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Encyclopedia > Soga clan

The Soga clan was one of the most powerful clans in Yamato Japan. For many generations, in the 6th and 7th centuries, the Soga monopolized the position of Great Royal Chieftain (Ō-omi) and was the first of many families to dominate the Imperial House, influencing the order of succession, and policy both domestic and foreign. History of Japan Paleolithic Jomon Yayoi Yamato period ---Kofun period ---Asuka period Nara period Heian period Kamakura period Muromachi period Azuchi-Momoyama period ---Nanban period Edo period Meiji period Taisho period Showa period ---Japanese expansionism ---Occupied Japan ---Post-Occupation Japan Heisei The Yamato period (大和) (better known as the Kofun...


Soga no Iname served as Great Minister from 536 until his death in 570, and was the first of the Soga to carry to extreme lengths the domination of the Throne by the nobility. One of the chief ways he exerted his influence was through marital connections with the Imperial family; Iname married one of his daughters to Emperor Kinmei. In an ironic way, the Soga unified and strengthened the country by expanding the power of the Emperor as a symbol and spiritual leader, even as they, a line of non-imperial nobles, took control of secular matters. Soga no Iname (蘇我稲目, d. ... Events June 8 - St. ... Events First mention of the Spear of Destiny (approximate date). ... Emperor Kinmei (欽明天皇) (509-571) was the 29th imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession, and the first to whom contemporary historiography assigns clear dates. ... His Majesty Emperor Akihito of Japan The Emperor of Japan (天皇 tennō) is the symbol of Japan, the unity of its people and the head of the Japanese Imperial Family. ...


When Buddhism was first introduced, many opposed it, disliking foreign ideas and resisting its spread. The Soga family, however, supported the introduction of Buddhism, placing a holy image of the Buddha in a major Shinto shrine; Soga no Iname claimed that Buddhism brought with it a new form of government that would subvert the independence of the clans, unifying the Japanese people under the Emperor. After fifty years of ideological war, Buddhism, defended and protected by the Soga, began to take hold in Japan. A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a religion and philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, who lived between approximately 566 and 486 BCE. Originating in India, Buddhism gradually spread throughout Asia to Central Asia... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a religion and philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, who lived between approximately 566 and 486 BCE. Originating in India, Buddhism gradually spread throughout Asia to Central Asia... A stone image of the Buddha. ... A torii at Itsukushima Shrine Shinto (神道 Shintō) (sometimes called Shintoism) is a native religion of Japan and was once its state religion. ... Soga no Iname (蘇我稲目, d. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a religion and philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, who lived between approximately 566 and 486 BCE. Originating in India, Buddhism gradually spread throughout Asia to Central Asia... His Majesty Emperor Akihito of Japan The Emperor of Japan (天皇 tennō) is the symbol of Japan, the unity of its people and the head of the Japanese Imperial Family. ...


However, by 644, the heads of the Soga clan were no longer satisfied to act behind the scenes. Soga no Emishi and his son Iruka began to build more and more elaborate palaces and tombs for themselves, styling themselves sovereigns. There seems little doubt that they intended to do away with the reigning dynasty, making themselves the new imperial line. But the leader of the Nakatomi clan, Nakatomi no Kamatari, conspired with Soga no Kurayamada no Ishikawa no Maro and Prince Naka no Ōe, and arranged for Iruka's assassination. Emishi's followers dispersed, and many were subsequently killed. The Soga clan's hold over the imperial family was broken once and for all. Two years later, Emperor Kōtoku enacted the Taika Reforms, further unifying Japan, and returning power to the Throne, especially power over the nobility. Events Births Deaths Paulinus of York, bishop of Northumbria November: Omar, Second caliph of Islam by assassination. ... Soga no Emishi (蘇我 蝦夷; 587 - 645) was a statesman of Yamato Imperial Court. ... Soga no Iruka (蘇我入鹿 ? - July 10, 645) was a statesman in the Yamato Period of Japan. ... Fujiwara no Kamatari (藤原鎌足, 614–669 A.D.) was the founder of the Fujiwara clan in Japan. ... Emperor Tenji of Japan (From Ogura Hyakunin Isshu) Tomb of Emperor Tenji, Kyoto Emperor Tenji (天智天皇) (626-672), also known as Tenchi, was the 38th imperial ruler of Japan. ... Soga no Iruka (蘇我入鹿 ? - July 10, 645) was a statesman in the Yamato Period of Japan. ... Emperor Kōtoku (孝徳天皇) (597-654) was the 36th imperial ruler of Japan. ... The Taika Reforms (大化改新 Taika no Kaishin) were a set of doctrines established by the Emperor Kōtoku in the year 646. ...


Some Important Members of the Soga Clan:

  • Soga no Iname - head of the Clan, served as Great Minister from 536 until his death in 570.
  • Soga no Umako - succeeded to post of Great Minister in 570.
  • Soga no Emishi - attempted to overthrow Imperial family in 640s
  • Soga no Iruka - son of Yemishi
  • Soga no Kurayamada no Ishikawa no Maro - conspirator against Emishi and Iruka; became Minister of the Right in 645.

Soga no Iname (蘇我稲目, d. ... Events June 8 - St. ... Events First mention of the Spear of Destiny (approximate date). ... Soga no Umako (蘇我馬子; 551? - 20 May 626), the son of Soga no Iname and the strongest member of Soga clan of Japan, conducted politicial reforms with Prince Shotoku during the rules of Emperors Bidatsu and Suiko, and established Soga clans stronghold in the governemt by having his daughter married... Soga no Emishi (蘇我 蝦夷; 587 - 645) was a statesman of Yamato Imperial Court. ... Soga no Iruka (蘇我入鹿 ? - July 10, 645) was a statesman in the Yamato Period of Japan. ... Events End of the reign of Empress Kogyoku of Japan Emperor Kotoku ascends to the throne of Japan Byzantines recapture Alexandria from the Arabs Births Empress Jito of Japan Categories: 645 ...

References

  • Sansom, George (1958). 'A History of Japan to 1334'. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press.
  • Hall, John Whitney, et al (1993). 'The Cambridge History of Japan: Volume 1 Ancient Japan'. Cambridge University Press.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Soga clan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (474 words)
For many generations, in the 6th and 7th centuries, the Soga monopolized the position of Great Royal Chieftain (Ō-omi) and was the first of many families to dominate the Imperial House, influencing the order of succession, and policy both domestic and foreign.
Soga no Iname served as Great Minister from 536 until his death in 570, and was the first of the Soga to carry to extreme lengths the domination of the Throne by the nobility.
The Soga family, however, supported the introduction of Buddhism, placing a holy image of the Buddha in a major Shinto shrine; Soga no Iname claimed that Buddhism brought with it a new form of government that would subvert the independence of the clans, unifying the Japanese people under the Emperor.
Japan, Buddhism and Warlords (4068 words)
The Soga clan had been rising in influence, including marrying their daughters into the ruling Yamato family, and the Soga clan leader believed what the king of Paekche had said: that Buddhism was the religion of the most civilized.
The Soga were allowed to maintain their adherence to Buddhism, and a few Buddhist monks arrrived from Korea, adding to a small Buddhist community at the capital.
Clans were expanding their estates and defying central authority - much as the owners of estates in France were defying the authority of France's monarchs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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