FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Somerset Levels
The view towards Brent Knoll from Glastonbury Tor.
The view towards Brent Knoll from Glastonbury Tor.

The Somerset Levels (or Somerset Levels and Moors as they are less commonly, but more correctly, called) is a sparsely populated wetland area of central Somerset, England, between the Quantock and Mendip hills, consisting of marine clay "levels" along the coast, and the inland (often peat based) "moors". Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3008x2000, 771 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Somerset Levels User:Steinsky/photos Geology of Somerset Brent Knoll Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3008x2000, 771 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Somerset Levels User:Steinsky/photos Geology of Somerset Brent Knoll Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added... Brent Knoll is a small hill in the county of Somerset in the United Kingdom. ... Glastonbury Tor is a teardrop-shaped hill at Glastonbury, Somerset, England, with its only standing architectural feature the roofless St Michaels Tower of the former church. ... A subtropical wetland in Florida, USA, with an endangered American Crocodile. ... Somerset is a county in the south-west of England. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... The Quantock Hills are a range of hills near Bridgwater in Somerset in the south-west of England. ... Cheddar Gorge The beautiful Mendip hills The Mendip Hills are a range of limestone hills (karst) situated to the south of Bristol and Bath in north Somerset, England. ... The Gay Head cliffs in Marthas Vineyard are made almost entirely of clay. ... Peat in Lewis, Scotland Peat is an accumulation of partially decayed vegetation matter. ...


The total area of the levels amounts to approximately 160,000 acres (650 km²) and broadly corresponds to the administrative district of Sedgemoor but also includes southeast Mendip. An acre is an English unit of area, which is also frequently used in the United States and some Commonwealth countries. ... Local government areas called districts are used, or have been used, in several countries. ... Sedgemoor is a local government district of Somerset in England. ... Categories: Stub | Somerset ...


Discussions are taking place concerning the possibility of obtaining World Heritage Site status for the Somerset Levels and Moors as a 'cultural landscape' [1]. A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State...

Contents

Geology

Although underlain by much older formations that protrude to form what would once have been islands - such as Athelney, Brent Knoll and Glastonbury Tor - the lowland landscape was formed only during the last 10,000 years, following the end of the last ice age. Athelney is a small village located in the Sedgemoor district of Somerset, England. ... Brent Knoll is a small hill in the county of Somerset in the United Kingdom. ... Glastonbury Tor is a teardrop-shaped hill at Glastonbury, Somerset, England, with its only standing architectural feature the roofless St Michaels Tower of the former church. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ...


The peak of the peat formation took place in swamp conditions around 6,000 years ago, although in some areas it continued into medieval times. A freshwater swamp This article is about the wetland type (a landform). ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ...


Drainage

The River Brue in an artificial channel draining farmland near Glastonbury.
The River Brue in an artificial channel draining farmland near Glastonbury.

The moors and levels formed from a submerged and reclaimed landscape. Much of the area is at, or only slightly above, sea level, so until it was drained in the 17th century it was a marsh that was frequently flooded by the sea, a problem that was not fully resolved until the sea defences were enhanced at Bridgwater in the early 20th century. Early attempts to control the water levels date from the 13th century but were not widespread. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3008x2000, 2364 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Somerset Levels User:Steinsky/photos Geology of Somerset River Brue Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3008x2000, 2364 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Somerset Levels User:Steinsky/photos Geology of Somerset River Brue Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added... River Brue originates in the parish of Brewham. ... Statistics Population: 8,800 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: ST501390 Administration District: Mendip Shire county: Somerset Region: South West England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Somerset Historic county: Somerset Services Police force: Avon and Somerset Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South Western Post office... Look up flood in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Coastal management. ... Statistics Population: 36,563 (2001 census) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: ST305370 Administration District: Sedgemoor Shire county: Somerset Region: South West England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Somerset Historic county: Somerset Services Police force: Avon and Somerset Police Ambulance service: South Western Post office and... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ...


The levels are now mechanically drained by a network of drainage channels, known locally as "rhynes" (pronounced "reens"). Water levels are carefully managed and the levels are not as intensively drained or farmed as the East Anglian fens (historically a similar area of low marsh). They are still liable to widespread fresh water flooding in winter. Norfolk and Suffolk, the core area of East Anglia. ... A fen is a sere, a phase in the natural ecological succession from the open water of a lake to (for example) woodland. ...


Flowing through the Levels are the rivers Axe, Brue, Huntspill, Kenn, Parrett, Tone and Yeo, together with the King's Sedgemoor Drain. The River Axe is a river in south west England. ... River Brue originates in the parish of Brewham. ... The River Hunstspill (or Huntspill River) is an aritificial river in the Somerset Levels in the Sedgemoor district of the United Kingdom. ... The River Parrett has its source in the springs in the hills around Chedington in Dorset in England and flows west through the Somerset Levels to its mouth in the Bristol Channel at Burnham on Sea a town on the edge of Bridgwater Bay, an important Nature Reserve. ... River Tone is a river in Somerset, that flows through Taunton and joins the River Parret. ... There are several rivers called the Yeo in the West Country of England. ... Kings Sedgemoor Drain is an artificial drainage channel which diverts the River Cary in Somerset, England along the southern flank of the Polden Hills, to discharge into the River Parrett at Dunball near Bridgwater. ...


Human habitation

In prehistory it is thought that, due to winter flooding, humans restricted their use of the levels to the summer, a practice that gave rise to name of the county of Somerset (derived from Sumorsaete, meaning land of the summer people). Stonehenge, England, erected by Neolithic peoples ca. ...


The area was settled by the Bronze Age, with the population supporting themselves largely by hunting and fishing in the surrounding marsh, living on artificial islands connected by wooden causeways on wooden piles. These included the Sweet Track, currently the world's oldest known engineered roadway dating from the 3800s BC. The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... The Hindenburgdamm rail causeway across the Wadden Sea to the island of Sylt in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany In modern usage, a causeway is a road or railway elevated by a bank, usually across a broad body of water or wetland. ... The Sweet Track is an ancient causeway in the Somerset Levels, England. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... (40th century BC - 39th century BC - 38th century BC - other centuries) (5th millennium BC - 4th millennium BC - 3rd millennium BC) Events Construction in England of the Sweet Track, the Worlds first known engineered roadway. ...


Several towns were also built on the natural 'islands' of slightly raised land, including Brent Knoll, Glastonbury, and the low range of the Polden Hills. It's easy to see why the area acquired a number of legends, particularly of King Arthur and his followers, who some believe based his court at the hill fort at South Cadbury. Brent Knoll is a small hill in the county of Somerset in the United Kingdom. ... Statistics Population: 8,800 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: ST501390 Administration District: Mendip Shire county: Somerset Region: South West England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Somerset Historic county: Somerset Services Police force: Avon and Somerset Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South Western Post office... The Polden Hills are a long, low ridge, extending for 20 miles, and separated from the Mendip Hills, to which they are nearly parallel, by a marshy tract, know as the Somerset Levels. ... A bronze Arthur in plate armour with visor raised and with jousting shield wearing Kastenbrust armour (early 15c). ... South Cadbury in Somerset is a hilltop archaeological site covering an area of around 8ha, 12km northeast of Yeovil and near the historical hillfort Cadbury Castle. ...


The Levels were also the location of the Glastonbury Lake Village. Discovered in 1982 by Arthur Bulleid, it remains the best-preserved prehistoric village in the United Kingdom, and was at one time inhabited by around 200 people living in 14 roundhouses. Statistics Population: 8,800 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: ST501390 Administration District: Mendip Shire county: Somerset Region: South West England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Somerset Historic county: Somerset Services Police force: Avon and Somerset Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South Western Post office... Stonehenge, England, erected by Neolithic peoples ca. ... The roundhouse is a type of house with a circular plan, built in western Europe before the Roman occupation. ...


Alfred the Great famously burnt cakes when hiding in the marshes of Athelney, after the Danish invasion in 875. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Athelney is a small village located in the Sedgemoor district of Somerset, England. ... Events December 29 - Charles the Bald, king of west Danes capture Lindisfarne and arrive in Cambridge. ...


Land use

The area has few trees and is dominated by grassland, mostly used as pasture for dairy farming. An Inner Mongolian Grassland. ... Pastureland Pasture is land with lush herbaceous vegetation cover used for grazing of ungulates as part of a farm or ranch. ... Dairy farm near Oxford, New York A dairy is a facility for the extraction and processing of animal milk (mostly from cows, sometimes from buffalo, sheep or goats) and other farm animals, for human consumption. ...


The River Parrett provides a source of eels (Anguilla anguilla) and elvers during January through to May. The River Parrett has its source in the springs in the hills around Chedington in Dorset in England and flows west through the Somerset Levels to its mouth in the Bristol Channel at Burnham on Sea a town on the edge of Bridgwater Bay, an important Nature Reserve. ... Suborders Anguilloidei Nemichthyoidei Congroidei Synaphobranchoidei See text for families. ...


Other local industries that once thrived on the Levels, such as thatching and basket making, are now in serious decline. Combined with the recent drop in farm incomes, this poses a potential threat to the 'traditional' nature of the area as a whole.


Willow

Willow has been cut and used on the Levels since humans moved into the area. Fragments of willow basket were found near the Glastonbury Lake Village, and it was also used in the construction of several Iron Age causeways. The willow was harvested using a traditional method of coppicing, where a tree would be cut back to the main stem. New shoots of willow, called "withies", would grow out of the trunk and these would be cut periodically for use.


During the 1930s over 9,000 acres (36 km²) of willow were being grown commercially on the Levels. Largely due to the displacement of baskets with plastic bags and cardboard boxes, the industry has severely declined since the 1950s. By the end of the 20th century only around 350 acres (1.5 km²) were grown commercially, near the villages of Burrowbridge, Westonzoyland and North Curry. The Somerset Levels is now the only area in the UK where basket willow is grown commercially. For weaving the species Salix triandra (Almond Willow, Black Maul) is grown, while Salix viminalis (Common Osier) is ideal for handles, bases, and the structural members in furniture and hurdles. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Burrowbridge is a village and parish in Somerset, England, situated on the River Parrett and A361 road five miles south east of Bridgwater in the Taunton Deane district on the edge of the Somerset Levels. ... Westonzoyland is a small village on the Somerset Levels, a few miles from Bridgwater. ... North Curry is a village and parish in Somerset, England, situated five miles east of Taunton in the Taunton Deane district. ...


Products including baskets, eel traps, lobster pots and furniture were widely made from willow throughout the area in the recent past. Among the more unusual products still made are passenger baskets for hot air balloons, the frames inside the bearskin hats worn by the regiments of the Household Cavalry, and an increasing number of willow coffins. A lobster trap (British English: lobster pot) is an effective way for fishermen to catch many lobsters at once when lobster fishing. ... Hot air balloons are the oldest successful human flight technology, dating back to the Montgolfier brothers invention in Annonay, France in 1783. ...


The industry is celebrated in the form of the Willow Man (sometimes known as the Angel of the South), a 12 m (40 foot) tall willow sculpture by artist Serena de la Hey that can be seen from the railway and the M5 motorway to the north of Bridgwater. Willow Man is a large outdoor sculpture by Serena de la Hey, situated in a field by the M5 motorway near Bridgwater in Somerset. ... This article concerns the M5 motorway in England. ...


Peat extraction

The extraction of peat from the Moors is known to have taken place during Roman times, and has been an ongoing practice since the levels were first drained. Peat in Lewis, Scotland Peat is an accumulation of partially decayed vegetation matter. ... Principal sites in Roman Britain Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ...


The introduction of plastic packaging in the 1950s allowed the peat to be packed without rotting. This lead to the industrialisation of peat extraction during the 1960s as a major market in horticultural peat was developed. The reduction in water levels that resulted put local ecosystems at risk. Although the practice is now much reduced, at least one large firm still operates on the levels and peat lorries remain a common feature of the back roads. The 1950s was the decade spanning the years 1950 to 1959. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... The Latin words hortus (garden plant) and cultura (culture) together form horticulture, classically defined as the culture or growing of garden plants. ... An ecosystem, a contraction of ecological and system, refers to the collection of components and processes that comprise, and govern the behavior of, some defined subset of the biosphere. ...


Roman industry

During the Roman occupation, the extraction of sea salt is known to have been a significant industry in the area around Highbridge. The discovery at Shapwick of 9,238 silver denarii [2] (the second largest hoard ever found from the Roman Empire) may have been linked to this industry, or to the associated local minting and counterfeiting operation. Sea salt harvest in ÃŽle de Ré, France. ... Map sources for Highbridge at grid reference ST3247 Highbridge is a Somerset market town situated on very edge of the Somerset Levels near the mouth of the River Brue. ... Shapwick is a village on the Somerset Levels, England, situated to the west of Glastonbury. ... First row : c. ... The Roman Empire is the name given to both the imperial domain developed by the city-state of Rome and also the corresponding phase of that civilization, characterized by an autocratic form of government. ... A mint is a facility which manufactures coins for currency. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


Biodiversity and conservation

As a result of the unimproved wetland nature of the Levels, the area contains a rich biodiversity of national and international importance. They support a vast variety of plant species, as well as common plants such as marsh marigold, meadowsweet and ragged robin. The area is an important feeding ground for birds including Bewick’s swan, Eurasian curlew, Common redshank, skylark, Common snipe, Common teal, wigeon and whimbrel, as well as birds of prey including the marsh harrier and peregrine falcon. A wide range of insect species is also present including rare invertebrates, particularly beetles including the lesser silver water beetle, Bagous nodulosus, Hydrophilus piceus, Odontomyia angulata, Oulema erichsoni and Valvata macrostoma. In addition, the area supports an important otter population (now a rare species in the British Isles). Rainforests are among the most biodiverse ecosystems on earth Biodiversity or biological diversity is the diversity of life. ... Binomial name Caltha palustris L. The marsh marigold or Caltha palustris is a perennial herbaceous plant of wet places with large attractive yellow flowers borne in late spring. ... Binomial name Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim. ... Binomial name Lychnis flos-culculi Ragged Robin (Lychnis flos-culculi) is a plant of the family Caryophyllaceae. ... Orders Many - see section below. ... Binomial name Cygnus columbianus (Ord, 1815) The Tundra Swan (Cygnus columbianus) is a small Northern Hemisphere swan. ... Binomial name Numenius arquata (Linnaeus, 1758) The Eurasian Curlew, or in Europe just Curlew, Numenius arquata, is a wader in the large family Scolopacidae. ... Binomial name Tringa totanus (Linnaeus, 1758) They have really long beaks for sticking them up the anus of another bird The Common Redshank or Redshank (Tringa totanus) is a wader in the large family Scolopacidae, the typical waders. ... Binomial name Alauda arvensis Linnaeus, 1758 The Skylark (Alauda arvensis) is a small passerine bird. ... Binomial name Gallinago gallinago Linnaeus, 1758 Subspecies (Wilsons Snipe) The Common Snipe, Gallinago gallinago, is a small, stocky shorebird. ... Binomial name Anas crecca Linnaeus, 1758 The Common Teal or Teal (Anas crecca) is a common and widespread duck which breeds in the northernmost areas of Europe and Asia. ... Binomial name Anas penelope Linnaeus, 1758 The Wigeon or Eurasian Wigeon (Anas penelope) is a common and widespread duck which breeds in the northernmost areas of Europe and Asia. ... Binomial name Numenius phaeopus (Linnaeus, 1758) The Whimbrel, Numenius phaeopus, is a wader in the large family Scolopacidae. ... Species Circus aeruginosus L. 1758 Circus spilonotus Kaup, 1847 Circus approximans Peale, 1848 The Marsh Harriers are birds of prey of the harrier subfamily. ... Binomial name Falco peregrinus Tunstall, 1771 The Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus), sometimes formerly known in North America as Duck Hawk, is a medium-sized falcon about the size of a large crow: 38-53 cm (15 to 21 inches) long. ... Orders See taxonomy Insects are invertebrates that are taxonomically referred to as the class Insecta. ... Invertebrate is a term coined by Jean-Baptiste Lamarck to describe any animal without a spinal column. ... Binomial name Hydrochara caraboides (Linnaeus, 1758) The Lesser Silver Water Beetle (Hydrochara caraboides) is a species of water scavenger beetle (family Hydrophilidae) only found in the Somerset Levels and a few locations in Cheshire in the United Kingdom. ... Genera Amblonyx Aonyx Enhydra Lontra Lutra Lutrogale Pteronura The aquatic (sometimes marine) carnivorous mammals known as otters form part of the large and diverse family Mustelidae, which also includes weasels, polecats, badgers, and others. ... Location of the British Isles The British Isles are a group of islands off the northwest coast of continental Europe consisting of Great Britain, Ireland, and several thousand smaller surrounding islands and islets. ...


The Levels and Moors include 32 Sites of Special Scientific Interest (twelve of them also Special Protection Areas), the Huntspill River [3] and Bridgwater Bay National Nature Reserves [4], the Somerset Levels and Moors Ramsar Site covering about 86,000 acres (350 km²), the Levels and Moors National Nature Reserve, Shapwick Heath National Nature Reserve, and numerous Scheduled Ancient Monuments. A Site of Special Scientific Interest or SSSI is a conservation designation denoting a protected area in the United Kingdom. ... A Special Protection Area or SPA is a designation under the European Commission Directive on the Conservation of Wild Birds (79/409/EEC). ... The River Huntspill (or Huntspill River) is an artificial river, in the Somerset Levels, in the Sedgemoor district of the United Kingdom. ... Bridgwater Bay is on the estuary of the River Severn, near Bridgwater in Somerset, United Kingdom at the mouth of the River Parrett. ... National Nature Reserves in England are managed by English Nature and are key places for wildlife and natural features in England. ... The Ramsar Convention is an international treaty for the conservation and sustainable utilization of wetlands, i. ... A Scheduled Ancient Monument is defined in the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 and the National Heritage Act 1983 of the United Kingdom government. ...


In addition, some 72,000 acres (290 km²) of the Levels are recognised as an Environmentally Sensitive Area, while other portions are designated as Areas of High Archaeological Potential. Despite this, there is currently no single conservation designation covering the entire area of the Levels and Moors. An Environmentally Sensitive Area (ESA) is a type of designation for an agricultural area which needs special protection because of its landscape, wildlife or historical value. ... Areas of Archaeological Potential and other terms such as Area of High Archaeological Potential or Urban Archaeological Zone are terms used to identify parts of the country where it is known that buried archaeology is likely to survive. ... A conservation designation is a name and/or acronym which explains the status of an area of land in terms of conservation or protection. ...


A survey in 2005 discovered that 11 of the known wooden Bronze Age causeways on the Levels had been destroyed or vanished, while others were seriously damaged. The reduction in water levels and subsequent exposure of the timber to oxygen and Aerobic bacteria is the cause of the destruction [5]. 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bacteria that require oxygen for respiration. ...


Tourism

Being largely flat, the Levels are well suited to bicycles, and a number of cycle routes exist including the Withy Way Cycle Route (22 miles, 35 km), Avalon Marshes Cycle Route (28 miles, 45 km), Peat Moors Cycle Route (24 miles, 39 km) and the Isle Valley Cycle Route (28 miles, 45 km). This article is becoming very long. ... Cycleways in England is a link page for any cycleway in England. ...


The River Parrett Trail (47 miles / 75km) long-distance footpath is also within the area. The following long-distance footpaths can be found in the United Kingdom: // England and Wales: National Trails National Trails are distinguished by being maintained by the National Trails organization [1]. As of April 2005, there were fifteen such trails, mostly in England. ...


There are currently four visitors' centres that aim to convey various aspects of the Levels.

  • The Willows & Wetlands Visitor Centre near Stoke St Gregory offers tours of the willow yards and basket workshops and explains the place of willow in the hisotrty of the Levels. The Somerset Willow Company also open the doors of their workshops to visitors.
  • The Peat Moors Centre to the west of Glastonbury is dedicated to the archaeology, history and geology of the area. It also includes reconstructions of some of the archeological discoveries, including a number of Iron Age round houses and the world's oldest engineered highway, the Sweet Track. From time to time the centre offers courses in a number of ancient technologies in subjects including textiles, clothing and basket making, as well as staging various open days, displays and demonstrations.
  • In Glastonbury itself is The Tribunal, a medieval merchant's house containing possessions and works of art from the Glastonbury Lake Village which were preserved in almost perfect condition in the peat after the village was abandoned. Also in Glastonbury, the Somerset Rural Life Museum contains information about crafts and folk traditions on the Levels, including willow growing.
  • The Langport & River Parrett Visitor Centre located at Langport details local life, history and wildlife.

In addition, Westonzoyland Pumping Station Museum, located near the town on the River Parrett, is housed in one of the earliest steam-powered pumping stations on the Levels, dating from the 1830s. The station was closed in the 1950s. Featuring several steam engines, some built locally, the museum holds a number of live steam days each year. Stoke St Gregory is a village and parish in Somerset, England, situated seven miles east of Taunton in the Taunton Deane district. ... Statistics Population: 8,800 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: ST501390 Administration District: Mendip Shire county: Somerset Region: South West England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Somerset Historic county: Somerset Services Police force: Avon and Somerset Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South Western Post office... Archaeology, archeology, or archology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech/discourse) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains and environmental data, including architecture, artifacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... HIStory: Past, Present and Future – Book I (or simply HIStory) is a double-disc album by Michael Jackson released in 1995 by the Epic Records devision of Sony Music. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Sweet Track is an ancient causeway in the Somerset Levels, England. ... Statistics Population: 8,800 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: ST501390 Administration District: Mendip Shire county: Somerset Region: South West England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Somerset Historic county: Somerset Services Police force: Avon and Somerset Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South Western Post office... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... The Somerset Rural Life Museum is situated in Glastonbury, Somerset, UK. It is a museum of the social and agricultural history of Somerset, housed in buildings surrounding a 14th century barn once belonging to Glastonbury Abbey. ... Map sources for Langport at grid reference ST4226 Langport is a small town and parish in Somerset, England, situated five miles west of Somerton in the South Somerset district. ... // The term steam engine may also refer to an entire railroad steam locomotive. ... Events and Trends Electromagnetic induction discovered by Michael Faraday Dutch-speaking farmers known as Voortrekkers emigrate northwards from the Cape Colony Croquet invented in Ireland Railroad construction begins in earnest in the United States Egba refugees fleeing the Yoruba civil wars found the city of Abeokuta in south-west Nigeria... The 1950s was the decade spanning the years 1950 to 1959. ...


See also

The North Somerset Levels are an expanse of low-lying flat ground which occupy an area between Weston-super-Mare and Bristol in North Somerset, England. ... The following is a list of locations in the Somerset Levels, England. ... Redgrave and Lopham Fen. ... The Romney Marsh is a sparsely-populated wetland area in the counties of Kent and East Sussex in the south-east of England. ... The geology of Somerset is very varied, and is reflected in an equally varied landscape. ... This is a list of topics related to the United Kingdom. ... Geological map of Great Britain. ... This page gives an overview of the complex structure of environmental and cultural conservation in the United Kingdom. ... On 30 January 1607 (New style) the Bristol Channel floods resulted in the drowning of an estimated 2,000 or more people, with houses and villages swept away, farmland inundated and livestock destroyed, wrecking the local economy along the coasts of the Bristol Channel. ...

External links

References

  • The Somerset Wetlands; Hill-Cottingham, Briggs, Brunning, King & Rix; Somerset Books; ISBN 0-86183-432-1.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Somerset Levels - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1464 words)
The Somerset Levels (or Somerset Levels and Moors as they are less commonly, but more correctly, called) is a sparsely populated wetland area of central Somerset, England, between the Quantock and Mendip hills, consisting of marine clay "levels" along the coast, and the inland (often peat based) "moors".
Water levels are carefully managed and the levels are not as intensively drained or farmed as the East Anglian fens (historically a similar area of low marsh).
The reduction in water levels and subsequent exposure of the timber to oxygen and Aerobic bacteria is the cause of the destruction [1].
Somerset - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1275 words)
Somerset is a county in the south-west of England.
Prior to 1974, Somerset adjoined the counties of Bristol and Gloucestershire to the north east, Wiltshire to the east, Dorset to the south east and Devon to the southwest.
Somerset is a largely rural county famous for its rolling hills and downland, the large flat Somerset Levels, and the Exmoor National Park which straddles the border with Devon.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m