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Encyclopedia > Soham murders
Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman
Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman

The Soham murders were a high profile murder case in August 2002 of two ten year old girls, Holly Marie Wells (born October 4, 1991-c.August 4, 2002) and Jessica Aimee Chapman (born September 1, 1991-c.August 4, 2002), in Soham, Cambridgeshire, England. They were murdered by Ian Huntley (born 31 January 1974). Image File history File links Merge-arrows. ... Maxine Ann Carr[1] (born February 16, 1977)[2] was the girlfriend of Ian Huntley at the time he committed the August 4, 2002 Soham murders. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see August (disambiguation). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... The designation C: (sometimes C: ) is the drive letter that refers to the main partition (or portion of an hard drive) on an MS-DOS or Windows personal computer. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... The designation C: (sometimes C: ) is the drive letter that refers to the main partition (or portion of an hard drive) on an MS-DOS or Windows personal computer. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... For the Sanskrit word Soham Soham is a small town in the English county of Cambridgeshire. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Ian Kevin Huntley (born 31 January 1974 in Grimsby, England) is a former school caretaker, who in 2003 was convicted of murdering two schoolgirls - Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman - in the case known as the Soham murders. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Murders

Huntley was the caretaker at the local secondary school, Soham Village College, at the time of the murders. He was then living with his girlfriend, Maxine Carr, who was a teaching assistant at Holly and Jessica's school, St Andrew's Primary School. A janitor is a person who takes care of a building, such as a school, office building, or apartment block. ... Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ... Soham Village College is a state secondary school with Foundation Technology College and Language College status in Soham, Cambridgeshire, England. ... Maxine Ann Carr[1] (born February 16, 1977)[2] was the girlfriend of Ian Huntley at the time he committed the August 4, 2002 Soham murders. ...


On the day of the murders, at around 18:15, Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman walked past Huntley's rented house in College Close. Huntley asked them to come into the house. He said that Carr was in the house as well, although in fact she had gone to visit family back in Grimsby. Shortly after Wells and Chapman entered 5 College Close, Huntley murdered them. For other uses, see Grimsby (disambiguation). ...


Huntley's reasons for committing the murders may never be known, but minutes before seeing the girls, Huntley had slammed the telephone down on Carr after a furious argument. This was due to suspicions that Carr was cheating. The police believe that Huntley killed the girls in a jealous rage.


Mental assessment

Ian Huntley's mental state was then assessed as to whether he suffered from a mental illness or not, and if he was fit to stand trial. This assessment took place at Rampton High Secure Hospital and was carried out by consultant psychiatrist, Dr. Christopher Clark. Dr. Clark stated in court that:

Although Mr. Huntley made clear attempts to appear insane, I have no doubt that the man currently, and at the time of the murder, was both physically and mentally sound and therefore, if he is found guilty, carried out the murder totally aware of his actions.

This left Huntley facing life imprisonment if a jury could be convinced of his guilt.


Huntley's defence conceded that he disposed of the girls' bodies and that they were in his house when they died. However, he claimed that Holly Wells accidentally fell in the bath and drowned and that Jessica Chapman was then so distressed that he had to restrain her to stop her screaming, but accidentally did this so forcefully that she too died. This led him to plead guilty to the lesser charge of manslaughter, but the jury rejected his story and found him guilty of the murder of both girls.


Huntley was convicted on December 17, 2003, by two eleven-to-one majority jury verdicts, and was sentenced to life imprisonment. No recommended minimum term was made by the trial judge; this would be decided by the High Court at a later date. December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Life imprisonment is a sentence of imprisonment for a serious crime, nominally for the entire remaining life of the prisoner, but in fact for a period which varies between jurisdictions: many countries have a maximum possible period of time (usually 50 years) a prisoner may be incarcerated, or require the... Her Majestys High Court of Justice (usually known more simply as the High Court) is, together with the Crown Court and the Court of Appeal, part of the Supreme Court of Judicature of England and Wales (which under the Constitutional Reform Act 2005, is to be known as the...


The search for the two girls and the subsequent trial generated intense media interest and speculation, ensuring that the names and faces of Huntley and Carr became well-known across the United Kingdom and worldwide.


Carr

Maxine Carr provided a false alibi to police for Huntley and was convicted of perverting the course of justice. Carr was found not guilty of assisting an offender, reflecting the court's acceptance that Carr only lied to police to protect Huntley because she believed his claims of innocence, not knowing that Huntley had committed the murders. Carr had claimed to be with Huntley at the time of the murders, but was in Grimsby. Carr was released on probation on 14 May 2004 with a new secret identity for her protection.[1] In British law, perversion of the course of justice is a criminal offence in which someone acts in a manner that in some way prevents justice being served on themselves or other parties. ... For other uses, see Grimsby (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Sentence

At first Huntley was sentenced to two life terms in prison however, On September 29, 2005 it was announced that Huntley must remain in prison for at least 40 years - a minimum term which will not allow him to be released until at least 2042, by which time he will be 68 years old. is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Huntley was the last of more than 500 life sentence prisoners waiting to have minimum terms set by the Lord Chief Justice after the Home Secretary's tariff-setting procedures were declared illegal. Anyone who committed a murder after 18 December 2003 would have a minimum term recommended by the trial judge and later confirmed - or amended - by the High Court. is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Her Majestys High Court of Justice (usually known more simply as the High Court) is, together with the Crown Court and the Court of Appeal, part of the Supreme Court of Judicature of England and Wales (which under the Constitutional Reform Act 2005, is to be known as the...


Beginnings

In February 1999, Huntley met 22-year-old Maxine Carr at Hollywood's nightclub in Grimsby. They shared a flat together in Barton-upon-Humber. Carr found a job packing fish at the local fish processing factory while Huntley worked as a barman. He also travelled to Cambridgeshire on his days off to help his father who worked as a school caretaker in the village of Littleport near Ely. He enjoyed the work so much that in September 2001 he applied for the position of caretaker at Soham Village College, a secondary school in a small town between Cambridge and Ely, after the previous caretaker was fired for having an inappropriate relationship with a pupil. Maxine Ann Carr[1] (born February 16, 1977)[2] was the girlfriend of Ian Huntley at the time he committed the August 4, 2002 Soham murders. ... For other uses, see Grimsby (disambiguation). ... , Church Tower of St Peter Barton on Humber . ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... Location within the British Isles. ... Statistics Population: 15,102 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TL535799 Administration District: East Cambridgeshire Shire county: Cambridgeshire Region: East of England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Cambridgeshire Historic county: Cambridgeshire Services Police force: Ambulance service: East of England Post office and telephone Post town: ELY... For the Sanskrit word Soham Soham is a small town in the English county of Cambridgeshire. ... This article is about the city in England. ...


Huntley was accepted for the post of caretaker at Soham Village College and he began work on 26 November 2001. Soham Village College is a state secondary school with Foundation Technology College and Language College status in Soham, Cambridgeshire, England. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...


The murders

On 4 August 2002, at around 6 p.m., two 10-year-old girls, Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman, walked past Huntley's rented house in College Close. Huntley asked them to come into the house. He said that Carr was in the house as well, since she was a learning support assistant at St Andrew's Primary, the girls' school, and had got along well with them, although in fact she had gone to visit family back in Grimsby. Shortly after Holly and Jessica entered 5 College Close, Huntley murdered them. It is said that Holly was drowned in the bath, and Jessica was suffocated with a pillow. is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


His reasons for committing the murders may never be known, but minutes before seeing the girls Huntley had slammed the telephone down on Carr after a furious argument, as he was suspicious that she was cheating on him. The police believe that Huntley killed the girls in a jealous rage. There may have also been a sexual motive. It seems likely that either, or possibly both, of these motives drove Huntley to kill the girls. The police found no evidence of preplanning, and later said that they would have expected to find it if it were there.


Police investigation

Regardless of how the girls died, Huntley disposed of their bodies in a ditch 20 miles away and set them alight in a bid to destroy the forensic evidence. The search for the girls was one of the most highly publicised missing person searches in British history and Huntley even appeared on the BBC's Look East regional news programme speaking of the shock of the local community. They were found 13 days later near the perimeter fence of RAF Lakenheath in Suffolk, on 17 August 2002, just twelve hours later their clothing was discovered in the grounds of Soham Village College and Huntley had been arrested. He was later charged with two counts of murder and detained under Section 48 of the Mental Health Act 1983, at Rampton Hospital, before a judge decided that he was fit to stand trial. The word forensic (from Latin: forensis - forum) refers to something of, pertaining to, or used in a court of law. ... BBC Look East is the BBCs regional television news programme for the eastern region, which is comprised of Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Norfolk, Northamptonshire and Suffolk (note this differs from the political East of England region). ... A perimeter fence is a structure that circles the perimeter of an area to prevent access. ... McDonnell Douglas F-15C-42-MC Eagle Serial 86-0175 taxis for takeoff RAF Lakenheath (IATA: LKZ, ICAO: EGUL) is a NATO airfield located near Lakenheath in Suffolk, England. ... Suffolk (pronounced ) is a large historic and modern non-metropolitan county in East Anglia, England. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Mental Health Act 1983 (1983 c. ...


Initially, Huntley was not the prime suspect, as on the same day that the two girls were reported as missing, the body of another man was found on a nearby railway line having apparently committed suicide; however, it was later discovered that this was a simply a coincidence, and that this man was not involved in the girls' disappearance, but had in fact died several hours earlier in a completely unrelated incident.


Huntley's trial

Huntley's trial opened at the Old Bailey on 5 November 2003. He was faced with two murder charges, while Carr was charged with perverting the course of justice and assisting an offender. Huntley admitted that the girls had died in his house, but claimed that he had accidentally knocked Holly into the bath while helping her control a nosebleed and had accidentally suffocated Jessica when she started to scream. However, the jury rejected his claims that the girls had died accidentally and on 17 December 2003 returned a majority verdict of guilty on both charges. Huntley was sentenced to life imprisonment, with his minimum term to be decided by the Lord Chief Justice at a later date. Carr was cleared of assisting an offender but found guilty of perverting the course of justice and jailed for three and a half years, but she was freed under police protection after just 5 months because she had already spent 16 months on remand. She was provided with a new identity and lives under police protection. In legal parlance, a trial is an event in which parties to a dispute present information (in the form of evidence) in a formal setting, usually a court, before a judge, jury, or other designated finder of fact, in order to achieve a resolution to their dispute. ... The Old Bailey. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Suffocation can mean two things: Suffocation, or Asphyxia, is a medical condition where the body is depraved of oxygen. ... For jury meaning makeshift, see jury rig. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In law, a verdict indicates the judgment of a case before a court of law. ... Life imprisonment is a sentence of imprisonment for a serious crime, nominally for the entire remaining life of the prisoner, but in fact for a period which varies between jurisdictions: many countries have a maximum possible period of time (usually 50 years) a prisoner may be incarcerated, or require the... The Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales is the second-highest judge of the Courts of England and Wales, after the Lord Chancellor, and the presiding judge of Criminal Division of the Court of Appeal, and of the Queens Bench Division of the High Court. ...


After Huntley was convicted, it was revealed that he had been investigated in the past for sexual offences and burglary but had still been allowed to work in a school. Home Secretary David Blunkett ordered an inquiry into these failings, chaired by Sir Michael Bichard, and later ordered the suspension of David Westwood, Chief of Humberside Police. The inquiry criticised Humberside Police for deleting information relating to previous allegations against Huntley and criticised Cambridgeshire Police for not following vetting guidelines. An added complication in the vetting procedures was the fact that Huntley had applied for the caretaker's job under the name of Ian Nixon. It is believed that Humberside Police either did not check under the name Huntley on the police computer - if they had then they would have discovered a burglary charge left on file - or did not check at all. The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... David Blunkett (born 6 June 1947) is a British Labour Party politician and has been Member of Parliament for Sheffield Brightside since 1987. ... Sir Michael Bichard KCB is a former civil servant in the United Kingdom, first in local and then central government. ... David Westwood, QPM is a British police officer. ...


Since being jailed, Huntley has repeatedly admitted that he lied when giving evidence at his trial. He changed his story about the death of Jessica, having previously admitted to suffocating her in a panic. An audio tape recording of Huntley speaking to a relative at Wakefield Prison revealed that he allegedly killed her when she tried to call for help on her mobile phone. Audio storage refers to techniques and formats used to store audio with the goal to reproduce the audio later using audio signal processing to something that resembles the original. ... Wakefield Prison was originally built as a house of correction in 1594 and is now the largest maximum security prisons in Britain. ...


On 29 September 2005, High Court Judge Mr Justice Moses, who presided over Huntley's original trial, ruled that he should spend 40 years in prison before he can be considered for parole. He was not issued with a whole life tariff because the judge said there was no evidence of abduction of the two girls. The beginning of his sentence was backdated to October 2002, when he was first remanded in custody — not August 2002, as he was initially held in a mental hospital before a judge decided he was fit to stand trial. is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Her Majestys High Court of Justice (known more simply as the High Court) is, together with the Crown Court and the Court of Appeal, part of the Supreme Court of England and Wales in England and Wales: see Courts of England and Wales. ... It has been suggested that Medical parole be merged into this article or section. ... The whole life tariff is a mechanism in British law whereby a prisoner is sentenced to remain in prison until death. ... Child abduction is the abduction or kidnapping of a child (or baby) by an older person. ...


Under this ruling, Huntley is expected to remain behind bars until at least October 2042 and the age of 68. In March 2007, the Lord Chancellor sparked controversy when he said in a Sunday Telegraph interview that Huntley is among a number of prisoners who should never be released as "that is what the public expect".[2] For other uses, see March (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... The Sunday Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper, founded in 1961. ...


The families of Huntley's victims later revealed that they had been hoping for a whole life tariff to be set, but Huntley's sentence was approximately three times heavier than the minimum terms imposed on most convicted murderers.


The Wells and Chapman families received £11,000 in compensation for the murder of their daughters, which was widely criticised. [1]


On 14 September 2005 Huntley was scalded with boiling water when another inmate, Mark Hobson, attacked him. [3] A prison service spokesman said that due to the nature of high-security prisoners, "it's impossible to prevent incidents of this nature occasionally happening", but Huntley alleged that the prison authorities failed in their duty of care towards him, and launched a claim for £15,000 compensation. Huntley was reportedly awarded £2,500 in legal aid to pursue this claim, a move strongly criticised by the Soham MP, Jim Paice, who insisted on tight restrictions on the use of public money for compensation, and said, "The people I represent have no sympathy for him at all". Huntley's injuries meant that he did not attend the hearing at which his minimum term was decided. is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mark Hobson, born 1969, is a British murderer who killed his ex-girlfriend and her twin sister in 2004 before killing an elderly couple who lived nearby. ... Most liberal democracies consider that it is necessary to provide some level of legal aid to persons otherwise unable to afford legal representation. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... James Edward Thornton Paice (born 24 April 1949, Suffolk) is a Conservative politician in the United Kingdom. ... “Taxes” redirects here. ...


On 5 September 2006, Huntley was found unconscious in his prison cell, thought to have taken an overdose. He had previously taken an overdose of anti-depressants while awaiting his trial.[4] He was under police guard in hospital until 7 September, whereupon he was taken back to his prison cell under police escort, prompting much reaction from many present at the scene as well as making the front pages of many of the UK papers the next morning. Following this attempted suicide his cell was cleared and a tape was found which was marked with Queen on one side and Meat Loaf on the other. This tape is thought to contain confessions from Ian Huntley on what he did and how he did it. It is believed that Huntley made the tape in return for anti-depressants from a fellow prisoner, who hoped to obtain and later sell the confession to the media upon his release.[5][6] On March 28, 2007, The Sun began publishing transcripts of Huntley's taped confession.[7] is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1972 in London by guitarist Brian May, lead vocalist Freddie Mercury, and drummer Roger Taylor, with bassist John Deacon joining the following year. ... This article is about the singer. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ...


On the 23rd January 2008, Ian Huntley was moved to HM Prison Frankland.


On the 30th January 2008, it was revealed in the UK press that Maxine Carr was engaged to be married.


After the trial

Following the announcement of Huntley's conviction, it emerged that various authorities were aware of allegations, from a number of sources, that he had committed one act of indecent assault, four acts of underage sex and three rape. Indecent assault is a form of sex crime in many jurisdictions. ... Pedophilia (American English) or paedophilia / pædophilia (British English), from the Greek παιδοφιλια (paidophilia) < παις (pais) boy, child and φιλια (philia) friendship, (ICD-10 F65. ...


The only one of these allegations that resulted in a charge was a rape, and the charge was dropped before it could reach court. Huntley had also been charged with burglary, but he was not convicted, although the charge remained on file. On the day of Huntley's conviction, the Home Secretary David Blunkett announced an inquiry into the vetting system which allowed Huntley to get a caretaker's job at a school despite four separate complaints about him reaching social services. One of the pertinent issues surfaced almost immediately when Humberside police (where all the alleged offences had taken place) stated that they believed that it was unlawful under the Data Protection Act to hold data regarding allegations which did not lead to a conviction; this was contradicted by other police forces who thought this too strict an interpretation of the Act. The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... David Blunkett (born 6 June 1947) is a British Labour Party politician and has been Member of Parliament for Sheffield Brightside since 1987. ... The Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) is an executive agency of the Home Office in the United Kingdom, which conducts criminal record checks on potential employees on behalf of organisations and recruiters throughout England and Wales. ... A social worker is a person employed in the administration of charity, social service, welfare, and poverty agencies, advocacy, or religious outreach programs. ... The Data Protection Act 1984 (DPA) is a British Act of Parliament that provided a legal basis and allowing for the privacy and protection of data of individuals in the UK. It was repealed by the Data Protection Act 1998. ...


There was also considerable concern about the police investigation into these murders. It took nearly two weeks before the police became aware of previous sexual allegations against Ian Huntley, and despite him being the last person to see either of the two children, his story was not effectively checked out early during the investigation.


Huntley had not been convicted of any of the underage sex, indecent assault or rape allegations, but his burglary charge had remained on file. Mr Howard Gilbert, the then head teacher of Soham Village College, later said that he would not have employed Huntley as a caretaker if he had been aware of the burglary charge, as one of Huntley's key responsibilities in his role was to ensure security in the school grounds.


On November 25, 2004, The Sun newspaper published details of a tape-recording they obtained of Ian Huntley admitting that he had lied in court. He was quoted as saying "I said that Jessica died in the bathroom. She didn't. She died in the living room. Everything happened as I said it did, apart from that." He said that he killed Jessica after she tried to flee once she had realised her friend had been killed elsewhere in the house. is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ...


Huntley also claimed that he couldn't live with the guilt of what he had done, and that he planned on committing suicide.


Huntley added that Carr had told him to burn the girls' bodies after he murdered them, a claim which contradicted the jury's opinion that Carr was not guilty of assisting an offender and had not known that Huntley had committed the murders.


The Bichard inquiry

The inquiry was announced on December 18, 2003, and Sir Michael Bichard was appointed as the chairman. The stated purpose was: is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Michael Bichard KCB is a former civil servant in the United Kingdom, first in local and then central government. ...

Urgently to enquire into child protection procedures in Humberside Police and Cambridgeshire Constabulary in the light of the recent trial and conviction of Ian Huntley for the murder of Jessica Chapman and Holly Wells.

In Particular to assess the effectiveness of the relevant intelligence-based record keeping, the vetting practises in those forces since 1995 and information sharing with other agencies, and to report to the Home Secretary on matters of local and national relevance and make recommendations as appropriate. Humberside Police is the police force for Humberside in England. ... Cambridgeshire Constabulary is the Home Office police force in England responsible for policing the ceremonial county of Cambridgeshire. ...

The inquiry opened on Tuesday, January 13, 2004. The findings of the Bichard Inquiry were published in June 2004. Humberside and Cambridgeshire police forces were heavily criticised for their failings in maintaining intelligence records on Huntley. is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: June 2004 in sports Deaths in June • 28 Anthony Buckeridge • 26 Naomi Shemer • 26 Yash Johar • 22 Bob Bemer • 22 Thomas Gold • 22 Francisco Ortiz Franco • 16 Thanom Kittikachorn • 10 Ray Charles • 5 Ronald Reagan... East Yorkshire Holderness Kingston upon Hull Beverley Boothferry Scunthorpe Glanford Great Grimsby Cleethorpes The Arms of Humberside County Council Humberside was a non-metropolitan county of England from April 1, 1974 until April 1, 1996. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ...


The inquiry also recommends a registration scheme for people working with children and vulnerable adults, like the elderly. It also suggested a national system should be set up for police forces to share intelligence information. The report said there should also be a clear code of practice on record-keeping by all police forces.


The Police Reform Act 2002

Sir Michael Bichard's report severely criticised the Chief Constable of Humberside Police, David Westwood, for ordering the destruction of criminal records of child abusers. Though supported by Humberside Police Authority, he was suspended by then Home Secretary David Blunkett, using powers granted under the Police Reform Act 2002 to order suspension as "necessary for the maintenance of public confidence in the force in question". The suspension was later lifted, with Westwood agreeing to retire a year early, in March 2005. Sir Michael Bichard KCB is a former civil servant in the United Kingdom, first in local and then central government. ... East Yorkshire Holderness Kingston upon Hull Beverley Boothferry Scunthorpe Glanford Great Grimsby Cleethorpes The Arms of Humberside County Council Humberside was a non-metropolitan county of England from April 1, 1974 until April 1, 1996. ... East Yorkshire Holderness Kingston upon Hull Beverley Boothferry Scunthorpe Glanford Great Grimsby Cleethorpes The Arms of Humberside County Council Humberside was a non-metropolitan county of England from April 1, 1974 until April 1, 1996. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... David Blunkett (born 6 June 1947) is a British Labour Party politician and has been Member of Parliament for Sheffield Brightside since 1987. ... ← - 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in March • 31 – Terri Schiavo • 30 – Mitch Hedberg • 29 – Johnnie Cochran • 27 – Wilfred Bigelow • 26 – Paul Hester • 26 – James Callaghan • 21 – Jeff Weise • 21 – Bobby Short • 19 – John De Lorean • 18 – Gary Bertini • 17 – George F...


The Chief Constable of Cambridgeshire Police, Tom Lloyd had also been criticised, as his force had failed to contact Humberside Police during the vetting procedure. Lloyd was criticised by the police inspectorate for being slow to cut a holiday short after the investigation had become the largest in the force's history. The inspectorate also criticised a 'lack of grip' on the investigation, which included nationally televised appeals by both footballer David Beckham and Detective Superintendent David Beck, who announced that he had left a message for abductors on Jessica's mobile phone before the case was taken from him. Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... East Yorkshire Holderness Kingston upon Hull Beverley Boothferry Scunthorpe Glanford Great Grimsby Cleethorpes The Arms of Humberside County Council Humberside was a non-metropolitan county of England from April 1, 1974 until April 1, 1996. ... David Beckham David Robert Joseph Beckham OBE (born May 2, 1975) is an English footballer born in Leytonstone, London. ...


Another complication was that two of the Cambridgeshire police officers involved with the families of the murdered girls had become Operation Ore suspects a month before the murders. Antony Goodridge, one of the exhibits officers, later pleaded guilty to child pornography offences and was given a six-month sentence. Detective Constable Brian Stevens, who had read a poem at the girls' memorial service, was cleared of charges of indecent assault and child pornography offences after the poor presentation of prosecution evidence by computer expert Brian Underhill caused the trial to be stopped. Stevens was later convicted of a charge of perverting the course of justice after it was proved that he had given a false alibi to clear himself of the charges, and was imprisoned for eight months. The Stevens case may have affected other Operation Ore inquiries. Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... Operation Ore is a large-scale international police operation that commenced in 1999 intending to indict thousands of users of websites featuring child pornography. ... Child pornography refers to pornographic material depicting children. ... Indecent assault is a form of sex crime in many jurisdictions. ... Child pornography refers to pornographic material depicting children. ... In British law, perversion of the course of justice is a criminal offence in which someone acts in a manner that in some way prevents justice being served on themselves or other parties. ... Operation Ore is a large-scale international police operation that commenced in 1999 intending to indict thousands of users of websites featuring child pornography. ...


Tom Lloyd announced his resignation in June 2005 following accusations that he had become extremely drunk at the Association of Chief Police Officers' annual conference and had pestered a senior female official. 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in June June 27: Shelby Foote June 27: John T. Walton June 26: Richard Whiteley June 25: John Fiedler June 25: Chet Helms June 24: Paul Winchell June 21: Jaime Cardinal Sin June 20: Jack Kilby...


References

  1. ^ Carr released from prison BBC News. May 14, 2004.
  2. ^ Ian Huntley should never go free says Falconer Sunday Telegraph, 18 March 2007, Retrieved 4 Feb 2008
  3. ^ Huntley scalded in prison attack BBC News 15 Sep 2005. Retrieved 4 Feb 2008
  4. ^ BBC NEWS Soham killer treated for overdose BBC News 5 Sep 2006. Retrieved 4 Feb 2008
  5. ^ Exclusive Huntley Print Cards For Sale'. Sunday Mirror. Retrieved on 2007-02-04.
  6. ^ Child killer 'gave drugs to Huntley' Cambridge News, 12 Sep 2006 Retrieved 4 Feb 2008
  7. ^ Huntley: I lied for lover Maxine The Sun 28 Mar 2007. Retrieved 4 Feb 2008

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Soham - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (313 words)
Soham is a small town in the English county of Cambridgeshire.
Soham Village College is one of a number of secondary schools of a type unique to Cambridgeshire.
In 2002 and 2003 Soham became the centre of international media attention due to the murder of two local schoolgirls, Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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