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Encyclopedia > Snow blindness
Snow blindness
Classification & external resources
ICD-10 H16.1
ICD-9 370.24
For other meanings see Snowblind.
Traditional Inuit goggles used to combat snow blindness
Traditional Inuit goggles used to combat snow blindness

Snow blindness is a painful condition, typically a keratitis, caused by exposure of unprotected eyes to the ultraviolet (UV) rays in bright sunlight reflected from snow or ice. This is especially a problem in polar regions and at high altitudes, as with every thousand feet increase in elevation, the intensity of UV rays goes up five percent. The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (most commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) provides codes to classify diseases and a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or disease. ... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10) is a coding of diseases and signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or diseases, as classified by the World Health Organization (WHO). ... // H00-H59 - Diseases of the eye and adnexa (H00-H06) Disorders of eyelid, lacrimal system and orbit (H00) Hordeolum and chalazion (H000) Hordeolum and other deep inflammation of eyelid (H001) Chalazion (H01) Other inflammation of eyelid (H010) Blepharitis (H011) Noninfectious dermatoses of eyelid (H02) Other disorders of eyelid (H020) Entropion... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (most commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) provides codes to classify diseases and a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or disease. ... The following is a list of codes for International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. ... Look up Snowblind in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1632x1232, 743 KB) Summary Inuit goggles made from caribou antler with caribou sinew for a strap. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1632x1232, 743 KB) Summary Inuit goggles made from caribou antler with caribou sinew for a strap. ... A human eye. ... “UV” redirects here. ... Prism splitting light High Resolution Solar Spectrum Sunlight in the broad sense is the total spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation given off by the Sun. ... The reflection of a bridge in Indianapolis, Indianas Central Canal. ... Animation of snowcover changing with the seasons Trees covered with snow Snow covering a leaf. ... Earths polar regions are the areas of the globe surrounding the poles, north of the Arctic circle, or south of the Antarctic Circle. ... Altitude is the elevation of an object from a known level or datum. ... Basic Definition In geography, the elevation of a geographic location is its height above mean sea level (or some other fixed point). ...


The problem is also related to the condition arc eye sometimes experienced by welders. Arc eye, also known as arc flash, welders flash, corneal flash burns, or flash burns, is a painful ocular condition sometimes experienced by welders who have failed to use adequate eye protection. ... A welder is a tradesman who specialises in welding materials together. ...


Snow blindness is akin to a sunburn of the cornea and conjunctiva, and may not be noticed for several hours from exposure. Symptoms can run the gamut from eyes being bloodshot and teary to increased pain, feeling gritty and swelling shut. In very severe cases, snow blindness can cause permanent vision loss. The cornea is the transparent front part of the eye that covers the iris, pupil, and anterior chamber, providing most of an eyes optical power [1]. Together with the lens, the cornea refracts light and, as a result, helps the eye to focus. ... The conjunctiva is a membrane that covers the sclera (white part of the eye) and lines the inside of the eyelids. ...


The Inuit carved goggles from caribou antler to help prevent snow blindness. The goggles were curved to fit the user's face and had a large groove cut in the back to allow for the nose. A long thin slit was cut through the goggles to allow in a small amount of light. The goggles were held to the head by a cord made of caribou sinew. For other uses, see Inuit (disambiguation). ... Watersport goggles Blowtorching goggles and safety helmet Goggles and safety glasses are forms of protective eyewear that usually enclose or protect the eye area in order to prevent particulates or chemicals from striking the eyes. ... Binomial name Rangifer tarandus The reindeer, known as caribou in North America, is an Arctic-dwelling deer (Rangifer tarandus). ... For the Poet Laureate of Milwaukee, see Antler (Poet). ... A tendon or sinew is a tough band of fibrous connective tissue, attached on one end to a muscle and on the other to a bone. ...

Contents

Prevention

When trekking, mountaineering or skiing, sunglasses that offer the following are frequently recommended: Many beautiful natural scenes are only accessible if one is willing to hike to get to them. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alpine skier carving a turn on piste Members of the U.S. Air Force skiing (and snowboarding) at Keystone Resorts 14th Annual SnoFest Downhill Ski Racing This article is about snow skiing. ... Ray-Ban Wayfarer sunglasses (RB2132 901L) Sunglasses are a visual aid, variously termed spectacles or glasses, which feature lenses that are coloured or darkened to prevent strong light from reaching the eyes. ...

  • 99-100% UV absorption
  • Polycarbonate or CR-39 lens (lighter, more comfortable than glass)
  • 5-10% visible light transmittance
  • Large lenses that fit close to the face
  • Wraparound, side-shielded, or dark-lensed 'glacier' glasses to prevent incidental light exposure
  • Wear even when the sky is overcast, as UV rays can still filter through clouds
  • In the event of lost or damaged sunglasses, fashion emergency goggles by cutting slits in dark fabric or tape folded back onto itself

Polycarbonates are a particular group of thermoplastic polyesters. ... A pair of modern glasses A pair of more traditional glasses Glasses, also called eyeglasses or spectacles, are frames, bearing lenses worn in front of the eyes normally for vision correction, eye protection, or for protection from UV rays. ... This article is about clouds in meteorology. ... Watersport goggles Blowtorching goggles and safety helmet Goggles and safety glasses are forms of protective eyewear that usually enclose or protect the eye area in order to prevent particulates or chemicals from striking the eyes. ...

Treatment

Following these guidelines will allow the pain and symptoms of snow blindness to disappear as the cornea heals:

  • Avoid rubbing eyes and remove contact lenses
  • Administer an oral pain medication such as ibuprofen
  • Cover eyes with soft thick cloth pads or gauze bandages to prevent irritation from eyelid movement and protect from light; rest in a dark room if possible
  • Apply cold wet compresses to ease burning sensations
  • Check injury at half-day intervals; remove dressing when eyes can remain open comfortably
  • Wear sunglasses outside until symptoms completely disappear

A soft contact lens A contact lens (also known as contact, for short) is a corrective or cosmetic lens placed on the cornea of the eye atop the iris. ... Ibuprofen (INN) (IPA: ) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) originally marketed as Nurofen and since under various trademarks including Act-3, Advil, Brufen, Dorival, Herron Blue, Panafen, Motrin, Nuprin and Ipren or Ibumetin (Sweden), Ibuprom (Poland), IbuHEXAL, Moment (Italy), Ibux (Norway). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A dressing is a piece of material, usually cloth, used to cover a wound and stop bleeding. ...

See also

Glare is difficulty seeing in the presence of bright light such as direct or reflected sunlight or artificial light such as car headlamps at night. ... This cosmetics store has lighting levels over twice recommended levels and sufficient to trigger headaches and other health effects Over-illumination is the presence of lighting intensity (illuminance) beyond that required for a specified activity. ... A winter sport is a sport commonly played during winter. ... Ray-Ban Wayfarer sunglasses (RB2132 901L) Sunglasses are a visual aid, variously termed spectacles or glasses, which feature lenses that are coloured or darkened to prevent strong light from reaching the eyes. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Blindness - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1453 words)
This means that a legally blind individual would have to stand 20 feet from an object to see it with the same degree of clarity as a normally sighted person could from 200 feet.
Historically, blind and visually impaired people have either been treated as if their lack of sight were an outward manifestation of some internal lack of reason, or as if they possessed extrasensory abilities.
The authors of modern educational materials (see: blindness and education for further reading on that subject), as well as those treating blindness in literature, have worked to paint a truer picture of blind people as three-dimensional individuals with a range of abilities, talents, and even character flaws.
AllRefer.com - blindness (Pathology) - Encyclopedia (351 words)
Blindness may be caused by injury, by lesions of the brain or optic nerve, by disease of the cornea or retina, by pathological changes originating in systemic disorders (e.g., diabetes) and by cataract, glaucoma, or retinal detachment.
Blindness caused by infectious diseases, such as trachoma, and by dietary deficiencies is common in underdeveloped countries where medical care is inadequate.
Snow blindness is a temporary condition resulting from a burn of the cornea caused by the reflection of sunlight on snow.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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