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Encyclopedia > Somewhere over the Rainbow

"Over the Rainbow", music by Harold Arlen and lyrics by Yip Harburg, is one of the most famous songs of the late 1930s. Harold Arlen, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1960 Harold Arlen (February 15, 1905 - April 23, 1986) was an American composer of popular music. ... E. Y. Yip Harburg (April 8, 1896 - March 5, 1981) was a lyricist who worked with many well-known composers. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ...


Many feel the song epitomizes the hopes and dreams of youthful aspiration for an ideal world of love and joy. The song was especially written to showcase Judy Garland's talents in the star vehicle The Wizard of Oz, and she was forever after called upon to sing it in all her public appearances, for it became her lifelong theme song. Judy Garland (June 10, 1922 – June 22, 1969), born Frances Ethel Gumm, was an American film actress considered by many to be one of the greatest singing stars of Hollywoods Golden Era of musical film. ... The Wizard of Oz is a 1939 musical fantasy film produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. ...


Its plaintive melody and simple lyrics depict a pre-adolescent girl's desire for an escape from the "hopeless jumble" of this world, from the sadness of raindrops to the bright new world "over the rainbow". It expresses the childlike faith that "Heaven" will magically "open a door" to a place where "troubles melt like lemon-drops".


However, with the rise of rainbow imagery linked to the gay community in the 1970s the song also lends itself to a more nuanced interpretation. The rainbow flag is often used as a symbol of gay pride, and the lyrics speak of a better life to come on the other side of that rainbow. As Garland is a well known gay icon, this interpretation is quite fitting. A Gay Icon is a larger-than-life celebrity or public figure with wide-spread fans amongst the LGBT community, particularly those figures preceived to be strong or brave individuals who have wrestled with issues of sexuality and/or psychological demons and have suffered publicly and survived. ...


The song tops the "Songs of the Century" list compiled by the Recording Industry Association of America and the National Endowment for the Arts. It also topped the American Film Institute's "100 Years, 100 Songs" list. The Songs of the Century list is part of an education project by the Recording Industry Association of America, the National Endowment for the Arts, and Scholastic Inc. ... The American Film Institute (AFI) is an independent non-profit organization created by the National Endowment for the Arts, which was established in 1967 when President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act. ...


The American troops in Europe in WWII adopted the song, as well as Irving Berlin's "White Christmas", as a symbol of the US, that faraway land that, after long years of war, seemed like a dream, beyond the rainbow. Modern listeners may be unaware that the song had an introductory stanza, as this was not sung in the film by Garland. Combatants Allies: Poland, British Commonwealth, France/Free France, Soviet Union, United States, China, and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, and others Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total dead: 50 million Military dead: 8 million Civilian dead: 4 million Total dead: 12 million World War II... Irving Berlin (May 11, 1888 – September 22, 1989), born Israel Isidore Beilin (as per [1]), in Tyumen, Russia (or possibly Mogilev, now Belarus), was an American composer and lyricist, one of the most prodigious and famous American songwriters in history. ... White Christmas is an Irving Berlin song whose lyrics reminisce about White Christmases. ...


The song has come to epitomize the gesture of the rising octave, which makes its opening so distinctive. Sight-singing instructors and other musicians use the song as an example and a reference point for hearing the interval. In music, an octave (sometimes abbreviated 8ve or 8va) is the interval between one musical note and another with half or double the frequency. ...


Modern-day recordings of the song

Hundreds of singers have recorded their own versions of "Over the Rainbow", including:


Sam Harris performed a winning rendition on the first season of the original Star Search. Barbra Streisand, Eric Clapton, Jerry Lee Lewis, Kylie Minogue, Rufus Wainwright, and Garland's daughters Liza Minnelli and Lorna Luft have sung the song in concert. One of the most interesting versions was recorded by the late Hawaiian singer Israel Kamakawiwo'ole whose medley of "Rainbow" and Louis Armstrong's "What a Wonderful World" was featured on the soundtrack of the films Meet Joe Black, Finding Forrester, and 50 First Dates. James Stewart memorably warbled a rendition while carrying a "drunk" Katharine Hepburn in The Philadelphia Story. Even horror legend Vincent Price did a version in the film Dr. Phibes Rises Again. Elisabeth Andreassen also recorded the song. There are several people named Michael Ball: Michael Ball (singer), a singer and actor Michael Ball (footballer), an English football (soccer) player (A gay) This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Dame Shirley Veronica Bassey, DBE (born January 8, 1937), is a Welsh singer, perhaps best-known for performing the theme songs to the James Bond films Goldfinger (1964), Diamonds Are Forever (1971), and Moonraker (1979). ... Tony Bennett, 2000 Tony Bennetts heart, left in San Francisco Tony Bennett (born August 3, 1926) is an American popular music, standards, and jazz singer who is widely considered to be one of the best interpretative singers in these genres. ... David Bowie (born David Robert Jones on January 8, 1947) is an English rock singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger, mixer, actor and artist. ... Brubeck in 1954 David Warren (Dave) Brubeck (born December 6, 1920 in Concord, California) is an American jazz pianist who has written a number of jazz standards, including In Your Own Sweet Way and The Duke. ... Eva Cassidy Eva Marie Cassidy (February 2, 1963 in Oxon Hill, Maryland – November 2, 1996 in Bowie, Maryland) was an American vocalist described by the British newspaper The Guardian as one of the greatest voices of her generation. Although possessing a soulful voice, an extraordinary range, and a diverse repertoire... Ray Charles was the stage name of Ray Charles Robinson (September 23, 1930 – June 10, 2004). ... Richard Clayderman Richard Clayderman (born Philippe Pagès on December 28, 1953, Paris, France) is a French pianist who has released numerous albums, including his own controversial renditions and arrangements of popular Beethoven, Liszt, Chopin and Mozart classics. ... Harry Connick, Jr. ... Vic Damone (born June 12, 1928 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American singer. ... Doris Day Doris Day (born April 3, 1924), is an American singer, actress, and animal welfare advocate. ... This article is about the rock group. ... Céline Marie Claudette Dion, OC, OQ (born March 30, 1968) is a Canadian Grammy, Juno, and Oscar award-winning pop singer and occasional songwriter and actress. ... Plácido Domingo (born January 21, 1941) is a world-renowned opera singer, conductor, and general manager. ... Linda Eder Linda Eder (born February 3, 1961) is a singer and Broadway star who has released several successful albums and has starred in the Broadway show Jekyll & Hyde. ... Ella Jane Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996), also known as Lady Ella (the First Lady of Song), was an American singer, considered one of the most influential jazz vocalists of the 20th Century, alongside Billie Holiday and Sarah Vaughan. ... Aretha Franklin Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American gospel, soul and R&B singer born in Memphis, Tennessee, but raised in Detroit, Michigan. ... Audrey Faith Perry, later known as Faith Hill (born September 21, 1967 in Jackson, Mississippi), is a successful American country singer, known for her commercial success as well as her much-publicized marriage to country singer Tim McGraw. ... Il Divo (L-R: Urs, Sébastien, David, and Carlos. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Stan Getz Stanley Getz, better known as Stan Getz (February 2, 1927 – June 6, 1991) was an American jazz musician. ... Bruddah Iz on the cover of Facing Future Israel Bruddah Iz Kamakawiwoole (May 20, 1959–June 26, 1997) (pronounced IPA ) was a popular entertainer and singer in Hawaii until his death at the age of 38. ... Patti LaBelle Patti LaBelle (born Patricia Louise Holt on May 24, 1944 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a hugely revered African-American R&B/soul singer who fronted two moderately successful groups before rising to stardom as a solo artist in the late 1970s, influencing a new generation of female singers. ... Kimberley Locke on the cover of her debut album One Love Kimberley Dawn Locke (born January 1, 1978 in Hartsville, Tennessee) is an American Adult Contemporary Pop/R&B singer. ... Melissa Manchester (born on February 15, 1951 at New York, New York) is an American singer-songwriter and actress. ... Marusha is a German Happy Hardcore artist, who was on the hit lists in the mid 90s. ... John Royce Mathis (born September 30, 1935), known popularly as Johnny Mathis, is an American popular music singer. ... Martina McBride at the 2003 American Music Awards. ... Susannah McCorkle Susannah McCorkle (1 January 1946 – 19 May 2001) was an American jazz singer much admired for her direct, unadorned singing style and quiet intensity. ... Katharine Hope McPhee (born March 25, 1984) is an American singer who was the runner-up on the fifth season of American Idol. ... Me First and the Gimme Gimmes is a punk rock cover band that formed in 1995. ... Metallica is an American heavy metal band. ... Major Glenn Miller Glenn Miller (March 1, 1904–probably December 15, 1944) started life as Alton Glenn Miller in Clarinda, Iowa. ... Jane Monheit (born November 3, 1977) is considered by some to be one of the most promising American jazz vocalists of her generation. ... Nana Mouskouri (born Ioanna Mouskouri on October 13, 1934, at 5 AM, in Chania, Crete, Greece) is a Greek singer and politician. ... The Mystics are a singing group which began in Brooklyn, New York, USA in the late 1950s. ... Willie Nelson William Hugh Willie Nelson (born April 30, 1933) is an American entertainer and songwriter, and originally from Abbott, Texas. ... Olivia Newton-John, 1988 Olivia Newton-John, OBE (born September 26, 1948, Cambridge) is a British-born Australian singer and actress. ... Harry Nilsson Harry Edward Nilsson III (June 15, 1941 – January 15, 1994) was an American songwriter, singer, pianist and guitarist, most popular during the 1960s and 1970s. ... The Ohio Players are a funk band whose heyday was in the mid- to late 1970s. ... Mandel Bruce Patinkin (born November 30, 1952 in Chicago, Illinois), is an American actor and renowned tenor. ... Phish was an American rock band noted for jamming and improvisation. ... The Platters were a very successful doo wop group, formed in 1953. ... Queen is a British rock band created by Freddie Mercury, Brian May, Roger Taylor, and John Deacon from the remains of Smile. ... The Ramones (L-R, Johnny, Tommy, Joey, Dee Dee) on the cover of their debut self-titled album (1976), cementing their place at the dawn of the punk movement. ... Reel Big Fish (RBF) is a southern California ska rock band who broke into the mainstream in the mid to late 1990s after the success of No Doubt and Sublime. ... Francis Albert Sinatra (December 12, 1915 – May 14, 1998) was an American singer who is one of the most highly acclaimed male popular song vocalists of all time. ... Jo Stafford Jo Elizabeth Stafford (born November 12, 1917) is a singer whose career spanned the late 1920s through the early 1960s. ... Art Tatum, The Great Jazz Pianist Arthur Tatum, Jr. ... Herbert Buckingham Khaury (April 12, 1923–November 30, 1996), better known by the stage name Tiny Tim, was an American singer, ukulele player, and musical archivist. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Shayne Ward (born 15 October 1984 in Manchester) is an Anglo-Irish pop singer who rose to prominence in the United Kingdom after becoming the winner of the 2005 series of the talent show The X Factor. ... Sam Harris is an American pop and musical theatre singer. ... Star Search was a television show from 1983 to 1995 hosted by Ed McMahon. ... Barbra Streisand (born April 24, 1942) is an iconic two-time Academy Award-winning American singer, theatre and film actress, composer, film producer and director. ... Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE (born March 30, 1945), nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award winning British guitarist, singer and composer, who became one of the most respected and influential musicians of the rock-era, garnering an unprecedented three inductions into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. ... Jerry Lee Lewis (born September 29, 1935) is an American rock and roll and country music singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... Kylie Ann Minogue (born May 28, 1968) is an Australian singer-songwriter and occasional actress. ... Rufus Wainwright at the Sundance Film Festival, January 21, 2006 Rufus McGarrigle Wainwright (born July 22, 1973) is a Canadian-American singer-songwriter. ... Liza Minnelli. ... Lorna Luft (born November 21, 1952 in Santa Monica, California) is an American entertainer, who has appeared on stage in Broadway, television, and film since childhood. ... In April of 1990, Daniel K. Akaka became the first native Hawaiian and Chinese American to serve in the United States Congress as a Senator from the State of Hawaii. ... Bruddah Iz on the cover of Facing Future Israel Bruddah Iz Kamakawiwoole (May 20, 1959–June 26, 1997) (pronounced IPA ) was a popular entertainer and singer in Hawaii until his death at the age of 38. ... Louis Daniel Armstrong (July 4, 1900[1] – July 6, 1971) (also known by the nicknames Satchmo for satchel-mouth and Pops) was an American jazz musician. ... What a Wonderful World was written by songwriters Bob Thiele and George David Weiss, first performed by Louis Armstrong, and released as a single in early 1968. ... Meet Joe Black is a 1998 remake of the 1934 film, Death Takes a Holiday, starring Brad Pitt, Anthony Hopkins, and Claire Forlani. ... Rob Brown and Sean Connery on the DVD cover Finding Forrester is a 2000 movie, written by Mike Rich and directed by Gus Van Sant, about a black teenager, Jamal Wallace, played by Rob Brown, who is accepted into a prestigious private high school. ... 50 First Dates is a 2004 romantic comedy starring Adam Sandler and Drew Barrymore and directed by Peter Segal. ... Jimmy Stewart, photo by Carl Van Vechten, 1934 James Maitland Jimmy Stewart (May 20, 1908 – July 2, 1997) was a highly acclaimed Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor, best known for his homebred screen persona. ... Hepburn, in a publicity shot for Song of Love Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an iconic four-time Academy Award-winning American star of film, television and stage, widely recognized for her sharp wit, New England gentility and fierce independence. ... The Philadelphia Story is a 1940 romantic screwball comedy starring James Stewart, Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant. ... Vincent Price on Broadway as Mr. ... Dr. Phibes Rises Again (1972) was the second Dr. Phibes movie, a sequel to The Abominable Dr. Phibes. ... Elisabeth Bettan Andreassen (born March 28, 1958) is a Swedish-Norwegian singer. ...


British television comedian Kenny Everett sometimes used the song in comedy segments that included the unique sound of a British police car siren and Everett singing the lyrics, "Behind me!" and "That's where you'll find me!" Kenny Everett Kenny Everett (born Maurice Cole in Crosby, Merseyside, Liverpool, December 25, 1944, died April 4, 1995), was a popular British radio DJ and television entertainer. ... Pneumatic siren Sirens are devices making sound to alarm others, such as the air raid siren or the sirens on emergency service vehicles such as ambulances, police cars and fire engines. ...


The cover band Me First and the Gimme Gimmes covered the song for their 1999 album Are a Drag, and in the animated series The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy, Grey Delisle sang it as her character, Mandy. Guitarist Joe Satriani occasionally covers the song at his concerts. Guitarist Ritchie Blackmore would perform a few bars of the verse at the beginning of his concerts, when he Rocked the world with his band of Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow, in those years from 1975 to 1983. Me First and the Gimme Gimmes is a punk rock cover band that formed in 1995. ... Are a Drag was the second album by Me First and the Gimme Gimmes, released in 1999 on the Fat Wreck Chords independent record label. ... The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy, created by Maxwell Atoms, is an American animated television series that currently airs on Cartoon Network. ... Grey DeLisle Grey DeLisle (born August 12, 1972 in Fort Ord, California) is an American singer, songwriter, and voice actress of Irish and Hispanic descent. ... A guitarist is a musician who plays the guitar. ... Joe Satch Satriani (born on July 15, 1956, in Westbury, New York and brought up in Carle Place, New York, USA) is an instrumental rock guitarist and teacher, and a recognized virtuoso of the rock guitar. ... A guitarist is a musician who plays the guitar. ... Ritchie Blackmore Richard Hugh Blackmore (born in Weston-super-Mare, April 14, 1945) is regarded as one of the most influential and respected British guitarists of all time. ... Ritchie Blackmores Rainbow (1975) is the first LP released by Rainbow. ...


In Stephen Schwartz's musical Wicked, a loose adaptation of Gregory Maguire's Oz novel of the same name, a variation of the tune is used as one of the leitmotifs attached to the main character, Elphaba. The lyrics of "Un-li-mi-ted, my fu-ture -" is arranged to the same intervals (though not the same rhythm) as "Some-where o-ver the rain-bow'. As Elphaba later becomes known as the Wicked Witch of the West, and because Dorothy and she are literary foils, the tune acquires an ironic subtext. (It also may be noted that by restricting the piece to seven notes, Schwartz avoids copyright issues with his use of the music. Stephen Schwartz (born March 6, 1948) is an American musical theater lyricist and composer. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Gregory Maguire received his Ph. ... The Oz books form a book series that begins with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and that relates the history of the Land of Oz. ... Wicked book cover Wicked (ISBN 0060987103), or Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, is a novel by Gregory Maguire. ... A leitmotif (also spelled leitmotiv) is a recurring musical theme, associated within a particular piece of music with a particular person, place or idea. ... Idina Menzel as Elphaba in the Broadway adaptation of Wicked - (Photo by Joan Marcus) Elphaba Thropp is the name given to the Wicked Witch of the West in Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West by Gregory Maguire, as well as in the Broadway adaptation... In music theory, an interval is the relationship between two notes or pitches, the lower and higher members of the interval. ... // Rhythm (Greek ρυθμός = tempo) is the variation of the duration of sounds or other events over time. ... The Wicked Witch of the West, as portrayed by Margaret Hamilton in the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz The Wicked Witch of the West (or simply The Wicked Witch) is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum in his childrens... A foil character is either one who is in most ways opposite to the main character or nearly the same as the main character. ... Irony is best known as a figure of speech (more precisely called verbal irony) in which there is a gap or incongruity between what a speaker or a writer says, and what is understood. ...


"Over The Rainbow" is featured as a Dance Dance Revolution song, available on the 7th mix in the CD line. An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: If you are familiar with the subject matter, please expand the article to establish its notability, citing reliable sources, so as to avoid its being considered...


The Smashing Pumpkins would often include "Over The Rainbow" in the live/jam version of "Silverfuck". This is present on the live concert album Earphoria but on the DVD Vieuphoria it is edited out, because they did not have the rights to the song. "Rainbow" can also be found on Ray Charles's final album, Genius Loves Company, as a duet with Johnny Mathis. The Smashing Pumpkins are a popular American alternative rock band which formed in Chicago, Illinois in 1988. ... Earphoria was a part of a live CD/VHS (with Vieuphoria) released in 1994 (and rereleased as a CD/DVD set on November 26, 2002) by The Smashing Pumpkins. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for data storage, including movies with high video and sound quality. ... Vieuphoria was a part of a live CD/VHS (with Earphoria) released in 1994 (and rereleased as a CD/DVD set on November 26, 2002) by The Smashing Pumpkins. ... Ray Charles was the stage name of Ray Charles Robinson (September 23, 1930 – June 10, 2004). ... The cover of Genius Loves Company. ... John Royce Mathis (born September 30, 1935), known popularly as Johnny Mathis, is an American popular music singer. ...


Jane Monheit, whose version of "Over The Rainbow" from her sophomore album Come Dream With Me contains an introduction verse that very few recognize (but was recently resurrected by runner-up Katharine McPhee on the 5th season of American Idol): Jane Monheit (born November 3, 1977) is considered by some to be one of the most promising American jazz vocalists of her generation. ... Katharine Hope McPhee (born March 25, 1984) is an American singer who was the runner-up on the fifth season of American Idol. ... American Idol, formerly known as American Idol: The Search for a Superstar, is an American television show. ...


"When all the clouds are a hopeless jumble / And the raindrops tumble to the ground / Heaven opens a magic lane / When all the clouds darken up the skyway / There's a rainbow highway to be found / Leading from your window pane / To a place behind the sun / Just a step beyond the rain ..."


Monheit will later re-record a shorter version of the song (minus this intro) for the soundtrack to the film Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow starring Jude Law, Angelina Jolie, and Gwyneth Paltrow. Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow is a film released on September 17, 2004 in the United States. ... Law in The Wisdom of Crocodiles (US title: Immortality) David Jude Law (born December 29, 1972, in Lewisham, South London, England) is an Academy Award nominated English actor. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Gwyneth Paltrow and Jude Law at a press conference for at the 2000 Berlinale, photo by Michael Weiner Gwyneth Kate Paltrow (born September 27, 1972) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ...


The song has produced memorable moments on American Idol. The third-place finisher on Season 2, Kimberley Locke, performed it at her initial audition and in the final three. She included it on the Season 2 compilation CD. Locke's version is highly embellished with vocal improvisations, but was widely respected by the judges and audience. American Idol, formerly known as American Idol: The Search for a Superstar, is an American television show. ... Kimberley Locke on the cover of her debut album One Love Kimberley Dawn Locke (born January 1, 1978 in Hartsville, Tennessee) is an American Adult Contemporary Pop/R&B singer. ...


In Season 5, Katharine McPhee performed the song in the final three show on May 16, 2006. Judge Simon Cowell chose the song for her. McPhee performed sitting on the stage and wearing red shoes. She sang the little-known opening verse a capella leading into a version that was more subdued than Locke's. The judges had high praise for McPhee's performance, and it is believed that the song was responsible for vaulting her into the season's final two. Several critics, including Cowell, consider McPhee's performance to be the best of the entire season[citation needed]. McPhee reprised her performance of the song in the final performance show on May 23. Her version again received rave reviews. It will be included as a double A-side on her single, "My Destiny," which will be released on June 27, 2006. Katharine Hope McPhee (born March 25, 1984) is an American singer who was the runner-up on the fifth season of American Idol. ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (137th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Simon Philip Cowell (born 7 October 1959) is a British artist and repertoire (A&R) executive for BMG, but is best known as a judge on the television programmes Pop Idol, American Idol, and The X Factor, where he is notorious for his unsparingly blunt and occasionally controversial criticism of... May 23 is the 143rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (144th in leap years). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into B-side. ... My Destiny is a song performed by Katharine McPhee and written by Harry Sommerdahl, Hanne Sorvaag and Tim Baxter. ... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Chinese Pop singer Angela Chang named her debut album "Over the Rainbow," after this song. She said this is the song her mother used to teach her to sing[citation needed]. Angela Chang (Simplified Chinese: 张韶涵; Traditional Chinese: 張韶涵; Pinyin: Zhāng Sháohán, born January 19, 1982) is a Taiwanese singer and also actress. ...


External links

  • lyrics at Warner Brothers website

  Results from FactBites:
 
Somewhere over the Rainbow - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1033 words)
"Over the Rainbow", music by Harold Arlen and lyrics by Yip Harburg, is one of the most famous songs of the late 1930s, as well as the seminal gay anthem.
The rainbow flag is often used as a symbol of gay pride, and the lyrics speak of a better life to come on the other side of that rainbow.
"Somewhere Over The Rainbow" is featured as a Dance Dance Revolution song, available on the 7th mix in the CD line.
Somewhere over the rainbow (931 words)
The rainbow is not some sort of heavenly, mystical phenomenon; it is a natural occurrence, scientifically explained, appearing when light shines through moisture and clouds.
The rainbow is, after all, a reminder that although the world may be deserving of a flood, such a cataclysmic event will not occur.
Interestingly, although a special blessing is recited on seeing the rainbow, we are nonetheless cautioned not to gaze lingeringly at the rainbow, since it is not a pleasant reminder.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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