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Encyclopedia > Social Democratic and Labour Party
Social Democratic and Labour Party
SDLP logo
Leader Mark Durkan MP MLA
Founded 1970
Headquarters 121 Ormeau Road
Belfast, BT7 1SH
Northern Ireland
Political Ideology Social democracy, Constitutionalist Irish Nationalism
Political Position {{{position}}}
International Affiliation Socialist International
European Affiliation Party of European Socialists
European Parliament Group n/a
Colours Green, red
Website http://www.sdlp.ie
See also Politics of the U.K.

Political parties
Elections Social Democratic & Labour Party File links The following pages link to this file: Social Democratic and Labour Party ... John Mark Durkan (born 1960) is a Roman Catholic nationalist politician in Northern Ireland and the leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... Dieu et mon droit (motto) (French for God and my right)2 Northern Irelands location within the UK Main language English Other recognised languages Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Peter Hain MP Area  - Total Ranked 4th... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... Constitutionalism is the limitation of government by law. ... Irish nationalism refers to political movements that desire greater autonomy or the independence of Ireland from Great Britain. ... The official symbol of Socialist International The Socialist International (SI) is an international organisation for social democratic and democratic socialist parties. ... The Party of European Socialists (PES) (French: Parti socialiste européen (PSE); German: Sozialdemokratische Partei Europas (SPE); Spanish: Partido socialista europeo (PSE); Italian: Partito socialista europeo (PSE)) is a European political party whose members are 30 social democratic, socialist and labour parties of the European Union member states as well... The politics of the United Kingdom are based upon a unitary state and a constitutional monarchy. ... Political parties in the United Kingdom lists political parties in the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom has five distinct types of elections: general, local, regional, European and mayoral. ...

The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLPIrish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. The SDLP is also a social democratic party, and is affiliated to the Socialist International. It is a member of the Party of European Socialists. The party's youth wing is SDLP Youth. Irish nationalism refers to political movements that desire greater autonomy or the independence of Ireland from Great Britain. ... Dieu et mon droit (motto) (French for God and my right)2 Northern Irelands location within the UK Main language English Other recognised languages Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Peter Hain MP Area  - Total Ranked 4th... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... The official symbol of Socialist International The Socialist International (SI) is an international organisation for social democratic and democratic socialist parties. ... The Party of European Socialists (PES) (French: Parti socialiste européen (PSE); German: Sozialdemokratische Partei Europas (SPE); Spanish: Partido socialista europeo (PSE); Italian: Partito socialista europeo (PSE)) is a European political party whose members are 30 social democratic, socialist and labour parties of the European Union member states as well... SDLP Youth is the youth wing of the Northern Ireland political party the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP). ...


The party currently has 3 MPs in the House of Commons, and 18 MLAs in the Northern Ireland Assembly. The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The logo of the Northern Ireland Assembly is a six flowered linen or flax plant, chosen for the plants historical economic importance to the region. ...

Contents


Leaders

Gerrard Gerry Fitt, Baron Fitt (9 April 1926 – 26 August 2005) was a Northern Irish politician. ... John Hume John Hume (born January 18, 1937) is an Northern Irish politician, and co-recipient of the 1998 Nobel Peace Prize, with David Trimble of the UUP. He was the second leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party, a position he held from 1979 until 2001. ... John Mark Durkan (born 1960) is a Roman Catholic nationalist politician in Northern Ireland and the leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party. ...

Foundation

The party was founded in the early 1970s. It was formed by former members of the Republican Labour Party - a fragment of the Irish Labour Party, the National Democrats, a small social democratic nationalist party, individual nationalists and members of the Northern Ireland Labour Party. The SDLP initially rejected the Nationalist Party's policy of abstensionism and sought to fight for civil rights within the Stormont system. The SDLP, though, quickly came to the view that Stormont was unreformable and withdrew from the Parliament of Northern Ireland. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... The Republican Labour Party was a political party in Northern Ireland. ... Logo of the Irish Labour Party The Irish Labour Party (Irish: Páirti an Lucht Oibre) is the third largest political party in the Republic of Ireland. ... The National Democrats were a small party in Northern Ireland founded by members of the Nationalist Party who previously attempted to get the Nationalists to adopt a constituency based structure with a party conference and agreed party programme. ... The Northern Ireland Labour Party was a political party which operated from 1924 until the 1980s. ... The Nationalist Party, an Irish political party, existed under various forms from 1874 to 1978. ... Abstensionism is the policy of seeking election to a body while refusing to take up the seats or even sitting in an alternative assembly. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Stormont is Stormont, a suburb of Belfast Stormont Castle, a castle in the area Parliament Building of Northern Ireland, known as Stormont a nickname for the former Parliament of Northern Ireland and its unionist-dominated executive, the Government of Northern Ireland Stormont County an old county that is now a... The Parliament of Northern Ireland was the home rule legislature created under the Government of Ireland Act 1920, which existed from June 7, 1921 to March 30, 1972, when it was suspended. ...


Aims

There is a debate over the intentions of the party's founders, with some now claiming that the aim was to provide a political movement to unite constitutional nationalists who opposed the paramilitary campaign of the Provisional Irish Republican Army and wished to campaign for civil rights for Catholics and a united Ireland by peaceful, constitutional means. However others argue that, as the name implies, the emphasis was originally on creating a social democratic party rather than a nationalist party. This debate between social democracy/socialism and nationalism was to persist for the first decade of the party's existence and still rears its head occasionally. Founder and first leader Gerry Fitt - a former leader of the explicitly socialist Republican Labour Party - would later claim that it was the party's decision to demand a Council of Ireland as part of the Sunningdale Agreement that signified the point at which the party adopted a clear nationalist agenda. He would later leave the party in 1980, claiming that it was no longer the party it was intended to be. The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA; more commonly referred to as the IRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the army or the RA) is an Irish Republican paramilitary organisation dedicated to the end of British rule in Northern Ireland and to a United Ireland. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... A United Ireland is the common demand of Irish nationalists, envisaging that the island of Ireland (currently divided into the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland) be reunited as a single political entity. ... Gerrard Gerry Fitt, Baron Fitt (9 April 1926 – 26 August 2005) was a Northern Irish politician. ... The Council of Ireland may refer to one of two councils, one proposed and one implemented for a brief period. ... The Sunningdale Agreement on December 9, 1973, was an attempt to end the Northern Ireland troubles by forcing unionists to share power with nationalists. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ...


However the party itself argues that its earliest publications show they have remained consistent in their search for a way out of an impasse in Northern Ireland that satisfies nationalist desires and calms unionist fears. The SDLP were the first to advocate the so-called principle of consent - recognising that fundamental changes in Northern Ireland's constitutional status could only come with the agreement of the majority of the people of Northern Ireland, despite the unionist majority partition had guaranteed there. For most of its existence Sinn Féin ridiculed this as a granting of a unionist veto. However, they grudgingly agreed to it, with reservations, when signing up to the Good Friday Agreement, though they contend it should not be a barrier to political progress in other areas. The principle of consent, also widely accepted by moderate unionists, was explicitly endorsed by a large majority of Irish people in referendums (held on the same day) that endorsed the agreement. In the context of Irish politics, Unionists are people in Northern Ireland, who wish to see the continuation of the Act of Union 1800, as amended by the Government of Ireland Act 1920, under which Northern Ireland, created in that latter Act, remains part of the United Kingdom of Great... The Partition of Ireland took place in May 1921. ... The Belfast Agreement (also known as the Good Friday Agreement and, more rarely, as the Stormont Agreement) was signed in Belfast on April 10, 1998 by the British and Irish Governments and endorsed by most Northern Ireland political parties. ...


Whilst anxious to achieve devolved government in Northern Ireland (which the British Government had prorogued in 1972), the SDLP were also insistent on what was then known as the Irish dimension - in other words a defined constitutional role for the Republic in northern affairs. This issue lead to the downfall of power sharing in 1974 (as the British Government were not prepared to break a general strike objecting to it) and to Gerry Fitt's decision to leave in 1980. Mr Fitt had agreed to enter into talks with Humphrey Atkins, the Secretary of State, which excluded an Irish dimension but was then rebuffed by his party conference. Devolution or home rule is the granting of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ... Motto: none Anthem: Amhrán na bhFiann (The Soldiers Song) Capital Dublin Largest city Dublin Official language(s) Irish, English Government President Taoiseach Parliamentary democracy Mary McAleese Bertie Ahern Independence  - Declared  - Recognised From UK by treaty 21 January 1919 6 December 1922 Accession to EU January 1, 1973 Area... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1974 calendar). ... A general strike is a strike action by an entire labour force in a city, region or country. ... Humphrey Atkins (August 12, 1922 - October 4, 1996) was a British Conservative politician who served as Secretary of State for Northern Ireland from 1979-1981 before being appointed in September 1981 as Lord Privy Seal in which he was the chief government spokesman in the House of Commons for Foreign... The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland is the British cabinet minister who has responsibility for the government of Northern Ireland. ...


John Hume was an advocate of a joint authority approach where both the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom would exercise political power. This was a central idea of the New Ireland Forum which brought together mainstream Irish parties in the 1980s. However this was rejected out-of-hand by Margaret Thatcher, the Prime Minister, in a speech that became known as "out, out, out" because she dismissed every proposal of the forum by saying "that is out". A coalition is an alliance between entities, during which they cooperate in joint action, each in their own self-interest. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (born 13 October 1925) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1979 to 1990. ...


The horrified reaction of the Taoiseach Garret FitzGerald to this speech and the electoral success of Sinn Féin following the 1981 Irish Hunger Strike shocked the Thatcher Government and they were receptive to Fitzgerald's lobbying on behalf of the SDLP which eventually led to the Anglo Irish Agreement. However, the agreement was undemocratically forced on the people of Northern Ireland - there was no plebiscite, and this led to opposition from both the unionists and from republicans. Republicans were concerned that the agreement did not go far enough. Unionists staged a peaceful demonstration of some 200,000 people in Belfast city centre, which was duly ignored and not widely reported on national television. The Taoiseach (plural: Taoisigh) or, more formally, An Taoiseach, is the head of government of the Republic of Ireland and the leader of the Irish cabinet. ... Dr. Garret FitzGerald (Irish name: Gearóid MacGearailt) (born February 9, 1926) was the seventh Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; July 1981 to February 1982, and December 1982 to March 1987. ... -1... The Anglo-Irish Agreement was an agreement between the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland which aimed to bring an end to the Troubles in Northern Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ...


While the SDLP's opponents claimed the party had become "post-nationalist" (following a speech where John Hume referred to "an increasingly post-nationalist Europe") after the Good Friday Agreement, Mark Durkan has recently described the party as republican. Durkan often emphasises to unionists that the protections and constitutional mechanisms of the Good Friday Agreement would remain in place even if Northern Ireland became part of a united Ireland. Nationalism is an ideology that creates and sustains a nation as a concept of a common identity for groups of humans. ... Irish Republicanism is an ideology based on the Irish nationalist belief that all of Ireland should be a united independent republic. ... A United Ireland is the common demand of Irish nationalists, envisaging that the island of Ireland (currently divided into the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland) be reunited as a single political entity. ...


Belfast Agreement

The SDLP were key players in the talks throughout the 1990s that led to the signing of the Belfast Agreement in 1998. John Hume won a Nobel Peace Prize that year with Ulster Unionist Party leader David Trimble in recognition of their efforts. The 1990s decade refers to the years from 1990 to 1999, inclusive. ... The Belfast Agreement (the Good Friday Agreement and, more rarely, as the Stormont Agreement) was a political development in the Northern Ireland peace process. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... The Nobel Peace Prize Medal featuring a portrait of Alfred Nobel Lester B. Pearson after accepting the Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize is one of five Nobel Prizes bequested by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... The Lord Trimble William David Trimble, Baron Trimble (born 15 October 1944) is a Northern Irish politician who served as leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) and the first First Minister of Northern Ireland. ...


Power-sharing Government

The SDLP served in the power-sharing Executive in Northern Ireland, alongside the Ulster Unionist Party, the Democratic Unionist Party and Sinn Féin. (The power-sharing administration is currently in suspension). Both Seamus Mallon and Mark Durkan served as Deputy First Minister alongside the UUP's First Minister David Trimble. A coalition is an alliance between entities, during which they cooperate in joint action, each in their own self-interest. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... For other political parties named Democratic Unionist Party, see Democratic Unionist Party (disambiguation). ... Seamus Mallon, MP Seamus Mallon (born on 17 August 1936) is a Northern Irish politician and former Deputy Leader of the nationalist Social Democratic and Labour Party. ... John Mark Durkan (born 1960) is a Roman Catholic nationalist politician in Northern Ireland and the leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party. ... The First Minister of Northern Ireland and the Deputy First Minister of Northern Ireland are the leaders of the Northern Ireland Executive, Northern Irelands home rule government set up in the 1990s as a result of the Good Friday Agreement. ... The Lord Trimble William David Trimble, Baron Trimble (born 15 October 1944) is a Northern Irish politician who served as leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) and the first First Minister of Northern Ireland. ...


Recent electoral performance

The SDLP was the largest nationalist party in Northern Ireland from the time of its foundation until the beginning of the 21st century. In 1998, it became the biggest party overall in terms of votes received, the first (as so far, only) time this had been achieved by a nationalist party. In the 2001 General Election and in the 2003 Assembly Election, Sinn Féin won more seats and votes than the SDLP for the first time. This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... Tony Blair William Hague Charles Kennedy The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish) is a name used by a series of Irish political movements of the 20th century, each of which claimed sole descent from the original party established by Arthur Griffith in 1905. ...


The retirement of John Hume was followed by a period when the party started slipping electorally. In the 2004 European elections Hume stood down and the SDLP failed to retain the seat he had held since 1979, losing to Sinn Féin. The European Parliament election, 2004 was the UK part of the European Parliament election, 2004. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish) is a name used by a series of Irish political movements of the 20th century, each of which claimed sole descent from the original party established by Arthur Griffith in 1905. ...

Some see the SDLP as first and foremost a party representing Catholic interests, with voters concentrated in rural areas and the professional classes, rather than a vehicle for Irish nationalism. The SDLP reject this argument, pointing to their strong support in Derry and their victory in South Belfast in the 2005 election. Furthermore, in the lead up to the 2005 Westminster Election, they published a document outlining their plans for a politically united Ireland. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (872x241, 12 KB) Summary Created by Nicholas Shanks. ... Rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas are sparsely settled places away from the influence of large cities and towns. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005 and won by the Labour Party, led by Tony Blair. ...


The party claims that the 2005 Westminster elections - when they lost Newry and Armagh to Sinn Féin but Durkan comfortably held Hume's seat of Foyle whilst the SDLP also gained South Belfast with a slightly bigger share of the vote than in the 2003 assembly elections - shows that the decline caused by Sinn Féin's rejection of physical force republicanism has slowed and that their vote share demands they play a central role in any constitutional discussions. Signs are that the Irish government are receptive to this view, though the British Government remain focused on Sinn Féin and the Democratic Unionist Party, as the mechanisms of government outlined in the Agreement mean that it is only necessary that a majority of assembly members from each community (which these two parties currently have) agree a way forward. The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005 and won by the Labour Party, led by Tony Blair. ... Newry and Armagh is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... Foyle is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... South Belfast is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... Government Buildings in Dublin. ... For other political parties named Democratic Unionist Party, see Democratic Unionist Party (disambiguation). ...


In July 2005 the IRA announced an end to their campaign. The SDLP fear that the British Government will then withdraw pressure on the republicans to end their rôle in "criminality" - the illegal activities taken to fund the "struggle" but which, in the eyes of many critics, have now taken on a life of their own as a source of funds for the republican movement's infrastructure. The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA; more commonly referred to as the IRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the army or the RA) is an Irish Republican paramilitary organisation dedicated to the end of British rule in Northern Ireland and to a United Ireland. ...


The SDLP endorsed and actively supported the replacement of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (a force which many nationalists opposed) with the Police Service of Northern Ireland. So far Sinn Féin has refused to endorse the PSNI. The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) was name of the police force in Northern Ireland from 1922 to 2001. ... The Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) is the police service that covers Northern Ireland. ...


Possible merger

In recent years there has been a debate in the party on the prospects of amalgamation with Fianna Fáil, a party in the Republic of Ireland, while the possibility of merger with Fine Gael, another Southern party, couldn't be dismissed. Fianna Fáil have made no such offer, but have done little to discourage rumours either. A recent attempt to press for amalgamation was defeated heavily at the SDLP's conference in 2004, and the party resolved to strengthen its social democratic profile. In addition to Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael, there is increasing speculation that a merger with the, similarly social democratic, Irish labour party could be on the cards. Many SDLP members are also members of the Northern Ireland Labour Forum; an official branch of the Irish Labour Party.But it would be wrong to regard the debate as a simple left versus right or red versus green question - as with Fianna Fáil itself, advocates of merger take a variety of positions on the left-right spectrum. However, Fianna Fáil have recently made their own inroads in Northern Ireland, opening a cumann in Derry and recruiting members in Belfast. Fianna Fáil - The Republican Party (IPA ; English translation: Soldiers of Ireland, but traditionally translated as Soldiers of Destiny) is the largest political party in Ireland. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Cumann (pl: Cumainn) is the lowest local unit or branch of a number of Irish political parties. ...


Westminster Parliament

With the collapse of the UUP in the 2005 UK general election and Sinn Féin's continual abstention from Westminster, the SDLP is once more the second largest parliamentary grouping from Northern Ireland at Westminster. The SDLP sees this as a major opportunity to become the voice of Irish Nationalism in Westminster and to provide effective opposition to the much enlarged DUP group. The SDLP is consequently paying more attention to the Westminster Parliament and working to strengthen its ties with the Parliamentary Labour Party, whose whip they informally accept. The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005 and won by the Labour Party, led by Tony Blair. ... The Parliamentary Labour Party (PLP) consists of the Labour Party in Parliament: Labour MPs as a collective body. ... In politics, a whip is a member of a political party in a legislature whose task is to ensure that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ...


Proposed Dail participation

The SDLP, along with Sinn Féin, have long sought speaking rights in Dáil Éireann, the parliament of the Republic. Taoiseach Bertie Ahern put forward a tentative proposal to allow MPs and MEPs from Northern Ireland to participate in debates on the region. However it met with vociferous opposition from the Republic's main opposition parties, and the plan was therefore shelved. Unionists had also strongly opposed the proposal. The Dáil Chamber Dáil Éireann[1] is the lower house of the Oireachtas (parliament) of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Taoiseach (plural: Taoisigh) or, more formally, An Taoiseach, is the head of government of the Republic of Ireland and the leader of the Irish cabinet. ... Patrick Bartholomew Ahern (Irish name: Pádraig Parthalán Ó hEachthairn) (born 12 September 1951), commonly called Bertie Ahern, is an Irish politician. ...


See also

This is a list of Social Democratic and Labour Party MPs. ...

External links

Political parties in the United Kingdom
Represented in the House of Commons (646) :

Labour (356) | Conservatives (197) | Liberal Democrats (63) | DUP (9) | SNP (6) | Sinn Féin (abstentionist) (5) | Plaid Cymru (3) | SDLP (3) | Ind KHHC (1) | Respect (1) | UUP (1) | Vacant (1) Political parties in the United Kingdom lists political parties in the United Kingdom. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party has, since the early twentieth century, been the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... The Conservative Party is one of the two largest political parties in the United Kingdom and the most successful party in political history based on election victories. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party in the United Kingdom. ... For other political parties named Democratic Unionist Party, see Democratic Unionist Party (disambiguation). ... In Scotland, the Scottish National Party (SNP) is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish) is a name used by a series of Irish political movements of the 20th century, each of which claimed sole descent from the original party established by Arthur Griffith in 1905. ... Plaid, also known in full as Plaid Cymru (pronounced IPA: ) – The Party of Wales, is the principal nationalist political party in Wales. ... Independent Kidderminster Hospital and Health Concern (often known by the shorter name Health Concern) is a political party based in Kidderminster, England. ... RESPECT The Unity Coalition is a left wing British political party founded on January 25, 2004 in London. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ...

Represented in the Scottish Parliament (129):

Labour (50) | SNP (27) | Conservative and Unionists (17) | Liberal Democrats (17) | Scottish Green Party (7) | Scottish Socialist Party (6) | Scottish Senior Citizens Unity Party (1) | Independent (5) For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... The Labour Party has, since the early twentieth century, been the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... In Scotland, the Scottish National Party (SNP) is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... The Conservative Party is one of the two largest political parties in the United Kingdom and the most successful party in political history based on election victories. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Scottish Green Party (Pàrtaidh Uaine na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the Green party of Scotland, and a full member of the European Federation of Green Parties. ... The Scottish Socialist Party (SSP) is a left wing Scottish political party which campaigns for a socialist economic platform and Scottish independence. ... The Scottish Senior Citizens Unity Party (SSCUP) were formed in February 2003, in time to contest that years elections to the Scottish Parliament. ...

Represented in the Welsh Assembly (60):

Labour (29) | Plaid Cymru (12) | Conservatives (11) | Liberal Democrats (6) | Forward Wales (1) | Vacant (1) The National Assembly for Wales (or NAfW) (Welsh: Cynulliad Cenedlaethol Cymru) is a devolved assembly with power to make legislation in Wales, and is also responsible for most UK government departments in Wales. ... The Labour Party has, since the early twentieth century, been the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... Plaid, also known in full as Plaid Cymru (pronounced IPA: ) – The Party of Wales, is the principal nationalist political party in Wales. ... The Conservative Party is one of the two largest political parties in the United Kingdom and the most successful party in political history based on election victories. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party in the United Kingdom. ... Forward Wales (or Cymru Ymlaen in Welsh) is a political party operating in Wales. ...

Represented in the Northern Ireland Assembly (108)

DUP (32) | UUP (25) | Sinn Féin (24) | SDLP (18) | Alliance (6) | UKUP (1) | Independent (2) The logo of the Northern Ireland Assembly is a six flowered linen or flax plant, chosen for the plants historical economic importance to the region. ... For other political parties named Democratic Unionist Party, see Democratic Unionist Party (disambiguation). ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish) is a name used by a series of Irish political movements of the 20th century, each of which claimed sole descent from the original party established by Arthur Griffith in 1905. ... The Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), is a political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... The UK Unionist Party (UKUP) is a small political party operating in Northern Ireland. ...

Represented in the London Assembly (25):

Conservatives (9) | Labour (7) | Liberal Democrats (5) | Greens (E&W) (2) | One London (2) The London Assembly is an elected body that supervises the Greater London Authority and the Mayor of London. ... The Conservative Party is one of the two largest political parties in the United Kingdom and the most successful party in political history based on election victories. ... The Labour Party has, since the early twentieth century, been the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Green Party of England and Wales (GPEW) is the principal Green political party in England and Wales. ... One London is a British political party formed on September 1, 2005 by Damian Hockney and Peter Hulme-Cross. ...

Represented in the European Parliament (72 out of 732):

Conservatives (ED, 26) | Labour (PES, 19) | Liberal Democrats (ELDR, 12) | UKIP (ID, 10) | Greens (E&W) (EGP, 2) | SNP (EFA, 2) | DUP (EUD1, 1) | Plaid Cymru (EFA, 1) | Sinn Féin (EUL, 1) | UUP (ED), 1 | Independent (2) (Ind) The European Parliament building in Strasbourg The inside of the building The European Parliament (formerly European Parliamentary Assembly) is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ... The Conservative Party is one of the two largest political parties in the United Kingdom and the most successful party in political history based on election victories. ... For other uses, see European Democrats (disambiguation). ... The Labour Party has, since the early twentieth century, been the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... The Party of European Socialists (PES) (French: Parti socialiste européen (PSE); German: Sozialdemokratische Partei Europas (SPE); Spanish: Partido socialista europeo (PSE); Italian: Partito socialista europeo (PSE)) is a European political party whose members are 30 social democratic, socialist and labour parties of the European Union member states as well... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party in the United Kingdom. ... The European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party (founded in 1993) is a liberal party, active in the European Union, uniting liberal and centrist parties around Europe which together represent more than 20 million European voters and is an international non-profit association incorporated under the laws of Belgium. ... The United Kingdom Independence Party (commonly known as UKIP, pronounced you-kip) is a Eurosceptic political party that aims at British withdrawal from the European Union. ... IND/DEM logo The Independence and Democracy (IND/DEM) group, formed July 20, 2004 is a euro-sceptic political group with 36 MEPs in the European Parliament. ... The Green Party of England and Wales (GPEW) is the principal Green political party in England and Wales. ... European Greens (or the European Green Party) is the name of the European Green Party, a political party at European level. ... In Scotland, the Scottish National Party (SNP) is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... The European Free Alliance (EFA) is a grouping of various political parties in Europe who believe in either full political independence (statehood), or some form of devolution or self-government for their country or region. ... For other political parties named Democratic Unionist Party, see Democratic Unionist Party (disambiguation). ... EUDemocrats (EUD) is an alliance of parties, movements and political organisations operating as a transnational Party at a European level (European political party), and incorporating members from both the centre-left and the centre-right. ... Plaid, also known in full as Plaid Cymru (pronounced IPA: ) – The Party of Wales, is the principal nationalist political party in Wales. ... The European Free Alliance (EFA) is a grouping of various political parties in Europe who believe in either full political independence (statehood), or some form of devolution or self-government for their country or region. ... Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish) is a name used by a series of Irish political movements of the 20th century, each of which claimed sole descent from the original party established by Arthur Griffith in 1905. ... GUE-NGL logo The European United Left–Nordic Green Left is a socialist and communist political grouping within the European Parliament. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... For other uses, see European Democrats (disambiguation). ... Non-Inscrits (English: Non-Attached; the English name is also official, but the French name is prevalent even in English texts) are Members of the European Parliament who do not sit in one of the political groups. ...

Minor parties:

British National Party | Socialist Labour | Liberal | English Democrats The British National Party (BNP) is a far-right political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Socialist Labour Party (SLP) is a small left-wing political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Party is a minor United Kingdom political party. ... The English Democrats Party, previously the English National Party, is an English nationalist political party in England, with representation throughout England, which seeks the establishment of a Parliament for England with at least the same powers as those granted to the Scottish Parliament. ...

1. DUP MEP Jim Allister is a member of the EUD, whilst the DUP itself remains non-affiliated. For other political parties named Democratic Unionist Party, see Democratic Unionist Party (disambiguation). ... Jim Allister, QC (born April 2, 1953) is a Northern Ireland unionist politician and barrister. ... EUDemocrats (EUD) is an alliance of parties, movements and political organisations operating as a transnational Party at a European level (European political party), and incorporating members from both the centre-left and the centre-right. ... Non-Inscrits (English: Non-Attached; the English name is also official, but the French name is prevalent even in English texts) are Members of the European Parliament who do not sit in one of the political groups. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Social Democratic and Labour Party - definition of Social Democratic and Labour Party in Encyclopedia (697 words)
It was formed by former members of the Republican Labour Party - a fragment of the Irish Labour Party, the National Democrats, a small social democratic nationalist party, individual nationalists and members of the Northern Ireland Labour Party.
The SDLP was the largest nationalist party in Northern Ireland from the time of its foundation until the beginning of the 21st century.
A recent attempt to press for amalgamation was defeated heavily at the SDLP's conference in 2004, and the party resolved to strengthen it social democratic profile.
Labour Party (UK) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6251 words)
The Labour Party's origins lie in the late 19th century, when it became apparent that there was an increasing need for a political party to represent the interests and needs of the large working-class population.
Labour's chances of electoral success were further damaged by the fact that the Thatcher government's popularity was on the rise after successfully guiding the country to victory in the Falklands War.
During this time the Labour Party emphasised the abandonment of its links to high taxation and old style nationalisation, which aimed to show that the party was moving away from the left wing of the political spectrum and moving towards the centre.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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