FACTOID # 6: Michigan is ranked 22nd in land area, but since 41.27% of the state is composed of water, it jumps to 11th place in total area.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Solid mechanics

Solid mechanics is the branch of physics and mathematics that concern the behavior of solid matter under external actions (e.g., external forces, temperature changes, applied displacements, etc.). It is part of a broader study known as continuum mechanics. Since antiquity, people have tried to understand the behavior of matter: why unsupported objects drop to the ground, why different materials have different properties, and so forth. ... Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Mathematics Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Mathematics Look up Mathematics in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Mathematics Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles — A collection of articles on various math topics, with interactive Java... In physics, a force is an external cause responsible for any change of a physical system. ... Continuum mechanics is a branch of physics (specifically mechanics) that deals with continuous matter, including both solids and fluids (i. ...


There are several standard models for how solid materials respond to stress:

  1. Elastic – a material has a rest shape and its shape departs away from the rest shape due to stress. The amount of departure from rest shape is called strain, the departure itself is called deformation. The resistance to deformation is called Young's modulus. Linearly elastic materials can be described by the 3-dimensional elasticity equations. A spring obeying Hooke's law is a one-dimensional linear version of a general elastic body.
  2. Viscoelastic – a material that is elastic, but also has damping.
  3. Plastic – a material that, when the stress exceeds a threshold, changes its rest shape in response. The material commonly known as "plastic" is named after this property.

See also viscosity and thermoplasticity. in Economics see elasticity (economics) in Materials Science the word elastomer refers to a material which is very elastic, like rubber. ... In any branch of science dealing with materials and their behaviour, strain is the geometrical expression of deformation caused by the action of stress on a physical body. ... In engineering mechanics, deformation is a change in shape due to an applied force. ... The modulus of elasticity can also be measured in other units of pressure, for example pounds per square inch (psi). ... 3-D elasticity is one of three methods of structural analysis. ... In physics, Hookes law of elasticity is an approximation which states that if a spring is elongated by some distance, x, the restoring force exherted by the spring, F, is proportional to x by a constant factor, k. ... A viscoelastic material is one in which: hysteresis is seen in the stress-strain curve. ... Friction is the force that opposes the relative motion or tendency of such motion of two surfaces in contact. ... In physics and materials science, plasticity is a property of a material to undergo a non-reversible change of shape in response to an applied force. ... Plastic is a term that covers a range of synthetic or semisynthetic polymerization products. ... The pitch drop experiment at the University of Queensland. ... A thermoplastic is a plastic that softens when heated and hardens again when cooled. ...


One of the most common practical applications of Solid Mechanics is the Euler-Bernoulli beam equation The elementary Euler-Bernoulli beam theory is a simplfication of the linear isotropic theory of elasticity which allows quick calculation of the load-carrying capacity and deflection of common structural elements called beams. ...


Solid mechanics extensively uses tensors to describe stresses, strains, and the relationship between them. In mathematics, a tensor is a certain kind of geometrical entity, or alternatively generalized quantity. The tensor concept includes the ideas of scalars, vectors, and linear operators. ...


Typically, solid mechanics uses linear models to relate stresses and strains (see linear elasticity). However, true materials exhibit non-linear behavior. The word linear comes from the Latin word linearis, which means created by lines. ... // Linear elasticity The linear theory of elasticity models the macroscopic mechanical properties of solids assuming small deformations. ... To do: 20th century mathematics chaos theory, fractals Lyapunov stability and non-linear control systems non-linear video editing See also: Aleksandr Mikhailovich Lyapunov Dynamical system External links http://www. ...


For more specific definitions of stress, strain, and the relationship between them, please see strength of materials. Strength of materials is the scientific area of applied mechanics for the study of the strength of engineering materials and their mechanical behavior in general (such as stress, deformation, strain and stress-strain relations). ...


References

Wikibooks
Wikibooks has more about this subject:
Solid mechanics
  • L.D. Landau, E.M. Lifshitz, Course of Theoretical Physics: Theory of Elasticity Butterworth-Heinemann, ISBN 075062633X
  • J.E. Marsden, T.J. Hughes, Mathematical Foundations of Elasticity, Dover, ISBN 0486678652
  • P.C. Chou, N. J. Pagano, Elasticity: Tensor, Dyadic, and Engineering Approaches, Dover, ISBN 0486669580
  • R.W. Ogden, Non-linear Elastic Deformation, Dover, ISBN 0486696480
  • S. Timoshenko and J.N. Goodier," Theory of elasticity", 2d ed., New York, McGraw-Hill, 1951.
  • A.I. Lurie, "Theory of Elasticity", Springer, 1999.
  • L.B. Freund, "Dynamic Fracture Mechanics", Cambridge University Press, 1990.
  • R. Hiil, "The Mathematical Theory of Plasticity", Oxford University, 1950.
  • J. Lubliner, "Plasticity Theory", Macmillan Publishing Company, 1990.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Solid and Structural Mechanics Books-Mechanics of Materials (237 words)
Mechanics of Materials, Bedford, A. and Liechti, K. Mechanics of Materials, Beer, F. and Johnston E. Mechanics of Materials, Craig, R. Mechanics of Materials, Gere, J. Mechanics of Materials, Vol 1 and 2, Hearn, E. Mechanics of Materials, Hibbeler, R. Mechanics of Materials, Riley, W. et al., 1998
Mechanics of Solid Materials, Lemaitre, J. and Chaboche, J. Mechanics of Solids, Fenner, R. Mechanics of Solids, Lardner, T. and Archer, R. Mechanics of Solids, Ross, C. Mechanics of Solids and Fluids, Ziegler, F., 1995
Mechanics of Solids and Structures, Rees, D. Mesomechanical Constitutive Modeling, Kafka, V., 2001
Solid mechanics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (356 words)
Solid mechanics is the branch of physics and mathematics that concern the behavior of solid matter under external actions (e.g., external forces, temperature changes, applied displacements, etc.).
Solid mechanics extensively uses tensors to describe stresses, strains, and the relationship between them.
Typically, solid mechanics uses linear models to relate stresses and strains (see linear elasticity).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m