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Encyclopedia > Snow shoes
Snowshoers in Bryce Canyon
Snowshoers in Bryce Canyon

Snowshoes are a form of footwear devised for travelling over snow. They work by distributing the weight of the person over a larger area so that the person's foot doesn't sink into the snow. Traditional showshoes have a hardwood frame with leather lacings. Some modern snowshoes are similar, but made of light metal while others are a single piece of plastic attached to the foot to spread the weight. In addition to distributing the weight, snowshoes are generally raised at the toe for maneuverability. They must not accumulate snow, hence the latticework, and require bindings to attach them to the feet. Download high resolution version (1000x750, 156 KB)NPS photo from [1] This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (1000x750, 156 KB)NPS photo from [1] This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... High-heeled shoe Footwear consists of garments worn on the feet. ... A fresh snowfall in Colorados (USA) high forests. ...


Development of snowshoes

Traditional snowshoe maker, c. 1900-1930.
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Traditional snowshoe maker, c. 1900-1930.

Nearly every Native American tribe developed its own particular shape of shoe, the simplest and most primitive being those of the far north. The Inuit have two styles, one being triangular in shape and about 18 inches (45 cm) in length, and the other almost circular. Southward the shoe becomes gradually narrower and longer, the largest being the hunting snow-shoe of the Cree, which is nearly 6 ft. long (more than 1.5 meters) and turned up at the toe. The stereotypical snowshoe resembles a tennis racquet. Image File history File links Snow shoe maker, photograph taken between circa 1900 and circa 1930. ... Image File history File links Snow shoe maker, photograph taken between circa 1900 and circa 1930. ... Native Americans (also Indians, Aboriginal Peoples, American Indians, First Nations, Alaskan Natives, Amerindians, or Indigenous Peoples of America) are the indigenous inhabitants of The Americas prior to the European colonization, and their modern descendants. ... Inuit woman Inuit (Inuktitut syllabics: ᐃᓄᐃᑦ, singular Inuk or Inuq / ᐃᓄᒃ) is a general term for a group of culturally similar indigenous peoples of the Arctic who descended from the Thule. ... Cree camp near Vermilion, Alberta The Cree are an indigenous people of North America whose people range from the Rocky Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean in both Canada and the United States. ... Tennis balls This article is about the sport, tennis. ... Squash racquet and ball Racquetball racquet and ball Real tennis racquets and balls A racquet or racket is a sports implement consisting of a handled frame with an open hoop across which a network of cord is stretched. ...


Snowshoes were slowly adopted by Europeans in America, with the French voyageurs well in advance of British settlers. Snowshoes worn by lumberjacks are about 40 inches (1 m) long and broad in proportion, while the tracker's shoe is over 5 feet long (1.5 m) and very narrow. This form was copied by the Canadian snowshoe clubs, but shortened to about 40 inches long (1 m) and 15 to 18 inches broad (about 40 to 45 cm), slightly turned up at the toe and terminating in a kind of tail behind. This is made very light for racing purposes, but much stouter for touring or hunting. The tail has the effect of keeping the shoe straight while walking. The coureurs des bois (runners of the woods) or voyageurs (travellers) is the name given to the men who engaged in the fur trade directly with the Amerindians in North America from the time of New France up through the 19th century, when much of the continent was still mostly...


Traditional snowshoes are made of a single strip of some tough wood, usually white ash, curved round and fastened together at the ends and supported in the middle by a light cross-bar, the space within the frame thus made being filled with a close webbing of dressed caribou or neat's-hide strips, leaving a small opening just behind the cross-bar for the toe of the moccasined foot. They are fastened to the moccasin by leather thongs, sometimes by buckles. Such shoes are still made and sold by native peoples. Binomial name Fraxinus americana L. The White Ash (Fraxinus americana) is one of the largest of the ash genus Fraxinus, growing to 35 m tall. ... Binomial name Rangifer tarandus The reindeer, known as caribou in North America, is an Arctic-dwelling deer (Rangifer tarandus). ... Moccasin is a Native American word, of which the spelling and pronunciation vary in different dialects, a shoe made of deerskin or other soft leather. ... Modern leather-making tools Leather is a material created through the tanning of hides, pelts and skins of animals, primarily cows. ... For the English historian, see Henry Thomas Buckle A buckle is a clasp used for fastening two things together, such as the ends of a belt, or for retaining the end of a strap. ...


Modern snowshoes

Solid plastic snowshoes
Solid plastic snowshoes
Aluminum and fabric showshoes
Aluminum and fabric showshoes

Modern showshoes take advantage of technical advances in plastics to make a lighter and more durable shoe using modern materials. The modern snowshoes require require little maintenance, and usually incorporate aggressive crampons. Newer snowshoes have heel-lifters, called "ascenders", that flip up to facilitate hill climbing. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (486x620, 58 KB)MSR brand snowshoes. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (486x620, 58 KB)MSR brand snowshoes. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (486x621, 52 KB)Atlas brand snowshoes. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (486x621, 52 KB)Atlas brand snowshoes. ... Plastic is a term that covers a range of synthetic or semi-synthetic polymerization products. ...


The method of walking is to lift the shoes slightly and slide the overlapping inner edges over each other, thus avoiding the unnatural and fatiguing "straddle-gait" that would otherwise be necessary. The walker, particularly the lead walker, must break a trail in the snow. The method of overlapping assists in making the path. Immoderate snowshoeing leads to serious lameness of the feet and ankles which the Canadian voyageurs call mal de raquette. Modern snowshoes are much lighter and more comfortable so that lameness caused by snowshoeing is now very rare. The coureurs des bois (runners of the woods) or voyageurs (travellers) is the name given to the men who engaged in the fur trade directly with the Amerindians in North America from the time of New France up through the 19th century, when much of the continent was still mostly...


Snowshoe racing is very common in the Canadian snowshoe clubs, and one of the events is a hurdle-race over hurdles 3 ft. 6 in. high. Snowshoeing is an alternative to cross-country skiing, which is more difficult in heavily forested areas. A twin-tip shaped downhill ski. ...


See Also

This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclop√¶dia Britannica, which is in the public domain. A winter sport is a sport commonly played during winter, usually a sport played on snow or ice. ... Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) represents, in many ways, the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Learning How to Use Snowshoes, Snow Shoes (2833 words)
The bear paw is an evenly balanced shoe and for this reason it is as much out of place in the open lowlands as the unevenly balanced, tailed shoe is on the heights.
When both snowshoes are on the snow, the rear narrow part of the forward shoe and the wide front part of the rear shoe should fit close to each other, but not quite touch.
To stand with your snow shoes suspended between two rocks or fallen trees is an avoidable strain.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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