FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Sophie Scholl
Hans Scholl, Sophie Magdalena Scholl, and Christoph Probst, who were executed for participating in the White Rose resistance movement against the Nazi regime in Germany.
Hans Scholl, Sophie Magdalena Scholl, and Christoph Probst, who were executed for participating in the White Rose resistance movement against the Nazi regime in Germany.

Sophia Magdalena Scholl (9 May 192122 February 1943), along with her brother Hans Scholl, were members of the White Rose non-violent resistance movement in Nazi Germany. They were both convicted of treason and executed by guillotine. This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Hans Scholl was born on September 22, 1918, when his father had his first position as mayor of Ingersheim near Crailsheim. ... Hans and Sophie Scholl and Christoph Probst, executed for participation in a resistance movement against the Nazi regime through White Rose. ... Monument to the Weiße Rose in front of the Ludwig-Maximilian-University, Munich White Rose (German: die Weiße Rose) was a non-violent resistance group in Nazi Germany, consisting of a number of students from the University of Munich and their philosophy professor. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hans Scholl was born on September 22, 1918, when his father had his first position as mayor of Ingersheim near Crailsheim. ... Monument to the Weiße Rose in front of the Ludwig-Maximilian-University, Munich White Rose (German: die Weiße Rose) was a non-violent resistance group in Nazi Germany, consisting of a number of students from the University of Munich and their philosophy professor. ... Nonviolence (or non-violence) is a set of assumptions about morality, power and conflict that leads its proponents to reject the use of violence in efforts to attain social or political goals. ... Widerstand (German: resistance) is the name given to the resistance movements in Nazi Germany. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Traitor redirects here. ... Historic replicas (1:6 scale) of the two main types of French guillotines: Model 1792, left, and Model 1872 (state as of 1907), right The guillotine is a device used for carrying out executions by decapitation. ...


Since the 1970s she has been celebrated as one of the great German heroes who actively opposed the Third Reich during the Second World War. This opposition cost Scholl her life. [1] Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...

Contents

Early life

The Town Hall in Forchtenberg, birth place of Sophie Scholl
The Town Hall in Forchtenberg, birth place of Sophie Scholl

Sophie's father was the mayor of Forchtenberg am Kocher when she was born; she was the fourth of five children: Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Forchtenberg is a town in the Hohenlohe district, in the German state of Baden-Württemberg. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Forchtenberg is a town in the Hohenlohe district, in the German state of Baden-Württemberg. ... The Kocher is a right tributary of the Neckar in northern Baden-Württemberg. ...

  1. Inge Aicher-Scholl (1917-1998)[2][3]
  2. Hans Scholl (1918-1943)
  3. Elisabeth Hartnagel (* 1920) (TV clips), married Sophie's fiancé Fritz Hartnagel See also his German entry.
  4. Sophie (1921-1943)
  5. Werner Scholl (1922, missing in action since June 1944)

Sophie was raised Roman Catholic. She entered grade school at the age of seven, learned easily and had a carefree childhood. In 1930, the family moved to Ludwigsburg and then two years later to Ulm where her father had a business consulting office. Hans Scholl was born on September 22, 1918, when his father had his first position as mayor of Ingersheim near Crailsheim. ... MIA is a three-letter acronym that is most commonly used to designate a combatant who is Missing In Action, and has not yet returned or otherwise been accounted for as either dead (KIA) or a prisoner of war (POW). ... Ludwigsburg is a city in Germany, about 12 km north of Stuttgarts city center, near the river Neckar. ... Ulm is a city in the German Bundesland of Baden-Württemberg, situated on the river Danube. ...


In 1932, Sophie started attending a secondary school for girls. At the age of twelve, she was required to join the Bund Deutscher Mädel (League of German Girls), like most of her classmates; however, her initial enthusiasm gradually gave way to criticism. She was aware of the dissenting political views of her father, of friends, and also of some teachers. Political attitude had become an essential criterion in her choice of friends. The arrest of her brothers and friends in 1937 for participating in the German Youth Movement left a strong impression on her. After the Nazi Gleichschaltung in Germany in 1933, the Bund Deutscher Mädel (frequently used in its abbreviated form, BDM) (League of German Girls) was the all-German party organization for girls between 14 and 18 years of age, as the girls segment of the Hitler Youth. ... The German Youth Movement (In German: Die deutsche Jugendbewegung) is a collective term for educational-cultural renewal movement starting from 1896 on. ...


She had a talent for drawing and painting and for the first time came into contact with a few so-called 'degenerate' artists. An avid reader, she developed a growing interest in philosophy and theology. This was her alternative world to fascist National Socialism. Joseph Goebbels, Adolf Hitler and Adolf Ziegler visit the entartete Kunst exhibition. ... The philosopher Socrates about to take poison hemlock as ordered by the court. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... National Socialism redirects here. ...


In the spring of 1940, she graduated from secondary school. The subject of her essay was 'The Hand that Moved the Cradle, Moved the World.' Being fond of children, she became a kindergarten teacher at the Fröbel Institute in Ulm-Söflingen. She had also chosen this kindergarten job hoping that it would be recognized as an alternate service to Reichsarbeitsdienst (National Labor Service), a prerequisite to be admitted to the University. This was not the case though and in the spring of 1941, she began a six month stint in the auxiliary war service as a nursery teacher in Blumberg. The military-like regimen of the Labor Service caused her to think very hard about the political situation as well as begin to practice passive resistance. The Reichsarbeitsdienst (or RAD, Reich Labour Service) was an Auxiliary formation which provided support for the German Wehrmacht during the Second World War. ... Blumberg is a town in the district of Schwarzwald-Baar in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ... Nonviolent resistance (or nonviolent action) is the practice of applying power to achieve socio-political goals through symbolic protests, economic or political noncooperation, civil disobedience and other methods, without the use of physical violence. ...


After her six months in the National Labor Service, in May 1942, she enrolled at the University of Munich as a student of biology and philosophy. Her brother Hans, who was studying medicine there, introduced her to his friends. Although this group of friends was eventually known for their political views, they were initially drawn together by a shared love of art, music, literature, philosophy and theology. Hiking in the mountains, skiing and swimming were also of importance. They often attended concerts, plays and lectures together. With approximately 48,000 students, the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich (German: Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München or LMU) is one of the largest universities in Germany. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Hans Scholl was born on September 22, 1918, when his father had his first position as mayor of Ingersheim near Crailsheim. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Politics is the process by which groups of people make decisions. ...


In Munich, Sophie met a number of artists, writers and philosophers, particularly Carl Muth and Theodor Haecker, who were important contacts for her. The question that they pondered the most was how the individual must act under a dictatorship. Theodor Haecker (1879-1945) was a German writer, translator and cultural critic. ...


During the summer vacation in 1942, Sophie Scholl had to do war service in a metallurgical plant in Ulm. At the same time, her father was serving time in prison for a critical remark about Hitler to an employee. Hitler redirects here. ...


The White Rose

Main article: White Rose

In the early summer of 1942, a group of young men — including Willi Graf, Christoph Probst and Hans Scholl — co-authored 6 anti-Nazi Third Reich political resistance leaflets. Calling themselves the White Rose, they instructed Germans to passively resist the Nazis. They had been horrified by the behaviour of the Germans on the Eastern Front where they had witnessed a group of naked Jews being shot in a pit. Monument to the Weiße Rose in front of the Ludwig-Maximilian-University, Munich White Rose (German: die Weiße Rose) was a non-violent resistance group in Nazi Germany, consisting of a number of students from the University of Munich and their philosophy professor. ...


Contrary to popular belief, Sophie Scholl was not a co-author of the articles. Hans had been keen, initially, to keep her in ignorance of their activities. However, once she discovered what Hans was doing, she joined him and proved invaluable to the group: as a female, her chances of being randomly stopped by the SS were much smaller. She and rest of the White Rose were arrested for distributing the sixth leaflet at the University of Munich on February 18, 1943. is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the People's Court before the notorious Judge Roland Freisler on February 21, 1943, Sophie was recorded as saying "Somebody, after all, had to make a start. What we wrote and said is also believed by many others. They just do not dare express themselves as we did." Hans and Sophie's defiance, in the face of terrifying consequences, gained them enormous admiration. Judge Freisler Roland Freisler (October 30, 1893 – February 3, 1945) was a prominent and notorious Nazi German judge. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Grave of Hans Scholl, Sophie Scholl, and Christoph Probst, in the Perlacher Friedhof, next to the Stadelheim prison in Munich.

On February 22, 1943, Sophie, her brother Hans and their friend Christoph Probst were found guilty of treason and condemned to death. They were all beheaded by executioner Johann Reichhart in Munich's Stadelheim Prison only a few hours later at 17:00. The execution was supervised by Dr. Walter Roemer who was the enforcement chief of the Munich district court. Prison officials emphasized the courage with which she walked to her execution. Sophie Scholl From german Wikipedia. ... Sophie Scholl From german Wikipedia. ... Hans Scholl was born on September 22, 1918, when his father had his first position as mayor of Ingersheim near Crailsheim. ... Hans and Sophie Scholl and Christoph Probst, executed for participation in a resistance movement against the Nazi regime through White Rose. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hans Scholl was born on September 22, 1918, when his father had his first position as mayor of Ingersheim near Crailsheim. ... Hans and Sophie Scholl and Christoph Probst, executed for participation in a resistance movement against the Nazi regime through White Rose. ... Johann Baptist Reichhart[1] (29 April 1893 – 26 April 1972) was a German executioner. ... Stadelheim Prison in Munich is one of the largest jails in Germany. ...


Her last words were "Die Sonne scheint noch," meaning "The sun still shines."[4]This was a metaphor for God and her commitment to hope for the future. The film of her last days, Sophie Scholl – Die letzten Tage (Sophie Scholl: The Final Days), used the sun to point to her Christian belief. Sophie Scholl – Die letzten Tage (Sophie Scholl - The Final Days) is a 2005 German film from director Marc Rothemund. ... Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch...


Following her death a copy of the sixth leaflet was smuggled out of Germany through Scandinavia to England by German jurist Helmuth von Moltke, where it was exploited by the Allied Forces who in mid-1943 dropped millions of propaganda copies over Germany of the tract, now retitled The Manifesto of the Students of Munich. Soviet Propaganda Poster during the World War II. The text reads Red Army Fighter, SAVE US! Chinese propaganda poster from during the Cultural Revolution. ...


The White Rose's legacy has, for many commentators, an intangible quality. Playwright Lillian Garrett-Groag stated in Newsday on February 22nd, 1993 that "It is possibly the most spectacular moment of resistance that I can think of in the 20th century... The fact that five little kids, in the mouth of the wolf, where it really counted, had the tremendous courage to do what they did, is spectacular to me. I know that the world is better for them having been there, but I do not know why." Lillian Garrett-Groag (birthdate unknown) is an American playwright, theatre director, and actor. ...


In the same issue of Newsday, Holocaust historian Jud Newborn noted that "You cannot really measure the effect of this kind of resistance in whether or not X number of bridges were blown up or a regime fell... The White Rose really has a more symbolic value, but that's a very important value." For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ...


Legacy

Honours

On February 22, 2003, a bust of Scholl was placed by the government of Bavaria in the Walhalla temple in her honour. is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ... View of the Walhalla from the Danube View of the Walhalla main hall The Walhalla, Hall of Fame and Honor is a hall of fame located on the Danube River 10 km from Regensburg, in Bavaria, Germany. ...


The Geschwister-Scholl-Institut for Political Science at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich is named in honour of Sophie and her brother Hans. The institute is home to the university's political science and communication departments, and is housed in the former Radio Free Europe building close to the city's Englischer Garten. Main building of the Ludwig Maximilians University Main staircase of the university, Munich The Atrium at the main building The Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich (German: Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München), also known as LMU or simply University of Munich, is a university in the heart of Munich. ... The Englischer Garten or English Garden is a large park in central Munich, Germany. ...


Over the last four decades many local schools as well as countless streets and squares in Germany have been named after Sophie Scholl and her brother.


In 2005, a ZDF Television audience survey voted Hans and Sophie the fourth greatest Germans of all time. Young viewers placed them first. Zweites Deutsches Fernsehen (Second German Television), ZDF, is a public service German television channel based in Mainz. ...


The preface to the Dumbach and Newborn book Sophie Scholl and the White Rose (2005) states that Brigitte Magazine's audience voted Scholl "The most important woman of the twentieth century" during a poll. The book states that the magazine's circulation at the time was 4,000,000 readers.


Film and theatrical portrayals

Actress Julia Jentsch as Sophie Scholl on trial in Sophie Scholl: The Final Days
Actress Julia Jentsch as Sophie Scholl on trial in Sophie Scholl: The Final Days

In February 2005, a movie about Sophie Scholl's last days, Sophie Scholl – Die letzten Tage (Sophie Scholl: The Final Days), featuring actress Julia Jentsch as Sophie, was released. Drawing on interviews with survivors and transcripts that had remained hidden in East German archives until 1990, it was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in January 2006. Image File history File links Sophiescholl_movie. ... Image File history File links Sophiescholl_movie. ... “Moving picture” redirects here. ... Sophie Scholl – Die letzten Tage (Sophie Scholl - The Final Days) is a 2005 German film from director Marc Rothemund. ... Julia Jentsch (born February 20, 1978 in Berlin) is a German actress. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... As a Special Award 1947 Shoeshine (Sciuscià) (Italy) - Societa Co-operativa Alfa Cinematografica - Paolo William Tamburella producer - Vittorio De Sica director 1948 Monsieur Vincent (France) - E. D. I. C., Union Général Cinématographique - George de la Grandiere producer - Maurice Cloche director 1949 The Bicycle Thief (Ladri di biciclette...


In an interview, Jentsch said that the role was "an honor."[5] For her portrayal of Scholl, she won the best actress at the European Film Awards, best actress at the German Film Awards (Lolas), along with the Silver Bear for best actress at the Berlin Film Festival. The European Movie Awards are the most prestigious paneuropean movie awards. ... The Deutscher Filmpreis (German Film Award) is the highest German movie award. ... The Berlin International Film Festival, also called the Berlinale, has been called one of the worlds most prestigious film festivals. ... The Berlin International Film Festival, also called the Berlinale, is one of the most important film festivals in Europe and the world. ...


There were three earlier film accounts of the White Rose resistance. The first film was made financed by the Bavarian state government and released in the 1970s entitled Das Verspechen (The Promise). In 1982, Percy Adlon's Fünf letzte Tage ((The) Last Five Days) presented Lena Stolze as Sophie in her last days from the point of view of her cellmate Else Gebel. In the same year, Stolze repeated the role in Michael Verhoeven's Die Weiße Rose (The White Rose). Percy Adlon, German Filmaker Percy Adlon (born June 1, 1935 in Munich, Germany) is a German Film - Television Director, Author and Producer. ... Lena Stolze (b. ... Michael Verhoeven (July 13, 1938 in Berlin) is a German film director. ... Die Weiße Rose (The White Rose) is a 1982 German movie about the resistance movement to the Nazi authorities led by a group of Catholic students in Munich in 1942-1943 whose members were caught and executed in February 1943, shortly after the German capitulation at Stalingrad. ...


American playwright Lillian Garrett-Groag's play The White Rose features Sophie Scholl as a major character. Lillian Garrett-Groag (birthdate unknown) is an American playwright, theatre director, and actor. ... The White Rose was written by Lillian Garrett-Groag and premiered in 1991 at the Old Globe Theatre in San Diego, Calif. ...


Psychology

One famous child psychologist, Alice Miller, states in Thou Shalt Not be Aware[6] that: Alice Miller (born 1923) is a psychologist noted for her work on child abuse and its effects upon society as well as the lives of individuals. ...

the tolerant and open atmosphere of their [Sophie and Hans Scholl’s] childhood had enabled them to see through Hitler’s platitudes at the Nuremberg Rally, when the brother and sister were members of Nazi youth organizations. Nearly all their peers were completely won over by the Führer, whereas Hans and Sophie had other, higher expectations of human nature, not shared by their comrades, against which they could measure Hitler. Because such standards are rare, it is also very difficult for patients in therapy to see through the manipulative methods they are subjected to; the patient does not even notice such methods because they are inherent in a system he takes completely for granted. The Nuremberg Rally (officially, Reichsparteitag, meaning national party convention) was the annual rally of the NSDAP (Nazi Party) in the years 1923 to 1938 in Germany. ... Nazi propaganda poster. ...

Effect on the student movement for democracy in South Korea

In 1980, South Korea, the military junta came into power massacring the people who cried for democracy in the city of Gwangju. They then suppressed democracy and arrested and tortured the people who cried for freedom and democracy on charge of communist. Under this circumstance, Inge Scholl's book was translated into Korean languague in the name of "The death of the men who no one hates"(Amudo Miwohaji Anneun Ja Eui Jukeum). Soon, it was forbidden by the military government. But the students struggling for democracy were inspired by Sophie's life and creed by comparing the similarities of Nazi to South Korean military government. Inge's book was read secretly but broadly circulated around the college students and affected the students to resolute into action for democracy. After democracy was established in Korea, this book is highly recommended not only for the college students, but also for every youth in the symbol of the unyielding consciousness and justice. This article is about Gwangju Metropolitan City in South Korea. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Berlin cheers for anti-Nazi film February 14, 2005
  2. ^ Inge Aicher-Scholl 06 September 1998
  3. ^ Inge Scholl: "Die Weiße Rose".
  4. ^ Sophie Scholl - Die letzten Tage, edited by Fred Breinersdorfer, 2005.
  5. ^ Es war uns eine Ehre, Sophie Scholl zu sein (2005).
  6. ^ New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1984, p. 21

Sophie Scholl – Die letzten Tage (Sophie Scholl - The Final Days) is a 2005 German film from director Marc Rothemund. ...

See also

Monument to the Weiße Rose in front of the Ludwig-Maximilian-University, Munich White Rose (German: die Weiße Rose) was a non-violent resistance group in Nazi Germany, consisting of a number of students from the University of Munich and their philosophy professor. ... Bust of Colonel Claus Schenk Graf von Stauffenberg (Memorial to the German Resistance, Berlin) The German Resistance refers to those individuals and groups in Nazi Germany who opposed the regime of Adolf Hitler between 1933 and 1945. ... Johann Baptist Reichhart[1] (29 April 1893 – 26 April 1972) was a German executioner. ... Die Weiße Rose (The White Rose) is a 1982 German movie about the resistance movement to the Nazi authorities led by a group of Catholic students in Munich in 1942-1943 whose members were caught and executed in February 1943, shortly after the German capitulation at Stalingrad. ... Sophie Scholl - The Final Days (German: Sophie Scholl – Die letzten Tage) is a 2005 German film by director Marc Rothemund and writer Fred Breinersdorfer. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Sophie Scholl

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sophie Scholl - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1214 words)
Hans Scholl, Sophie Scholl, and Christoph Probst, who were executed for participating in the White Rose resistance movement against the Nazi regime in Germany.
Sophie's father was the mayor of Forchtenberg am Kocher when she was born; she was the fourth of five children.
On February 22, 2003, a bust of Scholl was placed by the government of Bavaria in the Walhalla temple in her honour.
Sophie Scholl (1349 words)
Sophie Scholl, the daughter of Robert Scholl, the mayor of Forchtenberg, was born on 9th May, 1921.
Sophie's brother, Hans Scholl, was also growing disillusioned with Nazi Germany and in 1937 he was arrested and briefly jailed after being accused of subversive activities.
The accused, Sophie Scholl, as early as the summer of 1942 took part in political discussions, in which she and her brother, Hans School, came to the conclusion that Germany had lost the war.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m