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Encyclopedia > Sonic the Hedgehog CD
Sonic the Hedgehog CD
Image:Sonic CD Title.gif
Developer(s) Sega, Sonic Team
Publisher(s) Sega
Designer(s) Naoto Ohshima (director), Kazuyuki Hoshino, Takumi Miyake (Design), Matsuhide Mizoguchi (programming)
Release date(s) Flag of Japan September 23, 1993
Flag of Europe October 1993
Flag of the United States November 19, 1993
Flag of Japan August 9, 1996 (PC)
Flag of the United States September 26, 1996 (PC)
Flag of Europe October 3, 1996 (PC)
Genre(s) Platformer
Mode(s) Single player
Rating(s) ESRB: K-A (Windows version) (1995)
VRC: GA
Platform(s) Sega Mega-CD
(PC)
GameCube (as part of Sonic Gems Collection)
PlayStation 2 (as part of Sonic Gems Collection)
Media CD-ROM
System requirements Windows 95, 75 MHz Pentium CPU, SVGA, 2X CD-ROM, 15 MB hard disk space
Input Computer keyboard, Game controller

Sonic the Hedgehog CD (ソニック・ザ・ヘッジホッグCD Sonikku za Hejjihoggu Shīdī?), or simply Sonic CD, is a platform game in the Sonic the Hedgehog series, developed and published by Sega. It marked the first official appearance of both Metal Sonic and Amy Rose. It was released for the Sega Mega-CD in Japan on September 23, 1993, in Europe in October, 1993, and finally for the Sega CD in North America on November 19, 1993. The game was ported to PC CD-ROM in 1996. Image File history File links Sonic_CD_Title. ... A video game developer is a software developer (a business or an individual) that creates video games. ... This article is about the video game company. ... Sonic Team (ソニックチーム Sonikku ChÄ«mu) is a Japanese computer and video game developer established in 1988 originally known as Sega AM8. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the video game company. ... A game designer is a person who designs games. ... Naoto Oshima Naoto Ohshima (大島 直人 ÅŒshima Naoto) is a Japanese national and former Sega employee who designed the characters of Sonic the Hedgehog and Doctor Eggman. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see October (disambiguation). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... A personal computer (PC) is a computer whose price, size, and capabilities make it useful for individuals. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... A personal computer (PC) is a computer whose price, size, and capabilities make it useful for individuals. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... A personal computer (PC) is a computer whose price, size, and capabilities make it useful for individuals. ... Video games are categorized into genres based on their gameplay. ... A simple platform sequence from the game Wonder Boy Platform game, or platformer, is a video game genre characterized by jumping to and from suspended platforms or over obstacles. ... In computer games and video games, single-player refers to the variant of a particular game where input from only one player is expected throughout the course of the gaming session. ... The Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) is a self-regulatory organization that applies and enforces ratings, advertising guidelines, and online privacy principles for computer and video games and other entertainment software in the United States and Canada (officially adopted by individual provinces 2004-2005). ... The Video Game Ratings Council (V.R.C) was introduced by Sega of America in 1993 to rate all video games that were released for a sale in the United States of America. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A personal computer (PC) is a computer whose price, size, and capabilities make it useful for individuals. ... The Nintendo GameCube , GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... Sonic Gems Collection (ソニック ジェムズ コレクション) is a GameCube and (in Japan and Europe) PlayStation 2 compilation of the more obscure games of the Sonic series. ... “PS2” redirects here. ... Sonic Gems Collection (ソニック ジェムズ コレクション) is a GameCube and (in Japan and Europe) PlayStation 2 compilation of the more obscure games of the Sonic series. ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ... Windows 95 is a consumer-oriented graphical user interface-based operating system. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “CPU” redirects here. ... Super Video Graphics Array, almost always abbreviated to Super VGA or just SVGA is a broad term that covers a wide range of computer display standards. ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ... Typical hard drives of the mid-1990s. ... A 104-key PC US English QWERTY keyboard layout The Dvorak Simplified Keyboard layout A standard Hebrew keyboard showing both Hebrew and QWERTY. A computer keyboard is a peripheral partially modelled after the typewriter keyboard. ... A game controller is an input device used to control a video game. ... A simple platform sequence from the game Wonder Boy Platform game, or platformer, is a video game genre characterized by jumping to and from suspended platforms or over obstacles. ... The Sonic the Hedgehog series is a franchise of video games released by Sega starring their mascot character Sonic the Hedgehog. ... This article is about the video game company. ... Metal Sonic ) is the fictional robotic counterpart and a rival of video game character Sonic the Hedgehog. ... Amy Rose ), once known as Rosy the Rascal, is a video game character who appears in many of the Sonic the Hedgehog series of video games developed by Segas Sonic Team. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see October (disambiguation). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... The Sega Mega-CD (Japanese: メガCD) is an add-on device for the Sega Mega Drive released in Europe, Australia, and Japan. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... A personal computer (PC) is a computer whose price, size, and capabilities make it useful for individuals. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...

Contents

Gameplay

The main innovation of this chapter in the Sonic series is the manner in which the player can travel to four different versions of each level, each a different time period of the same location. This is accomplished by speed posts scattered around the level, bearing the labels "Past", and "Future". After running through one of these posts, the player has to run at top speed for a few seconds without stopping to travel into the respective time period. Because these teleports are relative, there are no "Past" signs in the Past, and no "Future" signs in the Future; that is, warping to the past in the future returns the player to the "present" time. Each stage has three "Acts" (Although they are called "Zones" in this game, see below), the third of which always takes place in the future. In computer and video games, a level (sometimes called a stage, course, round, world, map or landscape) is a separate area in a games virtual world, in modern games typically representing a specific location such as a building or a city. ...


The different time zones have slightly different layouts and sprite placements, as well as significant changes in the level art and palette. In addition, the robots within a level fall into a state of disrepair as time passes; in the present, some machines have become worn down while in the future all of them have. This affects the speed and attacking ability of the robots; some of them become completely ineffective, while others do not significantly change.


The appearance of the future changes depending on the actions of the player in the past. Hidden within the past of every level, there is a robot generating machine. If this is destroyed within a zone or all seven time stones are already collected, all of Dr. Eggman's robots will be destroyed in the past. Should the player warp into the future, it is a "Good Future" in which there are no enemies and fewer hazards. If the machine is not destroyed, the warp will lead the player into the "Bad Future" in which Dr. Eggman's robots run rampant, there are more hazards (though due to wear on some of the enemies, not always as many as in the past), and heavy pollution has harmed the level.


The third zone always takes place in the future and is mainly a short run up to the boss. Most boss battles are more elaborate than those in the other Sonic games, and typically require fewer hits than the usual 6 or 8. These boss battles, however, require more effort to actually hit Robotnik; one battle takes place on a makeshift pinball table and requires the player to use flippers to get up to Robotnik. Two battles do not involve hitting Robotnik to damage him; one takes place on a giant treadmill where the objective is to wear out Robotnik's machine by running on it, and the other is a race against Metal Sonic. The appearance of the third zone depends on the player's actions in the other two; if the player has achieved a Good Future in the other two zones (or all the time stones are collected), this zone will be a Good Future as well. However, if only one or neither stage has been made into a Good Future, the third zone will be a Bad Future. If all the third zones have Good Futures, the player is able to see the good ending. Look up boss in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


As in Sonic the Hedgehog, special stages can be accessed at the end of each zone if the player has collected, and is holding on to at least 50 rings. A giant ring will float above the finishing sign which Sonic can jump through to enter the special stage. They consist of a three-dimensional, flat surface. To complete a stage and collect the Time Stone reward, the player must seek and destroy six purple UFOs flying around the stage. If a UFO is destroyed, it gives a prize of either a super ring (have gold markings and give progressively larger bonuses starting with 20 rings when destroyed in series) or speed sneakers (have grey markings and temporarily boost speed). Collecting the seven time stones, only possible in the special stage, automatically guarantees that the player will reach the good ending even if one of the previously completed zones did not have a Good Future, and that all futures of upcoming zones will be good as well. Sonic the Hedgehog is the platform game that launched the career of Sonic the Hedgehog and Sonic Team. ...


Sonic CD was the first Sonic game to use a backup save, using the internal Sega CD memory or a backup RAM cartridge. The game saves after the end of each third zone (after which, a new level begins) and records the best times of the player in the time attack mode.


Plot

For one month out of every year, a tiny planet appears in the skies above Never Lake. The mysterious "Little Planet" holds seven gems that control the passage of time, bending the barriers between past and future. Intrigued by the unusual power of these stones, Dr. Eggman descends upon Little Planet and hatches a new scheme to take it over. Dr. Eggman as seen on Sonic X. In Sonic the Hedgehog video games, Doctor Eggman (in modern-day and Japanese versions), or Doctor Ivo Robotnik (early United States and European versions), is the archnemesis of Sonic the Hedgehog. ...


Fortunately, Sonic the Hedgehog has caught wind of Robotnik's plot and resolves to beat him to the Time Stones at all costs. However, to complicate matters Dr. Robotnik has kidnapped the young hedgehog Amy Rose, and uses her to bait Sonic and keep him off his trail. To that end, he deploys his most sophisticated and diabolical machine to date: a robot duplicate of the hedgehog hero, designed to match Sonic's every move and even surpass his own namesake's speed. This article is about the video game character. ... Dr. Eggman as seen on Sonic X. In Sonic the Hedgehog video games, Doctor Eggman (in modern-day and Japanese versions), or Doctor Ivo Robotnik (early United States and European versions), is the archnemesis of Sonic the Hedgehog. ... Amy Rose ), once known as Rosy the Rascal, is a video game character who appears in many of the Sonic the Hedgehog series of video games developed by Segas Sonic Team. ... Metal Sonic ) is the fictional robotic counterpart and a rival of video game character Sonic the Hedgehog. ...


Development

After the release of Sonic the Hedgehog, Lead Programmer Yuji Naka had grown dissatisfied with the rigid corporate policies at Sega, so he moved to the United States to work with the Sega Technical Institute. Incidentally, a large number of the original design team of Sonic also left for the U.S., to help instruct the American developers. With half of Sonic Team and two of its most important creators present, the Sega Technical Institute eventually got the job to develop Sonic the Hedgehog 3. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the video game company. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Meanwhile in Japan, Sonic CD was handled by a separate development team, headed by Sonic creator Naoto Ohshima. Initially, as revealed in interviews and magazine clippings, Sonic CD, and Sonic 3 for the Mega Drive/Genesis, Master System and Game Gear were all supposed to be the same game. However, during development, Sonic CD evolved into a vastly different type of game. Eventually, the gameplay of Sonic 3 would be favoured for the future games, but this explains why the theme and handling of Sonic CD are different. Naoto Oshima Naoto Ohshima (大島 直人 ÅŒshima Naoto) is a Japanese national and former Sega employee who designed the characters of Sonic the Hedgehog and Doctor Eggman. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ... Sega Master System The Sega Master System (SMS for short) (Japanese: マスターシステム), was an 8-bit cartridge-based gaming console manufactured by Sega. ... The Sega Game Gear was Segas first portable gaming system. ...


Music

The US and Japanese versions feature two different soundtracks, with the European release sharing the Japanese soundtrack. The Japanese soundtrack was composed by Naofumi Hataya & Masafumi Ogata, and featured songs by Keiko Utoku. The songs were entitled "Sonic - You Can Do Anything" (composed by Masafumi Ogata) and "Cosmic Eternity - Believe In Yourself" (composed by Naofumi Hataya). This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The U.S. version was delayed a few months to have a new soundtrack composed by Spencer Nilsen, who did other Sega CD soundtracks as well as some early Sega Saturn soundtracks. All the music except for the "Past" tunes (which were not Redbook audio but used the Sega CD's PCM channels) was replaced, and new themes were composed. The new theme was "Sonic Boom", performed by Pastiche (Sandy Cressman, Jenny Meltzer and Becky West). Both the opening and ending had similar lyrics but different instrumentation. This is credited as the "Special Edition for North America" soundtrack. These songs were later released on the limited edition Sonic Boom CD.[1] Spencer Nilsen is a video game music composer. ... It has been suggested that Arcade Racer Joystick be merged into this article or section. ... Red Book is the standard for audio CDs (Compact Disc Digital Audio system, or CDDA). ... Look up pastiche in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sonic Boom is a limited edition CD featuring music from the games Sonic CD (the US version) and Sonic Spinball. ...


It is interesting to note, that the last development version of Sonic CD (after the Japanese release) which was run on American NTSC systems, contained the Japanese soundtrack completely intact, indicating that at one point in localization, the soundtrack wasn't considered for revision. However, when it came time to release, the soundtrack was completely replaced [1] [2].


Ports

Sonic CD was ported to PC CD-ROM in 1996, marking Sonic's debut on the PC under the Sega PC brand. This version was released in Japan on August 9, 1996, in the United States and Canada in August 26, 1996, and in Europe in October 3, 1996. Among the most noteworthy changes of this version was the fact that the entire FMV animated intro and ending sequence is available for this version. The Mega-CD version only had a truncated version of the intro and ending sequence. The Japanese version of the game had its manual translated from the US version, and all versions had the US soundtrack, with the "Past" tunes converted to normal CD tracks. A personal computer (PC) is a computer whose price, size, and capabilities make it useful for individuals. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Sega PC is a computer and video game publication arm of video game company Sega. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Screenshot of an FMV from Final Fantasy VIII using Bink Video. ... Animation refers to the process in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ...


While the DirectX version of Sonic CD for PC is the most common and the best-selling initial commercial game for Windows 95, it is not the first version of Sonic CD for PC. The original version of Sonic CD for PC was powered using Dino libraries, an Intel-developed precursor to DirectX. This version of Sonic CD was never individually sold at retail, it was only sold with Packard Bell computers as a pre-installed game, and sold as double-packs along with other PC Sonic games. Upon the release of DirectX 3, Sega ported the Dino dependencies to DirectX calls and released Sonic CD in its DirectX form.[citation needed] Two different consumer electronics companies have used the Packard Bell name. ...


In addition to the PC port, Sonic CD is part of the Nintendo GameCube (and, in Japan and Europe, PlayStation 2) compilation Sonic Gems Collection. This version is ported from the PC version with some enhancements regarding the game's framerate and action speed (with no framerate slow-down). The soundtrack in this version depends on the region, though European versions of the game contain the American soundtrack (unlike previous European releases which featured the Japanese soundtrack)[citation needed]. The Nintendo GameCube , GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... “PS2” redirects here. ... Sonic Gems Collection (ソニック ジェムズ コレクション) is a GameCube and (in Japan and Europe) PlayStation 2 compilation of the more obscure games of the Sonic series. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Sonic the Hedgehog (16-bit) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5326 words)
Although Sonic the Hedgehog CD was made in Japan as well, Sonic the Hedgehog 2, Sonic the Hedgehog 3, and Sonic and Knuckles were produced in North America at Sega Technical Institute, albeit with almost exclusively Japanese staff members.
Sonic the Hedgehog is confirmed to be one of the Genesis titles available for Nintendo Wii's Virtual Console service from launch.
Sonic the Hedgehog is frequently modified by ROM hackers, and its data addresses and code are almost completely understood through reverse engineering techniques.
Sonic the Hedgehog CD - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2760 words)
Sonic the Hedgehog CD or Sonic CD (ソニック ザ ヘジホッグ CD/ソニック CD) (as it is known in Europe and North America) is a platform game in the Sonic the Hedgehog series, developed and published by Sega.
It was released for the Sega Mega-CD in Japan on September 23, 1993, in Europe in October, 1993, and finally for the Sega CD in North America on November 19, 1993.
Eventually, the gameplay of Sonic 2 would be favoured for the future games, but this explains why the theme and handling of Sonic CD are different, as well as the use of Sonic 1's sprites for Sonic.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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