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Encyclopedia > Soul music
R&B and Soul Music Portal
Soul
Stylistic origins
Cultural origins
Typical instruments
Mainstream popularity International, 1960s through early 1980s
Derivative forms Funk - Disco- contemporary R&B- Quiet Storm
Subgenres
Deep Soul - Motown Sound - Psychedelic soul - Blue-eyed soul - Brown-eyed soul
Fusion genres
Neo soul - Soul blues - Spoken Word Soul
Regional scenes
Detroit soul - Memphis soul - Philly soul - Northern soul
Other topics
Soul Musicians

Soul music is a music genre that combines rhythm and blues and gospel music, originating in the United States.[1] According to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, soul is "music that arose out of the black experience in America through the transmutation of gospel and rhythm & blues into a form of funky, secular testifying."[2] Soul music can refer to one of the following: Soul music is a musical genre, essentially rhythm and blues, which grew out of the African-American gospel and blues traditions during the late 1950s and early 1960s in the United States. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Portal. ... Gospel music is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. ... Blues music redirects here. ... R&B redirects here. ... This article is about the state. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... In a symphony orchestra the horn section is the group of musicians who play the horn (sometimes referred to as the French horn). ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... This article is about the music genre. ... Contemporary R&B is a music genre of American popular music, the current iteration of the genre that began in the 1940s as rhythm and blues music. ... Smokey Robinsons 1975 hit single provided the name for the quiet storm radio programming format and the music category. ... Blue-eyed soul Detroit (Motown) soul and Northern soul Modern soul Southern soul Memphis soul Neo soul Philadelphia soul Psychedelic soul ... Deep Soul is a musical style of R&B music, coined by Dave Godin. ... The Motown Sound is a style of soul music with distinctive characteristics, including the use of tambourine along with drums, bass instrumentation, a distinctive melodic and chord structure, and a call and response singing style originating in gospel music. ... Psychedelic soul is a concept used to categorize music that featured elements of psychedelic rock and soul/funk music. ... Blue-eyed soul (also known as white soul) is a term used to describe R&B or soul music performed by white artists. ... Brown-eyed soul is a subgenre of Soul music or Rhythm and Blues created mainly by Latinos and Italian-Americans during the 1950s and thriving into the 1980s. ... Neo soul (also known as nu soul) is a music genre and an umbrella term for current soul music. ... Soul blues is a style of blues music developed in the early late 1960s and 1970s and combining eliments of soul music and urban contemporary music. ... Spoken Word Soul-An eclectic blend of Poetry, Jazz-funk, Electronica & acoustic Country soul music elements. ... The Motown Sound is a style of soul music with distinctive characteristics, including the use of tambourine along with drums, bass instrumentation, a distinctive melodical and chord structure, and a call and response singing style originating in gospel music. ... Memphis soul is stylish, funky, uptown soul music that is not as hard edged as Southern soul. ... For the American indoor football team, see Philadelphia Soul. ... The Verve see A Northern Soul This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This is a list of soul musicians who have either been influential within the genre, or have had a considerable amount of fame. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... R&B redirects here. ... Gospel music is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... Though most indigenous Africans possess relatively dark skin, they exhibit much variation in physical appearance. ... This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ...


The performance is very emotional, and the melody is decorated with improvisational additions, twirls and auxiliary sounds. Catchy rhythms, stressed by handclaps and plastic body moves, are an important feature.[1] Other characteristics are a call and response between the soloist and the chorus, and an especially tense vocal sound. [1] Musical improvisation is the spontaneous creative process of making music while it is being performed. ... In music, a call and response is a succession of two distinct phrases usually played by different musicians, where the second phrase is heard as a direct commentary on or response to the first. ...

Contents

Origins

Soul music has some of its roots in gospel music and rhythm and blues.[1]Many consider soul music to be a genre of music created by African Americans in northern United States inner cities, particularly Chicago.[citation needed] Other areas, such as Detroit and Memphis, Tennessee quickly followed and created their own regional soul music style, due to their gospel roots. Some of the elements from Chicago and other parts of the United States, such as the south, brought some raw unpolished funky talent to heavily-populated inner cities, where soul became polished and perfected. Gospel music is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. ... R&B redirects here. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ...


Sam Cooke, Nina Simone, Jackie Wilson, and Etta James were early popular stars of the music genre, and other soul forerunners include: Mahalia Jackson, Louis Jordan, and Big Joe Turner. Some of the earliest soul artists included Ray Charles, Little Richard, Fats Domino and James Brown, although all were happy to call themselves rock and roll performers at the time. During the 1960s Beatles boom, both Charles and Brown claimed that they had always really been R&B singers. Little Richard proclaimed himself the "king of rockin' and rollin', rhythm and blues soulin'", because his music embodied elements of all three, and because he inspired artists in all three genres. Solomon Burke's early recordings for Atlantic Records codified the soul style, and his early 1960s songs "Cry to Me", "Just Out of Reach" and "Down in the Valley" are considered classics of the genre. Peter Guralnick writes, "it was only with the coming together of Burke and Atlantic Records that you could see anything resembling a movement."[citation needed] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Eunice Kathleen Waymon, better known by her stage name Nina Simone (IPA: ninɐ sʌmɞnɑ) (February 21, 1933 – April 21, 2003), was a fifteen-time Grammy Award-nominated American singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger and civil rights activist. ... For the British author, see Jacqueline Wilson. ... Etta James (born Jamesetta Hawkins on January 25, 1938) is an American blues, soul, R&B, and jazz singer and songwriter. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mahalia Jackson (October 26, 1911[1] – January 27, 1972) was an American Grammy Award-winning gospel singer, widely regarded as the best in the history of the genre and is the first Queen of Gospel Music. Mahalia Jackson became one of the most influential gospel singers in the world. ... Louis Jordan swinging on sax, Paramount Theatre, NYC, 1946 (Photo: William P. Gottlieb) Louis Jordan (July 8, 1908 – February 4, 1975) was a pioneering African-American blues, jazz and rhythm & blues musician and songwriter who enjoyed his greatest popularity from the late 1930s to the early 1950s. ... Big Joe Turner (born Joseph Vernon Turner Jr. ... For Ray Charles, the composer and conductor of the Ray Charles Singers, see Ray Charles (composer). ... Richard Wayne Penniman (born December 5, 1932), better known by the stage name Little Richard, is an African-American singer, songwriter, and pianist, who began performing in the 1940s and was a key figure in the transition from rhythm & blues to rock and roll in the mid-1950s. ... Antoine Dominique Fats Domino (born February 26, 1928) is a classic R&B and rock and roll singer, songwriter and pianist. ... James Brown, known variously as: Soul Brother Number One, the Godfather of Soul, Mr. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Atlantic Records (Atlantic Recording Corporation) is an American record label, and operates as a wholly owned subsidiary of Warner Music Group. ... Peter Guralnick is a music critic and historian of American popular music. ...


An important center of soul music recording was Florence, Alabama, where the Fame Studios operated. Jimmy Hughes, Percy Sledge and Arthur Alexander recorded at Fame, and Aretha Franklin recorded in the area later in the 1960s. Fame Studios, often referred to as Muscle Shoals (after a town neighboring Florence), enjoyed a close relationship with Stax, and many of the musicians and producers who worked in Memphis contributed to recordings done in Alabama. Florence Florence city is the seat of Lauderdale County, which is situated in the northwest corner of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... Percy Sledge Percy Sledge (born November 25, 1941 in Leighton, Alabama) is a US-American R&B and soul performer. ... Arthur Alexander (May 10, 1940 - June 9, 1993), born in Florence, Alabama, was perhaps the biggest star to arise out of the American country-soul scene. ... Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... Muscle Shoals is a city located in Colbert County, Alabama, USA. As of the 2000 census, the population of the city is 11,924. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Another notable Memphis label was Goldwax Records, owned by Quinton Claunch. Goldwax signed O.V. Wright and James Carr, who went on to make several records that are considered essentials of the genre. Carr's "The Dark End of the Street" (written by Chips Moman and Dan Penn) was recorded at two other important Memphis studios, Royal Recording and American Sound Studios, in 1967. American Studios owner Chips Moman produced "The Dark End of the Street", and the musicians were his house band of Reggie Young, Bobby Woods, Tommy Cogbill and Gene Chrisman. Carr also made recordings at Fame Studios, utilizing musicians David Hood, Jimmy Johnson and Roger Hawkins. O.V. Wright was a soul singer who achieved fame working with producer Willie Mitchell in the 1960s and 1970s. ... James Carr (June 13, 1942 - January 7, 2001), was a United States soul music singer. ... The Dark End of the Street is a 1967 soul song written by Dan Penn and Chips Moman and first performed by James Carr. ... Lincoln Wayne Chips Moman is an American record producer, guitarist and songwriter, born 1936 in La Grange, Georgia. ... Wallace Daniel Pennington (16 November 1941 -) is an American singer, songwriter, record producer and sometime guitar player who co-wrote many soul hits of the 1960s including Dark End of the Street & Do Right Woman (with Chips Moman) and Out of Left Field & Cry Like A Baby (with Spooner Oldham). ... A house band is a group of musicians, centrally organized by a band leader, that regularly play a venue every night it is open for business and are synonymous with the establishment. ... Reggie Young has been the current trombonist with the funk group Earth, Wind, & Fire since 1987. ... David Hood is a world class bassist from Muscle Shoals, Alabama. ... Jimmy Johnson is a member of the legendary Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section that was attached to FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama for an extended period in the 60s and 70s. ...


Aretha Franklin's 1967 recordings, such as "I Never Loved a Man (The Way I Love You)", "Respect" (originally sung by Otis Redding), and "Do Right Woman-Do Right Man", are considered the apogee of the soul music genre, and were among its most commercially successful productions. During the late 1960s, Stax artists such as Eddie Floyd and Johnnie Taylor made significant contributions to soul music. Howard Tate's recordings in the late 1960s for Verve Records, and later for Atlantic (produced by Jerry Ragovoy) are another notable body of work in the soul genre. Respect is a 1967 hit and the signature song of the R&B singer Aretha Franklin, written and originally released by Volt recording artist Otis Redding in 1965. ... This article is about several astronomical terms (apogee & perigee, aphelion & perihelion, generic equivalents based on apsis, and related but rarer terms. ... Eddie Floyd (b. ... Johnnie Taylor on the cover of Eargasm Johnnie Harrison Taylor (born May 5, 1937, Crawfordsville, Arkansas; died May 31, 2000, Dallas, Texas) was an American vocalist in a wide variety of genres, from gospel, blues and soul to pop, doo-wop and disco. ... Howard Tate is an American soul music singer and songwriter. ... Verve Records is an American Jazz record label, founded by Norman Granz in 1956, which absorbed the catalogues of his earlier labels: Norgran Records and Clef Records (founded 1953). ...


Motown Records also contributed to the soul canon, although at the time, the Detroit-based label described itself as a manufacturer of pop music. Music by Motown artists such as Stevie Wonder, Gladys Knight, and Marvin Gaye did much to popularise the style, and the overall Motown sound did much to define what later became known as northern soul. In Chicago, Curtis Mayfield created the sweet soul sound that later earned him a reputation as the Godfather of northern soul. As a member of The Impressions, Mayfield infused a call and response style of group singing that resembled the gospel style, and influenced many other groups of the era. Motown Records, also known as Tamla-Motown outside of the United States, is a record label originally based out of Detroit, Michigan (Motor City, hence mo(tor)town), from where it achieved widespread international success. ... This article is about the genre of popular music. ... Stevie Wonder (born Stevland Hardaway Judkins on May 13, 1950, name later changed to Stevland Hardaway Morris)[1] is an American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and record producer. ... Gladys Maria Knight (born May 28, 1944 in Atlanta, Georgia, USA) is a seven-time Grammy Award-winning American R&B/soul singer, actress and author. ... Marvin Gaye (born Marvin Pentz Gay, Jr. ... The Verve see A Northern Soul This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Curtis Mayfield (June 3, 1942 – December 26, 1999) was an American soul, funk and R&B singer, songwriter and guitarist best known for his anthemic music with The Impressions and composing the soundtrack to the blaxploitation film Superfly. ... The Impressions are an American music group from Chicago that formed in 1958. ... The term Call and response may refer to Call and response -- a type of musical phrasing Call-and-response -- a type of communication Call and Response is a Californian pop band. ...


By 1968, the soul music movement had begun to splinter, as James Brown and Sly & the Family Stone began to evolve both soul and rhythm and blues into other forms. Guralnick argues that, "More than anything else, though, what seems to me to have brought the era of soul to a grinding, unsettling halt was the death of Martin Luther King in April of 1968."[citation needed] we still listen to soul today and is heard all throughout the world! For other persons named James Brown, see James Brown (disambiguation). ... Sly & the Family Stone was an American rock band from San Francisco, California. ...


1970s

Later examples of soul music include recordings by The Staple Singers (such as I'll Take You There), and Al Green's 1970s recordings,done at Willie Mitchell's' Royal Recording in Memphis. Mitchell's Hi Records continued the Stax tradition in that decade, releasing many hits by Green, Ann Peebles, Otis Clay, O.V. Wright and Syl Johnson. Bobby Womack, who recorded with Chips Moman in the late 1960s, continued to produce soul recordings in the 1970s and 1980s. The Staple Singers were a United States gospel, soul, and R&B singing group. ... This article is about the singer. ... Willie Mitchell is a soul, R&B, rock and roll, pop and funk music producer and arranger who runs Royal Recording in Memphis, Tennessee. ... High Records was a Memphis soul and rockabilly label started by singer Ray Harris, record store owner Joe Cuoghi, Bill Cantrell, and Quinton Claunch in 1957. ... Ann Peebles is an internationally acclaimed singer and songwriter best known for her popular Memphis soul albums of the 1970s on the Hi Records label. ... Syl Johnson (b Sylvester Thompson, 1 July 1936, Holly Springs, Mississippi) is an American blues and soul singer. ... Bobby Womack (born Robert Dwayne Womack, 4 March 1944, in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.) is an American singer, guitarist and songwriter. ...


In Detroit, producer Don Davis worked with Stax artists such as Johnnie Taylor and The Dramatics. Early 1970s recordings by The Detroit Emeralds, such as Do Me Right, are a link between soul and the later disco style. Motown Records artists such as Marvin Gaye and Smokey Robinson contributed to the evolution of soul music, although their recordings were considered more in a pop music vein than those of Redding, Franklin and Carr. Although stylistically different from classic soul music, recordings by Chicago-based artists such as Jerry Butler and The Chi-Lites are often considered part of the genre. Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... The name Don Davis may refer to one of the following people: Don S. Davis - an actor who is known for his roles in Stargate SG-1 and Twin Peaks Don Davis - a composer who is known for his scores for films like The Matrix Don Davis - an astronomer who... The Dramatics was a soul music vocal group, formed in the late 1960s. ... This article is about the music genre. ... Motown Records, also known as Tamla-Motown outside of the United States, is a record label originally based out of Detroit, Michigan (Motor City, hence mo(tor)town), from where it achieved widespread international success. ... Marvin Gaye (born Marvin Pentz Gay, Jr. ... William Smokey Robinson, Jr. ... This article is about the genre of popular music. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Jerry Butler Jerry Butler, Jr. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


By the early 1970s, soul music had been influenced by psychedelic rock and other genres. The social and political ferment of the times inspired artists like Gaye and Curtis Mayfield to release album-length statements with hard-hitting social commentary. Artists like James Brown led soul towards funk music, which became typified by 1970s bands like Parliament-Funkadelic and The Meters. More versatile groups like War, the Commodores and Earth, Wind and Fire became popular around this time. During the 1970s, some slick and commercial blue-eyed soul acts like Philadelphia's Hall & Oates and Oakland's Tower of Power achieved mainstream success, as did a new generation of street-corner harmony or city-soul groups like The Delfonics and Howard University's Unifics. Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... Curtis Mayfield (June 3, 1942 – December 26, 1999) was an American soul, funk and R&B singer, songwriter and guitarist best known for his anthemic music with The Impressions and composing the soundtrack to the blaxploitation film Superfly. ... James Brown, known variously as: Soul Brother Number One, the Godfather of Soul, Mr. ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... ... The Meters were a band that performed and recorded from the late 1960s until 1977. ... War was a multiracial, multicultural American funk band of the 1970s from Southern California, known for the hit songs Low Rider and Why Cant We Be Friends?. Formed in 1969, War was the first and most successful musical crossover, fusing elements of rock, funk, jazz, Latin music, R&B... The Commodores were a highly successful funk/soul band of the 1970s and 1980s. ... Earth, Wind & Fire was a legendary American funk band, formed in Chicago in 1969. ... Blue-eyed soul (also known as white soul) is a term used to describe R&B or soul music performed by white artists. ... Hall & Oates is a popular music duo made up of Daryl Hall & John Oates. ... For the episode of the 1987 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles cartoon TV series, see Tower of Power (TMNT 1987 episode). ... The Delfonics are a quintessential Philadelphia soul singing group, most popular in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ...


By the end of the 1970s, disco and funk were dominating the charts. Philly soul and most other soul genres were dominated by disco-inflected tracks. During this period, groups like The O'Jays and The Spinners continued to turn out hits. This article is about the music genre. ... The OJays is a popular Philadelphia soul group, originally consisting of Walter Williams (born August 25, 1942), Bill Isles, Bobby Massey, William Powell (January 20, 1942 - May 26, 1977) and Eddie Levert (born June 16, 1942). ... The Spinners are a Detroit, Michigan -based soul band popular in the 1960s and 1970s. ...


1980s and later

The emergence of hip hop culture in the late 1970s greatly influenced the soul music that followed in the 1980s. With Afrika Bambaata & The Soulsonic Force enjoying huge hits with beat-heavy tracks like "Planet Rock" and "Looking For The Perfect Beat", soul music-makers realised they would have to make their beats bigger, and also find a way of fusing soul and hip hop music. Production teams like James 'Jimmy Jam' Lewis and Terry Harris (former members of The Time), L.A. (Reid) and Babyface created a harder but also lusher almost epic soul sound, providing endless hits for Janet Jackson, Alexander O'Neal, The SOS Band and Bobby Brown. Writer/producer Teddy Riley and others created something called new jack swing (also known as swingbeat), which fused soul and hip hop. This sound provided hits for acts like Guy, Boyz II Men, Wreckx-n-Effect and Bell Biv DeVoe. Hip hop is a subculture, which is said to have begun with the work of DJ Kool Herc, Grandmaster Flash & the Furious Five, and Afrika Bambaattaa. ... Afrika Bambaataa (born April 10, 1960) is a DJ and community leader from the South Bronx, who in the late 1970s, was instrumental in the early development of hip hop. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... The Time may refer to: The Time, a funk band of the 80s associated with Prince Or may be a typo for: The Times of London The New York Times This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Kenneth Babyface Edmonds (born April 10, 1958 in Indianapolis, Indiana) is an R&B and pop singer, songwriter, keyboardist, record producer, film producer, and entreprenuer. ... This article is about the singer. ... Alexander ONeal (born November 14, 1953 in Natchez, Mississippi) is an American singer. ... The SOS Band is an American musical ensemble, founded in Atlanta, Georgia in 1977. ... This article is about the R&B singer. ... Teddy Riley is the name of more than one person of note. ... New Jack Swing, or swingbeat[1], is a hybrid style popular from the late-1980s into the mid-1990s, which fuses hip-hop with rhythms, samples and production techniques with the urban contemporary sound of R&B. The new jack swing style developed as many previous R&B styles did... Guy is a popular 1980s and 1990s hip-hop, R&B and soul band that was one of the early pioneers of hip-hop/R&B music and which set a trend in the late 1980s and early 1990s in a movement called the New Jack Swing. ... Boyz II Men is a four-time Grammy Award-winning American R&B/soul singing group from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Wreckx-N-Effect was a New Jack Swing band, that had their only hit Rump Shaker, in 1992. ... Bell Biv DeVoe was a successful splinter group of New Edition that consisted of three previous members, Ricky Bell (also known as Slick), Michael Bivins (also known as Biv), and Ronnie DeVoe (also known as R.D.). // Bell Biv DeVoe began to take shape in the late 80s, but not...


After the death of disco and funk in the early 1980s, soul music survived for a short time before going through another metamorphosis. With the introduction of influences from electro music and funk, soul music became less raw and more slickly produced, resulting in a newer genre that was called R&B, (often known as contemporary R&B), which sounded very different from the original rhythm and blues style. Electro, short for electro funk (also known as robot hip hop and Electro hop) is an electronic style of hip hop directly influenced by Kraftwerk and funk records (unlike earlier rap records which were closer to disco). ... Contemporary R&B is a music genre of American popular music, the current iteration of the genre that began in the 1940s as rhythm and blues music. ... R&B redirects here. ...


In early 1980s Chicago, a new dance genre called house was heavily influenced by soul, funk and disco. This was mainly made using synthesizers and other electronic equipment. House and techno rose to mainstream popularity in the late 1980s and remained popular in the 1990s and 2000s. House music is a style of electronic dance music that was developed by dance club DJs in Chicago in the early to mid-1980s. ... The term synthesiser is also used to mean frequency synthesiser, an electronic system found in communications. ... For the comic book character previously known as Techno, see Fixer (comics). ...


Also starting in the 1980s, soul music from the United Kingdom become popular worldwide, with artists such as Soul To Soul, Loose Ends, Imagination, Mica Paris and Sade. British soul music became very popular in the 2000s too with artists such as Joss Stone, Terri Walker, Beverley Knight, Corrine Bailey Rae, Adele, Duffy, Amy Winehouse and the Brand New Heavies achieving great success. Soul To Soul album cover Released by Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble in 1985. ... Loose Ends was a successful English R&B band that had several urban contemporary hits. ... For other uses, see Imagination (disambiguation). ... Mica Paris (born Michelle Wallen on April 27, 1969 in London, England) is an English singer. ... Sade can mean: Sade (movie) starring French actor Daniel Auteuil. ... Joss Stone (born Joscelyn Eve Stoker on 11 April 1987) is a British soul, R&B, and blues singer, songwriter, and occasional actress who emerged to fame in late 2003 with her debut album, The Soul Sessions, which was certified triple platinum by the BPI, and was announced as one... Terri Walker is a British soul singer. ... Beverley Knight MBE (born March 22, 1973) is a critically-acclaimed English soul and R&B singer, songwriter, and record producer who released her debut album in 1995. ... Corinne Bailey Rae (born 26 February 1979) is an acclaimed English singer and songwriter who released her eponymous debut album in February 2006. ... Adele Laurie Blue Adkins (born 5 May 1988 in Enfield, North London),[1] known professionally as Adele, is an English soul and jazz singer. ... Amy-Jade Winehouse (born 14 September 1983) is an English soul, jazz, R&B singer and songwriter. ... The Brand New Heavies are an acid jazz and funk group formed in 1985 in Ealing, a suburb of London, England. ...


The United States saw the development of neo-soul around 1994. Mainstream record label marketing support for soul genres cooled in the 2000s due to the industry's re-focus on hip hop. Neo soul (also known as nu soul) is a music genre and an umbrella term for current soul music. ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ...


Soul subgenres

Detroit (Motown) soul

For more details on these topics, see Motown Records and Motown Sound.

Dominated by Berry Gordy's Motown Records empire, Detroit soul is strongly rhythmic, and influenced by gospel music. The Motown Sound often includes hand clapping, a powerful bass line, violins, bells and other untraditional instruments. Motown's house band was The Funk Brothers, and singers included: Marvin Gaye, The Temptations, Smokey Robinson & the Miracles, Gladys Knight & the Pips, Martha Reeves & the Vandellas, The Marvelettes, Mary Wells, Diana Ross & the Supremes, The Jackson 5, The Four Tops and Stevie Wonder. Songwriters included: Holland-Dozier-Holland, Norman Whitfield, Barrett Strong, Smokey Robinson, Nickolas Ashford & Valerie Simpson, Ivy Jo Hunter, Roger Penzabene, and Stevie Wonder. Motown Records, also known as Tamla-Motown outside of the United States, is a record label originally based out of Detroit, Michigan (Motor City, hence mo(tor)town), from where it achieved widespread international success. ... The Motown Sound is a style of soul music with distinctive characteristics, including the use of tambourine along with drums, bass instrumentation, a distinctive melodic and chord structure, and a call and response singing style originating in gospel music. ... Berry Gordy, Jr. ... Motown Records, also known as Tamla-Motown outside of the United States, is a record label originally based out of Detroit, Michigan (Motor City, hence mo(tor)town), from where it achieved widespread international success. ... The Motown Sound is a style of soul music with distinctive characteristics, including the use of tambourine along with drums, bass instrumentation, a distinctive melodic and chord structure, and a call and response singing style originating in gospel music. ... A clap is the sound made by striking together two flat surfaces, as in the body parts of humans or animals. ... For the Anne Rice novel, see Violin (novel). ... A bell is a simple sound-making device. ... The Funk Brothers was the nickname given to a group of Detroit, Michigan, session musicians who performed on the backing tracks to most Motown Records recordings from 1959 until 1972, when the company moved to Los Angeles. ... Marvin Gaye (born Marvin Pentz Gay, Jr. ... “Temptations” redirects here. ... Smokey Robinson (born February 19, 1940) is an American R&B and soul singer and songwriter. ... The Pips redirects here. ... Martha and the Vandellas were an American Motown group of the 1960s. ... The Marvelettes was an American singing girl group on the Motown label. ... Mary Esther Wells (May 13, 1943 – July 26, 1992) was an American soul, R&B, and pop singer. ... Reissue album cover showing The Supremes in 1966. ... The Jackson 5 (also spelled The Jackson Five or The Jackson 5ive, abbreviated as J5, and later known as The Jacksons) was an American popular music quintet (and briefly a sextet and quartet) from Gary, Indiana. ... The Four Tops are an American vocal quartet, whose repertoire has included doo-wop, jazz, soul music, R&B, disco, adult contemporary, and showtunes. ... Stevie Wonder (born Stevland Hardaway Judkins on May 13, 1950, name later changed to Stevland Hardaway Morris)[1] is an American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and record producer. ... Holland-Dozier-Holland is a songwriting and production team made up of Lamont Dozier and brothers Brian Holland and Edward Holland, Jr. ... Norman Whitfield Norman Jesse Whitfield (born in Harlem, New York in 1943) was a songwriter and producer for Berry Gordys Motown label during the 1960s. ... Barrett Strong (born February 5, 1941 in West Point, Mississippi) is an African-American singer and songwriter. ... William Smokey Robinson, Jr. ... Nickolas Ashford (born May 4, 1942, in Fairfield, South Carolina) and Valerie Simpson (born August 26, 1946 in The Bronx, New York) are a successful songwriting/production team, as well as being recording artists in their own right. ... Ivy Jo Hunter (born George Ivy Hunter) was a songwriter and record producer for the Motown label. ... Roger Penzabene was an African American songwriter for the Motown label. ... Stevie Wonder (born Stevland Hardaway Judkins on May 13, 1950, name later changed to Stevland Hardaway Morris)[1] is an American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and record producer. ...


Deep soul and southern soul

For more details on this topic, see Deep soul and Southern soul

The terms deep soul and southern soul generally refer to a driving, energetic soul style combining R&B's energy with pulsating southern United States gospel music sounds. Memphis, Tennessee label Stax Records nurtured a distinctive sound, which included putting vocals further back in the mix than most contemporary R&B records, using vibrant horn parts in place of background vocals, and a focus on the low end of the frequency spectrum. The vast majority of Stax releases were backed by house bands Booker T and the MGs (with Booker T. Jones, Steve Cropper, Duck Dunn, and Al Jackson) and the Memphis Horns (the splinter horn section of the Mar-Keys). The label counted Otis Redding, Carla Thomas, Sam & Dave, Rufus Thomas, William Bell, and Eddie Floyd among its stars. Deep Soul is a musical style of R&B music, coined by Dave Godin. ... Southern soul is a style of music that falls within the larger soul music and r&b Music genres. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... Gospel music is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... Stax Records is an American record label, originally based out of Memphis, Tennessee. ... Booker T. & the M.G.s is a soul band, most prominent in the 1960s and 1970s. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Steve The Colonel Cropper (born October 21, 1941) is an American guitarist, songwriter, producer, and soul musician. ... Donald Duck Dunn (born November 24, 1941) is a bassist, producer, and songwriter. ... This article needs cleanup. ... The Mar-Keys, formed in 1958, were a studio session band for the Stax label from Memphis, Tennessee in the 1960s. ... Otis Ray Redding, Jr. ... Carla Thomas (born December 21, 1942 in Memphis, Tennessee) is often referred to as the Queen of Memphis Soul. ... Samuel David Moore (b. ... Rufus 1990 album for Alligator Records, That Woman Is Poison! Rufus Thomas (March 26, 1917 – December 15, 2001) was a rhythm and blues and soul singer from Memphis, Tennessee, who recorded on Sun Records in the 1950s and on Stax Records in the 1960s and 1970s. ... Eddie Floyd (b. ...


Memphis soul

For more details on this topic, see Memphis soul.

Memphis soul is a shimmering, sultry style of soul music produced in the 1960s and 1970s at Stax Records and Hi Records in Memphis, Tennessee. It featured melancholic and melodic horns, organ, bass, and drums, as heard in recordings by Hi's Al Green and Stax's Booker T. & the M.G.'s. The latter group also sometimes played in the harder-edged Southern soul style. The Hi Records house band (Hi Rhythm Section) and producer Willie Mitchell developed a surging soul style heard in the label's 1970s hit recordings. Some Stax recordings fit into this style, but had their own unique sound. Memphis soul is stylish, funky, uptown soul music that is not as hard edged as Southern soul. ... Stax Records is an American record label, originally based out of Memphis, Tennessee. ... High Records was a Memphis soul and rockabilly label started by singer Ray Harris, record store owner Joe Cuoghi, Bill Cantrell, and Quinton Claunch in 1957. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the singer. ... For other people known as Booker T., see Booker T. Booker T. & the MGs is a soul band, most prominent in the 1960s and 1970s. ... Southern soul is a style of music that falls within the larger soul music and r&b Music genres. ... The Hi Rhythm Section was the house band for hit soul albums by several artists, including Al Green and Ann Peebles, on Willie Mitchells Hi Records label in the 1970s. ... Willie Mitchell is a soul, r&b, rock and roll, pop and funk music producer and arranger who runs Royal Recording in Memphis, Tennessee. ...


Philadelphia soul

For more details on this topic, see Philadelphia soul.

Based primarily in the Philadelphia International record label, Philadelphia soul (AKA Philly Soul) had a lush orchestral sound and doo-wop-inspired vocals. Thom Bell, and Kenneth Gamble & Leon Huff are considered the founders of Philadelphia soul, which was dominated by artists such as The Spinners, The Delfonics, The O'Jays, The Stylistics, The Intruders, Patti LaBelle, MFSB, The Three Degrees, Daryl Hall & John Oates, Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes, McFadden & Whitehead and, for a time, The Temptations. Conference National Division Eastern Year founded 2004 Home arena Wachovia Center & Wachovia Spectrum(alt. ... Philadelphia International Records is a record label founded by Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff in 1971. ... Orchestra at City Hall (Edmonton). ... Doo-wop is a style of vocal-based rhythm and blues music popular in the mid-1950s to the early 1960s in America. ... For other people with similar names, see Tom Bell and Thomas Bell. ... Kenneth Gamble (born on August 11, 1943 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) and Leon Huff (born in 1942 in Camden, New Jersey) are an American songwriting and record production team. ... The Spinners are a Detroit, Michigan-based soul vocal group active since 1954 (see 1954 in music), and most popular during the 1970s. ... The Delfonics are a quintessential Philadelphia soul singing group, most popular in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... The OJays is a popular Philadelphia soul group, originally consisting of Walter Williams (born August 25, 1942), Bill Isles, Bobby Massey, William Powell (January 20, 1942 - May 26, 1977) and Eddie Levert (born June 16, 1942). ... The Stylistics was one of the best-known Philadelphia soul groups of the 1970s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Patti LaBelle (born May 24, 1944) is an American R&B, soul singer and songwriter. ... MFSB (short for, officially, Mother, Father, Sister, Brother, although some claimed that it actually stood for Mother Fuckin SonovaBitch, according to the book Last Night A DJ Saved My Life [Bill Brewster and Frank Broughton, Grove Press, 2000, ISBN 0-8021-3688-5]) were a loose conglomeration of studio musicians... The Three Degrees The Three Degrees are a female Philly soul and disco vocal musical group formed in 1963 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Daryl Hall and John Oates. ... Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes were an American singing group, one of the most popular Philadelphia soul groups of the 1970s. ... McFadden and Whitehead were an American songwriting, production, and recording duo, best known for their signature tune Aint No Stoppin Us Now. They wrote and produced some of the most popular R&B hits of the 1970s, and were primarily associated with Gamble and Huffs Philadelphia International soul... “Temptations” redirects here. ...


Psychedelic soul

For more details on this topic, see Psychedelic soul.

Psychedelic soul was a blend of psychedelic rock and soul music in the late 1960s, which paved the way for the mainstream emergence of funk music a few years later. Principal figures included multicultural band Sly & the Family Stone, Curtis Mayfield, The Fifth Dimension, and (with producer Norman Whitfield) The Temptations and The Undisputed Truth. Psychedelic soul is a concept used to categorize music that featured elements of psychedelic rock and soul/funk music. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... The term multiculturalism generally refers to a state of both cultural and ethnic diversity within the demographics of a particular social space. ... Sly & the Family Stone was an American rock band from San Francisco, California. ... Curtis Mayfield (June 3, 1942 – December 26, 1999) was an American soul, funk and R&B singer, songwriter and guitarist best known for his anthemic music with The Impressions and composing the soundtrack to the blaxploitation film Superfly. ... The Fifth Dimension The Fifth Dimension (also known as The 5th Dimension) is an American popular music vocal group, whose repertoire also includes R&B, soul, and jazz. ... Norman Whitfield Norman Jesse Whitfield (born in Harlem, New York in 1943) was a songwriter and producer for Berry Gordys Motown label during the 1960s. ... “Temptations” redirects here. ... The Undisputed Truth, on the cover of their first LP, 1971s The Undisputed Truth, which contains their only hit single, Smiling Faces Sometimes. The Undisputed Truth was a 1970s Motown recording act, assembled by record producer Norman Whitfield as a means for being able to experiment with his psychedelic...


Blue-eyed soul

For more details on this topic, see Blue-eyed soul.

Blue-eyed soul, (also known as white soul) is a term used to describe R&B or soul music performed by white artists. The term doesn't refer to a distinct style of music, and the meaning of blue-eyed soul has evolved over decades. Originally the term was associated with mid-1960s white artists who performed soul and R&B that was similar to the music released by Motown Records and Stax Records. The term continued to be used in the 1970s and 1980s, particularly by the British media to describe a new generation of singers who adopted elements of the Stax and Motown sounds. To a lesser extent, the term has been applied to singers in other music genres that are influenced by soul music. Notable blue-eyed soul artists include Christina Aguilera, George Michael, Hall & Oates, Righteous Brothers, Boy George, The Action, The Rascals, Mitch Ryder & the Detroit Wheels, The Soul Survivors, Dusty Springfield, Bobbie Gentry, Mina, Average White Band, Duffy, B.J. Thomas, Amy Winehouse and Joss Stone. Blue-eyed soul (also known as white soul) is a term used to describe R&B or soul music performed by white artists. ... R&B redirects here. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Motown Records, also known as Tamla-Motown outside of the United States, is a record label originally based out of Detroit, Michigan (Motor City, hence mo(tor)town), from where it achieved widespread international success. ... Stax Records is an American record label, originally based out of Memphis, Tennessee. ... The Motown Sound is a style of soul music with distinctive characteristics, including the use of tambourine along with drums, bass instrumentation, a distinctive melodic and chord structure, and a call and response singing style originating in gospel music. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the singer. ... For other persons named George Michael, see George Michael (disambiguation). ... Hall & Oates is a popular music duo made up of Daryl Hall & John Oates. ... The Righteous Brothers were the musical duo of Bill Medley and Bobby Hatfield. ... George Alan ODowd, better known as Boy George (born June 14, 1961 in Eltham, London) is a rock singer-songwriter and club DJ. He grew up in a large, working-class Irish family in Thurles, County Tipperary, Ireland. ... The Action were an English band of the 1960s. ... For the English Indie rock band, see The Rascals (English band) The Rascals (previously The Young Rascals) were an American soul and rock group of the 1960s. ... Mitch Ryder (born 26 February 1945) is an American musician born in Hamtramck, Michigan as William S. Levise Jr. ... The Soul Survivors were an American R&B group, known for their 1967 hit Expressway to Your Heart, which was the first hit by Philadelphia soul producers Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff. ... Dusty Springfield OBE (16 April 1939–2 March 1999) was a popular English singer whose career spanned four decades. ... Bobbie Gentry (b. ... For the Korean singer, see Shim Mina. ... The Average White Band (also AWB) is a Scottish funk and R&B band. ... Billy Joe Thomas (born August 7, 1942) is an Oklahoma-born country singer. ... Amy-Jade Winehouse (born 14 September 1983) is an English soul, jazz, R&B singer and songwriter. ... Joss Stone (born Joscelyn Eve Stoker on 11 April 1987) is a British soul, R&B, and blues singer, songwriter, and occasional actress who emerged to fame in late 2003 with her debut album, The Soul Sessions, which was certified triple platinum by the BPI, and was announced as one...


Neo soul

For more details on this topic, see Neo soul.

The term neo soul is a marketing phrase coined by producer and record label executive Kedar Massenburg to describe a musical blend of 1970s soul-style vocals and instrumentation with contemporary R&B sounds, hip hop beats and poetic interludes. The style was developed in the early to mid 1990s by artists such as Omar Lye-Fook, Maxwell, D'Angelo and Soul II Soul. Erykah Badu, Lauryn Hill, Jill Scott and Angie Stone helped popularize the sound. Other notable performers include Rahsaan Patterson, Cody Chesnutt, Jaguar Wright, Eric Benet, Amel Larrieux, Adriana Evans, Raphael Saadiq, India.Arie, Lalah Hathaway, Anthony Hamilton, Musiq, Amp Fiddler, Alicia Keys, Joss Stone, Floetry, Vivian Green, Leela James, Frank McComb, Goapele, and N'dambi, as well as newcomers Conya Doss, Ledisi, Maysa, Maya Azucena, Rachael Bell and Eric Roberson. A key musical element in the Neo Soul artist/producer's arsenal is typically a heavy dose of Fender Rhodes or Wurlitzer electric piano pads over a mellow, grooving interplay between the drums (usually with a rim shot snare sound) and a muted, deep funky bass. The Fender Rhodes piano sound gives the music of this sub-genre a "vintage", warm, organic character, reminiscent of the 1970s-era recordings of Stevie Wonder and Donny Hathaway, as well as the work of Roy Ayers on his Mystic Voyage and Everybody Loves the Sunshine albums. Neo soul (also known as nu soul) is a music genre and an umbrella term for current soul music. ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Kedar Massenberg is an American record producer and record label executive, best known as the president of Motown Records from 1997 to 2004. ... Contemporary R&B is a music genre of American popular music, the current iteration of the genre that began in the 1940s as rhythm and blues music. ... Hip hop is a cultural movement that began amongst urban African American youth in New York and has since spread around the world. ... Omar Lye-Fook (a. ... Maxwell is a common Scottish, English, or Irish name that may refer to: // Anna Maxwell (1851–1929) Augustus Maxwell (1820–1903) Blakey Harris James 2006 Colt Telecom Brian Maxwell (1953–2004) Carmen Maxwell Cedric Maxwell (born 1955) Charlie Maxwell (born 1927) David Maxwell (academic) David Maxwell Fyfe, 1st Earl of... For other uses, see DAngelo (disambiguation). ... Soul II Soul is a dance/funk/soul act that emerged at the end of the 80s from London. ... Erykah Badu (born Erica Abi Wright, February 26, 1971, in Dallas, Texas) is an American neo-soul, R&B/hip hop artist whose work crosses over into jazz. ... Lauryn Noel Hill (born May 25, 1975) is an American singer, rapper, musician, record producer and film actress. ... For the footballer, see Jill Scott (footballer). ... Angie Stone (born Angela Laverne Brown on January 30, 1961) is an American R&B, soul, and neo soul singer, songwriter, keyboardist, record producer, and occasional actress. ... Rahsaan Patterson is an African-American singer and actor, best known for portraying The Kid on the popular 1980s television show Kids Incorporated. ... Cody ChesnuTT Cody ChesnuTT is an American musician from Atlanta, Georgia, whose music blends elements of rock, funk, soul, hip-hop, and blues. ... Jaguar Wright is a soul/R&B vocalist from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Eric Benét (born October 15, 1966 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is an American rhythm and blues and gospel singer. ... Amel Larrieux is an American R&B and soul singer and songwriter. ... Adriana Evans is an American R&B vocalist. ... Raphael Saadiq (born Charlie Ray Wiggins on May 14, 1966 in Oakland, California) is an acclaimed American music artist. ... India. ... Lalah Hathaway (born Eulaulah Hathaway [1]), is a contemporary R&B/Jazz singer. ... Anthony Hamilton (born January 28, 1971 in Charlotte, North Carolina) is an American R&B, soul, and neo soul singer, songwriter, and record producer who rose to fame with his Platinum-selling second studio album Comin from Where Im From (2003), which featured the singles Comin from Where I... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Amp Fiddler is a funk musician. ... Alicia Keys (born Alicia J. Augello-Cook on January 25, 1981[2][3][4]) is an American R&B, soul, and neo soul singer-songwriter, pianist, and actress who has sold over 25 million albums worldwide as of 2007, and has won numerous awards, including eleven Grammy Awards, eleven Billboard... Joss Stone (born Joscelyn Eve Stoker on 11 April 1987) is a British soul, R&B, and blues singer, songwriter, and occasional actress who emerged to fame in late 2003 with her debut album, The Soul Sessions, which was certified triple platinum by the BPI, and was announced as one... Floetry is a female British hip-hop/neo-soul duo. ... Vivian Green (born 1980) is an American R&B singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... Leela James is an African American Los Angeles native and soul singer who cites James Brown, Roberta Flack, Marvin Gaye, Donny Hathaway, Gladys Knight, Mavis Staples and Stevie Wonder as influences. ... Frank McComb (born July 15, 1970, Cleveland, Ohio, USA) is a jazz singer and keyboardist. ... Goapele Mohlabane (pronounced gwah-puh-LAY) (born on July 11, 1977), professionally known as Goapele is an American soul and R&B singer and songwriter. ... Ndambi (meaning Most Beautiful) is a soul singer from Dallas, TX. She used to sing background vocals for Erykah Badu. ... Ledisi Anibade (pronounced LED-is-EE) is an R&B singer from New Orleans. ... Maysa Figueira Monjardim (born June 6, 1936 in São Paulo; died January 22, 1977) was a singer, composer, and actress from Brazil. ... // Rachael Bell is a 17 year old student living in the UK. She received a significant amount of press coverage in April 2007 when she held a house party in her parents house that was gate-crashed and attended by over 200 guests causing over £20,000 worth of damage... Eric Roberson is a Soul artist from Rahway, New Jersey, USA. He is sometimes referred to simply as Erro. ... A Rhodes piano is a musical instrument. ... The Wurlitzer electric piano was one of a series of electromechanical stringless pianos manufactured and marketed by the Rudolph Wurlitzer Company, Corinth, Mississippi, U.S. and North Tonawanda, NY. Interestingly, the Wurlitzer company itself never called the instrument an electric piano, inventing instead the phrase Electronic Piano and using this... Stevie Wonder (born Stevland Hardaway Judkins on May 13, 1950, name later changed to Stevland Hardaway Morris)[1] is an American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and record producer. ... Donny Hathaway (October 1, 1945 – January 13, 1979) was an American soul musician. ... Roy Ayers (born September 10, 1940, Los Angeles) is a funk, soul and jazz vibraphone player. ...


Northern soul and modern soul

Further information: Northern soul & Modern soul

The phrase northern soul was coined by journalist Dave Godin and popularised in 1970 through his column in Blues and Soul magazine.[3] The term refers to rare soul music that was played by DJs at nightclubs in northern England. The playlists originally consisted of obscure 1960s and early 1970s American soul recordings with an uptempo beat, such as those on Motown Records and more obscure labels such as Okeh Records. Modern soul developed when northern soul DJs began looking in record shops in the United States and United Kingdom for music that was more complex and contemporary. What emerged was a richer sound that was more advanced in terms of Hi-Fi and FM radio technology. The Verve see A Northern Soul This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Dave Godin (1936-October 15, 2004) was an English fan of American soul music. ... Laser lights illuminate the dance floor at a Gatecrasher dance music event in Sheffield, England A nightclub (or night club or club) is a drinking, dancing, and entertainment venue which does its primary business after dark. ... Northern England, The North or North of England is a rather ill-defined term, with no universally accepted definition. ... Uptempo (sometimes UpTempo or up tempo) is an umbrella term for a quick-paced electronic music style. ... Motown Records, also known as Tamla-Motown outside of the United States, is a record label originally based out of Detroit, Michigan (Motor City, hence mo(tor)town), from where it achieved widespread international success. ... Okeh Records began as an independent record label based in the United States of America in 1918; from the late 1920s on was a subsidiary of Columbia Records. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... High Fidelity is also the title of a book by Nick Hornby and a film directed by Stephen Frears, based upon Hornbys book. ... FM radio is a broadcast technology invented by Edwin Howard Armstrong that uses frequency modulation to provide high-fidelity sound over broadcast radio. ...


See also

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This is a list of soul musicians who have either been influential within the genre, or have had a considerable amount of fame. ... Spoken Word Soul-An eclectic blend of Poetry, Jazz-funk, Electronica & acoustic Country soul music elements. ...

Audio samples

  • (Italian) Soul music: listen to soul music from Porretta Soul festival on Magazzini-Sonori.
  • Download sample of The Delfonics' "Ready or Not Here I Come (Can't Hide From Love)" from The Sound of Sexy Soul, one of the pioneering recordings of Philly soul
  • Download sample of D'Angelo's "Untitled (How Does It Feel)" from Voodoo. D'Angelo is one of the most renowned male artists of the neo soul genre.

The Delfonics are a quintessential Philadelphia soul singing group, most popular in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... For the American indoor football team, see Philadelphia Soul. ... For other uses, see DAngelo (disambiguation). ... Voodoo is a neo soul album by DAngelo, released on January 11, 2000 (see 2000 in music). ... Neo soul (also known as nu soul) is a music genre and an umbrella term for current soul music. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d Valter Ojakäär (1983). Popmuusikast. Eesti Raamat. 
  2. ^ Otis Redding
  3. ^ For Dancers Only by Chris Hunt, Mojo. 2002]

World Cup Stories by Chris Hunt Chris Hunt is a magazine editor, journalist and author. ...

Bibliography

  • Miller, Jim (editor) (1976). The Rolling Stone Illustrated History of Rock & Roll. New York: Rolling Stone Press/Random House. ISBN 0-394-73238-3. (Chapter on "Soul," by Guralnick, Peter. pp. 194-197.
  • Escott, Colin. Liner notes for The Essential James Carr. Razor and Tie Records, 1995.

External links

Blue-eyed soul (also known as white soul) is a term used to describe R&B or soul music performed by white artists. ... Brown-eyed soul is a subgenre of Soul music or Rhythm and Blues created mainly by Latinos and Italian-Americans during the 1950s and thriving into the 1980s. ... Chicago soul is a form of soul music that arose during the 1960s in Chicago. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Hip hop soul is the second major subgenre of contemporary R&B. The term generally describes a style of music that blends soulful R&B singing and raw hip hop production. ... Memphis soul is stylish, funky, uptown soul music that is not as hard edged as Southern soul. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Neo soul (also known as nu soul) is a music genre and an umbrella term for current soul music. ... The Verve see A Northern Soul This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Conference National Division Eastern Year founded 2004 Home arena Wachovia Center & Wachovia Spectrum(alt. ... Psychedelic soul is a concept used to categorize music that featured elements of psychedelic rock and soul/funk music. ... Southern soul is a style of music that falls within the larger soul music and r&b Music genres. ... Spoken Word Soul-An eclectic blend of Poetry, Jazz-funk, Electronica & acoustic Country soul music elements. ... Soul rock is a musical genre designated to label primarily musicians of Anglo-Saxon descent who verge from having a sound that not only relies heavily on the guitar, bass, and drums, but also the smooth vocal harmonies that are typically attributed to soul singers generally of African descent. ... This is a list of soul musicians who have either been influential within the genre, or have had a considerable amount of fame. ... An African American man gives a piano lesson to a young African American woman, in 1899 or 1900, in Georgia, USA. Photograph from a collection of W.E.B. DuBois. ... Blues music redirects here. ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... Gospel music is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. ... Motown Records, also known as Tamla-Motown outside of the United States, is a record label originally based out of Detroit, Michigan (Motor City, hence mo(tor)town), from where it achieved widespread international success. ... R&B redirects here. ... Stax Records is an American record label, originally based out of Memphis, Tennessee. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The mod revival was a music genre and subculture that started in the United Kingdom in 1978 and later spread to other countries (to a lesser degree). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Music for the Soul - Music for recovery and healing (980 words)
Music For The Soul is a not-for-profit Christian ministry committed to providing life-changing healing through music and song.
Music is the language of the heart, a universal language that speaks to all people, going places where words alone will not penetrate.
Music for the Soul is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a 501(c)(3).
Stax Museum of American soul music artists records exhibits merchandise in Memphis (507 words)
This 17,000-square-foot facility with more than 2,000 cultural artifacts, music exhibits, video footage, and items of memorabilia is designed to preserve and promote the legacy of American soul music, particularly that of Stax Records.
With permanent Soul Music exhibits, like Soul Train, to changing exhibits, like Wattstax and Blaxploitation, the mission of the Stax Museum is to keep the memory of Stax soul music legends alive forever.
And because we are the only soul music museum in the world, you'll also find programs, special events, concerts, exhibits and memorabilia dedicated to other soul music artists and labels, including that of Muscle Shoals, Motown, Atlantic, and Hi Records.
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