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Encyclopedia > Soul to Soul (film)
Soul To Soul

Directed by Denis Sanders
Produced by Richard Bock, Tom Mosk
Written by {{{writer}}}
Starring {{{starring}}}
Music by {{{music}}}
Cinematography David Myers
Editing by {{{editing}}}
Distributed by {{{distributor}}}
Released 1971
First Screened {{{screened}}}
Running time 96 min.
Language English
Budget {{{budget}}}
Preceded by {{{preceded_by}}}
Followed by {{{followed_by}}}
IMDb profile

Soul To Soul was a concert held in Accra, Ghana on March 6. 1971 by an array of American R&B, soul, rock, and jazz musicians. It is also the name of a 1971 documentary film recording the concert. 1971 (MCMLXXI) is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Accra, population 1,970,400 (2005), is the capital of Ghana. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... The soul, according to many religious and philosophical traditions, is a self aware ethereal substance particular to a unique living being. ... Rock is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars, and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles, however saxophones have been omitted from newer subgenres of rock music since the 90s. ... Jazz master Louis Armstrong remains one of the most loved and best known of all jazz musicians. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ...


Concert

Ghana, after declaring its independence in 1957, had made a variety of efforts to connect with African-Americans, some of whom — including Maya Angelou, W.E.B. DuBois. and George Padmore — lived in the African nation for a time. In the mid 1960s, Angelou approached the government of Kwame Nkrumah and suggested bringing a number of African-American artists to Ghana for the annual independence celebrations. Nkrumah was deposed before action could be taken, but when the American father-son team of Ed Mosk and Tom Mosk approached the Ghana Arts Council in 1970 with an idea for a concert, the Council agreed. A massive 1970 concert by James Brown in Lagos, Nigeria had prompted the Mosks' confidence in the idea. 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... Maya Angelou Maya Angelou (born Marguerite Ann Johnson on April 4, 1928 in St. ... W. E. B. Du Bois William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963) was an African American civil rights activist, sociologist, historian, writer, editor, poet, freemason, and scholar. ... George Padmore (1902-1959), born Malcolm Nurse was a Trinidadian communist and later a leading Pan-Africanist with anti-communist sympathies. ... Kwame Nkrumah (September 21, 1909 – April 27, 1972) was an African anti-colonial leader, founder and first president of the modern Ghanaian state and one of the most influential Pan-Africanists of the 20th century. ... James Brown, known variously as: Soul Brother Number One, the Godfather of Soul, Mr. ... Map of Nigeria showing Lagos on the lower left Lagos is the largest city in Nigeria. ...


Of the musicians invited to perform, Wilson Pickett was by far the biggest star in Ghana, where he was known as "Soul Brother No. 2." (James Brown was, of course, Soul Brother No. 1.) Organizers also unsuccessfully sought performances by Americans Aretha Franklin, James Brown, Booker T & The MG's, Louis Armstrong and gospel singer Marion Williams. In addition, Fela Kuti was approached, but did not perform. Wilson Pickett (March 18, 1941 – January 19, 2006) was an African-American R&B and soul singer. ... Aretha Franklin Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an iconic American gospel, soul and R&B singer born in Memphis, Tennessee, but raised in Detroit, Michigan. ... James Brown, known variously as: Soul Brother Number One, the Godfather of Soul, Mr. ... Booker T. & the M.G.s is a soul band, most prominent in the 1960s and 1970s. ... Louis Daniel Armstrong (usually pronounced Louee in the French pronunciation with a silent s) (August 4, 1901 – July 6, 1971) (also known by the nicknames Satchmo and Pops) was an American jazz musician. ... Marion Williams (August 29, 1927 - July 2, 1994) was a legendary American gospel singer, often regarded as one of the most powerful voices in American music history. ... Fela Anikulapo Kuti (b. ...


The show was held in Black Star Square (now Independence Square) on the Gulf of Guinea and ran 14 hours, finishing at 6:45 a.m. with a gospel set by The Voices of East Harlem. The Gulf of Guinea is the part of the Atlantic southwest of Africa. ...


Several at the show remarked that Santana, despite having only one black member, played the most "African-sounding" music of the night. Some have argued that the band's merger of Latin rhythms with rock music strongly influenced the development of Afrobeat. Santana during concert in Barcelona 2003 Carlos Santana (born July 20, 1947) is a famous Mexican rock and roll guitarist, originally from Autlan de Navarro, Jalisco. ... Afrobeat is a combination of American funk rhythms fused with African percussion and vocal styles. ...


Musicians

The American artists were mostly African-American and represented a variety of musical styles: An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, American-African or simply black), is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...

The concert also featured performances by several Ghanaian acts: Wilson Pickett (March 18, 1941 – January 19, 2006) was an African-American R&B and soul singer. ... Tina Turner on the cover of her 1991 album Simply the Best Tina Turner (born Anna Mae Bullock on November 26, 1939) is an African American R&B, pop, rock and soul singer, Buddhist and occasional actress probably best known for her scorching performances with the Ike and Tina Turner... Les McCann (September 23, 1935, Lexington, KY) is jazzman who saw a great of success as a crossover artist. ... Eddie Harris (October 20, 1934–November 5, 1996), was an American jazz tenor saxophonist. ... The Staple Singers were a United States gospel, soul, and R&B singing group. ... Santana during concert in Barcelona 2003 Carlos Santana (born July 20, 1947) is a famous Mexican rock and roll guitarist, originally from Autlan de Navarro, Jalisco. ... Timbales (or tymbales) are shallow cylindrical single-headed drums, similar to single-headed tom-toms. ... Roberta Flack Roberta Flack (born February 10, 1939) is an American singer. ...

  • Guy Warren, a.k.a. "The Divine Drummer," also known as Kofi Ghanaba, one of the first African musicians to play alongside American jazz musicians
  • The Damas Choir, perhaps the nation's most prominent vocal group since the 1940s, led by Ishmael Adams
  • Charlotte Dada, sometimes spelled "Dadah" or "Daddah," best known in the West for her soul cover of The Beatles' "Don't Let Me Down"
  • Kwa Mensah, a pioneer in highlife music and the older palmwine style
  • The Kumasi Drummers, a group from the Ashanti Region
  • The Aliens, Ghana's best known rock band, sometimes known as The Psychedelic Aliens or The Magic Aliens
  • The Anansekromian Zounds, the house band for the Ghana Arts Council

In addition, Les McCann and Eddie Harris played part of their set with a Ghanaian calabash player and medicine man named Amoah Azangeo. Guy Warren (born Kofi Ghanaba, 1923 in Acra) was a Ghanaian musician, best known as the inventer of Afro-jazz and a member of The Tempos. ... Guy Warren (born Kofi Ghanaba, 1923 in Acra) was a Ghanaian musician, best known as the inventer of Afro-jazz and a member of The Tempos. ... The Beatles were a British rock music group from Liverpool, England held in very high regard for both their artistic achievements and their huge commercial success, and have amassed an enormous worldwide fanbase that continues to exist to this day. ... Highlife is a musical genre that originated in Ghana and Sierra Leone in the 1920s and spread to other West African countries. ... Ashanti may refer to: The Ashanti people, an ethnic group Ashanti, a region of Ghana Ashanti Shaquoya Douglas, a singer HMS Ashanti, two Royal Navy warships This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Binomial name Lagenaria siceraria (Molina) Standl. ...


While $50,000 was budgeted for paying the American performers, only $1,000 was set aside for the local musicians.


Film

The concert was filmed and released in August 1971. It featured extensive excerpts from the concert performances, along with documentary footage of the musicians interacting with local Ghanaians in the days before the show. The film played in limited release around the world for the next two years but was not a financial success and did not cover the costs of putting on the show. August is the eighth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ...


The film was eventually restored thanks to a program by The Grammy Foundation that seeks to preserve important films about music, and it debuted again in February 2004 at an event at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. It was released on DVD on August 24, 2004. The new release does not include any performances by Roberta Flack, who requested their removal. But it does include a soundtrack album on CD, which features tracks from all the Western performers excluding Santana and Flack, plus the Kumasi Drummers, the Damas Choir, and Kwa Mensah. It also includes a new song entitled "Soul To Soul (2004)" by Earl Thomas. Look up February in Wiktionary, the free dictionary February is the second month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Los Angeles County Museum of Art, also known as LACMA, is the official art museum of the County of Los Angeles, California. ... August 24 is the 236th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (237th in leap years), with 129 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Roberta Flack Roberta Flack (born February 10, 1939) is an American singer. ...


 
 

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