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Encyclopedia > Soldier (film)
Soldier

Soldier theatrical poster
Directed by Paul W. S. Anderson
Produced by Jeremy Bolt
Susan Ekins
Fred Fontana
R.J. Louis
James G. Robinson
Jerry Weintraub
Written by David Peoples
Starring Kurt Russell
Jason Scott Lee
Jason Isaacs
Connie Nielsen
Sean Pertwee
Music by Joel McNeely
Cinematography David Tattersall
Distributed by Warner Brothers
Release date(s) October 23, 1998 (USA)
Running time 99 min.
Country United States
Language English
Budget $75,000,000
IMDb profile

Soldier is a 1998 science fiction film directed by Paul W.S. Anderson. The film, classified as a thriller, starred Kurt Russell as Sgt. Todd, a soldier trained from birth. The film also featured Gary Busey, Jason Scott Lee, Jason Isaacs, Connie Nielsen, Sean Pertwee and Michael Chiklis. Image File history File links Promo poster, fair use. ... Paul Wank Stain Anderson (born March 4, 1965 in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England) is a film director who regularly works in sci-fi movies and video game adaptations. ... Jeremy Bolt is a British film-producer who often works with Paul W. S. Anderson at Impact Films. ... David Webb Peoples (born c. ... Kurt Vogel Russell (born March 17, 1951) is an American actor. ... Jason Scott Lee playing Bruce Lee in Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story. Jason Scott Lee (李截, pinyin: Lǐ Jié, born November 19, 1966) is an American movie actor. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Connie Nielsen in Mission to Mars (2000) Connie Inge-Lise Nielsen (born July 3, 1965) is a Danish actress. ... Sean Pertwee (born June 4, 1964) is a British actor. ... Joel McNeely (b. ... David Tattersall is a famous British cinematographer and director of photography, the art of selecting the right light and camera when shooting a movie. ... Warner Bros. ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... Paul Wank Stain Anderson (born March 4, 1965 in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England) is a film director who regularly works in sci-fi movies and video game adaptations. ... Thriller films are movies that primarily use action and suspense to engage the audience. ... Kurt Vogel Russell (born March 17, 1951) is an American actor. ... This article is about a military rank. ... William Gareth Jacob Busey, Sr. ... Jason Scott Lee playing Bruce Lee in Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story. Jason Scott Lee (李截, pinyin: Lǐ Jié, born November 19, 1966) is an American movie actor. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Connie Nielsen in Mission to Mars (2000) Connie Inge-Lise Nielsen (born July 3, 1965) is a Danish actress. ... Sean Pertwee (born June 4, 1964) is a British actor. ... Michael Charles Chiklis (born August 30, 1963) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning American actor. ...


It was written by David Peoples, who co-wrote the script for Blade Runner. By his own admission, he considers Soldier to be a "sidequel"/spiritual successor to Blade Runner.[1] It also obliquely references various elements of stories written by Philip K. Dick (who wrote the novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, on which Blade Runner is based), or film adaptations thereof. David Webb Peoples (born c. ... Blade Runner is a 1982 cyberpunk, neo-noir film directed by Ridley Scott from a screenplay written by Hampton Fancher and David Peoples, loosely based on the novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A spiritual successor, sometimes called a spiritual sequel, is a successor to a video game, movie, novel, comic, stage play, or television mini-series. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction. ... Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a 1968 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ...

Contents

Production

Synopsis

The film begins in the year 1996 (year zero). A group of infants are chosen by a commander in the American forces, to be raised as soldiers. We watch one of the infants, Todd, as he matures and undergoes extreme mental and physical training to prepare for his career. This includes phrase repetition conditioning, running, weapons training, wrestling, boxing, and desensitization to violence. Todd appears to be one of the best in his group. After completing their training in 2013 (year seventeen), Todd and his group fight in multiple wars, including the War of the Six Cities (year thirty-eight), the Moscow Incident, and the Battle of the Argentine Moons. The Military of the United States, also known as the United States Armed Forces, is structured into five branches consisting of the: United States Army United States Marine Corps United States Navy United States Air Force United States Coast Guard Reserves United States National Guard United States Army Reserve United...


The film then jumps to 2036 (year forty). Todd is now forty and a veteran of many battles. A commander named Colonel Mekum announces that he intends to replace Todd and the others with a new group of genetically-engineered soldiers. The commander makes it clear that the new soldiers are superior in strength, ability, and complete genetic lack of emotion, making the "old ones", who were trained from birth, obsolete.


Todd's own commander, Captain Church, insists that his group is far from obsolete, and resists replacing them. The two commanders agree to a contest to see which unit is best, but Todd's group is no match for the genetically-engineered soldiers. Two of his comrades are killed while fighting a single opponent in hand-to-hand combat. Only Todd manages to seriously injure Caine 607 (Lee) before the contest ends, but even he is finally knocked unconscious and believed dead. The surviving members of Todd's group are remanded to menial support roles and stripped of the title 'Soldier'.


Todd and his dead comrades are transported, via P376 disposal ship, to Arcadia 234, a waste disposal planet with dangerously high wind velocities. Todd and his dead comrades are literally thrown out with the trash, dumping him onto the planet along with the debris. Though badly injured, Todd limps his way toward a group of humans who left Earth twelve years earlier, in 2024, on a voyage to the Trinity Moons. The colonists crash-landed on Arcadia 234, and have been stranded there ever since. They now live as a closely-knit community among the planet's trash heaps. This article is about Earth as a planet. ...


Todd has great difficulty adapting to the community due to his extreme conditioning. Many of the settlers are afraid of him, but still try to welcome him into the group. He is able to make friends with a settler named Mace, and tries to teach Mace's son, Nathan, to protect himself from a poisonous breed of snake that is indigenous to the planet. Unfortunately, Mace and his wife Sandra misinterpret Todd's actions as an irresponsible risk to their son. Mace worries that Todd might hurt Nathan or someone else in their community. He is also jealous of the attention Todd is paying to his wife.


Todd soon begins to experience flashbacks from his time as a soldier and mistakes one of the colonists for an enemy, nearly killing him. The settlers decide that Todd is too dangerous to live among them (even Mace appears to agree with the decision) so they exile Todd after giving him enough supplies to survive on his own. He then settles in an old rocket engine nozzle among the garbage heaps and sheds a single tear. Todd does not appear to understand what it is. (Soldiers are presumably forbidden to cry)


When Nathan saves his parents from a snake due to a single lesson from Todd, Mace realizes that Todd was only trying to help his son and decides to find the soldier so he can invite him back into the community. But the new soldiers arrive on a training exercise and begin a ground battle against the colonists. Mace is killed in the initial attack. Though outmanned and outgunned, Todd's years of battle experience let him outmaneuver the replicant army with guerilla tactics. A final personal combat with Caine 607 ends with a hint of a happy future for Todd. Todd and his comrades take over the ship, tossing Mekum and his aides out onto the planet. They and the colonists escape the planet just as it is destroyed by the new soldiers' planet killer weapon. After setting a course to the Trinity Moons, Todd embraces Nathan and they look upon a galaxy as the film ends. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Lexx, from the series Lexx In science fiction, a planet killer (also called a planet buster in some Sci-Fi circles) is an entity, often a large spaceship or space station, expressly designed to destroy or render uninhabitable a planet. ...


Cast

Actor/Actress Role(s)
Kurt Russell Todd
Jason Scott Lee Caine 607
Jason Isaacs Mekum
Connie Nielsen Sandra
Sean Pertwee Mace
Jared Thorne Nathan
Taylor Thorne Nathan
Mark Bringleson Rubrick
Gary Busey Church
K. K. Dodds Sloan
James Black Riley
Mark De Alessandro Goines
Vladimir Orlov Romero
Carsten Norgaard Green
Duffy Gaver Chelsey
Michael Chiklis Jimmy Pig
Alexander Denk Military Observer

Kurt Vogel Russell (born March 17, 1951) is an American actor. ... Jason Scott Lee playing Bruce Lee in Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story. Jason Scott Lee (李截, pinyin: Lǐ Jié, born November 19, 1966) is an American movie actor. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Connie Nielsen in Mission to Mars (2000) Connie Inge-Lise Nielsen (born July 3, 1965) is a Danish actress. ... Sean Pertwee (born June 4, 1964) is a British actor. ... William Gareth Jacob Busey, Sr. ... K. K. Dodds (born 1965) is an American actress. ... a 7th grader who excells in guitar, basketball, and is a devout Christian. ... Count Grigory Orlov Orlov (Орлов) is the name of a Russian noble family which produced several distinguished statesmen, diplomatists and soldiers. ... Carsten Noorgard, (born 1963, Frederiksberg, Denmark, is an actor, beginning his career playing the enigmatic Dolpin Man in the 1988 film The Fruit Machine (1988), a/k/a Wonderland (USA). ... Michael Charles Chiklis (born August 30, 1963) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning American actor. ...

Reception

Like its sister film Blade Runner, Soldier was a box office flop. Shot with a rather high budget of $75 million, the film only took in $15 million worldwide. [1] Blade Runner is a 1982 cyberpunk, neo-noir film directed by Ridley Scott from a screenplay written by Hampton Fancher and David Peoples, loosely based on the novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick. ... Look up flop in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Critical reaction was harsh as well; the film's director, Paul Anderson, was heavily criticized for his work, and some considered writer David Peoples to not be up to his usual standards with the screenplay.[citation needed]


References to Blade Runner

Soldier is set within the same fictional universe as the 1982 cult science fiction film Blade Runner. Writer David Webb Peoples specifically wrote these references in his script for Soldier. A fictional universe is an imaginary world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction or translatable non-fiction. ... Blade Runner is a 1982 cyberpunk, neo-noir film directed by Ridley Scott from a screenplay written by Hampton Fancher and David Peoples, loosely based on the novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick. ... David Webb Peoples (born c. ...

  • Tannhauser Gate, a location mentioned by Roy Batty in Blade Runner ("I watched c-beams glitter in the dark near the Tanhauser Gate"), is referenced three times in Soldier. Near the beginning of the film, Todd's accomplishments can be seen on a computer screen. The screen reads that he was involved in the Battle of Tannhauser Gate. After Todd arrives at the settlement on Arcadia, a woman looks at Todd's arm, which reads, among other things, "Tannhauser Gate." When the woman reveals this to her husband, he replies "Tannhauser Gate was a battle."
  • Reportedly, the original plan was to actually show the Battle of Tannhauser Gate in the film, but this idea was scrapped during production.
  • The Shoulder of Orion, another location mentioned by Roy Batty in Blade Runner, is also listed on the computer screen at the beginning of the film as a battle Todd had participated in.
  • A vehicle from Blade Runner (known as a "spinner") can be viewed in one scene in the village on Arcadia, while the villagers are celebrating what is apparently Christmas.([2])
  • David Peoples has also stated that the soldiers of this film are examples of the engineered life forms (known as "replicants") seen in Blade Runner.[citation needed]
  • The film also obliquely references various elements of works by Philip K. Dick, who had written the novel on which Blade Runner is based. However, Dick was not involved in Soldier's creation, having died in 1982.
  • Director Paul W. S. Anderson states in the DVD commentary for the film that, in addition to the film being set in the same fictional universe as Blade Runner, Blade Runner was one of his primary influences when making the film and the themes and overall tone were meant to be similar.

The Tannhauser Gate is a location originally referred to in dialogue in the 1982 film Blade Runner, and again in the 1998 film Soldier. ... This article details the minor characters in the film Blade Runner. ... Blade Runner is a 1982 cyberpunk, neo-noir film directed by Ridley Scott from a screenplay written by Hampton Fancher and David Peoples, loosely based on the novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick. ... Police spinner flying over industrial sprawl. ... Christmas is an annual holiday that celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ...

Trivia

  • Todd's service record, as displayed on a computer screen, includes the following references, almost all of which were movies Russell starred in and named for the character he played in each film:
  • Among the garbage on the planet:
    • The USS Franklin D. Roosevelt
    • The F-117X Remora from Executive Decision (1996)
    • A spinner from Blade Runner (1982)
    • A piece of the Lewis & Clark from Event Horizon (1997)
    • The Liberty Bell is among the garbage in the ship that slides towards Todd when he gets dumped on the planet.
  • In the film The Fox and the Hound, Kurt Russell provided the voice of a character named Tod.
  • The film's original title was "The Base."
  • A false press statement was released, saying that Kurt Russell broke his ankle during a stunt, when in fact he tripped over an ornamental cabbage during a break. However, as Todd tries to outrun a billboard letter collapsing towards him, a close-up of the large object "chasing" his feet shows that his right ankle was crushed (although this may have been a stuntman).
  • Shorter people (4 feet tall) were used in the scenes with the large military vehicles to make the machines look larger.
  • Todd, the main character of this film, is on screen over 85% of the time, but only speaks a total of 104 words. Russell was reportedly paid 20 million dollars for his work in this film. This works out to $192,307 per word.
  • The trailer featured a spectacular space battle involving 20-30 ships around a planet (possibly a glimpse of the Battle of Tannhauser Gate). The film contained no such scene, nor could it plausibly have done so except perhaps as a flashback.
  • During the sequences where Caine 607 is driving the crawler, the control he uses to fire the weapons is a Saitek X36 PC joystick.
  • During the War Of Six Cities scene, the map hanging on the wall is the plan of the Moscow Metro.
  • One of the sound bites when Caine is pounding the residence is music from Led Zeppelin's "Immigrant Song."
  • David L. Snyder, who was the Production Designer for the film, was the Art Director for Blade Runner.
  • The spacesuits worn in the film are later featured as Mal and Zoe's spacesuits in the TV series Firefly and its sequel Serenity.

The Tannhauser Gate is a location originally referred to in dialogue in the 1982 film Blade Runner, and again in the 1998 film Soldier. ... Escape from New York is a 1981 science fiction/action film directed and scored by John Carpenter. ... John Carpenters Escape From L.A. (better known as Escape From L.A.) is a 1996 film directed by John Carpenter. ... Stargate is a science fiction/action film released in 1994, directed by Roland Emmerich and written by Dean Devlin and Roland Emmerich, with a soundtrack by David Arnold. ... Tango & Cash is a 1989 American movie starring Sylvester Stallone and Kurt Russell. ... John Carpenters The Thing is a 1982 science fiction film directed by John Carpenter. ... Captain Ron is a 1992 film starring Martin Short and Kurt Russell. ... Backdraft is an American movie released in 1991, directed by Ron Howard and written by Gregory Widen. ... The Strongest Man in the World is a Walt Disney film from 1975, starring Kurt Russell, still a student in the fictional Medfield College. ... Now You See Him, Now You Dont is a Walt Disney film from 1972, starring Kurt Russell, a student in the fictional Medfield College. ... The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes is a Walt Disney film from 1969, starring Alan Hewitt, Kurt Russell, Frank Webb, and Joe Flynn. ... Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (Paramount Pictures, 1982; see also 1982 in film) is the second feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Ripley (Sigourney Weaver) being taught how to use the M41A pulse rifle by Corporal Hicks (Michael Biehn). ... Aliens is a 1986 science fiction movie starring Sigourney Weaver, Michael Biehn, Lance Henriksen, Carrie Henn, Bill Paxton and Paul Reiser. ... This page is about the cartoon character. ... Bugs Bunny is an Academy Award-winning fictional animated rabbit who appears in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated films produced by Warner Bros. ... Doom (or DOOM)[1] is a 1993 computer game by id Software that is a landmark title in the first-person shooter genre. ... For skill 1 / skill 2+ Without / with backpack The BFG9000 is a weapon found in the computer games Doom, Doom II, and Doom 3 (although the BFG 9000 found in Doom 3 shares only the name. ... USS (CVB/CVA/CV-42) was the second of three Midway class aircraft carrier, serving in the United States Navy from 1945 to 1977. ... Executive Decision is a 1996 action film released on Friday, March 15, 1996. ... Event Horizon is a 1997 science fiction horror film that was directed by Paul W. S. Anderson and written by Philip Eisner (with an uncredited rewrite by Andrew Kevin Walker). ... The Liberty Bell. ... The Fox and the Hound is the twenty-fourth animated feature in the Disney animated features canon. ... The Tannhauser Gate is a location originally referred to in dialogue in the 1982 film Blade Runner, and again in the 1998 film Soldier. ... A current official map of the Moscow Metro. ... Led Zeppelin were an English rock band that formed in September 1968. ... Immigrant Song is the opening track on English rock band Led Zeppelins third album, Led Zeppelin III, released in 1970. ... Blade Runner is a 1982 cyberpunk, neo-noir film directed by Ridley Scott from a screenplay written by Hampton Fancher and David Peoples, loosely based on the novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick. ...

DVD release

Soldier was released on DVD on March 2, 1999. It was released as a double-sided disc, which included the widescreen version on one side, with fullscreen on the other. The film's audio was mixed in Dolby 5.1 surround sound for the DVD, and included on the disc was a film commentary. is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ...


Features:

  • Available Subtitles: English, French
  • Available Audio Tracks: English (Dolby Digital 5.1), French (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Commentary by: director Paul Anderson, co-producer Jeremy Bold and actor Jason Isaacs (Dolby Digital 2.0)

Notes and references

  1. ^ Cinescape, September/October 1998 issue

External links

The Blade Runner series
Films Blade RunnerSoldier
Novels Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?The Edge of HumanReplicant NightEye and Talon
Games/comics The Blade Runner videogameA Marvel Comics Super Special: Blade Runner
Characters Rick DeckardEldon TyrellGaffRachaelRoy BattyLeon KowalskiPrisZhoraJ.F. Sebastian
Locations Tyrell CorporationBradbury BuildingTannhauser Gate
Cast Harrison FordRutger HauerSean YoungEdward James OlmosDaryl Hannah
Crew Ridley ScottHampton FancherMichael DeeleyDavid Peoples
Other topics Philip K. DickVangelisSoundtrackThemesReplicants • Voight-Kampff machine • Spinner
Related articles PostmodernismCyberpunkCult film

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The 1992 science fiction film Universal Soldier directed by Roland Emmerich stars Jean-Claude Van Damme and Dolph Lundgren as soldiers who kill each other in Vietnam but are reanimated in a secret Army project along with a large group of other previously dead soldiers.
The film was followed by two television movie sequels in 1998 Universal Soldier II: Brothers in Arms and Universal Soldier III: Unfinished Business, and a theatrical sequel that ignored them (Universal Soldier: The Return) in 1999, with the only returning cast member to any being Van Damme for the latter.
Instead, the Unviersal Soldiers (or "UniSols") are called in, an elite counter terrorism unit, but Devreaux (now designated "GR44") and Scott (now designated "GR13") are among this team, apparently having been revived, but with no memories of their previous lives.
Soldier (film) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1847 words)
The film, classified as a thriller, starred Kurt Russell as Sgt. Todd, a soldier trained from birth.
Soldier is set within the same fictional universe as the 1982 cult science fiction film Blade Runner.
Director Paul W. Anderson states in the DVD commentary for the film that, in addition to the film being set in the same fictional universe as Blade Runner, Blade Runner was one of his primary influences when making the film and the themes and overall tone were meant to be similar.
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