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Encyclopedia > Son of God
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Son of God is a phrase from the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible), and the New Testament and other Jewish writings. In the holy Hebrew scriptures, according to Jewish religious tradition, it is related to many diverse subjects, as to angels, humans and even all mankind. According to most Christian traditions, it refers to the relationship between Jesus and God, see God the Son, as well as a relationship achievable by believing Christians.[1] Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh to refer to its canon, which corresponds to the Protestant Old Testament. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... Tanakh (‎) (also Tanach, IPA: or , or Tenak) is an acronym that identifies the Hebrew Bible. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Annunciation - the Angel Gabriel announces to Mary that she will bear Jesus (El Greco, 1575) An angel is an ethereal being found in many religions, whose duties are to assist and serve God. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... This 11th-century portrait is one of many images of Jesus in which a halo with a cross is used. ...


Similar terminology was present during the Ministry of Jesus and in his cultural and historical background. The Roman emperor Augustus was known as "divi filius" (son of the divine one, or of the god, namely of the deified Julius Caesar):[2] "Divi filius", not "Dei filius" (son of God), was the term used.[3] Historians believe Alexander the Great implied he was a demigod by actively using the title "Son of AmmonZeus". (His mother Olympias was said to have declared that Zeus impregnated her while she slept under an oak tree sacred to the god.) The title was bestowed upon him by Egyptian priests of the god Ammon at the Oracle of the god at the Siwah oasis in the Libyan Desert[4] The title was also used of wonder-workers.[5] According to the Canonical Gospels, the Ministry of Jesus began when Jesus was around 30 years old, and lasted a period of 1-3 years, with the Synoptic Gospels generally being considered to argue for it having been a period of 1 year, and the Gospel of John arguing for... This article — a part of the Jesus and history series of articles — discusses the cultural and historical background of Jesus, the central figure of Christianity, without regard to his divinity, or to his existence as an actual historical figure. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... The term demigod, meaning half-god, is a modern distinction, often misapplied in Greek mythology. ... Ammon or Ammonites (עַמּוֹן People, Standard Hebrew ʻAmmon, Tiberian Hebrew ʻAmmôn), also referred to in the Bible as the children of Ammon, were a people living east of the Jordan river who along with the Moabites traced their origin to Lot, the nephew of the patriarch Abraham, and who were... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Macedonian princess. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... Ammon or Ammonites (עַמּוֹן People, Standard Hebrew ʻAmmon, Tiberian Hebrew ʻAmmôn), also referred to in the Bible as the children of Ammon, were a people living east of the Jordan river who along with the Moabites traced their origin to Lot, the nephew of the patriarch Abraham, and who were... Consulting the Oracle by John William Waterhouse, showing eight priestesses in a temple of prophecy An oracle is a person or persons considered to be the source of wise counsel or prophetic opinion; an infallible authority, usually spiritual in nature. ... Desert landscape in Southern Libya The Libyan Desert (Arabic: الصحراء الليبية) is an African desert that is located in the northern and eastern part of the Sahara Desert and occupies southwestern Egypt, eastern Libya and northwestern Sudan. ...


"Son of God" as applied to Jesus is distinguished from similar expressions applied to rulers and heroes in that, while these were treated as sons of some particular god among many (polytheism), Jesus was called the son of the one monotheistic God, i.e. Yahweh or God the Father. Polytheism is belief in or worship of multiple gods or deities. ... Monotheism (in Greek monon = single and Theos = God) is the belief in a single, universal, all-encompassing deity. ... For other uses, see Yahweh (disambiguation). ... In many religions, the supreme God is given the title and attributions of Father. ...

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In the Gospels, the being of Jesus as "son of God", corresponds exactly to the typical Hasid from Galilee, a "pious" holy man that by divine intervention performs miracles and exorcisms,[6][7] an opinion not shared by all (see, below, "Son of God" in the New Testament). Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ... The Hasideans (Hasidæans or Assideans) were a Jewish religious party which commenced to play an important role in political life only during the time of the Maccabean wars, although it had existed for quite some time previous. ... Galilee (Arabic al-jaleel الجليل, Hebrew hagalil הגליל), meaning circuit, is a large area overlapping with much of the North District of Israel. ... A miracle, derived from the old Latin word miraculum meaning something wonderful, is a striking interposition of divine intervention by God in the universe by which the ordinary course and operation of Nature is overruled, suspended, or modified. ... Saint Francis exorcised demons in Arezzo, fresco of Giotto Exorcism (from Late Latin exorcismus, from Greek exorkizein - to adjure, correctly pronounced exercism) is the practice of evicting demons or other evil spiritual entities from a person or place which they are believed to have possessed (taken control of). ...


"Sons of God" according to Judaism

In the Old Testament

In the Old Testament, the phrase "son(s) of God" has an unknown meaning: there are a number of later interpretations. Our translation most likely comes from the Septuagint, which uses the phrase "Uioi Tou Theou", "Sons of the god", to translate it. Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh to refer to its canon, which corresponds to the Protestant Old Testament. ... The Septuagint: A column of uncial text from 1 Esdras in the Codex Vaticanus, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brentons Greek edition and English translation. ...

  • The Hebrew phrase Benei Elohim, often translated as "sons of God", is seen by some to describe angels or immensely powerful human beings. The notion of the word as describing non-divine beings most likely comes from the Targumic Aramaic translation, which uses the phrases "sons of nobles", "Bnei Ravrevaya" in its translation. See Genesis 6:2-4 and Book of Job 1:6. Many Bible scholars believe that this reflects usage in pre-Biblical near-eastern mythology.[citation needed]
  • It is used to denote a human judge or ruler (Psalm 82:6, "children of the Most High"; in many passages "gods" and "judges" can seem to be equations). In a more specialized sense, "son of God" is a title applied only to the real or ideal king over Israel (II Samuel 7: 14, with reference to King David and those of his descendants who carried on his dynasty; comp. Psalm 89:27, 28).
  • Israel as a people is called God's "son", using the singular form (comp. Exodus 4: 22 and Hosea 11:1).

In Judaism the term "son of God" is rarely used in the sense of "messiah, or anointed ones." Psalm 2 refers to God's appointed king of Zion as both God's messiah (an anointed king) and like a son of God. “Hebrew” redirects here. ... There are several theories concerning the identity of the sons of God (bnei elohim, בני האלהים, contrasted with daughters of men) identified in the book of Genesis. ... The Annunciation - the Angel Gabriel announces to Mary that she will bear Jesus (El Greco, 1575) An angel is an ethereal being found in many religions, whose duties are to assist and serve God. ... A targum (plural: targumim) is an Aramaic translation of the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh) written or compiled in the Land of Israel or in Babylonia from the Second Temple period until the early Middle Ages (late first millennium). ... For other uses, see Genesis (disambiguation). ... The Book of Job (איוב) is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible. ... The Books of Samuel (Hebrew: Sefer Shmuel ספר שמואל), are part of the Tanakh (part of Judaisms Hebrew Bible) and also of the Old Testament (of Christianity). ... This page is about the Biblical king David. ... Psalms (Tehilim תהילים, in Hebrew) is a book of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh, and of the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Exodus is the second book of the Torah, the Tanakh, and the Old Testament. ... See also Hoshea, who has the same name in Biblical Hebrew. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In Jewish messianism and eschatology, the Messiah (Hebrew: משיח; Mashiah, Mashiach, or Moshiach, anointed [one]) is a term traditionally referring to a future Jewish king from the Davidic line who will be anointed (the meaning of the Hebrew word משיח) with holy anointing oil and inducted to rule the Jewish people during... Zion (Hebrew: צִיּוֹן, tziyyon; Tiberian vocalization: tsiyyôn; transliterated Zion or Sion) is a term that most often designates the Land of Israel and its capital Jerusalem. ... To anoint is to grease with perfumed oil, animal fat, or melted butter, a process employed ritually by many religions and races. ...


In the Jewish literature that was not finally accepted as part of the Hebrew Bible, but that many Christians do accept as Scripture (see Deuterocanonical books, there are passages in which the title "son of God" is given to the anointed person or Messiah (see Enoch, 55:2; IV Esdras 7:28-29; 13:32, 37, 52; 14:9). The title belongs also to any one whose piety has placed him in a filial relation to God (see Wisdom 2:13, 16, 18; 5:5, where "the sons of God" are identical with "the saints"; comp. Ecclesiasticus [Sirach] iv. 10). Deuterocanonical books is a term used since the sixteenth century in the Roman Catholic Church and Eastern Christianity to describe certain books and passages of the Christian Bible, in contrast to the protocanonical books which are contained in the Hebrew Bible. ... In Jewish messianism and eschatology, the Messiah (Hebrew: משיח; Mashiah, Mashiach, or Moshiach, anointed [one]) is a term traditionally referring to a future Jewish king from the Davidic line who will be anointed (the meaning of the Hebrew word משיח) with holy anointing oil and inducted to rule the Jewish people during...


It has been speculated that it was because of the frequent use of these books by the Early Christians in polemics with Jews, that the Sanhedrin at Yavneh rejected them around AD 80. The Early Christians is a term used to refer to the early followers of Jesus of Nazareth, before the emergence of established Christian orthodoxy. ... After the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 CE, Rabbi Yohanan ben Zakkai relocated to the city of Yavne/Jamnia and founded a school of Jewish law there, becoming a major source for the later Mishna. ... Events By place Roman Empire The Emperor Titus inaugurates the Flavian Amphitheatre with 100 days of games. ...


"Son of God" in the New Testament

In the New Testament the phrase "son of God" is applied repeatedly, in the singular, to Jesus, and to others only in the plural.[8] The New Testament calls Jesus God's "only begotten son" (John 1:8, 1 John 4:9), "his own son" (Romans 8:3). It also refers to Jesus simply as "the son", especially when "the Father" is used to refer to God, as in the phrase "the Father and the Son" (2 John 1:9, Matthew 28:19). This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...


John Dominic Crossan's interpretation

John Dominic Crossan says that the titles "Divine",[9] "Son of God",[10] "God",[11] "God from God",[citation needed] "Dominus" (lord),[12][citation needed] "Redeemer,"[citation needed] "Liberator,"[citation needed] and "Saviour of the World"[citation needed] were collectively[citation needed] applied to Octavian, who became Caesar Augustus after defeating Mark Antony at the Battle of Actium in 31 B.C.[13] Crossan cites what he calls the adoption of them by the early Christians to apply to Jesus as denying them of Caesar the Augustus. "They were taking the identity of the Roman emperor and giving it to a Jewish peasant. Either that was a peculiar joke and a very low lampoon, or it was what the Romans called majistas and we call high treason. " [14] John Dominic Crossan (born Nenagh, Co. ... May refer to the persons: Augustus, Roman Emperor Pope John XIII nigger Category: ... The famous statue of Octavian at the Prima Porta Caesar Augustus (Latin:IMP·CAESAR·DIVI·F·AVGVSTVS) ¹ (23 September 63 BC–19 August AD 14), known to modern historians as Octavian for the period of his life prior to 27 BC, is considered the first and one of the most... Bust of Mark Antony Marcus Antonius (Latin: M·ANTONIVS·M·F·M·N[1]) ( January 14 83 BC – August 1, 30 BC), known in English as Mark Antony, was a Roman politician and general. ... Combatants Octavian Mark Antony, Cleopatra VII of Egypt Commanders Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa Mark Antony Strength 260 warships, mostly liburnian vessels 220 warships, mostly quinqueremes and 60 egyptian warships Casualties Unknown Almost all of Antonys fleet The Battle of Actium was a naval battle of the Roman Civil War between...


Jesus as divine

In mainstream Christianity the title of Son of God is used to describe Jesus as a divine being and a member of the Trinity. The idea behind this view is that God entered into his Creation in the fullest sense, by taking human form in the flesh. Thus, because God is Jesus' Father and his Father is divine, Jesus is also divine. (In the same way, because Jesus' mother is human, he is human. This logic reflects rather the plurality of God than his unity and is often referred to as the Hypostatic Union) Some also see the title as an oblique reference to Proverbs 30:4. The New Testament refers to or implies the deity of Jesus in, for example, Hebrews 1:8, which quotes Psalm 45:6 and interprets it as a confirmation of Jesus' divinity by God the Father. In John 8:58, Jesus states, "Before Abraham was, I am," implying his divinity both by claiming existence prior to his earthly conception, and by referencing God's name "I am" (revealed in Exodus 3:14) in such a way as to suggest that it applied to himself. However other passages, such as John 14:28 or Matthew 19:17, may be perceived as showing that Jesus as the Son of God is not identifiable with or equal to God[15]. The title of Son of God is used by some groups, such as Jehovah's Witnesses, who do not view the title as implying that Jesus is himself God or equal to God. This article is about the Christian Trinity. ... The hypostatic union (also known as the mystical union), in Christian theology, refers to the dual nature of Jesus Christ as being simultaneously God and Man. ...


Jesus as godly

A few Christian scholars[citation needed] hold that in the Synoptic Gospels, Jesus styled himself the Son of God in the same sense as any righteous persons might call themselves "sons" or "children" of God. However, while many of the Israelites portrayed in the Old Testament of the Christian Bible speak in the name of God ("The LORD says this ..."), Jesus often spoke by his own authority (for example, "Truly, I teach to you ..."). He also claimed to hold the power to forgive sins, a power notioned by Judaism as belonging solely to God (as the commandment says "...no other God but me..."). A central tenet of Pharisaic Judaism is that each person has the power, indeed the obligation, to forgive sins of others, but only those committed against themselves: see also Judaism and Christianity, Discourse on ostentation#Prayer. In the New Testament of the Christian Bible, gospels Matthew, Mark, and Luke are so similar that they are called the synoptic gospels (from Greek, συν, syn, together, and οψις, opsis, seeing). ... The Pharisees (from the Hebrew perushim, from parash, meaning to separate) were, depending on the time, a political party, a social movement, and a school of thought among Jews that flourished during the Second Temple Era (536 BCE–70 CE). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The discourse on ostentation, Matthew 6, is a section of the Sermon on the Mount, occurring after the antithesis of the Law, but before the discourse on judgementalism, according to the Gospel of Matthew. ...


In either case, Christians point out that this interpretation does not conflict with the New Testament's portrayal of Jesus as more than merely human and, in their view, both human and divine, as indicated by the miraculous resurrection of God-the-Son from the realm of the dead, miracle-working, forgiveness of sins, and judgement over all people. The resurrection of Jesus is an event in the New Testament in which God raised him from the dead[1] after his death by crucifixion. ... According to the canonical Gospels, Jesus worked many miracles in the course of his ministry. ... For other uses, see Forgiveness (disambiguation). ... Image:Michelangelo - Fresco of the Last Judgment. ...


Jesus as the Messiah

The description "son of God" is applied in the Old Testament and other Jewish writings to kings and in particular to the awaited Messiah (a word that literally means an anointed person and that in the Old Testament was applied to kings and other leaders and that was translated into Greek as Χριστός (Christos), a word of similar meaning that is at the origin of the English word "Christ"). In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Aramaic: , ; Arabic: , ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oi on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ... To anoint is to grease with perfumed oil, animal fat, or melted butter, a process employed ritually by many religions and races. ...


The title of Messiah or Christ was considered to apply to a political office. The New Testament might thus be understood as threatening the political authority of Caesar, who used the title "Divi Filius" (son of the deified preceding emperor) as shown in literature, coinage and lapidary inscriptions of the time. See also Render unto Caesar.... Caesar (plural Caesars), Latin: Cæsar (plural Cæsares), is a title of imperial character. ... Christ and the tribute by Masaccio “Render unto Caesar…” is a phrase attributed to Jesus in the synoptic gospels. ...


Christians

In the Gospel of John, the author writes that "to all who believed him and accepted him [Jesus], he gave the right to become children of God" [John 1:12]. The phrase "children of God" is used ten times in the New Testament.[16] To these can be added the five times, mentioned above, in which the New Testament speaks of "sons of God". As is evident, these phrases, always in the plural, are not used in the exclusive sense sometimes given to the phrase "the Son of God" applied to Jesus in the New Testament. For other uses, see Gospel of John (disambiguation). ...


In modern English usage

In modern English usage, the Son of God is almost always, in religious contexts, a reference to Jesus; "a son of God" may be taken to refer to one of the "sons of God" or "children of God", taken as referring to all humankind or all Christians or some more limited group. This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...


"Son of a god" in other belief systems

Human or part-human offspring of deities are very common in other religions and mythologies. A great many pantheons also included genealogies in which various gods were descended from other gods, and so the term "son of a god" may be applied to many deities themselves.


Ancient mythology contains many characters with both a human parent and a god parent. They include Hercules, whose father was Zeus, and Virgil's Aeneas, whose mother was Venus. For other uses, see Hercules (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Marble Venus of the Capitoline Venus type, Roman (British Museum) Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. ...


In the Greek and Roman cultures in which early Christianity expanded after first arising within Judaism, the concepts of demi-gods, sons or daughters of a god, as in the story of Perseus, were commonly known and accepted. Perseus with the head of Medusa, by Antonio Canova, completed 1801 (Vatican Museums) Perseus, Perseos, or Perseas (Greek: Περσεύς, Περσέως, Περσέας), the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, and was the hero who killed Medusa. ...


In the Rastafari movement it is Haile Selassie who is considered to be God the Son, as a part of the Holy Trinity. He himself never accepted the idea officially. Haile Selassie I Rasta, or the Rastafari movement, is a religion that accepts Haile Selassie I, the former Emperor of Ethiopia, as God incarnate, whom they call Jah. ...


In the Epic of Gilgamesh, one of the earliest recorded legends of humanity, Gilgamesh claimed to be of both human and divine descent. For other uses, see Gilgamesh (disambiguation). ...


See also

For other uses, see Son of man (disambiguation). ... The king or wang (王 wang2) was the Chinese head of state from the Zhou to Qin dynasties. ... There are several theories concerning the identity of the sons of God (bnei elohim, בני האלהים, contrasted with daughters of men) identified in the book of Genesis. ... Mec Vannin is a political party operating in the Isle of Man. ... Tammuz or Tamuz (Arabic تمّوز Tammūz; Hebrew תַּמּוּז, Standard Hebrew Tammuz, Tiberian Hebrew Tammûz; Akkadian Duʾzu, Dūzu; all from Sumerian Dumuzid or Dumuzi legal son who was the dying and rising shepherd... In many religions, the supreme God is given the title and attributions of Father. ... Russian Orthodox Icon of the Theotokos Theotokos is a Greek word that means God-bearer or Mother of God. It is a title assigned by the early Christian Church to Mary, the mother of Jesus, at the Third Ecumenical Council held at Ephesus in 431. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The term trilemma derives from the much older term dilemma, a choice between two unacceptable options. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Cf. John 1:12
  2. ^ Augustus. The Facts
  3. ^ See Lewis and Short for the meanings of "divus". The distinction is remarked on also in the online Encyclopaedia Britannica: "It became customary — if emperors (and empresses) were approved of in their lives — to raise them to divinity after their deaths. They were called divi, not dei like the Olympian gods".
  4. ^ "Not the least of the many extraordinary facts about Alexander is that both in his lifetime and after his death he was worshipped as a god, by Greeks and Ancient Macedonians as well as, for example, Egyptians (to whom he was Pharaoh). The episode that led to Callisthenes' death in 327 was connected to this fact. Greeks and Ancient Macedonians believed that formal obeisance should be paid only to gods. So the refusal of his Greek and Macedonian courtiers to pay it to Alexander implied that they, at any rate, did not believe he genuinely was a living god, at least not in the same sense as Zeus or Dionysus were. Alexander, regardless, did nothing to discourage the view that he really was divine. His claim to divine birth, not merely divine descent, was part of a total self-promotional package, which included the striking of silver medallions in India depicting him with the attributes of Zeus. Through sheer force of personality and magnitude of achievement he won over large numbers of ordinary Greeks and Macedonians to share this view of himself, and to act on it by devoting shrines to his cult."Cartledge, Paul (2004). "Alexander the Great". History Today 54: 1. 
  5. ^ Bauer lexicon, 2nd edition, 1979, page 834. In Contra Celsus VI chapter XI, Origen uses the term of the Samaritan Dositheus, without saying he was a wonder-worker, rather saying that, in the case of Dositheus, the title was self-attributed: "Such were Simon, the Magus of Samaria, and Dositheus, who was a native of the same place; since the former gave out that he was the power of God that is called great, and the latter that he was the Son of God." The Samaritan Dositheus claimed to be the Messiah, which may be what Origen meant by saying that he gave out that he was the Son of God (cf. Catholic Encyclopedia: Dositheans).
  6. ^ Vermes, Geza Jesus the Jew, Fortress Press, New York 1981. p.209
  7. ^ Paolo Flores d'Arcais, MicroMega 3/2007, p.43
  8. ^ Five times explicitly (Matthew 5:9, Luke 20:36, Romans 8:14 and 8:19, Galatians 3:26, and implicitly in Galatians 4:6
  9. ^ Presumably a reference to the Latin word "divus", a title given to Octavian, as to later emperors, only after death (see Apotheosis): in life Octavian rejected it ("Ostentatiously rejecting divinity on his own account, he rose to power via Caesar's divine image instead" - Augustus, by Pat Southern, p. 63).
  10. ^ The corresponding Latin phrase is "divi filius", i.e. (adopted) son of the deified Julius Caesar, a title on which, as indicated in the already quoted biography of Augustus by Pat Southern, he largely built his rise to power. "Divi filius" is not the same expression as "Dei filius", which was applied to Jesus in the Vulgate translation of the New Testament, as, for instance, in 1 John 5:5.
  11. ^ Presumably, again a reference to the Latin word "divus".
  12. ^ The assertion here attributed to Crossan that Octavian used this title is contradicted by other sources, such as The Britannica Online Encyclopaedia, which states that the word "dominus" meant "in ancient Rome, 'master', or 'owner', particularly of slaves. The name became the official title for the emperor, beginning with Diocletian, who reigned from AD 284 to 305; and thus he and his successors are often referred to as the dominate (dominatus), as contrasted with the earlier principate (principatus) of Augustus and his successors."
  13. ^ In reality, Octavian became Caesar (a member of the family of that name) in 44 B.C. (Augustus. The Facts; A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, by William Smith), and Augustus on 16 January 27 B.C., four years after defeating Mark Antony at the Battle of Actium in 31 B.C.
  14. ^ Crossan, John Dominic, God and Empire, 2007, p. 28
  15. ^ http://skepticsannotatedbible.com/interp/jesus_god.html
  16. ^ The other nine instances are John 11:52, Romans 8:16, Romans 8:21, Romans 9:8, Philippians 2:15, 1 John 3:1-2, 1 John 3:10, 1 John 5:2

For the full range of meanings of Macedonia, see Macedonia (terminology). ... Pharaoh was the ancient Egyptian name for the office of kingship. ... Callisthenes, or Kallisthenes, ( in Greek) of Olynthus (c. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... This article does not discuss cult in its original meaning. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Origen Origen (Greek: Ōrigénēs, 185–ca. ... For the film, see Simon Magus (film). ... Géza Vermes (IPA: , born 22 June 1924) is a scholar and writer on religious history, particularly Jewish and Christian. ... Paolo Flores dArcais (Cervignano del Friuli, july 11 1944) is an italian philosopher and journalist, editor of magazine MicroMega. ... MicroMega is a political, cultural, social and economic magazine. ... Look up Apotheosis in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... The Vulgate Bible is an early 5th century version in Latin, partly revised and partly translated by Jerome on the orders of Pope Damasus I in 382. ... Look up Caesar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events The Emperor Tiberius retires to Capri, leaving the praetorian prefect Sejanus in charge of both Rome and the Empire. ... Bust of Mark Antony Marcus Antonius (Latin: M·ANTONIVS·M·F·M·N[1]) ( January 14 83 BC – August 1, 30 BC), known in English as Mark Antony, was a Roman politician and general. ... Combatants Octavian Mark Antony, Cleopatra VII of Egypt Commanders Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa Mark Antony Strength 260 warships, mostly liburnian vessels 220 warships, mostly quinqueremes and 60 egyptian warships Casualties Unknown Almost all of Antonys fleet The Battle of Actium was a naval battle of the Roman Civil War between...

References

References of the devil or demons calling Jesus Son of God: This page is about the concept of the Devil. ... “Fiend” redirects here. ...

  • Matthew 4:3
  • Matthew 4:6,
  • Matthew 8:29
  • Mark 3:11
  • Luke 4:3
  • Luke 4:9
  • Luke 4:41

References to humans calling Jesus Son of God:

  • Matthew 14:33
  • Matthew 27:54
  • Mark 1:1
  • Mark 15:39
  • John 1:34
  • John 1:49
  • John 11:27
  • John 20:31
  • Acts 9:20
  • Romans 1:4
  • 2 Corinthians 1:19
  • Galatians 2:20
  • Hebrews 4:14
  • Hebrews 6:6
  • Hebrews 7:3
  • Hebrews 10:29
  • 1 John 3:8
  • 1 John 4:15
  • 1 John 5:1
  • 1 John 5:5
  • 1 John 5:10
  • 1 John 5:13
  • 1 John 5:20
  • Matthew 14:33
  • Revelation 2:18

Jesus referring to himself as the Son of God:

  • John 3:18
  • John 5:25
  • John 10:36
  • John 11:4

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Son of God - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (929 words)
The term was widespread during the life of Jesus, as Roman emperor Augustus was known as the "son" of the deified Julius Caesar.
In Judaism the term "son of God" is rarely used in the sense of "messiah." Psalm 2 refers to God's appointed king of Zion as both God's messiah and like a son of god.
In modern English usage, the Son of God is almost always a reference to Jesus Christ, whom traditional Christianity holds to be the son of the God the Father.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Son of God (1886 words)
The theocratic king as lieutenant of God, and especially when he was providentially selected to be a type of the Messias, was honoured with the title "Son of God".
The title "the Son of God" is frequently applied to Jesus Christ in the Gospels and Epistles.
Son of God is equal to the Messias, still, as the same words were used on both occasions, It is likely they had the same meaning in both cases.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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