 1838. ... Kangaroo Island is Australias third largest island - after Tasmania and Melville Island. ... Edward Gibbon Wakefield Edward Gibbon Wakefield (20 March 1796 – May 16, 1862) was the driving force behind much of the early colonization of South Australia, and later New Zealand. ... The New Zealand Company formed in 1839 to promote the colonisation of New Zealand. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ...


The state's economy centres on the agricultural, manufacturing and mining industries and has an increasingly significant finance sector as well.

Contents

History

The first recorded European sighting of the South Australian coast was in 1627 when the Dutch ship the Gulden Zeepaert, skippered by Francois Thijssen, examined the coastline. Thijssen named his discovery "Pieter Nuyts Land", after the highest ranking individual on board. The coastline of South Australia was first mapped by Matthew Flinders and Nicolas Baudin in 1802. Baudin referred to the land as "Terre Napoléon". The history of South Australia details from the first human activity in the region, estimated at about 20 000 years ago to the current events of the 21st century. ... François Thijssen was a Dutch explorer who is famous because of his travel along the South coast of Australia. ... Captain Matthew Flinders RN (16 March 1774 – 19 July 1814) was one of the most successful navigators and cartographers of his age. ... Nicolas Baudin Nicolas-Thomas Baudin (February 17, 1754 - September 16, 1803) was a French explorer. ...


In 1834, the British Parliament passed the South Australia Act 1834, which enabled the province of South Australia to be established. The Act stated that 802,511 square kilometres (309,851 sq mi) would be allotted to the colony, and it would be convict-free. The plan for the colony was that it be the ideal embodiment of the best qualities of British society, that is, no religious discrimination or unemployment. The South Australia Colonisation Act 1834 is the short title of an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom with the long title An Act to empower His Majesty to erect South Australia into a British Province or Provinces and to provide for the Colonisation and Government thereof and...


Settlement of nine vessels and 636 people was temporarily made at Kingscote on Kangaroo Island, until the official site of the colony was selected where Adelaide is currently located. The first immigrants arrived at Holdfast Bay (near the present day Glenelg) in November 1836 and the colony was proclaimed on December 28, 1836, now known as Proclamation Day. South Australia is the only Australian state to be settled entirely by free settlers. Kingscote (35°39′S 137°38′E) is the main town on Kangaroo Island, with a population of about 1,200 people. ... Kangaroo Island is Australias third largest island - after Tasmania and Melville Island. ... For other uses, see Adelaide (disambiguation). ... Exactly when Immigration to Australia began is unknown but estimates typically range from 40,000 - 50,000 years ago,[1] when the ancestors of Australian Aborigines arrived on the continent via the islands of the Malay Archipelago and New Guinea. ... Holdfast Bay is now known as Glenelg. ... Stamford Grand and Glenelg foreshore from jetty. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Proclamation Day is the South Australian public holiday that celebrates the proclamation of South Australia as a British colony. ...


The current flag of South Australia was adopted on January 13, 1904, and is a British blue ensign defaced with the state badge. The badge is described as a Piping Shrike with wings outstretched on a yellow disc. The state badge is believed to have been designed by Robert Craig of the Adelaide School of Arts. Flag Ratio: 1:2 The current state flag of South Australia, a state of Australia, was officially adopted in 1904. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Flag of South Australia featuring the Piping Shrike The Piping Shrike is the emblematic bird that appears on South Australias flag, State Badge and Coat of Arms. ... United States Army Second Lieutenant Robert Craig was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for heroic service as an infantry officer during the invasion of Sicily in World War II. // Robert Craig was born in Scotland, emigrating with his family to the United States and settling in Toledo, Ohio. ...


South Australia granted restricted women's suffrage in 1861, and in 1894 became the second place in the world to grant universal suffrage (after New Zealand) where women had the dual rights to vote and to stand for election.[2]


Geography

Main article: Geography of South Australia
Satellite image of eastern South Australia. Note the dry lakes (white patches) in the north

The terrain consists largely of arid and semi-arid rangelands, with several low mountain ranges in which the most important mountains are the Mt Lofty-Flinders Ranges system which extends north about 800 kilometres (497 mi) from Cape Jervis to the northern end of Lake Torrens and salt lakes. The highest point in the state is not in those ranges, but Mount Woodroffe at 1,435 metres (4,708 ft) in the Musgrave Ranges in the extreme northwest of the state.[3] The western portion of the state consists of the sparsely-inhabited Nullarbor Plain fronting the cliffs of the Great Australian Bight. Location of South Australia in Australia South Australia occupies the south central part of the continent of Australia. ... Download high resolution version (722x1354, 112 KB)Eastern South Australia, the image is slightly too short to include the northern border. ... Download high resolution version (722x1354, 112 KB)Eastern South Australia, the image is slightly too short to include the northern border. ... Mount Lofty Summit The Mount Lofty Ranges are the range of mountains to the east of Adelaide in South Australia, stretching from the southernmost point of the Fleurieu Peninsula at Cape Jervis northwards for over 300 kilometres before petering out north of Peterborough. ... Flinders Ranges is a national park in South Australia (Australia), 384 km north of Adelaide. ... Cape Jervis is a town at the southwestern tip of Fleurieu Peninsula in South Australia at 35°36′ S 138°06′ E, approximately 108 km south of Adelaide. ... Lake Torrens National Park in South Australia (Australia), is located 431 km north of Adelaide. ... Mount Woodroffe () is South Australias highest peak, at 1,435 metres. ... Musgrave Ranges is a mountain range in Central Australia, straddling the boundary of South Australia and the Northern Territory, extending into Western Australia. ... For the roadhouse along the Eyre Highway, see Nullarbor, South Australia NASA - Visible Earth, Nullarbor. ... The Great Australian Bight is a large bight, or open bay, encompassing an area of the Southern Ocean located off the central and western portions of the southern coastline of mainland Australia. ...


The principal industries and exports of South Australia are wheat, wine and wool. More than half of Australia's wines are produced here.


South Australia has boundaries with every other Australian state and territory except the Australian Capital Territory and Tasmania. The area now known as the Northern Territory was annexed to South Australia in 1863, however it was handed over to the Federal government in 1911 and became a separate territory. South Australia's south coast is flanked by the Southern Ocean. Its mean temperature range is 29 °C (84 °F) in January and 15 °C (59 °F) in July. Daily temperatures in parts of the state in January & February can be up to 48 °C (118 °F). Capital Canberra Government Constitutional monarchy Administrator none Chief Minister Jon Stanhope (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 2  - Senate seats 2 Gross Territorial Product (2006)  - Product ($m)  $19,167 (6th)  - Product per capita  $57,303/person (1st) Population (End of November 2006)  - Population  333,667 (7th)  - Density  137. ... Slogan or Nickname: Island of Inspiration; The Apple Isle; Holiday Isle Motto(s): Ubertas et Fidelitas (Fertility and Faithfulness) Other Australian states and territories Capital Hobart Government Constitutional monarchy Governor William Cox Premier Paul Lennon (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 5  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product... For similar terms, see Northern Territories (disambiguation) Slogan or Nickname: The Territory, The NT, The Top End Motto(s): none Other Australian states and territories Capital Darwin Government Constitutional monarchy Administrator Ted Egan Chief Minister Clare Martin (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 2  - Senate seats 2 Gross Territorial Product (2004... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ...


Highest maximum temperature: 50.7 °C (123.3 °F), Oodnadatta, 2 January 1960 (The highest official temperature recorded in Australia). Oodnadatta, South Australia (27°32′ S 135°26′ E) is located in the heart of the desert 112 m above sea level, 1,011 km north of Adelaide. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Lowest minimum temperature: −8 °C (17.6 °F), Yongala, 20 July 1976[4] is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Economy

The manufacturing industry plays a very important role in South Australia's economy, generating 15% of the state's Gross State Product and playing a large part in exports. The manufacturing industry consists of automotive (44% of total Australian production, 2006) and component manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, defence technology (2.1% of GSP, 2002-2003) and electronic systems (3.0% of GSP in 2006). South Australia's economy relies on exports more than any other state in Australia. Export earnings stand at AUD$10 billion worth per year and grew by 8.8% from 2002 to 2003. Pharmacology (in Greek: pharmacon is drug, and logos is science) is the study of how chemical substances interfere with living systems. ...


Production of South Australian food and drink (including agriculture, horticulture, aquaculture, fisheries and manufacturing) is a $10 billion industry. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Australian cuisine. ...


South Australia's economic growth has lagged behind the rest of Australia for some time (2.1% from 2002 to 2003), but performance seems to be improving (forecast 3.5% for 2006/2007). South Australia's credit rating was upgraded to AAA+, having lost it in the State Bank collapse. South Australia's Gross State Product was AUD$48.9 billion starting 2004, making it AUD$32,996 per capita. Exports for 2006 were valued at $9.0bn with imports at $6.2bn. Private Residential Building Approvals experienced 80% growth over the year of 2006. A credit rating assesses the credit worthiness of an individual, corporation, or even a country. ... The State Bank of South Australia was a bank owned by the Government of South Australia. ... Au. ... Au. ...


South Australia's economy includes the following major industries (Oct 2006 in AUD$M):

  • Meat & Meat Preparations: 463.1
  • Wheat: 487.5
  • Wine: 1,482.2
  • Wool & Sheepskins: 160
  • Machinery: 379.5
  • Metal & Metal Manufactures: 1,888.7
  • Fish and Crustaceans: 316.1
  • Road Vehicles, parts & accessories: 1,196.9
  • Petroleum & products: 227.7
  • Other & confidential: 2,393.6

Other industries, such as education and defence technology, are of growing importance.


South Australia receives the least amount of Federal funding for its local road network than any other state on a per capita or per kilometre basis.[5]


Government

Parliament House, Adelaide

South Australia is a constitutional monarchy with the Queen of Australia as the head of state. It is a state of the Commonwealth of Australia. Its bicameral parliament consists of a House of Assembly (lower house) and a Legislative Council (upper house), with legislative elections held every four years. The current Premier of South Australia is Mike Rann, a member of the Australian Labor Party. The form of the Government of South Australia is prescribed in its Constitution, which dates from 1856, although it has been amended many times since then. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Adelaide_parliament_house. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Adelaide_parliament_house. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A constitutional monarchy or limited monarchy is a form of government established under a constitutional system which acknowledges an elected or hereditary monarch as head of state, as opposed to an absolute monarchy, where the monarch is not... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... For the comedy film of the same name, see Head of State (film). ... Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is the sixth-largest country in the world, the only country to occupy an entire continent, and the largest in the region of Australasia/Oceania. ... The House of Representatives Chamber of the Parliament of Australia in Canberra. ... The House of Assembly, or lower house, is one of the two chambers of parliament in the Australian state of South Australia. ... The Legislative Council chamber circa 1939 The Legislative Council, or upper house, is one of the two chambers of parliament in the Australian state of South Australia. ... 2006 election 2002 election 1997 election 1993 election 1989 election 1985 election 1982 election 1979 election 1977 election 1975 election 1973 election 1970 election 1968 election 1965 election 1962 election 1959 election 1956 election 1953 election 1950 election 1921 election 1918 election 1915 election 1902 election 1897 election 1896 election... This is a list of Premiers of South Australia. ... Michael David Rann (born 1953), Australian politician, is the 44th Premier of South Australia. ... ALP redirects here. ...


Initially, the Governor of South Australia (the first was Captain John Hindmarsh) held almost total power that he derived from the Letters Patent created by the Imperial Government to create the colony. He was only accountable to the British Colonial Office and thus democracy did not exist in the colony. A new body was created to advise the Governor on the administration of South Australia in 1843 called the Legislative Council.[6] It consisted of three representatives of the British Government and four colonists appointed by the Governor. The Governor retained total executive power. See Governors of the Australian states for a description and history of the office of Governor. ... Captain John Hindmarsh, KH, RN was the first Governor of South Australia, from 28 December 1836 to 16 July 1838. ... The Secretary of State for the Colonies or Colonial Secretary was the British Cabinet official in charge of managing the various British colonies. ...


In 1851, the Imperial Parliament enacted the Australian Colonies Government Act which allowed for the election of representatives to each of the colonial legislatures and the drafting of a Constitution to properly create representative and responsible Government in South Australia and later that year, wealthy male colonists were allowed to vote for 16 members on a new 24 seat Legislative Council. Eight members continued to be appointed by the Governor. Formally known as the Act for the Better Government of Her Majestys Australian Colonies (1850), the Australian Colonies Government Act, was legislation enacted by the British House of Commons separating the southeastern Australian district of Port Phillip from New South Wales and establishing it as the colony of Victoria. ...


The main responsibility of this body was to draft a Constitution for South Australia. The body drafted the most democratic constitution ever before seen in the British Empire and provided for manhood suffrage. It created the bicameral Parliament of South Australia and the two houses of parliament. For the first time in the colony, the executive was elected by the people and the colony used the Westminster system where the government is the party or coalition that exerts a majority in the House of Assembly. In 1894, South Australia was the first Australian colony to allow women to vote and it had the first Parliament in the world to allow women to be elected as members. Catherine Helen Spence was the first woman in Australia to be a candidate for political office when she nominated to be one of South Australia's delegates to the constitutional conventions that drafted the Constitution. South Australia became an original state of the Commonwealth of Australia on 1 January 1901. The Parliament of South Australia consists of the South Australian Legislative Council and the South Australian House of Assembly. ... The Houses of Parliament, also known as the Palace of Westminster, in London. ... Catherine Helen Spence on the back of the 2001 Australian commemorative $5 note Catherine Helen Spence (31 October 1825 – 3 April 1910) was an Australian author, teacher, journalist, politician and leading suffragette. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Education

Education is compulsory for all children until the age of 16, however, the majority of students stay on to complete their South Australian Certificate of Education (SACE). School education is the responsibility of the South Australian government, but the public and private education systems are funded jointly by it and the Commonwealth Government. The South Australian Government provides, to schools on a per student basis, 89 percent of the total Government funding while the Commonwealth contributes 11 percent. Since the early 1970's it has been an ongoing controversy[7] that 68 percent of Commonwealth funding (increasing to 75% by 2008) goes to private schools that are attended by 32% of the states students.[8] Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The University of Adelaide (colloquially Adelaide University or Adelaide Uni) is a public university located in Adelaide. ... North Terrace, looking west from Kintore Avenue Adelaide in 1839 as viewed south-east from North Terrace North Terrace is a street in Adelaide, the capital city of South Australia. ... SACE logo The South Australian Certificate of Education (SACE) is the credential given to students who have completed Year 11 and Year 12 of their secondary schooling, in the state of South Australia, Australia. ... The Commonwealth of Australia is a federative constitutional monarchy under a parliamentary democracy. ...


From 1 January 2009, the school leaving age will be raised to 17.[9] is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


There are three universities in South Australia: University of Adelaide, Flinders University and University of South Australia . All are based in Adelaide, and Mount Gambier.[10] Carnegie Mellon University's Heinz School and "Entertainment Technology Center" have campuses in Adelaide.[11] The University of Adelaide (colloquially Adelaide University or Adelaide Uni) is a public university located in Adelaide. ... Flinders University, or The Flinders University of South Australia, is a public university in Adelaide, founded in 1966. ... UniSA redirects here. ... Mount Gambier is the second most populous city in South Australia after Adelaide, the capital of the State. ... Carnegie Mellon University (also known as CMU) is a private research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. ... The H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management (The Heinz School) at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA is one of the nations top-ranked public policy schools. ...


Tertiary vocational education is provided by TAFE South Australia colleges throughout the state. TAFE South Australia (TAFE SA) provides vocational education and training in South Australia. ...


See List of schools in South Australia for a list of and links to schools in South Australia. // Kalaya Childrens Centre, Queenstown, South Australia Kaurna Plains, Elizabeth, South Australia Preschool School Child Care Located in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Amata Anangu School, Amata, South Australia Ernabella Anangu School, Ernabella, South Australia Fregon Anangu School, Fregon, South Australia Indulkana Anangu School, Indulkana, South Australia Kenmore Park Anangu School...


Sport

Australian rules football is the most popular sport in South Australia. [1] The state has the highest participation rate of people taking part in Australian Football, with over 2.2% of the population aged 18 years and over participating in the sport.[12] South Australia fields two teams, the Adelaide Crows and Port Adelaide Power in the Australian Football League national competition. The Adelaide Crows have a membership base of 50,000,[13] higher than any of the other 15 teams in the competition. Both teams regularly draw large crowds. The South Australian National Football League, which owns the dedicated Australian Football stadium AAMI Stadium, is a popular local league comprising nine teams. Sport is an important part of the culture across Australia, with South Australia being no exception. ... High marking is a key skill and spectacular attribute of Australian rules football Precise field and goal kicking using the oval shaped ball is the key skill in Australian rules football Australian rules football, also known as Australian football, Aussie rules, or simply football or footy is a code of... The Adelaide Football Club, nicknamed the Crows, is an Australian rules football club playing in the Australian Football League, based in Adelaide, South Australia. ... This article is about the Australian Football League club. ... This article is about the national league in Australian rules football. ... The Adelaide Football Club, nicknamed the Crows, is an Australian rules football club playing in the Australian Football League, based in Adelaide, South Australia. ... The South Australian National Football League (SANFL) is the premier league and governing body for the sport of Australian rules football in the state of South Australia. ... AAMI Stadium, formerly known as Football Park, is an AFL stadium located in West Lakes, Adelaide, South Australia. ...


South Australia's soccer team in the new A-League is Adelaide United. Basketball also has a big following in South Australia with the Adelaide 36ers playing out an 8,070 seat stadium in Findon and winning four championships in the last 20 years in the National Basketball League (Australia). South Australia also has a cricket team, the Southern Redbacks, who play at Adelaide Oval in North Adelaide during the summer; however they have not won a title since 1996. The Redbacks currently have four players who hold a contract with Cricket Australia. Soccer redirects here. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Adelaide United Football Club are an Australian professional football club based in the city of Adelaide, South Australia. ... The Adelaide 36ers are Adelaides mens professional basketball team, established as the Adelaide City Eagles when they joined the National Basketball League (NBL) in 1982. ... The National Basketball League is Australias top-level professional basketball competition. ... The Southern Redbacks are an Australian first class cricket team based in Adelaide, South Australia. ... Cricket Australia logo Cricket Australia, formerly (and still often referred to as) the Australian Cricket Board, is the governing body for professional and amateur cricket in Australia. ...


Fifty Nine percent of children take part in organised sports. For boys, Soccer has the highest participation rate (22%) followed by Swimming (16%). For girls Netball is most popular (18%) followed by Swimming (16%).[14] Swimmer redirects here. ... A netball game in Australia Netball is a non-contact generally indoor sport similar to, and derived from, basketball. ...


Notable places

South Australian cities, towns, settlements and road network

Regions: Download high resolution version (799x929, 20 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: South Australia Birdsville Track List of South Australian highways User:Fikri/Maps Wikipedia:Australian Wikipedians notice board/Archive 8 Categories: GFDL images ... Download high resolution version (799x929, 20 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: South Australia Birdsville Track List of South Australian highways User:Fikri/Maps Wikipedia:Australian Wikipedians notice board/Archive 8 Categories: GFDL images ... South Australia General highways map of South Australia Highways of south eastern South Australia South Australia is distinctly divided into two main areas; the well watered and populated southeastern corner and the arid outback for the rest of the state. ...

Rivers: The Waterfall Gully waterfall in the Adelaide Foothills The Adelaide Hills are part of the Mount Lofty Ranges, east of the city of Adelaide in the state of South Australia. ... It has been suggested that Barossa Shiraz be merged into this article or section. ... The Clare township The Clare Valley is one of Australias oldest and most famous wine regions, and also one of the most scenic, presenting visitors with a series of small intimate valleys and magnificent views Settlers from England, Ireland and Poland first moved into the region during the 1840... Satellite photo of the Eyre Peninsula bushfires, taken on January 11 2005 Eyre Peninsula is a triangular peninsula in South Australia. ... The Fleurieu Peninsula is a picturesque peninsula located south of Adelaide in South Australia, Australia. ... Flinders Ranges is a national park in South Australia (Australia), 384 km north of Adelaide. ... Kangaroo Island is Australias third largest island - after Tasmania and Melville Island. ... The Limestone Coast is a recently adopted name for the region in the South East of South Australia. ... For the roadhouse along the Eyre Highway, see Nullarbor, South Australia NASA - Visible Earth, Nullarbor. ... The Riverland is a tourism and wine region in South Australia. ... The Yorke Peninsula is a peninsula located north-west and west of Adelaide in South Australia, Australia, between Spencer Gulf on the west and Gulf St. ...

Lakes: Cooper Creek Crossing in Innamincka, Strzelecki Desert, South Australia. ... The Marne River (34°42′ S 139°34′ E) is the major tributary from the eastern Mount Lofty Ranges into the Murray River in South Australia. ... For other uses, see Murray River (disambiguation). ... The Onkaparinga River runs from its source near Mount Torrens in the Mount Lofty Ranges, and flows south westerly to an estuary at Port Noarlunga. ... Port River is a river that runs through Port Adelaide, a part of the capital of South Australia, Adelaide. ... The River Torrens is the most significant river of the Adelaide Plains. ...

Islands: Lake Albert is a notionally fresh water lake near the mouth of the Murray River. ... Lake Alexandrina is a lake in South Australia, Australia. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Lake Frome (30°37′S 139°52′E) is a large endorheic lake in South Australia, east of the Flinders Ranges. ... Lake Gairdner (31°34′S 136°00′E) is a large endorheic lake in central South Australia, and is considered the fourth largest salt lake in Australia when it is flooded. ... Lake Torrens National Park in South Australia (Australia), is located 431 km north of Adelaide. ... The Blue Lake (37°50′S 140°46′E) in Mount Gambier is a large lake located in an extinct volcanic caldera. ...

Main Highways: Granite Island (35°33′S 138°37′E) is a small island next to Victor Harbor, South Australia, not far from South Australias Capital city, Adelaide. ... Hindmarsh Island (Kumarangk in Ngarrindjeri dialect) is an island in South Australia. ... Kangaroo Island is Australias third largest island - after Tasmania and Melville Island. ... The South Neptune Islands sit on a shelf 70 kilometres south-south east from Port Lincoln, in South Australia. ... Flinders Island ([1]) is an island in the Investigator Group off the coast of South Australia. ...

The Barrier Highway is a State highway in New South Wales, Australia. ... The Barossa Valley Highway (also known as Barossa Valley Way) is the main road linking most of the major towns of the Barossa Valley in South Australia. ... The Dukes Highway is an important highway corridor in South Australia which links the Australian cities of Adelaide and Melbourne. ... Named for Edward John Eyre the Eyre Highway is a highway linking Western Australia and South Australia. ... Flinders Highway connects the South Australian towns of Ceduna and Port Lincoln. ... Lincoln Highway links Port Augusta and Port Lincoln, both located in South Australia. ... Main North Road is a major road north from Adelaide in South Australia. ... The Mallee Highway (route B12) runs east from Tailem Bend in South Australia through cereal-growing farmland to Pinnaroo near the border with Victoria, where it crosses route B57 from Bordertown to Loxton. ... The Princes Highway is a segment of Australias Highway 1 that extends from Sydney to Adelaide, via Melbourne. ... Categories: Australian highways | South Australia | Australia geography stubs ... The Stuart Highway is one of Australias major roadways. ... The Sturt Highway, outside of Gawler, South Australia. ... South Eastern Freeway is a freeway linking Adelaide to Princes Highway near Swanport, South Australia. ... The Expressway near its start, at Marion. ...

See also

South Australia Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... For other uses, see Adelaide (disambiguation). ... This is a list of Local Government Areas of South Australia. ... South Australia General highways map of South Australia Highways of south eastern South Australia South Australia is distinctly divided into two main areas; the well watered and populated southeastern corner and the arid outback for the rest of the state. ... This is a list of town and locality names in South Australia outside of the metropolitan postal area of Adelaide. ... People from Adelaide are known as Adelaideans, and many have achieved renown. ... Proclamation Day is the South Australian public holiday that celebrates the proclamation of South Australia as a British colony. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Grass fire at Willunga. ... South Australian Ambulance Service (SAAS) is an independent organisation, dedicated to providing the highest levels of prehospital medical emergency care and patient transport in South Australia, Australia. ... Pie floater A pie floater is a meal served at pie carts in Adelaide and elsewhere in South Australia. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Australian cuisine. ... North Terrace, Adelaide - Cultural Precinct The Adelaide Festival of Arts is a prestigious arts festival held biannually in Adelaide, South Australia. ... South Australia The South Australian wine industry is responsible for more than half the production of all Australian wine. ...

References

  1. ^ Most Australians describe the body of water south of the continent as the Southern Ocean, rather than the Indian Ocean as officially defined by the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO). In 2000, a vote of IHO member nations defined the term "Southern Ocean" as applying only to the waters between Antarctica and 60 degrees south latitude.
  2. ^ Women and Politics in South Australia The State Library of South Australia
  3. ^ Highest Mountains. Geoscience Australia. Retrieved on 2006-05-28.
  4. ^ World temperature extremes (2005-10-17). Retrieved on 2006-05-28.
  5. ^ Inquiry into Local Government and Cost Shifting. Australian House of Representatives (2003). Retrieved on 2007-06-11.
  6. ^ Legislative Council 1843-1856. Parliament of South Australia (2005). Retrieved on 2006-05-28.
  7. ^ The Redefinition of Public Education
  8. ^ Ministerial Council National Report on Schooling in Australia
  9. ^ Owen, Michael. "School leaving age to be raised", The Advertiser, News Corp, 2006-05-22. Retrieved on 2006-05-28. 
  10. ^ Campuses and maps. University of South Australia (2006-03-15). Retrieved on 2006-05-28.
  11. ^ Welcome to ETC: Australia. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved on 2006-05-28.
  12. ^ source AuSport 2000
  13. ^ Adelaide Crows (2006-05-23). "50,000 milestone coming closer". Press release. Retrieved on 2006-05-28.
  14. ^ Australian Bureau of Statistics Children's Participation in Cultural and Leisure Activities PDF Doc
  • Dorothy Jauncey, Bardi Grubs and Frog Cakes — South Australian Words, Oxford University Press (2004) ISBN 0-19-551770-9

The Southern Ocean in Australia is defined differently than by some other countries. ... The International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) is an intergovernmental international organization established in 1921. ... Geoscience Australia is an agency of the Australian federal government. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Type Lower house Speaker of the House David Hawker, Liberal since November 16, 2004 Members 150 Political groups ALP (85) Liberal Party (53) National Party (10) Last elections 24 November 2007 Meeting place Parliament House, Canberra, ACT Web site House of Representatives Entrance to the House of Representatives Judicial High... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Parliament of South Australia consists of the South Australian Legislative Council and the South Australian House of Assembly. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Advertiser is the only local daily newspaper published in Adelaide, South Australia. ... News Corporation (NYSE: NWS) is a media conglomerate that operates world-wide. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... UniSA redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Carnegie Mellon University (also known as CMU) is a private research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Adelaide Football Club, nicknamed the Crows, is an Australian rules football club playing in the Australian Football League, based in Adelaide, South Australia. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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The history of South Australia details from the first human activity in the region, estimated at about 20 000 years ago to the current events of the 21st century. ... Flag Ratio: 1:2 The current state flag of South Australia, a state of Australia, was officially adopted in 1904. ... South Australia was the first colony in Australia to build a railway line. ... Grass fire at Willunga. ... The Waterfall Gully waterfall in the Adelaide Foothills The Adelaide Hills are part of the Mount Lofty Ranges, east of the city of Adelaide in the state of South Australia. ... It has been suggested that Barossa Shiraz be merged into this article or section. ... The Clare township The Clare Valley is one of Australias oldest and most famous wine regions, and also one of the most scenic, presenting visitors with a series of small intimate valleys and magnificent views Settlers from England, Ireland and Poland first moved into the region during the 1840... Satellite photo of the Eyre Peninsula bushfires, taken on January 11 2005 Eyre Peninsula is a triangular peninsula in South Australia. ... The Fleurieu Peninsula is a picturesque peninsula located south of Adelaide in South Australia, Australia. ... Flinders Ranges is a national park in South Australia (Australia), 384 km north of Adelaide. ... The Limestone Coast is a recently adopted name for the region in the South East of South Australia. ... The Mid North is a region of South Australia, north of the Adelaide Plains, but not as far north as the Far North, or outback. ... For the roadhouse along the Eyre Highway, see Nullarbor, South Australia NASA - Visible Earth, Nullarbor. ... The Riverland is a tourism and wine region in South Australia. ... The Yorke Peninsula is a peninsula located north-west and west of Adelaide in South Australia, Australia, between Spencer Gulf on the west and Gulf St. ... For other uses, see Adelaide (disambiguation). ... Port Augusta (32°29′ S 137°46′ E, population 15,250) is a town in South Australia. ... Mount Gambier is the second most populous city in South Australia after Adelaide, the capital of the State. ... The Murray Bridge that crosses the Murray River Driving across the bridge Murray Bridge () is a city in South Australia about 80 kilometres (50 miles) southeast of Adelaide and 1 hour drive north of Meningie. ... Port Lincoln (postcode 5606) is a city in the Australian state of South Australia. ... Port Pirie is a city located 224 kilometres north of Adelaide in South Australia. ... Rosetta Head, colloquially known as The Bluff, is one of the popular tourist attractions in the town. ... City Plaza, Hummock Hill in the background Location of Whyalla in South Australia (red) Whyalla (33°02′S 137°34′E) is a city and port located on the east coast of the Eyre Peninsula opposite Port Pirie in South Australia. ... The form of the Government of South Australia is prescribed in its Constitution, which dates from 1856, although it has been amended many times since then. ... Judicial High Court Lower Courts Constitution State and territory governments Executive Governors and Administrators Premiers and Chief Ministers Legislative Parliaments and Assemblies State electoral systems ACT - NSW - NT - Qld. ... See Governors of the Australian states for a description and history of the office of Governor. ... This is a list of Premiers of South Australia. ... Image File history File links South_Australia_coa. ... A legislature is a governmental deliberative body with the power to adopt laws. ... The Parliament of South Australia consists of the South Australian Legislative Council and the South Australian House of Assembly. ... The House of Assembly, or lower house, is one of the two chambers of parliament in the Australian state of South Australia. ... This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 2006 to 2010, as elected at the 2006 state election. ... The South Australian House of Assembly is made up of 47 single-member electoral districts consisting of approximately the same number of enrolled voters. ... The Legislative Council chamber circa 1939 The Legislative Council, or upper house, is one of the two chambers of parliament in the Australian state of South Australia. ... This is a list of members of the South Australian Legislative Council, as elected at the 2006 state election: 1 There are still two unfilled seats that must be filled by casual vacancies. ... This is a list of state elections in South Australia. ... This is a list of Premiers of South Australia. ... Parliamentary elections for both houses of the Parliament of South Australia were held in South Australia in 1965, whilst the state was still under the electoral malapportionment coined as the Playmander. ... Parliamentary elections for both houses of the Parliament of South Australia were held in South Australia in 1968, which saw Steele Hall and the Liberal and Country League opposition defeat the incumbent Australian Labor Party led by Don Dunstan, despite that Labor won 53. ... Parliamentary elections for both houses of the Parliament of South Australia were held in South Australia in 1970, which saw Don Dunstan and the Australian Labor Party opposition defeat the incumbent Liberal and Country League led by Steele Hall, in part due to electoral reforms that were implemented after the... Parliamentary elections for both houses of the Parliament of South Australia were held in South Australia in 1973, which saw Don Dunstan and the Australian Labor Party win a second successive term, against the Liberal and Country League (LCL) led by was Bruce Eastick. ... Parliamentary elections for both houses of the Parliament of South Australia were held in South Australia in 1975, which saw Don Dunstan and the Australian Labor Party win a third successive term against the Liberal Party of Australia opposition led by Bruce Eastick and the more progressive Liberal Movement. ... Parliamentary elections for the lower house of the Parliament of South Australia were held in South Australia in 1977, which saw Don Dunstan and the Australian Labor Party win a fourth successive term, against the Liberal Party of Australia opposition lead by David Tonkin. ... Parliamentary elections for both houses of the Parliament of South Australia were held in South Australia in 1979, which saw David Tonkin and the Liberal party defeat the incumbent Australian Labor Party led by Des Corcoran, after being premier for only seven months after Don Dunstans sudden resignation due to... Parliamentary elections for both houses of the Parliament of South Australia were held in South Australia in 1982, which saw John Bannon and the Australian Labor Party defeat the incumbent Liberal Party of Australia led by David Tonkin, after one term in power. ... Parliamentary elections for both houses of the Parliament of South Australia were held in South Australia on December 7, 1985, which saw John Bannon and the Australian Labor Party win a second successive term, against the Liberal Party of Australia opposition led by John Olsen. ... Parliamentary elections for both houses of the Parliament of South Australia were held in South Australia in 1989, which saw John Bannon and the Australian Labor Party win a third successive term, against the Liberal Party of Australia opposition led by John Olsen, despite only gaining 48. ... Parliamentary elections on 11 December 1993 for both houses of the Parliament of South Australia were held in South Australia, which saw Dean Brown and the Liberal Party of Australia defeat the incumbent Australian Labor Party led by Lynn Arnold who was premier for one year after John Bannons... Legislative elections for State Parliament were held in South Australia on 11 October 1997. ... Legislative elections for Parliament of South Australia were held in South Australia on 9 February 2002. ... The general election for the 51st Parliament of South Australia was held in the state of South Australia on 18 March 2006, and was conducted by the independent State Electoral Office. ... The judiciary, also referred to as the judicature, consists of justices, judges and magistrates among other types of adjudicators. ... High Court entrance The High Court of Australia is the final court of appeal in Australia, the highest court in the Australian court hierarchy. ... The Supreme Court of South Australia building from Victoria Square. ... The District Court of South Australia is South Australias principal trial court. ... The Magistrates Court building. ... The Coroners Court is housed in the Adelaide Magistrates Court building. ... The states and territories of Australia make up the Commonwealth of Australia under a federal system of government. ... Capital Canberra Government Constitutional monarchy Administrator none Chief Minister Jon Stanhope (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 2  - Senate seats 2 Gross Territorial Product (2006)  - Product ($m)  $19,167 (6th)  - Product per capita  $57,303/person (1st) Population (End of November 2006)  - Population  333,667 (7th)  - Density  137. ... NSW redirects here. ... For similar terms, see Northern Territories (disambiguation) Slogan or Nickname: The Territory, The NT, The Top End Motto(s): none Other Australian states and territories Capital Darwin Government Constitutional monarchy Administrator Ted Egan Chief Minister Clare Martin (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 2  - Senate seats 2 Gross Territorial Product (2004... Slogan or Nickname: Sunshine State, Smart State Motto(s): Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Anna Bligh (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd... Slogan or Nickname: Island of Inspiration; The Apple Isle; Holiday Isle Motto(s): Ubertas et Fidelitas (Fertility and Faithfulness) Other Australian states and territories Capital Hobart Government Constitutional monarchy Governor William Cox Premier Paul Lennon (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 5  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product... VIC redirects here. ... Slogan or Nickname: Wildflower State or the Golden State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Ken Michael Premier Alan Carpenter (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 15  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2005-06)  - Product ($m)  $107,910 (4th)  - Product per capita  $53,134/person... The Jervis Bay Territory is a territory of the Commonwealth of Australia. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Australian Antarctic Territory (AAT) is the part of Antarctica claimed by Australia. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
South Australia - MSN Encarta (580 words)
South Australia is a state of Australia in the southern central part of the country.
South Australia, state in south-central Australia, bounded on the north by the Northern Territory, on the northeast by Queensland, on the east by New South Wales and Victoria, on the south by the Indian Ocean, and on the west by Western Australia.
The interior of South Australia is sparsely populated; most of the state’s population is concentrated in the fertile coastal areas and in the valley of the Murray.
South Australia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1574 words)
South Australia is a state of Australia in the southern central part of the country.
South Australia's south coast is flanked by the Southern Ocean.
South Australia is a constitutional monarchy with the Queen of Australia as the head of state.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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