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Encyclopedia > Soho
Cast-iron architecture in Greene Street
Cast-iron architecture in Greene Street

SoHo is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is bounded roughly by Houston Street on the north, Lafayette Street on the east, Canal Street on the south, and Varick Street on the west. Download high resolution version (1024x768, 435 KB) This is a photograph looking north (towards Spring St. ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 435 KB) This is a photograph looking north (towards Spring St. ... A street in SoHo in New York City showing a number of nineteenth century industrial structures with cast-iron facades. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Five Boroughs of New York City: 1: Manhattan 2: Brooklyn 3: Queens 4: Bronx 5: Staten Island In New York City, a borough is a unique form of government used to administer the five constituent counties that make up the city; it differs significantly from other borough forms of... Manhattan is a borough of New York City, New York, USA, coterminous with New York County. ... Houston Street is a large thoroughfare running east - west through the downtown area of the borough of Manhattan in New York City, one block south of 1st Street. ... Canal Street is a major street in New York City, crossing lower Manhattan to join New Jersey in the west (via the Holland Tunnel) to Brooklyn in the east (via the Manhattan Bridge). ... Varick Street runs north-south in the New York City borough of Manhattan. ...


The name is an acronym for South of Houston Street, and has no relation to the Soho district of London, England. Its name has been the model for other new neighborhood descriptions in New York City, such as TriBeCa and DUMBO. Before its incarnation as a trendy locale, it was known as the Cast Iron District. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Backronym and Apronym (Discuss) Acronyms and initialisms are abbreviations, such as NATO, laser, and ABC, written as the initial letter or letters of words, and pronounced on the basis of this abbreviated written form. ... Cast-iron architecture in Greene Street SoHo is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. ... London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. ... Hudson Street in TriBeCa. ... A view of part of DUMBO with Manhattan in the distance Newly built apartment tower DuMBo (an acronym for Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass) is the popular name of a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ... Cast iron usually refers to grey cast iron, but can mean any of a group of iron-based alloys containing more than 2% carbon (alloys with less carbon are carbon steel by definition). ...

Contents

Cast Iron District and LoMEX

What became SoHo was to have been the locale of two enormous elevated highways, comprising the two branches of the Lower Manhattan Expressway. The highway was intended to create an automobile and truck through-route connecting the Manhattan and Williamsburg Bridges on the east with the Holland Tunnel on the west. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Lower Manhattan Expressway (also known as the Canal Street Expressway or LOMEX) was a controversial plan for an expressway through lower Manhattan conceptualized by master builder Robert Moses in the early 1960s. ... Karl Benzs Velo model (1894) - entered into the first automobile race Passenger cars in use in 2000 An automobile (or motorcar; often simply car; also auto, motor) is a wheeled passenger vehicle that carries its own motor. ... The driver of this DAF tractor with an auto-transport semi-trailer truck prepares to offload Å koda Octavia cars in Cardiff, Wales For other articles with similar names, see Lorry (disambiguation) and truck (disambiguation). ... The Manhattan Bridge is a suspension bridge that crosses the East River in New York City, connecting Lower Manhattan (at Canal Street) with Brooklyn (at Flatbush Avenue Extension). ... The Williamsburg Bridge is a suspension bridge in New York City across the East River connecting the Lower East Side of Manhattan at Delancey Street with the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn on Long Island at Broadway near the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway (Interstate 278). ... Clifford Milburn Holland, 1919 Traveling through the Holland Tunnel, from Manhattan to New Jersey. ...


The young historic preservation movement and architectural critics, stung by the destruction of the original Pennsylvania Station and the threat to other historic structures, challenged the plans because of the threatened loss of a huge quantity of 19th century cast-iron structures, which were not then highly valued by the general public or contemporary business community. When John V. Lindsay became mayor of New York City in 1966, his initial reaction was to try to push the expressways through with political spin, dubbing the Robert Moses project the Lower Manhattan Expressway (or Lomex), depressing some of the proposed highway in residential areas and stressing the importance of the artery to the city. Nevertheless, through the efforts of Jane Jacobs, George Maciunas and other local leaders, the project was derailed and abandoned. Historic preservation, heritage management, or heritage conservation is the theory and practice of creatively maintaining the historic built environment and controlling the landscape component of which it is an integral part. ... This article is about the built environment. ... Pennsylvania Station (commonly known as Penn Station) is the major intercity rail station and a major commuter rail hub in New York City. ... Cast iron usually refers to grey cast iron, but identifies a large group of ferrous alloys, which solidify with a eutectic. ... John Vliet Lindsay (November 24, 1921–December 19, 2000) was an American politician who served as a Congressman (1959-1966) and mayor of New York City (1966-1973). ... For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Politics is the process by which groups of people make decisions. ... Robert Moses with a model of his proposed Battery Bridge Robert Moses (December 18, 1888–July 29, 1981) was the master builder of mid-20th century New York City, Long Island, and other suburbs. ... The Lower Manhattan Expressway (also known as the Canal Street Expressway or LOMEX) was a controversial plan for an expressway through lower Manhattan conceptualized by master builder Robert Moses in the early 1960s. ... Jane Jacobs Jane Jacobs, OC, O.Ont (May 4, 1916 – April 25, 2006) was an American-born Canadian urbanist, writer and activist. ... George Maciunas (November 8, 1931-May 9, 1978) was a Lithuanian-American artist. ...


Artist studios and residences

After abandonment of the highway scheme, the city was still left with a large number of historic buildings that were unattractive for the kinds of manufacturing and commerce that survived in the city in the 1970s. Many of these buildings, especially the upper stories which became known as lofts, attracted artists who valued the spaces for their large areas, large windows admitting natural light and cheap rents. Most of these spaces were also used illegally as living space, being neither zoned nor equipped for residential use; yet, this zoning violation was ignored for a long period of time as occupants using space that would have most likely been dormant or abandoned as a result of the poor economy in New York City during that time. Manufacturing is the application of tools and a processing medium to the transformation of raw materials into finished goods for sale. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A loft, in the sense of the word meaning attic. ... Natural Ice Natural Ice, also know as Natty Ice on ad posters, is a macro lager made by Anheuser-Busch introduced in the 1980s. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with rental agreement. ... A typical zoning map; this one identifies the zones, or development districts, in the city of Ontario, California Zoning is a North American term for a system of land-use regulation. ... A residence may be a house, a place to live, like a nursing home. ...


Historic district

As the artist population grew, the city made some attempts to stem the movement, especially concerned about the occupation of space that did not meet residential building codes, and the possibility that the space might be needed at some time for the return of manufacturing to New York City.


Pressured on many sides, the city eventually gave up on attempting to keep all of the Cast Iron District as industrial space, and the area received historical designation as SoHo.


The historic district is officially bounded by Houston Street, West Broadway, Canal Street and Crosby Street. It is noted for the elaborate cast-iron architecture of many of its buildings, most of which date from the late 19th century. These buildings originally housed warehouses and factories. It is also noted for its cobblestone streets, which have all recently been repaved with the exception of Crosby Street, Wooster Street, Mercer Street and part of Howard Street. Houston Street looking east, from The Bowery Houston Street looking west, from The Bowery Houston Street (pronounced ) is a major east-west thoroughfare in downtown New York City. ... West Broadway is the name of two north-south streets in the New York City borough of Manhattan. ... New York Citys main Chinatown meets Little Italy at Canal Street. ...


The neighborhood rose to fame as a neighborhood for artists during the 1960s and 1970s, when the cheap spaces vacated by departing factories were converted by artists into lofts and studios. SoHo's lofts were especially appealing to artists because they could use the wide spaces and tall ceilings that factories and warehouses required to create and store their work. During this period, which lasted into the 1980s, living in SoHo was often of dubious legality, as the area was zoned for light industrial and commercial uses rather than residential, and many residents had to convert their apartments into livable spaces on their own, with little money. However, beginning in the 1980s, in a way that would later apply elsewhere, the neighborhood began to draw more affluent residents. This led to an eventual exodus of the area's artists during the 1990s, leaving galleries, boutiques, restaurants, and young urban professionals behind. Yuppies (or young urban professionals and young upwardly mobile professionals[1]) is a market segment whose consumers are characterized as self-reliant, financially secure individualists who do not exhibit or aspire to traditional American values. ...


SoHo's location, the appeal of lofts as living spaces, its architecture and, ironically, its "hip" reputation as a haven for artists all contributed to this change. The pattern of gentrification is typically known as the "SoHo Effect" and has been observed in several cities around the United States. Thirty years ago a backwater of poor artists and small factories, SoHo is now a popular tourist destination for people looking for fashionable (and expensive) clothing and exquisite architecture. This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ...


SoHo's boutiques and restaurants are clustered in the northern area of the neighborhood, along Broadway and Prince and Spring streets. The sidewalks in this area are often crowded with tourists and with vendors selling jewelry, t-shirts, and other works, sometimes leaving no space for pedestrians to walk. SoHo is known for its eclectic mix of different boutiques for shopping, including Prada, Chanel, popular skateboard/sneakerhead stores such as Supreme and Clientele, Kid Robot, and the newly established Apple Store. In recent years, however, more mundane chain stores have crept into SoHo, such as Bloomingdale's, H&M, Victoria's Secret, and J. Crew. SoHo has become fairly commercialized. Yet, the southern part of the neighborhood, along Grand Street and Canal Street, retains some of the feel of SoHo's earlier days and is less upscale and less crowded than the northern half. There are even a few small factories that have managed to remain. Canal Street at SoHo's south boundary contrasts with the former's posh shopping district in offering cheap imitation clothing and accessories. A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City. ... New York Citys main Chinatown meets Little Italy at Canal Street. ...


Nearby neighborhoods include:

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... NoHo can also refer to North Hollywood in Los Angeles, California. ... Food vendors line the streets of Little Italy. ... Mural on Orchard Street and Houston Street by artist Marco L.E.S. redirects here. ... A Chinese lion helps usher in the 2006 Chinese New Year. ...

External links

  • Air visit of 'Tribeca and Soho' in Photographs
  • Map of stores and restaurants in Soho
  • Photographs of SoHo

Coordinates: 40°43′29″N, 74°00′00″W Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 221 KB) Summary The top floors of the Chrysler building seen from the east on 42nd Street in morning light. ... The Borough President appoints members of Community Boards. ... The Manhattan Community Board 1 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhoods of Tribeca and Lower Manhattan in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 2 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhoods of Greenwich Village, West Village, NoHo, SoHo, Lower East Side, Chinatown, and Little Italy in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 3 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhoods of Tompkins Square, East Village, Lower East Side, Chinatown and Two Bridges, in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 4 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhoods of Clinton and Chelsea in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 5 is a local government unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Midtown in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 6 is a local government unit of the City of New York, encompassing the East Side of Manhattan from 14th to 59th Streets. ... The Manhattan Community Board 7 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Manhattan Valley, Upper West Side, and Lincoln Square in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 8 is a local government unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Upper East Side, LenoxHill, Yorkville, and Roosevelt Island in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 9 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Hamilton Heights, Manhattanville, and Morningside Heights in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 10 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Harlem and Polo Grounds in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 11 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of East Harlem, El Barrio/Spanish Harlem, Wards and Randalls Island in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 12 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Inwood and Washington Heights in the borough of Manhattan. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
SoHo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (926 words)
SoHo is a neighborhood in Manhattan that is bounded roughly by Houston Street on the north, Lafayette Street on the east, Canal Street on the south, and Sixth Avenue on the west.
SoHo's lofts were especially appealing to artists because they could use the wide spaces and tall ceilings that factories and warehouses required to create and store their work.
SoHo's boutiques and restaurants are clustered in the northern area of the neighborhood, along Broadway and Prince and Spring streets.
Soho - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1602 words)
Soho is a small, multicultural area of central London which is home to industry, commerce, culture and entertainment, as well as a residential area for both rich and poor.
Soho is near the heart of London's theatre area, and is a centre of the independent film and video industry as well as the television and film post-production industry.
Soho is such a varied and cosmopolitan area that in much of it the sex industry is not at all evident; the idea that it is wholly a red light district is now very out of date.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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