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Encyclopedia > Sorbian languages
Sorbian
Wendish, Lusatian
Geographic
distribution:
Lusatia
Genetic
classification
:
Indo-European
 Balto-Slavic
  Slavic
   West Slavic
    Sorbian
Subdivisions:
The Sorbian-speaking region in Germany.

The Sorbian languages are classified under the West Slavic branch of the Indo-European languages. They are the native languages of the Sorbian people, a Slavic minority in eastern Germany. The language has also historically been known as Wendish or Lusatian. Their collective ISO 639-2 code is wen. Lusatia (German Lausitz, Upper Sorbian Łužica, Lower Sorbian Łužyca, Polish Łużyce, Czech Lužice, sometimes called Sorbia, is a historical region between Bóbr-Kwisa rivers and Elbe river in northeastern Germany (states of Saxony and Brandenburg), south-western Poland (voivodship of Lower Silesia and northern Czech... Current distribution of Human Language Families Most languages are known to belong to language families. ... The Indo-European languages are a family of several hundred languages and dialects (443 according to the SIL estimate), including most of the major languages of Europe, as well as many in Southwest Asia, Central Asia and Southern Asia. ... The Balto-Slavic language group is a hypothetical language group consisting of the Baltic and Slavic language subgroups of the Indo-European family. ... The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup of Indo-European languages, have speakers in most of Eastern Europe, in much of the Balkans, in parts of Central Europe, and in the northern part of Asia. ... This article or section should be merged with List of West Slavic languages The West Slavic languages is a subdivision of the Slavic language group (q. ... Upper Sorbian (hornjoserbsce) is a minority language of Germany spoken in the historical province of Upper Lusatia, today part of Saxony. ... Lower Sorbian (dolnoserbski) is a minority language spoken in eastern Germany in the historical province of Lower Lusatia, today part of Brandenburg. ... Image File history File links Germany_sorbian_region. ... The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup of Indo-European languages, have speakers in most of Eastern Europe, in much of the Balkans, in parts of Central Europe, and in the northern part of Asia. ... The Indo-European languages are a family of several hundred languages and dialects (443 according to the SIL estimate), including most of the major languages of Europe, as well as many in Southwest Asia, Central Asia and Southern Asia. ... The Sorbs are a Slavic minority indigenous to the region known as Lusatia in the German states of Saxony and Brandenburg (in former GDR territory). ... ISO 639 is one of several international standards that lists short codes for language names. ...


There are two literary languages: Upper Sorbian (hornjoserbsce), spoken by about 55,000 people in Saxony, and Lower Sorbian (dolnoserbski) spoken by about 14,000 people in Brandenburg. The area where the two languages are spoken is known as Lusatia (Łužica in Upper Sorbian, Łužyca in Lower Sorbian, or Lausitz in German). Upper Sorbian (hornjoserbsce) is a minority language of Germany spoken in the historical province of Upper Lusatia, today part of Saxony. ... The Free State of Saxony (German: Freistaat Sachsen; Sorbian: Swobodny Stata Sakska) is at a land area of 18,413 km² and a population of 4. ... Lower Sorbian (dolnoserbski) is a minority language spoken in eastern Germany in the historical province of Lower Lusatia, today part of Brandenburg. ... Surrounding but excluding the national capital Berlin, Brandenburg (Sorbian/Lusatian: Brandisborska) is one of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states). ... Lusatia (German Lausitz, Upper Sorbian Łužica, Lower Sorbian Łužyca, Polish Łużyce, Czech Lužice, sometimes called Sorbia, is a historical region between Bóbr-Kwisa rivers and Elbe river in northeastern Germany (states of Saxony and Brandenburg), south-western Poland (voivodship of Lower Silesia and northern Czech...


Both languages have dual grammatical number; they are among the very few living Indo-European languages to retain this feature (the other being Slovenian). The dual is used when exactly two people or things are meant and is in addition to singular and plural. Dual is the grammatical number used for two referents. ... The Indo-European languages are a family of several hundred languages and dialects (443 according to the SIL estimate), including most of the major languages of Europe, as well as many in Southwest Asia, Central Asia and Southern Asia. ... The word singular may refer to one of several concepts. ... Look up Plural in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Plural is a grammatical number, typically referring to more than one of the referent in the real world. ...


In Germany Upper and Lower Sorbian are officially recognized and protected as minority languages.


The city of Bautzen near Dresden is a centre of Upper Sorbian culture. Notable is the fact that bilingual signs can be seen around the city including the name of the city itself at the railway station given as 'Bautzen/Budyšin'. Bautzen (pronounced , listen, until 1868: Budissin; Upper Sorbian: BudyÅ¡in; Lower Sorbian: BudyÅ¡yn; , listen; Polish: Budziszyn; Czech: Budyšín) is a city in eastern Saxony, Germany, and capital of the eponymous district. ... From left to right: Brühls Terrace; the Hofkirche and the castle; the Semper Opera House. ...


The city of Cottbus (Chóśebuz) is considered the cultural centre of Lower Sorbian; here too bilingual signs are found. Map of Germany showing Cottbus Cottbus (Sorbian: ChoÅ›ebuz, Czech: ChotÄ›buz, Polish: Chociebuż, archaic German: Kottbus) is a city in Brandenburg, Germany, situated around 125 km southeast of Berlin on the Spree river. ...


Sorbian is also spoken in the small Wendish settlement of Serbin in Lee County, Texas, and until recently newspapers were published in Wendish there. It has been heavily influenced by surrounding speakers of German and English. Serbin is a community in southwestern Lee County, Texas, originally established by Wends in the mid 1850s. ... Location in the state of Texas Formed Seat Giddings Area  - Total  - Water 1,642 km² (634 mi²) 14 km² (6 mi²) 0. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


See also

The Sorbian alphabet is based on the Latin alphabet but uses diacritics such as the acute accent and the hacek. ... The Sorbs are a Slavic minority indigenous to the region known as Lusatia in the German states of Saxony and Brandenburg (in former GDR territory). ... Wends (German: Wenden, Latin: Venedi) is the English name for some Slavic people from north-central Europe particularly the Sorbs living in modern-day Germany. ...

External links

  • wen - Test sorbian Wikipedias
  • German - Lower Sorbian online dictionary
  • Sorbian language tree
  • Euromosaic information page

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sorbian languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (278 words)
The Sorbian languages are classified under the West Slavic branch of the Indo-European languages.
The area where the two languages are spoken is known as Lusatia (Łužica in Upper Sorbian, Łužyca in Lower Sorbian, or Lausitz in German).
Sorbian is also spoken in the small Wendish settlement of Serbin in Lee County, Texas, and until recently newspapers were published in Wendish there.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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