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Encyclopedia > Some Like It Hot
Some Like It Hot
Directed by Billy Wilder
Produced by Ashton Productions / Mirisch Company
Written by Billy Wilder
I. A. L. Diamond
Starring Tony Curtis
Jack Lemmon
Marilyn Monroe
George Raft
Music by Adolph Deutsch
Cinematography Charles Lang
Editing by Arthur P. Schmidt
Distributed by United Artists
Release date(s) March 29, 1959
Running time 120 min.
Language English
Budget $2,883,848
IMDb profile

Some Like It Hot is a 1959 comedy film directed by Billy Wilder. It stars Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon, and the supporting cast includes Joe E. Brown and George Raft. In 2000, the American Film Institute listed Some Like It Hot as the greatest American comedy film of all time. Image File history File links Some_Like_It_Hot_poster. ... Billy Wilder (June 22, 1906 – March 27, 2002) was an Austrian-born, Jewish-American journalist, screenwriter, film director, and producer whose career spanned more than 50 years and 60 films. ... The Mirisch Company, also known as the Mirisch Corporation, is a film production company owned by Walter Mirisch and his brothers, Marvin and Harold Mirisch. ... Billy Wilder (June 22, 1906 – March 27, 2002) was an Austrian-born, Jewish-American journalist, screenwriter, film director, and producer whose career spanned more than 50 years and 60 films. ... I.A.L. Diamond (27 June 1920 - 21 April 1988) was a comedy writer in Hollywood during the 1940 and 50s. ... Tony Curtis (born Bernard Schwartz, June 3, 1925) is an American film actor. ... John Uhler Lemmon III (February 8, 1925 – June 27, 2001), better known as Jack Lemmon, was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson on June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe Award-winning American actress, singer, model and pop icon. ... Raft in They Drive by Night George Raft (September 26, 1895 - November 24, 1980) was an American film actor most closely identified with his portrayals of gangsters in crime melodramas of the 1930s and 1940s. ... Adolph Deutsch (October 20, 1897 - January 1, 1980) was an Academy Award-winning composer, songwriter, conductor and arranger. ... Charles Lang (March 22, 1902 – April 3, 1998) was a noted film cinematographer. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The current United Artists logo (a variant was used during the 1980s). ... March 29 is the 88th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (89th in leap years). ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... See also: 1958 in film 1959 1960 in film 1950s in film 1960s in film years in film film Events The Three Stooges make their 180th and last short film, Sappy Bullfighters. ... Comedy film is genre of film in which the main emphasis is on humor. ... Billy Wilder (June 22, 1906 – March 27, 2002) was an Austrian-born, Jewish-American journalist, screenwriter, film director, and producer whose career spanned more than 50 years and 60 films. ... Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson on June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe Award-winning American actress, singer, model and pop icon. ... Tony Curtis (born Bernard Schwartz, June 3, 1925) is an American film actor. ... John Uhler Lemmon III (February 8, 1925 – June 27, 2001), better known as Jack Lemmon, was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Joe E. Brown in the late 1920s. ... Raft in They Drive by Night George Raft (September 26, 1895 - November 24, 1980) was an American film actor most closely identified with his portrayals of gangsters in crime melodramas of the 1930s and 1940s. ... This is a list of film-related events in 2000. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The 100 funniest American films. ...


The film was adapted by Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond from the story by Robert Thoeren and Michael Logan. Logan had already written the story (but without the gangsters) for a German film, Fanfaren der Liebe (directed by Kurt Hoffmann, 1951), so that Wilder's film is seen by some as a remake. I.A.L. Diamond (27 June 1920 - 21 April 1988) was a comedy writer in Hollywood during the 1940 and 50s. ... See also: 1950 in film 1951 1952 in film 1950s in film 1940s in film years in film film Events Sweden - May Britt is scouted by Italian film-makers Carlo Ponti and Mario Soldati Top grossing films North America David and Bathsheba Show Boat tie The Great Caruso and An... In film, a remake is a newer version of a previously released film or a newer version of the source (play, novel, story, etc. ...

Contents

Plot

Some Like It Hot tells the story of two struggling musicians, Joe and Jerry (Curtis and Lemmon), who are on the run from a Chicago gang after witnessing the Saint Valentine's Day massacre of 1929. Spats Columbo (Raft), the gangster in charge, orders the execution of Jerry and Joe. They escape in the confusion and decide to leave town, but the only out-of-town job they can find is in an all-girl band. The two disguise themselves as women and call themselves Josephine and Geraldine (later he changes it to Daphne). They join the band and go to Florida by train. Joe and Jerry both fall for "Sugar Kane" Kowalczyk (Monroe), the band's Polish-American vocalist and ukulele player, and fight for her affection while maintaining their disguises. Picture of The St. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... A singer is a musician who uses their voice to produce music. ... The ukulele (Hawaiian: , IPA pronunciation: ; Anglicised pronunciation usually IPA: ), sometimes spelled ukelele (particularly in the UK) or uke, is a chordophone classified as a plucked lute; it is a subset of the guitar family of instruments, generally with four strings or four courses of strings. ...


In Florida, Joe woos Sugar by assuming a second disguise as a millionaire (claiming to be "Junior", the heir to Shell Oil, and mimicking Cary Grant's voice), while an actual millionaire, Osgood Fielding III (Brown), falls for Jerry in his Daphne guise. One night Osgood asks Jerry/Daphne out to his yacht. Joe convinces Jerry/Daphne to keep Osgood ashore while he goes on his yacht with Sugar. That night Osgood proposes to Daphne and Daphne, in a state of excitement, accepts. The mob eventually finds Joe and Jerry again, when they arrive at the same hotel for a conference honoring "Friends of Italian Opera". After several humorous chases (and witnessing yet another mob rubout), Jerry, Joe, Sugar, and Osgood escape to the millionaire's yacht. Enroute, Sugar tells Joe she's in love with him, not Junior. Jerry tells Osgood that he can't marry him for many different reasons, all of which Osgood seems oblivious to. Eventually Jerry/Daphne produces his trump card, pulling off his wig and saying "I'm a man!". Osgood utters the immortal line "Well, nobody's perfect." Royal Dutch Shell PLC is a multinational oil company (oil major) of British and Dutch origins. ... Archibald Alec Leach (January 18, 1904 – November 29, 1986), better known by his screen name, Cary Grant, was a British born, American film actor. ...


Trivia

  • On the set, Wilder grew exasperated by Monroe's inability to remember her lines. He had several of them written in inconspicuous spots on the set, so she could read them. It is possible to see Monroe's eyes move back and forth during the scene where she talks to Curtis' character on the phone in her hotel room — she was reading from a chalkboard held behind the camera.
Cover of VHS release
  • Jack Lemmon considered a scene from this film to be the best of his screen career. Tony Curtis enters the hotel room to find Lemmon lying on a bed clothed in an evening dress, singing and shaking a pair of maracas. Lemmon announces he's engaged to Joe E. Brown. After blithely answering a string of objections — What will you do on your honeymoon? morphs into a comparison of the French Riviera and Niagara Falls — Lemmon admits that he plans to annul the marriage and collect alimony as hush money.
  • Wilder paid tribute to three great gangster films of the 1930s with subtle gags in the film's script. The crimelord "Little Bonaparte" stems from Little Caesar, while Spats Columbo threatens to smash a grapefruit in the face of one of his henchmen (James Cagney's famous scene from The Public Enemy). He then grabs a coin from the air as it is being flipped by another gangster, a cliché that originated with Raft's character in Howard Hawks' Scarface — thus making Raft's line "Where did you pick up that cheap trick?" a bit of meta-humor.
  • The film was originally planned to be filmed in full color, but after several screen tests it had to be changed to black and white. The reason for this was a very obvious 'green tint' around the heavy make-up of Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon when in role as Josephine and Daphne.
  • The film's title is a line in the nursery rhyme "Pease Porridge Hot." It also occurs as dialogue in the film when Joe, as "Junior", tells Sugar he prefers classical music over hot jazz.
  • The film's working title was "Not Tonight, Josephine".

File links The following pages link to this file: Some Like It Hot Categories: Video covers ... File links The following pages link to this file: Some Like It Hot Categories: Video covers ... The Quai des États-Unis in Nice on the French Riviera at night. ... For other uses, see Niagara Falls (disambiguation). ... Hush money is an informal term for financial incentives or rewards offered in exchange for not divulging information. ... Face The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... Little Caesar is a 1931 crime film made during the Pre-Code era which tells the story of a man who works his way up the ranks of the mob until he reaches its upper heights. ... James Francis Cagney, Jr. ... The Public Enemy is a 1933 Pre-Code American crime drama film. ... Howard Hawks (May 30, 1896 – December 26, 1977) was an American film director, producer and writer of the classic Hollywood era. ... Scarface (also known as Scarface, the Shame of the Nation and The Shame of a Nation) is a 1932 gangster film of the Pre-Code era which tells the story of gang warfare and police intervention when rival gangs fight over control of a city. ... A nursery rhyme is a traditional song or poem taught to young children, originally in the nursery. ... Pease Porridge Hot is the name of a childrens nursery rhyme. ... The Catholic Legion of Decency was set up in 1934 to combat the trend of immoral films. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) was a highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... This article is about the novel and the movies based on it. ... See also: 1959 in film 1960 1961 in film 1950s in film 1960s in film years in film film // Events April 20 - for the first time since coming home from military service in Germany, Elvis Presley returns to Hollywood, California to film G.I. Blues August 10 - Filming of West... The Production Code (also known as the Hays Code) was a set of industry guidelines governing the production of American motion pictures. ... The current United Artists logo (a variant was used during the 1980s). ... The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) is a non-profit trade association formed to advance the interests of movie studios. ...

Adaptations

In 1972, a musical play based on the screenplay of the film, entitled Sugar, opened on Broadway, starring Elaine Joyce, Robert Morse, Tony Roberts and Cyril Ritchard, with book by Peter Stone, lyrics by Bob Merrill, and (all-new) music by Jule Styne. A 1991 production of this show in London featured Tommy Steele and retained the original title. Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Fantasticks is the longest-running musical in history Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... Sugar is a 1972 Broadway musical based on the screenplay for the film Some Like it Hot, which was written by Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond and based on a story by Robert Thoeren. ... Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... Elaine Joyce (born December 19, 1945, Kansas City, Missouri) is an American actress. ... Actor Robert Morse photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1958 Robert Morse (b. ... Tony Roberts (born October 22, 1939 in New York) is an film actor who is best know for his work in the films of Woody Allen. ... Cyril Ritchard was born December 1, 1897 in Sydney, Australia and died December 18, 1977 in Chicago, Illinois. ... Peter Stone (February 27, 1930 -April 26, 2003) was a writer for theater, television and movies. ... Bob (Robert) Merrill (born Henry Lavan May 17, 1921? or ? 1923?- February 17, 1998) was a Jewish-American composer and lyricist. ... Jule Styne (December 31, 1905 – September 20, 1994) was a British born American songwriter. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Young Love by Tommy Steele Tommy Steele OBE (born December 17, 1936 in London, England) is a English entertainer. ...


In 2002, Tony Curtis performed in a stage production of the film, portraying the character originally played by Joe E. Brown. For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


In 1975, an Indian film director Narendra Bedi directed Rafoo Chakkar (u-turned), a film majorly inspired by Some Like It Hot starring Indian actor Rishi Kapoor and actress Neetu Singh as the main stars. Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rafoo Chakkar is a 1975 Indian Hindi movie produced by Nadiadwala and directed by R.S. Bedi. ... Rishi Kapoor in Bobby (1973) Rishi Kapoor (born September 4, 1952 in Mumbai) is an Indian Bollywood actor. ... Neetu Singh in Hawas (1974) Neetu Singh as child actress) Neetu Singh (born July 8, 1958) is an Indian actress. ...


Awards

The film won an Academy Award for Best Costume Design, Black-and-White (Orry-Kelly) and was nominated for Best Actor in a Leading Role (Jack Lemmon), Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Black-and-White, Best Cinematography, Black-and-White, Best Director and Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium. Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... This Academy Award was first given for movies made in 1948 when separate awards were given for black-and-white and color movies. ... Orry-Kelly was the professional name of John Orry Kelly (31 December 1897 - 27 February 1964), a prolific Hollywood costume designer. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... The Academy Awards are the oldest awards ceremony for achievements in motion pictures. ... The Academy Award for Best Cinematography is awarded each year to a cinematographer for his work in one particular motion picture. ... // The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Academy Awards, awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which are voted on by others within the industry. ... The Academy Award for Writing Adapted Screenplay is one of the Academy Awards, the most prominent film awards in the United States. ...


It won the Golden Globe for Best Comedy. Marilyn Monroe won the Golden Globe for Best Actress in Musical or Comedy, and Jack Lemmon for Best Actor in Musical or Comedy. The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ...


The film has been acclaimed worldwide as one of the greatest film comedies ever made. It ranked #1 on the American Film Institute's list of the greatest comedies as well as #14 on their list of the 100 best American films. The film has also been deemed "culturally significant" by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. In 2000, readers of Total Film magazine voted it the 8th greatest comedy film of all time (see Total Film Magazine's List of the 50 Greatest Comedy Films of All Time). This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The 100 funniest American films. ... The first of the AFI 100 Years. ... The Library of Congress is the de facto national library of the United States and the research arm of the United States Congress. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Total Film, published by Future Publishing, is the United Kingdoms second best-selling film magazine, after the longer-established Empire from Emap. ...


Famous quotes

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Some Like It Hot

Jerry (as Daphne): Now you've done it!
Joe (as Josephine): Done what?
Jerry (as Daphne): You tore off one of my chests! Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ...


Sugar: "Real diamonds! They must be worth their weight in gold!"


Joe: "The ship is in ship-shape shape!"


Sugar: "It's the story of my life. I always get the fuzzy end of the lollipop."


Sweet Sue: "Didn't you girls go to a conservatory?"
Jerry (as Daphne): "Yes, for a whole year."
Sweet Sue: "I thought you said it was three years."
Joe: "We got time off...for good behaviour."


(Last Lines) Jerry (as Daphne): "You don't understand, Osgood! Aaah... I'm a man!"
Osgood: "Well, nobody's perfect."


Jerry: Have I got things to tell you!
Joe: What happened?
Jerry: I'm engaged.
Joe: Congratulations. Who's the lucky girl?
Jerry: I am!


See also

  • Cross-dressing in film and television

Film poster for Glen or Glenda Cross-dressing in motion pictures began in the early days of the silent films. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Some Like It Hot - definition of Some Like It Hot in Encyclopedia (482 words)
Some Like It Hot is a 1959 comedy film which tells the story of two struggling musicians who are on the run after witnessing the St.
Some Like It Hot was directed by Wilder, who was exasperated by Monroe's inability to remember her lines.
It has been reported that Monroe was pregnant during the filming of this movie, but there is no record of her ever having children or a miscarriage.
Some Like it Hot (717 words)
Capsicums, including chilies and other hot peppers, are also potent, killing or inhibiting up to 75 percent of bacteria), while pepper of the white or fl variety inhibits 25 percent of bacteria, as do ginger, anise seed, celery seed and the juices of lemons and limes.
Indeed, in hot countries nearly every meat-based recipe calls for at least one spice, and most include many spices, especially the potent spices, whereas in cooler counties substantial fractions of dishes are prepared without spices, or with just a few," notes Billing.
As a result, the estimated fraction of food-spoilage bacteria inhibited by the spices in each recipe is greater in hot than in cold climates, she said.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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