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Encyclopedia > Sour Grapes
Look up sour grapes in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Sour grapes is the false denial of desire for something sought but not acquired; to denigrate and feign disdain for that which one could not attain. This metaphor originated from the fable The Fox and the Grapes by Aesop, where the protagonist fox fails to reach some grapes hanging high up on a vine, retreats, and says that the grapes are sour anyway. The phenomenon has been seen as a challenge to the rational-actor view within the social sciences, with its significance debated by scholars such as Jon Elster and Steven Lukes. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Fox and the Grapes is a fable attributed to Aesop. ... The Fox and the Grapes is a fable attributed to Aesop. ... Aesop, as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle by Hartmann Schedel in 1493. ... Rational choice theory assumes human behavior is guided by instrumental reason. ... Jon Elster (born 1940) is a Norwegian social and political theorist who has authored works in the philosophy of social science and rational choice theory. ... Professor Steven Michael Lukes, D.Phil. ...


The phrase is sometimes also used to refer to one expressing, in an unsportsmanlike or ungracious way, anger or frustration at having failed to acquire something (i.e. being a "sore loser"), regardless of whether the party denies their desire for the item. Not including the denial of desire is technically a slipshod extension of the metaphor because it is inconsistent with the phrase's origin in the fable and the notion of the grapes being declared "sour". [1] This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ...


References

  1. ^ Garner, B., A Dictionary of Modern American Usage, Oxford University Press, 1998 ISBN 0-19-507853-5

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Fox and the Grapes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (387 words)
The Fox and the Grapes is a fable attributed to Aesop.
The English idiom "sour grapes" - derived from this fable - refers to the denial of one's desire for something that one fails to acquire or to the person who holds such denial.
The word "sour" was probably chosen by the translators in Western Europe, writing during the Victorian era.
Sour grapes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (284 words)
The term sour grapes refers to the denial of one's desire for something that one fails to acquire.
This moral originated from the fable The Fox and the Grapes by Aesop.
Sour Grapes (cartoon character) is also the name of the female villian in the Strawberry Shortcake series, a children's animated series from the 1980's which has been reintroduced in the last few years.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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