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Encyclopedia > Soldier Field
Soldier Field
Stadium in a Park


Location 1410 South Museum Campus Dr
Chicago, Illinois 60605
Broke ground 1922
Opened October 9, 1924
Reopened September 27, 2003
Closed January 19, 2002 - September 26, 2003
Owner Chicago Park District, City of Chicago
Operator SMG-Soldier Field Joint Venture
Surface Grass (1924-1970), AstroTurf (1971-1987), Grass (1988-present)
Construction cost $10 million USD
$365 million USD (Renovation)
Architect Holabird & Roche
Former names Municipal Grant Park Stadium (1924-1925)
Tenants
Chicago Bears (NFL) (1971-2001) (2003-present)
Chicago Fire (MLS) (1998-2001) (2003-2005)
Chicago Enforcers (XFL) (2001)
Chicago Blitz (USFL) (1983-1984)
Chicago Sting (NASL) (1975-1976)
Chicago Winds (WFL) (1975)
Chicago Fire (WFL) (1974)
Chicago Cardinals (NFL) (1959)
Chicago Rockets/Hornets (AAFC) (1946-1949)
Chicago Spurs (NPSL) (1967)
1968 International Special Olympics Games
Capacity
61,500

Soldier Field (formerly Municipal Grant Park Stadium) is located on Lake Shore Drive in Chicago, Illinois, and is currently home to the NFL's Chicago Bears. It reopened on September 27, 2003 after a complete rebuild (the second in the stadium's history). Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Soldfldlogo. ... Presented here is a photo of Soldier Field, Chicago, Illinois, and the home of the Chicago Bears. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chicago Park District is the oldest and financially largest Park District in the nation, with over a $400 million budget. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... “USD” redirects here. ... Soldier Field The architectural firm of Holabird & Roche was founded in Chicago in 1880. ... City Chicago, Illinois Other nicknames Da Bears, The Monsters of the Midway Team colors Navy Blue and Orange Head Coach Lovie Smith Owner Virginia Halas McCaskey Chairman Michael McCaskey General manager Jerry Angelo Fight song Bear Down, Chicago Bears Mascot Staley Da Bear League/Conference affiliations Independent (1919) National Football... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Year founded 1997 League Major League Soccer Nickname La Maquina Roja, Men in Red, CF97 Stadium Toyota Park Bridgeview, IL Coach Juan Carlos Osorio[1] Owner Andell Holdings First Game Miami Fusion 0–2 Chicago Fire (Lockhart Stadium; March 21, 1998) Largest Win Kansas City Wizards 0–7 Chicago Fire... Major League Soccer (MLS) is a professional soccer league with teams in the United States and Canada. ... Categories: Chicago sports | Defunct American football teams | American football stubs ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... Categories: Defunct American football teams | Chicago sports | American football stubs ... “USFL” redirects here. ... The Chicago Sting (1975-1988) were a United States professional soccer team based in Chicago, Illinois. ... Nasl, or El Nasl, is one of the names given to the star Gamma-2 Sagittarii in the constellation Sagittarius NASL is a common abbreviation for the North American Soccer League, a defunct professional soccer league that operated between 1968 and 1984. ... The Chicago Winds was the World Football Leagues ill-fated 1975 entry the successor to the Chicago Fire. ... WFL logo The World Football League was an American football league that played in 1974 and part of 1975. ... The Chicago Fire was a football team in the short-lived World Football League from 1974-75. ... WFL logo The World Football League was an American football league that played in 1974 and part of 1975. ... City Glendale, Arizona Other nicknames The Cards, The Birds, Big Red, The Buzzsaw Team colors Cardinal Red, Black, and White Head Coach Ken Whisenhunt Owner Bill Bidwill General manager Rod Graves Mascot Big Red League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1920–present) Western Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952... The Chicago Rockets was an American Football team that played in the All-America Football Conference from 1946 to 1949. ... The All-America Football Conference (AAFC) was a professional American football league that challenged the rival National Football League from 1946 to 1949. ... The Chicago Spurs were a soccer team based out of Chicago, Illinois that played in the non-FIFA sanctioned National Professional Soccer League. ... National Professional Soccer League. ... The First International Special Olympics Games (Summer Special Olympics) were held in Soldier Field, Chicago, Illinois. ... The double-decker Lake Shore Drive Bridge across the Chicago River; Wacker Drive is visible in the background Lake Shore Drive at the Chicago River in 1941 Looking northeast across Lakeshore East at the triple-decker Wacker Drive. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... NFL redirects here. ... City Chicago, Illinois Other nicknames Da Bears, The Monsters of the Midway Team colors Navy Blue and Orange Head Coach Lovie Smith Owner Virginia Halas McCaskey Chairman Michael McCaskey General manager Jerry Angelo Fight song Bear Down, Chicago Bears Mascot Staley Da Bear League/Conference affiliations Independent (1919) National Football... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2003 NFL season was the 84th regular season of the National Football League. ...


With the current stadium capacity of 61,500, Soldier Field will become the smallest stadium in the NFL when the Indianapolis Colts move out of the RCA Dome and into Lucas Oil Stadium in 2008. McAfee Coliseum Monster Park Qwest Field Qualcomm Stadium University of Phoenix Stadium Paul Brown Stadium Soldier Field RCA Dome Edward Jones Dome Arrowhead Stadium Invesco Field [at Mile High] Ford Field Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome Lambeau Field Ralph Wilson Stadium Gillette Stadium Giants Stadium Reliant Stadium Louisiana Superdome Georgia Dome... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... City Indianapolis, Indiana Other nicknames The Horseshoes Team colors Speed Blue and White Head Coach Tony Dungy Owner Jim Irsay General manager Bill Polian Mascot Blue League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970... The RCA Dome is a domed stadium located in Indianapolis, Indiana which is the home of the Indianapolis Colts NFL franchise. ... Lucas Oil Stadium is a retractable roof sports facility currently under construction in Indianapolis. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

History

Previously it was the site of the former College All-Star Game, an exhibition between the last year's NFL champion (or, in its final years, Super Bowl champion) and a team of collegiate all-star players of the previous season prior to their reporting to the training camps of their new professional teams. This game was discontinued after the 1976 game due to the risk of injury to the all-stars in what was essentially a meaningless exhibition, and the lack of competitiveness of the game, which in its waning years was almost always won by the professional champions. The College All-Star Game was a preseason American football game played annually (except in 1974) from 1934 to 1976 between the National Football League champions and a team of star college seniors from the previous year. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... The 1976 NFL season was the 57th regular season of the National Football League. ...


In its earliest configuration Soldier Field was capable of seating nearly 74,000 spectators, and was in the shape of a U. Additional seating could be added along the interior field, upper promenades and on the large, open field and terrace beyond the north endzone, bringing the capacity to over 100,000. The largest crowd for any event at Soldier Field was 260,000 on September 8, 1954, for the Catholic Church’s Marian Year Tribute.[1] is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Although used as the site for many sporting events and exhibitions, it was not until September 1971 that the Chicago Bears first made it their home. Seating capacity was reduced to 57,000 by building a grandstand in the open end of the U shape. This moved the field closer to both ends at the expense of seating capacity. The goal of this renovation was to move the fans closer to the field. Beginning in 1978 the plank seating was replaced by individual seats with backs and armrests. By 1994, additional seating was added bringing the capacity to 66,944. [2] Seating capacity refers to the number of people who can be seated in a specific space, either in terms of the space available, or in terms of limitations set by law. ...


AstroTurf replaced the grass in 1971 when the Bears moved to the stadium. Grass returned for the 1988 football season.


The field serves as a memorial to American soldiers who died in wars, hence its name. It was designed in 1919 and completed in the 1920s. It officially opened on October 9, 1924 (the 53rd anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire), as Municipal Grant Park Stadium, changing its name to Soldier Field on November 11, 1925. Its design is modelled on the Greco-Roman architectural tradition, with doric columns rising above the stands. However, after being rebuilt, the modern stands now dwarf the columns. The new stadium seats 61,500 people - 5,444 fewer than the old one. This article is about a military rank. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Artists rendering of the fire, by John R Chapin, originally printed in Harpers Weekly The Great Chicago Fire was a conflagration that burned from Sunday October 8 to early Tuesday October 10, 1871, killing hundreds and destroying about four square miles in Chicago, Illinois. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In modern Olympic and amateur wrestling, Greco-Roman wrestling is a particular style and variation. ... The Doric order was one of the orginal pokersthree orders or organizational systems of Ancient Greek or classical architecture; the other two canonical orders were the Ionic and the Corinthian. ...


Mainly thought of as the long-time home of the NFL's Chicago Bears, the 100,000-seat stadium on the shores of Lake Michigan hosted the Jack Dempsey-Gene Tunney championship fight in 1927, track and field competitions and several major college football games, including Army-Navy and Notre Dame-USC. Punch Lunch battle was the boxing rematch between world Heavyweight champion Gene Tunney and former champion Jack Dempsey, held on September 22, 1927, at Soldier Field in Chicago. ...


The stadium was the site of numerous races. A 1/4 mile board track was built,[1] and the first two midget car races at the track in 1939 were won by Sam Hanks.[2] The track was also used for motorcycle races. The board track was removed and it was changed to a half-mile dirt oval track. In 1956, NASCAR swung through for its only race at Soldier Field. Twenty-five cars started the 200-lapper, with Fireball Roberts averaging 61.037 mph to win $850. The racetrack was torn out in 1970. Official starter Barney Oldfield beside racer Ralph Hepburn at Fulford-Miami Speedway board track on February 22, 1926, courtesy of the Florida Photographic Collection Board track racing was a type of racing where the track had a surface of wood boards. ... Midget cars are very small race cars with a very high power-to-weight ratio. ... Sam Hanks (born July 13, 1914, died June 27, 1994) was an American race car driver who won the Indianapolis 500 in 1957. ... Dirt track racing is a type of auto racing performed on oval tracks. ... Oval racing is a type of motorsport, primarily American, that involves running multiple cars wheel-to-wheel in a race around a track roughly oval in shape. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... Edward Glenn Fireball Roberts, Jr. ...


In 1984, Soldier Field was listed in the National Register of Historic Places program managed by the National Park Service, and it was later designated a National Historic Landmark. A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...


Renovation

In 2001 the Chicago Park District, which owns the structure, faced substantial criticism from the Chicago Tribune when it announced plans to alter the stadium. Proponents, however, argued the renovation was direly needed citing aging and cramped facilities. // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ...


Reaction to the renovation was mixed. The New York Times ranked the facility as one of the five best new buildings of 2003,[3] while the Chicago Tribune architecture critic dubbed it the "Eyesore on the Lake Shore."[4] The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ...


On September 23, 2004, as a result of the 2003 renovation,[5] a 10-member federal advisory committee unanimously recommended that Soldier Field be delisted as a Landmark. The recommendation to delist was prepared by Carol Ahlgren, architectural historian at the National Park Service's Midwest Regional Office in Omaha, Nebraska. Ms. Ahlgren was quoted in Preservation Online as stating that "If we had let this stand, I believe it would have lowered the standard of National Historic Landmarks throughout the country" and "If we want to keep the integrity of the program, let alone the landmarks, we really had no other recourse." The stadium lost the Landmark designation on February 17, 2006, primarily due to the extent of the renovations.[6] is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Omaha” redirects here. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Notable events

  • The 1985 NFC Championship Game took place in Soldier Field, where the Bears defeated the Los Angeles Rams 24-0.
  • The 1988 NFC Championship Game took place here, where the Bears lost to eventual Super Bowl XXIII champions San Francisco 49ers 28-3.
  • The 2006 NFC Championship Game granted the Bears their second trip to the Super Bowl, the first in 21 years, with a 39-14 victory over the New Orleans Saints.

is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Established in 1856, Louisville Male High School in Louisville, Kentucky is the oldest public high school west of the Alleghenies. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... NFC Championship Game is an American football game played every year to determine the champion of the National Football Conference of the National Football League. ... The NFL playoffs following the 1985 NFL season led up to Super Bowl XX. Because the Jets and Giants both used Giants Stadium as their home field, the two wild card playoff games were held on different days. ... The NFL playoffs following the 1988 NFL season led up to Super Bowl XXIII. Due to Christmas, the two wild card playoff games were held in a span of three days. ... Date January 22, 1989 Stadium Joe Robbie Stadium City Miami, Florida MVP Jerry Rice, Wide receiver Favorite 49ers by 7 National anthem Billy Joel Coin toss Nick Buoniconti, Bob Griese, and Larry Little Referee Jerry Seeman Halftime show Be Bop Bamboozled - South Florida-area dancers and performers, and 3-D... City San Francisco, California Other nicknames Niners, The Red And Gold, Bay Bombers Team colors Cardinal red, metallic gold and black Head Coach Mike Nolan Owner Denise DeBartolo York and John York General manager Lal Heneghan Mascot Sourdough Sam League/Conference affiliations All-America Football Conference (1946-1949) Western Division... The NFL playoffs following the 2006 NFL season led up to Super Bowl XLI. // at RCA Dome, Indianapolis, Indiana Game time: 4:30 p. ... Date February 4, 2007 Stadium Dolphin Stadium City Miami Gardens, Florida MVP Peyton Manning, Quarterback, Colts Favorite Colts by 6. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... M*A*S*H, see The Army-Navy Game (M*A*S*H episode). ... Punch Lunch battle was the boxing rematch between world Heavyweight champion Gene Tunney and former champion Jack Dempsey, held on September 22, 1927, at Soldier Field in Chicago. ... For the mixed martial arts division of the same name, see Heavyweight (MMA). ... William Harrison Jack Dempsey (June 24, 1895 – May 31, 1983) was an American boxer who held the world heavyweight title between 1919 and 1926. ... James Joseph Gene Tunney (May 25, 1897 – November 7, 1978) was the heavyweight boxing champion from 1926-28 who defeated Jack Dempsey in 1926 and 1927 in what became known as The Long Count Fight and retired undefeated after winning against Tom Heeney in 1928. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Catholic[4] institution located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated section of St. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... Edward Glenn Fireball Roberts, Jr. ... The NASCAR NEXTEL Cup Series is NASCARs top racing series. ... The Fog Bowl was the name given to the December 31, 1988 NFL playoff game between the Philadelphia Eagles and the Chicago Bears. ... City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Team colors Midnight Green, Black, White, and Silver Head Coach Andy Reid Owner Jeffrey Lurie General manager Tom Heckert (official) Andy Reid (de facto) Fight song Fly, Eagles Fly Mascot Swoop League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1933–present) Eastern Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952... Qualifying countries The 1994 FIFA World Cup, the 15th staging of the FIFA World Cup, was held in the United States from June 17 to July 17, 1994. ... This article is about the band. ... “Rolling Stones” redirects here. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bon Jovi is a hard rock band originating from Sayreville, New Jersey. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... Northern Illinois University, located in DeKalb, Illinois, It was founded on May 22, 1895 by Illinois Governor John P. Altgeld as a satellite campus for the Illinois State Normal School (now Illinois State University), located in Normal, Illinois. ... Head coach Kirk Ferentz 9th year, 55–43 Home stadium Kinnick Stadium Capacity 70,585 - Natural Grass Conference Big Ten First year 1889 Athletic director Gary Barta Website Hawkeyesports. ... A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... DeKalb is a city in DeKalb County, Illinois, United States. ... Interstate 88 (abbreviated I-88) is an interstate highway entirely within the state of Illinois. ... The Mid-American Conference (MAC) is a college athletic conference with a membership base that stretches from Pennsylvania to Illinois. ... This article is about the actor/producer/director. ... Flags of Our Fathers (2000) is the New York Times-bestselling book by James Bradley with Ron Powers about the five United States Marines and one United States Navy Corpsman (Medic) who would eventually be made famous by Joe Rosenthals lauded photograph of the flag raising at Iwo Jima... For other uses, see Iwo Jima (disambiguation). ... The 2007 CONCACAF Gold Cup is the ninth edition of the Gold Cup, the association football championship of North and Central America and the Caribbean (CONCACAF). ... It has been suggested that Super-cl%C3%A1sico_derby be merged into this article or section. ...

Image gallery

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 2000 pixel, file size: 3. ...

References

  1. ^ Biography for Ronney Householder at the National Midget Auto Racing Hall of Fame, Retrieved October 9, 2007
  2. ^ Biography for Sam Hanks at the National Midget Auto Racing Hall of Fame, Retrieved October 9, 2007
  3. ^ (ARCHITECTURE: THE HIGHS; The Buildings (and Plans) of the Year By HERBERT MUSCHAMP (NYT) Published: December 28, 2003)
  4. ^ http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/specials/chi-0407250421jul25,1,7977992.story?coll=chi-archspecials-hed
  5. ^ http://eculturalresources.com/news/787.html
  6. ^ National Park Service: Listing changes 4/17/06 through 4/21/06
  7. ^ a b 2002 NCAA Records book - Attendance Records page 494 (PDF)

Ronney Householder (May 5, 1908 Omaha, Nebraska – November 11, 1972 Detroit, Michigan) was an American race car driver. ... The National Midget Auto Racing Hall of Fame is a Hall of Fame and museum for midget cars. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... Sam Hanks (born July 13, 1914, died June 27, 1994) was an American race car driver who won the Indianapolis 500 in 1957. ... The National Midget Auto Racing Hall of Fame is a Hall of Fame and museum for midget cars. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ...

External links

Coordinates: 41°51′44.30″N, 87°37′00.02″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Preceded by
Wrigley Field
19211970
Home of the
Chicago Bears

19712001
Succeeded by
Memorial Stadium (Champaign)
2002
Preceded by
Memorial Stadium (Champaign)
2002
Home of the
Chicago Bears

2003–present
Succeeded by
current stadium
Preceded by
Comiskey Park
19291958
Home of the
Chicago Cardinals

1959
Succeeded by
Busch Stadium
19601965
Preceded by
first stadium
Home of the
Chicago Fire

19982002
Succeeded by
Cardinal Stadium
20022003
Preceded by
Cardinal Stadium
20022003
Home of the
Chicago Fire

20032005
Succeeded by
Toyota Park
2006–present
Preceded by
Giants Stadium
East Rutherford
CONCACAF Gold Cup
Final Venue

2007
Succeeded by
2009 Final Venue

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New Soldier Field (2486 words)
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Soldier Field (304 words)
During the 1920s, the South Park Commission constructed Soldier Field, the first great metropolitan-sponsored athletic structure, at the approximate site where the Burnham Plan of 1909 had proposed a facility for sport and other great events.
Originally known as Grant Park Stadium, it was soon renamed Soldier Field in honor of deceased World War I servicemen.
Soldier Field has been the home of the Bears since 1971.
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