FACTOID # 29: 73.3% of America's gross operating surplus in motion picture and sound recording industries comes from California.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Socialist Party (France)

Coordinates: 48°51′35.35″N, 2°19′22.44″E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Parti Socialiste
Leader François Hollande
Founded 1969 (PS)
Headquarters 10, rue de Solférino
75333 Paris Cedex 07
Political Ideology Social democracy, Third Way
European Affiliation Party of European Socialists
International Affiliation Socialist International
Colours Red, Pink
National Assembly 186 (2007)
Senate 97 (group 2004)
EU Parliament 31
Website www.parti-socialiste.fr
See also Constitution of France

France Politics
French Parliament
French Government
French President
Political parties
Elections This is the emblem of the French Socialist Party. ... François Hollande (born August 12, 1954) is a French politician. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... // PS is a two-letter abbreviation. ... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... Third way can refer to: The Third Way, an economic and political idea that positions itself between democratic socialism and laissez-faire capitalism, combining the ordoliberal social market with neo-liberalism. ... The Party of European Socialists (PES) is a European political party whose members are 33 social democratic, socialist and labour parties of the European Union member states as well as Norway. ... The official symbol of Socialist International. ... For other uses, see Red (disambiguation). ... This article is about the color. ... The Palais Bourbon, front The French National Assembly (French: Assemblée nationale) is one of the two houses of the bicameral Parliament of France under the Fifth Republic. ... The Senate amphitheater in the Luxembourg Palace The Senate (in French :le Sénat) is the upper house of the Parliament of France. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild... The current Constitution of France was adopted on October 4, 1958, and has been amended 17 times, most recently on March 28, 2003. ... This article is about political groups and tendencies in France. ... The Parlement of France is bicameral, and consists of the National Assembly (Assemblée Nationale) and the Senate (Sénat). ... This article is about the political and administrative structures of the French government. ... The President of France, known officially as the President of the Republic (Président de la République in French), is Frances elected Head of State. ... Political parties in France lists political parties in France. ... France is a representative democracy. ...

The Socialist Party (Parti Socialiste, PS) is the largest left-wing political party in France. It replaced the French Section of the Workers' International (SFIO) in 1969. Left wing redirects here. ... The French Section of the Workers International (Section Française de lInternationale Ouvrière, SFIO), founded in 1905, was a French socialist political party, designed as the local section of the Second International (i. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ...


A social democratic party, it first won power under the Fifth Republic with François Mitterrand's victory at the 1981 presidential election. It also won, as part of a coalition, a majority in the National Assembly for the first time. From 1986 to 1988, Jacques Chirac was prime minister during the first cohabitation. A second took place in 1993, when Mitterrand appointed Édouard Balladur as prime minister. The 1995 presidential election was won by Chirac against PS leader Lionel Jospin, putting an end to Mitterrand's 14 years of power. However, the third cohabitation took place when the socialists won the 1997 legislative elections, and Chirac appointed Lionel Jospin as prime minister, a position he held until April 21, 2002, in the presidential election. Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...   IPA: (October 26, 1916 – January 8, 1996) served as President of France from 1981 to 1995, elected as representative of the Socialist Party (PS). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Palais Bourbon, front The French National Assembly (French: Assemblée nationale) is one of the two houses of the bicameral Parliament of France under the Fifth Republic. ... “Chirac” redirects here. ... Cohabitation in government occurs in semi-presidential systems, such as Frances system, when the President and the Prime Minister come from different political parties. ... Édouard Balladur (born 2 May 1929) is a French right-wing politician. ... Second Round First Round See also: President of France, France, Politics of France Categories: Elections in France | 1995 elections ... Lionel Robert Jospin (born July 12, 1937 in Meudon, a suburb of Paris) is a French statesman who served as Prime Minister of France from 1997-2002. ... French legislative election took place in May 25 and June 1, 1997 to elect the 11th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The 2002 French presidential election consisted of a first round election on 21 April 2002, and a runoff election between the top two candidates (Jacques Chirac and Jean-Marie Le Pen) on 5 May 2002. ...


The party's candidate for the 2007 presidential election, Ségolène Royal, was defeated by Nicolas Sarkozy by about 53% to 47%. The 2007 French presidential election, the ninth of the Fifth French Republic was held to elect the successor to Jacques Chirac as president of France for a five-year term. ... Marie-Ségolène Royal (born 22 September 1953 in Dakar, Senegal, then a French colony), known as  , (IPA: ) is a French politician. ... Nicolas Sarkozy at Paris, May 2005. ...

Contents

History

French socialism until 1969

After the failure of the Paris commune (1871), French socialism was figuratively beheaded. Its leaders were killed or exiled. France's first socialist party, the Federation of the Socialist Workers of France (Fédération des travailleurs socialistes de France or FTSF), was founded in 1879. It was characterised as "possibilist" because it promoted gradual reforms. Two parties split off from it: in 1882, the French Workers' Party (Parti ouvrier français or POF) of Jules Guesde and Paul Lafargue (the son-in-law of Karl Marx), then in 1890 the Revolutionary Socialist Workers Party (Parti ouvrier socialiste révolutionnaire or POSR) of Jean Allemane. At the same time, the heirs of Louis Auguste Blanqui, a symbol of the French revolutionary tradition, created the Central Revolutionary Committee (Comité révolutionnaire central or CRC) led by Edouard Vaillant. There were also some declared socialist deputies such as Alexandre Millerand and Jean Jaurès who did not belong to any party. The French Section of the Workers International (Section Française de lInternationale Ouvrière, SFIO), founded in 1905, was a French socialist political party, designed as the local section of the Second International (i. ... Le Père Duchesne looking at the statue of Napoleon I on top of the Vendome column: Eh ben ! bougre de canaille, on va donc te foutre en bas comme ta crapule de neveu !… (Well now! buggering rascal, we will knock you the fuck off just like your crook of... Frances first socialist party, the Federation of the Socialist Workers of France (Fédération des travailleurs socialistes de France or FTSF), was founded in 1879. ... The Parti Ouvrier Français (POF, or French Workers Party) was the first Marxist party in France, created in 1880 by Jules Guesde and Paul Lafargue, Marxs son-in-law (famous for having written The Right to Be Lazy, which criticized labours alienation). ... Jules Basile Guesde (November 11, 1845 - July 28, 1922) was a French socialist politician. ... Paul Lafargue Paul Lafargue (1842-1911) was a French revolutionary Marxist socialist journalist, political writer and activist; he was Karl Marxs son-in-law, having married his second daughter Laura. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Louis Auguste Blanqui Louis Auguste Blanqui (February 8, 1805 - January 1, 1881) was a French political activist. ... Alexandre Millerand (February 10, 1859 - April 7, 1943) was a French socialist politician. ... Jean Jaurès. ...


In 1899, the participation of Millerand in Pierre Waldeck-Rousseau's cabinet caused a debate about socialist participation in a "bourgeois government". Three years later, Jaurès, Allemane and the possibilists founded the French Socialist Party while Guesde and Vaillant formed the Socialist Party of France. Then, in 1905, during the Globe Congress, the two groups merged in the French Section of the Workers International (Section française de l'Internationale ouvrière or SFIO). Jaurès became the party leader. Pierre Marie René Ernest Waldeck-Rousseau (December 2, 1846 - August 20, 1904) was a French statesman. ... The Section Française de lInternationale Ouvrière (SFIO, French section of the Workers International), founded in 1905, was a French socialist political party, designed as the local section of the Second International (i. ...


The party was hemmed in between the middle class liberals of the Radical Party and the revolutionary syndicalists who dominated the trade unions. Together with the Radicals, who wished to separate Church and State, it participated in the "Block of Lefts" (Bloc des Gauches). In 1906, the General Confederation of Labour claimed its independence. A number of political organizations have called themselves the Radical Party, or have Radical as part of their name. ... Syndicalism refers to a set of ideas, movements, and tendencies which share the avowed aim of transforming capitalist society through action by the working class on the industrial front. ... The Confédération Générale du Travail (CGT or General Confederation of Work) is one of the five major French confederations of trade unions. ...


The French socialists were strongly anti-war, but following the assassination of Jaurès in 1914 they were unable to resist the wave of militarism which followed the outbreak of World War I. They suffered a severe split over participation in the wartime government of national unity. In 1919 the anti-war socialists were heavily defeated in elections. In 1920, during the Tours Congress, the majority and left wing of the party broke away and formed the French Section of the Communist International (Section française de l'Internationale Communiste or SFIC) to join the Third International founded by Lenin. The right wing, led by Léon Blum, kept the "old house" and remained in the SFIO. Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Tours Congress was the 18th national congress of the SFIO, the French Section of the Second International, which took place in december 1920 and during which the majority voted to spin-out and create the SFIC (French Section of the Communist International), which later took its actual name of... This does not cite any references or sources. ... The term Third International has two well-established meanings: For the unabridged dictionary, see Websters Third New International Dictionary. ... Vladimir Ilyich Lenin ( Russian: Влади́мир Ильи́ч Ле́нин  listen?), original surname Ulyanov (Улья́нов) ( April 22 (April 10 ( O.S.)), 1870 – January 21, 1924), was a Russian revolutionary, the leader of the Bolshevik party, the first Premier of the Soviet Union, and the founder of the ideology of Leninism. ... Léon Blum Léon Blum (9 April 1872 - 30 March 1950), was the Prime Minister of France three times: from 1936 to 1937, for one month in 1938, and from December 1946 to January 1947. ...


In 1924 and in 1932, the Socialists joined with the Radicals in the Coalitions of the Left (Cartels des Gauches), but refused to join the non-Socialist governments led by the Radicals Edouard Herriot and Edouard Daladier. These governments failed because the Socialists and the Radicals could not agree on economic policy, and also because the Communists, following the policy laid down by the Soviet Union, refused to support "bourgeois" governments. For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cartel des gauches (French for Left-wing Coalition) designed the governmental alliance between the Radical-Socialist Party and the socialist SFIO after World War I (1914-18), which lasted until the end of the Popular Front (1936-38). ... Categories: Politics stubs | Liberal related stubs | 1872 births | 1957 deaths | Members of the Académie française | Prime ministers of France | Alumni of the École Normale Supérieure ... French politician Édouard Daladier Édouard Daladier (June 18, 1884 - October 10, 1970) was a French politician, and Prime Minister of France at the start of the Second World War. ...


In 1934, the Communists changed their line, and the three parties came together in the Popular Front, which won the 1936 elections and brought Blum to power as France's first Socialist Prime Minister. Indeed, for the first time of its history, the SFIO obtained more votes and seats than the Radical Party. Within a year, however, his government collapsed over economic policy and also over the issue of the Spanish Civil War. The demoralised left fell apart and was unable to resist the collapse of the French republic after the military defeat of 1940. Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Popular Front was an alliance of left-wing political parties (the Communists, the Socialists and the Radicals), which was in government in France from 1936 to 1938. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish Civil War of 1820-1823. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


After the liberation of France in 1944, the SFIO re-emerged in a coalition with a powerful Communist Party (which became the main left-wing party) and the Christian Democratic MRP. This alliance did not survive the Cold War. Blum proposed the construction of a Third Force with the center-left and the center-right, against the Gaullists and the Communists. However, his candidate to lead of the SFIO, Daniel Mayer, was defeated by Guy Mollet. Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... The Popular Republican Movement (Mouvement Républicain Populaire or MRP) was a French Christian democratic party of the Fourth Republic. ... Northern Ireland politician Ian Paisleys paramilitary force established to oppose the 1985 Anglo-Irish Agreement. ... Daniel Mayer (1909-1996) was a member of the French Socialist Party. ... Guy Mollet (31 December 1905 - 3 October 1975) was a French Socialist politician. ...


Mollet was supported by the left wing of the party. Paradoxically, he spoke a Marxist language without questioning the alliance with the center and the center-right. He was Prime Minister at the head of a minority government in 1956. But the party was in decline, as were the Radicals, and the left never came close to forming a united front. Indeed, this led Mollet to assert, "the Communist Party is not on the left, but in the East". The repressive policy of Mollet in the Algerian War and his support for Charles de Gaulle's come-back in 1958 caused a split and the foundation of the Unified Socialist Party (Parti socialiste unifié or PSU). The SFIO returned to opposition in 1959; it reached its lowest ebb in the 1960s. A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants FLN (1954-62) MNA (1954-62) France (1954-62) FAF (1960-61) OAS (1961-62) Commanders Mostefa Benboulaïd Ferhat Abbas Hocine Aït Ahmed Ahmed Ben Bella Krim Belkacem Larbi Ben MHidi Rabah Bitat Mohamed Boudiaf Messali Hadj Paul Cherrière (1954-55) Henri Lorillot (1955-56... For other uses, see Charles de Gaulle (disambiguation). ... The Unified Socialist Party (French: Parti Socialiste Unifié, PSU) was a socialist political party in France, founded on April 3, 1960. ...


Both because of its opposition to the principle of presidential election by universal suffrage and because De Gaulle's re-election appeared inevitable, the SFIO did not nominate a candidate for the 1965 election. Consequently, it supported the candidacy of François Mitterrand, a former minister of the Fourth Republic who had been a conservative, then a leftist independent. He was resolutely anti-Gaullist. He obtained a good result and faced De Gaulle in an unexpected second ballot, becoming the leader of the non-Communist left. The 1965 French presidential election was the first presidential election by direct universal suffrage of the French Fifth Republic. ...   IPA: (October 26, 1916 – January 8, 1996) served as President of France from 1981 to 1995, elected as representative of the Socialist Party (PS). ...


In order to exist between the Communist Party, leading the left, and the Gaullist Party, leading the country, the SFIO, Radicals, and left-wing republican groups created the Federation of the Democratic and Socialist Left under Mitterrand's leadership. But unable to benefit from the May 1968 events, it exploded after its disastrous defeat at the June 1968 legislative elections. One year later, the SFIO candidate Gaston Defferre was eliminated in the first round of the 1969 presidential election, with only 5% of votes. In France, the Gaullist Party is usually used to refer to the largest party professing to be Gaullist. ... The Federation of the Democratic and Socialist Left (Fédération de la gauche démocrate et socialiste or FGDS) was a conglomerate of French center-left non-Communist forces. ... A May 1968 poster: Be young and shut up, with stereotypical silhouette of General de Gaulle. ... French legislative election took place on June 23 and 30, 1968 to elect the 4th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic In 1967, the Presidential Majority won by a short head the legislative election. ... Gaston Defferre (September 14, 1910 - May 7, 1986, Marseille) was a French socialist politician. ... Second Round First Round See also President of France France Politics of France Categories: | | ...


The foundation of the PS and the "Union of Left" (1969-1981)

In 1969, during the Alfortville Congress, the SFIO was replaced by the Socialist Party (Parti socialiste or PS). It was joined by pro-Pierre Mendès-France clubs (Union of Clubs for the Renewal of the Left led by Alain Savary) and left-wing republican groups (Union of Socialist Groups and Clubs of Jean Poperen). During the Issy-les-Moulineaux Congress, Alain Savary was elected First Secretary with the support of his predecessor Guy Mollet. He proposed an "ideological dialogue" with the Communists. Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Pierre Mendès France Pierre Mendès France (Paris, 11 January 1907 - 18 October 1982), French politician, was born in Paris, into a family of Portuguese Sephardic Jewish origin. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Two years later, during the Epinay Congress, pro-François Mitterrand clubs (Convention of the Republican institutions), joined the party. Mitterrand defeated the Savary-Mollet duo by proposing an electoral programme with the Communists. In 1972, the Common Programme was signed with the PCF and Leftwing Radicals. The left, and notably the Socialist Party, experienced an electoral recovery at the 1973 legislative election. Candidate of the left-wing alliance, Mitterrand came close to winning the 1974 presidential election. Indeed, he obtained 49.2% of votes in the second round. The Epinay Congress was the third national congress of the French Socialist Party (Parti socialiste or PS), which took place on 11, 12 and 13 June 1971, in the town of Épinay-sur-Seine. ... French legislative election took place on March 4 and 11, 1973 to elect the 5th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic. ... Second Round First Round See also President of France France Politics of France Categories: | | ...


At the end of 1974, some PSU members, included leader Michel Rocard, re-joined the PS. They represented the "left-wing Christian" and non-Marxist group. The most conservative members of the PS, they advocated an alignment of French socialism along European Social-Democratic lines, that is, a clear acceptance of the market economy. While the "Union of the Left" triumphed at the 1977 municipal election, the electoral rise of the PS worried the Communist Party. The two parties failed to update the Common Programme and the PCF leader Georges Marchais denounced a "turn towards the Right" of the PS. Michel Rocard, French politician Michel Rocard (born August 23, 1930) is a French Socialist politician, former French Prime minister, and currently a member of the European Parliament. ... Georges Marchais (June 7, 1920 - November 16, 1997) was the head of the French Communist Party, and a candidate in the French presidential elections of 1981. ...


In spite of positive polls, the "Union of the Left" lost the 1978 legislative election. For the first time since 1936, the Socialists scored better ahead of the Communists, becoming the main left-wing party, but their defeat caused an internal crisis. Mitterand's leadership was challenged by Rocard, who wanted to abandon the Common Programme which he considered archaic and unrealistic. Mitterrand felt that the left could not win without the alliance between the Socialists and the Communists. In 1979, Mitterrand won the Metz Congress, then, despite Rocard's popularity, was chosen as PS candidate for the 1981 presidential election. French legislative election took place on March 12 and 19, 1978 to elect the 6th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... The Metz Congress is the seventh national congress of the French Socialist Party (Parti socialiste or PS) which took place on 6, 7 and 8 April 1979. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Mitterrand's presidency and the exercise of power (1981-1995)

In 1981 Mitterrand defeated the incumbent conservative, Valéry Giscard d'Estaing, to become the first socialist of the Fifth Republic to be elected President of France by universal suffrage. He dissolved the National Assembly and, for the first time in their history, the French Socialists won an absolute majority of the seats. This "pink surge" took place to the detriment of the right-wing parliamentary parties (Rally for the Republic and Union for French Democracy), and the Communist Party too. François Maurice Adrien Marie Mitterrand (October 26, 1916 - January 8, 1996) was a French politician and President of France from May 1981, re-elected in 1988, until 1995. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Valéry Marie René Giscard dEstaing (born 2 February 1926) is a French centre-right politician who was President of the French Republic from 1974 until 1981. ... The Fifth Republic is the fifth and current republican constitution of France, which was introduced on October 5, 1958. ... The President of France, known officially as the President of the Republic (Président de la République in French), is Frances elected Head of State. ... The Palais Bourbon, front The French National Assembly (French: Assemblée nationale) is one of the two houses of the bicameral Parliament of France under the Fifth Republic. ... The Rally for the Republic, also known by its French acronym RPR (Rassemblement pour la République), was a French political party. ... The Union for French Democracy, also known by its French acronym UDF (Union pour la Démocratie Française), is a French centrist political party. ...


Mitterrand was the last elected national leader in Europe to attempt to carry out a socialist-inspired agenda (the 110 Propositions), furthering the dirigiste trends of the preceding conservative governments. The Prime Minister Pierre Mauroy nationalised the banks, the insurance industry and the defence industries, in accordance with the 1972 Common Program. Workers' wages were increased and working hours reduced to 39, and many other sweeping reforms carried out, but the economic crisis continued. Reforms included the abolition of death penalty, creation of a solidarity tax on wealth (ISF), introduction of proportional representation in legislative elections (which was applied only at the 1986 election), decentralization of the state (1982-83 laws), repeal of price liberalization for books (Lang Law of 1981), etc. 110 Propositions for France (110 Propositions pour la France) was the name of the Socialist Partys program for the 1981 presidential election during which the Socialist Partys candidate, François Mitterrand, was elected by 51,76% of the people. ... Dirigisme (from the French) (in English also dirigism although per the OED both spellings are used) is an economic term designating an economy where the government exerts strong directive influence. ... Lionel Jospin and Pierre Mauroy, October 17, 2000. ... Nationalization, also spelled nationalisation, is the act by which a nation takes possession of assets without requiring the owners consent, with or without payment of compensation. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The solidarity tax on wealth is a French annual direct tax on those having assets in excess of 720,000 euros (as of January 1, 2003). ... Proportional representation (sometimes referred to as full representation, or PR), is a category of electoral formula aiming at a close match between the percentage of votes that groups of candidates (grouped by a certain measure) obtain in elections and the percentage of seats they receive (usually in legislative assemblies). ... The French legislative election took place on March 16, 1986 to elect the 8th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic. ... Decentralization is the process of dispersing decision-making closer to the point of service or action. ...


As early as 1982, Mitterrand faced a clear choice between maintaining France's membership in the European Monetary System, and thus the country's commitment to European construction, and pursuing his socialist policies. He chose the former, starting the Socialist Party's acceptance of the market economy. In 1984 Mitterrand and his second Prime Minister, Laurent Fabius, clearly abandoned any further socialist measures. The "Union of Left" died and the Communist ministers resigned. There are three stages of monetary cooperation in the European Union. ... This article is about the year. ... Laurent Fabius (born 20 August 1946) is a former Socialist Prime Minister of France. ...


The PS lost its majority in the French National Assembly in 1986, forcing Mitterrand to "cohabit" with the conservative government of Jacques Chirac. Nevertheless, Mitterrand was re-elected President in 1988 with a moderate programme entitled "United France". He proposed neither nationalisations nor privatisations. He chose as Prime Minister the most popular and moderate of the Socialist politicians, Michel Rocard. His cabinet included 4 center-right ministers but it was supported by only a plurality in the National Assembly elected in June 1988. The Palais Bourbon, front The French National Assembly (French: Assemblée nationale) is one of the two houses of the bicameral Parliament of France under the Fifth Republic. ... “Chirac” redirects here. ... French legislative election took place on June 5 and 12, 1988 to elect the 9th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic. ...


During his second term, Mitterrand focused on foreign policy and European construction. He convened a referendum for the ratification of the Maastricht Treaty. He left domestic policy to his prime ministers: Michel Rocard, Edith Cresson and Pierre Bérégovoy. The party was hit by scandals about its financing and weakened by the struggle between the heirs of "Mitterrandism". The Maastricht Treaty (formally, the Treaty of European Union, TEU) was signed on February 7, 1992 in Maastricht, Netherlands after final negotiations in December 1991 between the members of the European Community and entered into force on November 1, 1993 during the Delors Commission. ... Édith Cresson Édith Cresson (born on 27 January 1934 as Édith Campion in Boulogne-Billancourt, near Paris) is a French politician. ... Pierre Eugène Bérégovoy (December 23, 1925 - May 1, 1993) was a French Socialist politician of russian origin. ...


In 1990, during the Rennes Congress, the "Mitterrandist group" split between the supporters of Laurent Fabius and the friends of Lionel Jospin. Furthermore, a part of the left-wing of the party, led by Jean-Pierre Chevènement split off due to his opposition to the Gulf War and the Maastricht Treaty. This section created the Citizens' Movement (Mouvement des citoyens or MDC). Finally, many on the left were disappointed by the results of the Socialist governments. At the 1993 legislative election, the PS did poorly, returning to the levels of the SFIO in the 1960s. The Socialist group of the National Assembly numbered 53 deputies against 260 during the previous term. This article is about the year. ... The Rennes Congress is the thirteenth national congress of the French Socialist Party (Parti socialiste or PS). ... Laurent Fabius (born 20 August 1946) is a former Socialist Prime Minister of France. ... Lionel Robert Jospin (born July 12, 1937 in Meudon, a suburb of Paris) is a French statesman who served as Prime Minister of France from 1997-2002. ... Jean-Pierre Chevènement Jean-Pierre Chevènement (born March 9, 1939 in Belfort) is a French politician. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... The Citizen and Republican Movement (Mouvement républicain et citoyen) is a political party in France. ... French legislative election took place on March 21 and 28, 1993 to elect the 10th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic. ...


Rocard became First Secretary of the party, and was considered the "natural candidate" for the next presidential election. He called for a political "big bang": an agreement with the center and the center-right, but his efforts were in vain. One year later, his party obtained only 14% of votes at the European election. Henri Emmanuelli, a "Mitterrandist" left-winger, succeeded him as First Secretary. Jacques Delors, president of the European commission and a favorite according to the polls, declined to be the PS candidate due to the radicalization of the party. Finally, Lionel Jospin, who proposed to "take stock" of Mitterrand's inheritance, was chosen as the party's candidate, but lost to Jacques Chirac. Henri Emmanuelli (born on May 31, 1945) is a French politician. ... Jacques Lucien Jean Delors (born July 20, 1925 in Paris) is a French economist and politician, the only person who served two terms as President of the European Commission (between 1985 and 1995). ... Berlaymont, the Commissions seat The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive branch of the European Union. ... Lionel Robert Jospin (born July 12, 1937 in Meudon, a suburb of Paris) is a French statesman who served as Prime Minister of France from 1997-2002. ... “Chirac” redirects here. ...


Jospin and the "Plural Left" (1995-2002)

In the legislature, the PS reconstructed a coalition with other left-wing parties: the PCF, the Greens, the Left Radical Party and the MDC. This "Plural Left" (Gauche plurielle) won the 1997 legislative election and Jospin became Prime Minister of the third "cohabitation". Les verts (the Greens) is one Green Party of France. ... The Left Radical Party (French: or PRG) is a minor French centre-left, social-liberal party with moderate views, formed in 1972 by a split from the Radical, Republican and Radical-Socialists Party, once the dominant party of the French left. ... The Gauche Plurielle (French for Plural Left) was a left-wing coalition in France, composed of the Socialist Party (Parti socialiste or PS), the French Communist Party (Parti communiste français or PCF), the Greens, the Left Radical Party (Parti radical de gauche or PRG), and the Citizens Movement (Mouvement... French legislative election took place in May 25 and June 1, 1997 to elect the 11th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic. ... Cohabitation in government occurs in semi-presidential systems, such as Frances system, when the President and the Prime Minister come from different political parties. ...


His policy was broadly progressive but had little to do with traditional socialism. The Aubry laws reduced the working time to 35 hours a week. Universal medical insurance was instituted. However, the policy of privatization was pursued.


His coalition dissolved when the MDC leader Jean-Pierre Chevènement resigned from the Cabinet. The Green and Communist allies were weakened by their governmental participation. Jean-Pierre Chevènement Jean-Pierre Chevènement (born March 9, 1939 in Belfort) is a French politician. ...


The 2002 presidential election was focused on the theme of insecurity. Jospin, again the Socialists' candidate, was eliminated in the first round due to there being too many left-wing candidates who split the vote. He announced his retirement from politics, and the PS called on its supporters to vote for Chirac in order to defeat the National Front leader Jean-Marie Le Pen, who had surprisingly advanced to the run-off. Two months later, the "Plural Left" lost the legislative election. The 2002 French presidential election consisted of a first round election on 21 April 2002, and a runoff election between the top two candidates (Jacques Chirac and Jean-Marie Le Pen) on 5 May 2002. ... This article is about the French political party, not the WWII French resistance movement Front national. ... Jean-Marie Le Pen (born June 20, 1928, La Trinité-sur-Mer, France) is a French far-right nationalist politician, founder and president of the Front National (National Front) party. ... The French legislative elections took place on June 9 and 16, 2002 to elect the 12th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic, in a context of political crisis. ...


After the 2002 shock

François Hollande, who became First Secretary in 1997, was re-elected in 2003 during the Dijon Congress with the support of the main Socialist personalities, against the left-wing of the party. In the 2004 regional elections, the Socialists had a major comeback. In coalition with the former "Plural Left", they gained power in 20 of the 22 metropolitan regions (all except Alsace and Corsica) and in the four overseas regions. The party benifited from increasing frustration with right-wing parties. However, the Socialist Party has experienced considerable difficulty in formulating an alternative to right-wing policy. François Hollande (born August 12, 1954) is a French politician. ... Regional elections were held in France on March 21 and March 28, 2004. ... Elsaß redirects here. ... For other uses, see Corsica (disambiguation). ...


On December 1, 2004, 59% of Socialist Party members approved the proposed European Constitution. However, several well-known members of the Party, including Laurent Fabius, and left-wingers Henri Emmanuelli and Jean-Luc Mélenchon, asked the public for a "no" vote in the 29 May 2005 French referendum on the European Constitution, where the proposed Constitution was rejected. Fabius was ejected from the executive office of the party. The split over the European Constitution, as well as party leaders' competing ambitions to win the presidential nomination in 2007, led the party into considerable disarray. is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, commonly referred to as the European Constitution, is an international treaty intended to create a constitution for the European Union. ... Laurent Fabius (born 20 August 1946) is a former Socialist Prime Minister of France. ... Henri Emmanuelli (born on May 31, 1945) is a French politician. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... On 29 May 2005 a referendum was held in France to decide whether the country should ratify the proposed Constitution of the European Union. ...


In November 2005, during the Le Mans Congress, three main groups were present. The majority supported a moderate text and obtained 55%. Fabius's friends ("To Rally the Left") advocated more radical policies and gained 20%. Finally, another faction ("New Socialist Party") claimed it was necessary to renovate the party by proposing left-wing policies and a profound reform of French institutions. It obtained 25% of the vote. Virtually all factions agreed on a common agenda, broadly based on the moderate and pro-European majority's position with some left-wing amendments. Ongoing events • Abramoff-Reed gambling scandal • Al Jazeera bombing memo • Avian influenza (H5N1) outbreak • Black sites scandal • Conservative leadership race (UK) • Fuel prices • Irans nuclear program • Jilin chemical plant explosions • Kashmir earthquake • Malawi food crisis • Malaysian prisoner abuse scandal • New Delhi bombings investigation • Niger food crisis • North Indian cyclone...


2007 presidential elections

From left to right: Dominique Strauss-Kahn, Bertrand Delanoë and Ségolène Royal sitting in the front row at a meeting held on Feb. 6, 2007 by the French Socialist Party at the Carpentier Hall in Paris.
From left to right: Dominique Strauss-Kahn, Bertrand Delanoë and Ségolène Royal sitting in the front row at a meeting held on Feb. 6, 2007 by the French Socialist Party at the Carpentier Hall in Paris.

For the 2007 presidential election, many potential candidates appeared: François Hollande, Laurent Fabius (from the left-wing of the party), Dominique Strauss-Kahn (who claimed to represent "social democracy"), Jack Lang, Martine Aubry and Ségolène Royal, who was favoured according to the polls. Some Socialist leaders asked Jospin to return. He declared he was "available" then finally refused. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 721 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1250 × 1040 pixel, file size: 923 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ségolène... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 721 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1250 × 1040 pixel, file size: 923 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ségolène... Dominique Strauss-Kahn (born 25 April 1949 in Neuilly-sur-Seine; often referred to as DSK) is a French economist, lawyer, and politician, member of the social-democrat Socialist Party (PS). ... Bertrand Delanoë at a Socialist rally in May 2007 Bertrand Delanoë (born May 30, 1950) ( ) is a French politician, and has been the mayor of Paris since 2001. ... Marie-Ségolène Royal (born 22 September 1953 in Dakar, Senegal, then a French colony), known as  , (IPA: ) is a French politician. ... The 2007 French presidential election, the ninth of the Fifth French Republic was held to elect the successor to Jacques Chirac as president of France for a five-year term. ... François Hollande (born August 12, 1954) is a French politician. ... Laurent Fabius (born 20 August 1946) is a former Socialist Prime Minister of France. ... Dominique Strauss-Kahn (born 25 April 1949 in Neuilly-sur-Seine; often referred to as DSK) is a French economist, lawyer, and politician, member of the social-democrat Socialist Party (PS). ... Jack Lang in Belém (Brazil) Jack Mathieu Emile Lang (born 2 September 1939) is a French politician and a member of the French Socialist Party. ... Martine Aubry (maiden name Delors), born on August 8th, 1950 in Paris is a French politician. ... Marie-Ségolène Royal (born 22 September 1953 in Dakar, Senegal, then a French colony), known as  , (IPA: ) is a French politician. ...


On November 16, 2006, the members of the Socialist Party chose Ségolène Royal to be their candidate with a majority of 60%. Her challengers, Strauss-Kahn and Fabius, obtained 21% and 19% respectively. is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Marie-Ségolène Royal (born 22 September 1953 in Dakar, Senegal, then a French colony), known as  , (IPA: ) is a French politician. ...


After obtaining 25.87% of the vote in the first round of France's presidential elections, Royal qualified for the second round of voting but lost with 46.94 % to Nicolas Sarkozy on May 6, 2007. Immediately after her defeat several party bosses (notably Strauss-Kahn), held Ségolène Royal personally responsible for the unsuccessful campaign. The party now seems divided between Ségolène Royal who wishes to forge an alliance with the centre party "MoDem"; Bertrand Delanoë who wishes to keep the status quo of the 2007 campaign and come back to the "gauche plurielle"; and Fabius, who has represented the left wing since 2005. Nicolas Sarkozy at Paris, May 2005. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


2007 National Assembly election

In the 10 and 17 June 2007 French National Assembly elections, the party won 186 out of 577 seats. The Palais Bourbon, front The French National Assembly (French: Assemblée nationale) is one of the two houses of the bicameral Parliament of France under the Fifth Republic. ... The French legislative elections took place on 10 June and 17 June 2007 to elect the 13th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic, a few weeks after the French presidential election run-off on 6 May. ...


Leadership

First secretaries from 1969:

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...   IPA: (October 26, 1916 – January 8, 1996) served as President of France from 1981 to 1995, elected as representative of the Socialist Party (PS). ... Lionel Robert Jospin (born July 12, 1937 in Meudon, a suburb of Paris) is a French statesman who served as Prime Minister of France from 1997-2002. ... Lionel Jospin and Pierre Mauroy, October 17, 2000. ... Laurent Fabius (born 20 August 1946) is a former Socialist Prime Minister of France. ... Michel Rocard, French politician Michel Rocard (born August 23, 1930) is a French Socialist politician, former French Prime minister, and currently a member of the European Parliament. ... Henri Emmanuelli (born on May 31, 1945) is a French politician. ... Lionel Robert Jospin (born July 12, 1937 in Meudon, a suburb of Paris) is a French statesman who served as Prime Minister of France from 1997-2002. ... François Hollande (born August 12, 1954) is a French politician. ...

Electoral Record

Presidential

President of the French Republic
Election year Candidate # of 1st round votes  % of 1st round vote # of 2nd round votes  % of 2nd round vote
1974 François Mitterrand 11,044,373 43.25% 12,971,604 49.19%
1981 François Mitterrand 7,505,960 25.86% 15,708,262 51.76%
1988 François Mitterrand 10,381,332 34.11% 16,704,279 54.02%
1995 Lionel Jospin 7,098,191 23.30% 15,763,027 47.4%
2002 Lionel Jospin 4,610,749 16.18%
2007 Ségolène Royal 9,500,112 25.87% 16,790,440 46.94%

This article is about the political and administrative structures of the French government. ... Second Round First Round See also President of France France Politics of France Categories: | | ...   IPA: (October 26, 1916 – January 8, 1996) served as President of France from 1981 to 1995, elected as representative of the Socialist Party (PS). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...   IPA: (October 26, 1916 – January 8, 1996) served as President of France from 1981 to 1995, elected as representative of the Socialist Party (PS). ... Second Round First Round See also President of France France Politics of France Categories: Election related stubs | Elections in France | 1988 elections ...   IPA: (October 26, 1916 – January 8, 1996) served as President of France from 1981 to 1995, elected as representative of the Socialist Party (PS). ... Second Round First Round See also: President of France, France, Politics of France Categories: Elections in France | 1995 elections ... Lionel Robert Jospin (born July 12, 1937 in Meudon, a suburb of Paris) is a French statesman who served as Prime Minister of France from 1997-2002. ... The 2002 French presidential election consisted of a first round election on 21 April 2002, and a runoff election between the top two candidates (Jacques Chirac and Jean-Marie Le Pen) on 5 May 2002. ... Lionel Robert Jospin (born July 12, 1937 in Meudon, a suburb of Paris) is a French statesman who served as Prime Minister of France from 1997-2002. ... The 2007 French presidential election, the ninth of the Fifth French Republic was held to elect the successor to Jacques Chirac as president of France for a five-year term. ... Marie-Ségolène Royal (born 22 September 1953 in Dakar, Senegal, then a French colony), known as  , (IPA: ) is a French politician. ...

Legislative

French National Assembly
Election year # of 1st round votes  % of 1st round vote # of seats
1973 4,579,888 18.9% 89
1978 6,451,151 22.6% 103
1981 9,077,435 36.0% 266
1986 8,693,939 31.0% 206
1988 8,493,602 34.8% 260
1993 4,476,716 17.6% 53
1997 5,961,612 23.5% 246
2002 6,086,599 24.1% 141
2007 6,436,136 24.7% 186

The Palais Bourbon, front The French National Assembly (French: Assemblée nationale) is one of the two houses of the bicameral Parliament of France under the Fifth Republic. ... French legislative election took place on March 4 and 11, 1973 to elect the 5th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic. ... French legislative election took place on March 12 and 19, 1978 to elect the 6th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic. ... French legislative election took place on June 14 and 21, 1981 to elect the 7th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic. ... The French legislative election took place on March 16, 1986 to elect the 8th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic. ... French legislative election took place on June 5 and 12, 1988 to elect the 9th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic. ... French legislative election took place on March 21 and 28, 1993 to elect the 10th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic. ... French legislative election took place in May 25 and June 1, 1997 to elect the 11th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic. ... These are the results of the French legislative election of 2002 Category: ... The French legislative elections took place on 10 June and 17 June 2007 to elect the 13th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic, a few weeks after the French presidential election run-off on 6 May. ...

European Parliament

European Parliament
Election year  % of overall vote # of seats won
1984 23.53% 22
1984 20.75% 20
1989 23.61% 22
1994 14.5% 15
1999 21.95% 22
2004 28.9% 31

Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild... In 1984 the second direct elections to the European Parliament were held in the France. ... In 1984 the second direct elections to the European Parliament were held in the France. ... On June 15 1989 the third direct elections to the European Parliament were held in the France. ... On June 12 1994 the fourth direct elections to the European Parliament were held in the France. ... On June 13 1994 the fifth direct elections to the European Parliament were held in the France. ... Elections to the European Parliament were held in France on June 13, 2004. ...

See also

The History of France has been divided into a series of separate historical articles navigable through the list to the right. ... Religious socialism Key Issues People and organizations Related subjects Socialism refers to a broad array of ideologies and political movements with the goal of a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community. ... The French Section of the Workers International (Section Française de lInternationale Ouvrière, SFIO), founded in 1905, was a French socialist political party, designed as the local section of the Second International (i. ... The Workers and Peasants Socialist Party (Parti socialiste ouvrier et paysan, PSOP) was an ephemeral socialist organisation in France formed in the late 1930s by Marceau Pivert. ...

External links

  • (French) Parti Socialiste - Official site
Political parties in France lists political parties in France. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The National Front (FN, French: ) is a French Far right, nationalist [1] political party, founded in 1972 by Jean-Marie Le Pen. ... The National Republican Movement (Mouvement National Républicain or MNR) is a French far-right political party, created by Bruno Mégret as a split from Jean-Marie Le Pens National Front. ... The Union for a Popular Movement (Union pour un Mouvement Populaire, UMP), is the main French centre-right political party. ... The Forum of Social Republicans (Forum des républicains sociaux, FRS) is a conservative christian-democratic party in France. ... The Rally for France and European Independence (Rassemblement pour la France et lIndépendance de lEurope) is a political party in France of the right. ... The Movement for France (French: Mouvement pour la France), or MPF, is a French conservative, traditionalist and nationalist party, founded on November 20, 1994, with a marked regional implementation in Vendée. ... The National Center of Independents and Peasants (Centre National des Indépendants et Paysans) is a political party in France. ... For other uses, see Radical Party (France). ... The Democratic Movement (Mouvement démocrate, MoDem) is a centrist and pro-European French political party that was founded by centrist politician François Bayrou to succeed his Union for French Democracy and to contest the 2007 parliamentary election, after his strong showing in the 2007 presidential election. ... New Centre (Nouveau Centre, NC), also known as the European Social Liberal Party (Parti Social Libéral Européen, PSLE) is a political party in France, formed by the members of the Union for French Democracy (UDF) – including a majority of former parliamentarians (18 of 29 members of the UDF... The Union for French Democracy, also known by its French acronym UDF (Union pour la Démocratie Française), is a French centrist political party. ... The Citizenship, Action, Participation for the 21st Century (Citoyenneté Action Participation pour le 21ème siècle) is a minor green political party in France. ... Les Verts (or The Greens) are an ecologist political party to the left of the political spectrum in France. ... Génération Écologie is, together with the Greens (Les Verts), one of the two green parties in France. ... The Independent Ecological Movement (Mouvement Ecologiste Indépendant) is a political party in France founded by Antoine Waechter, former presidential candidate of The Greens. ... The Left in France at the beginning of the 20th century was represented by two main political parties, the Republican, Radical and Radical-Socialist Party and the SFIO (French Section of the Workers International), created in 1905 as a merger of various Marxist parties. ... The Left Radical Party (French: or PRG) is a minor French centre-left, social-liberal party with moderate views, formed in 1972 by a split from the Radical, Republican and Radical-Socialists Party, once the dominant party of the French left. ... The Citizen and Republican Movement (Mouvement républicain et citoyen) is a political party in France. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... The Revolutionary Communist League (Ligue communiste révolutionnaire) (LCR) is a French democratic revolutionary socialist political party. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Party of the Workers (Parti des Travailleurs or PT), is a French Trotskyist party. ... CPNT symbol Hunting, Fishing, Nature, Tradition (French: Chasse, Pêche, Nature, Traditions) is a French political party of the right, which aims to defend the traditional values of rural France. ... The Liberal Alternative (French: Alternative Libérale) is a French political party created on March 1, 2006. ... Political parties Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      This is an overview of political parties by country, in the form of a table with a link to a list of political parties in each country and showing which party system is dominant in each country . ... This article is about political groups and tendencies in France. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Socialist Party (France) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1924 words)
The Socialist Party (Parti Socialiste or PS), which replaced the SFIO in 1969, is as of 2006 the main opposition party in France.
France's first socialist party, the French Workers' Party (Parti Ouvrier Français) was founded in 1880 by Jules Guesde and Paul Lafargue (the son-in-law of Karl Marx).
The party is due to choose a candidate for the 2007 presidential elections in November 2006.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m