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Encyclopedia > Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937 film)
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

Original theatrical poster
Directed by Wilfred Jackson
Produced by Walt Disney
Written by Merrill De Maris
Brothers Grimm (fairy tale)
Starring Adriana Caselotti
Lucille La Verne
Pinto Colvig
Roy Atwell
Music by Frank Churchill
Paul Smith
Leigh Harline
Editing by Walt Disney
Distributed by RKO Radio Pictures
Release date(s) February 4, 1938
Running time 83 min.
Country United States
Language English
Budget $1,488,000[1]
Gross revenue $184,925,486
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (or Snow White and the Seven Dwarves in the United Kingdom) is a 1937 American film based on the eponymous European fairy tale by the Brothers Grimm. It was the first full length animated feature to be produced by Walt Disney, and the first color feature-length animated film with optical sound in movie history. It's also the 1st Walt Disney Animated Classic. Image File history File links Snowwhiteposter. ... Wilfred Jackson (January 24, 1906–August 7, 1988) was an American animator, arranger, composer and director best known for his work on the Mickey Mouse and Silly Symphonies series of cartoons from The Walt Disney Company. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... Merill De Maris is an artist who worked on Disney Comic Strips for King Features Syndicate. ... For other uses, see Brothers Grimm (disambiguation). ... Adriana Hitchell Caselotti (May 16, 1916 - January 19, 1997) was an American actress best known for providing the voice behind the lead character in Walt Disneys Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. ... Lucille La Verne (November 8, 1872 – March 4, 1945) was an actress known for her appearances in silent, scolding, and vengeful roles in early color films, as well as for her triumphs on the American stage. ... Vance DeBar Pinto Colvig was a vaudeville actor, radio actor, newspaper cartoonist, prolific movie voice actor, and circus performer whose schtick was playing clarinet off-key while mugging. ... Roy Atwell Date of Birth 2 May 1878 Syracuse,New York, USA Date of Death 6 February 1962 New York,New York, USA Actor,comedian,and composer,educated at the Sargent School of Acting. ... Frank Churchill (October 20, 1901 - May 14, 1942) was an American composer of popular music for films. ... For other persons of the same name, see Paul Smith. ... Leigh Harline (March 26, 1907 - December 10, 1969) was an award-winning film composer. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... The classic logo of RKO Radio Pictures. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 1937 in film 1937 1939 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events January — MGM announces that Judy Garland would be cast in the role of Dorothy in the upcoming Wizard of Oz motion picture. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article is about the Snow White character. ... For other uses, see Brothers Grimm (disambiguation). ... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ... A reel of film, which predates digital cinematography. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... This is a list of animated feature-length films from around the world organised alphabetically under the year of release (the year during which the completed film was first released to the public). ...


Walt Disney's Snow White premiered at the Carthay Circle Theater on December 21, 1937, and the film was released to theaters by RKO Radio Pictures on February 4, 1938. The story was adapted by storyboard artists Dorothy Ann Blank, Richard Creedon, Merrill De Maris, Otto Englander, Earl Hurd, Dick Rickard, Ted Sears and Webb Smith from the German fairy tale Snow White by the Brothers Grimm. David Hand was the supervising director, while William Cottrell, Wilfred Jackson, Larry Morey, Perce Pearce, and Ben Sharpsteen directed the film's individual sequences. is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The classic logo of RKO Radio Pictures. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Storyboards are graphic organizers such as a series of illustrations or images displayed in sequence for the purpose of previsualizing a motion graphic or interactive media sequence, including website interactivity. ... Merill De Maris is an artist who worked on Disney Comic Strips for King Features Syndicate. ... Earl Hurd (September 14, 1880 – September 28, 1940) was a pioneering American animator and film director. ... Date of Birth: 13 March 1900 Massachusetts, USA Date of Death: 22 August 1958 Los Angeles County, California,USA Walt & Lily Disney along with many members of the Disney company attended his wedding. ... A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... This article is about the Snow White character. ... For other uses, see Brothers Grimm (disambiguation). ... Wilfred Jackson (January 24, 1906–August 7, 1988) was an American animator, arranger, composer and director best known for his work on the Mickey Mouse and Silly Symphonies series of cartoons from The Walt Disney Company. ...


Snow White was one of only two animated films to rank in the American Film Institute's list of the 100 greatest American films of all time in 1997 (the other being Disney's Fantasia), ranking number 49. It achieved a higher ranking (#34) in the list's 2007 update, this time being the only traditionally animated film on the list. The following year AFI would name the film as the the greatest animated film of all time This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The first of the AFI 100 Years. ... Fantasia is a 1940 motion picture, produced by Walt Disney and first released on November 13, 1940 in the United States. ... AFI’s 100 Years. ...


In 1989, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was added to the United States National Film Registry as being deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant." The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ...

Contents

Plot

The film begins with a prologue: A prologue (Greek πρόλογος, from προ~, pro~ - fore~, and lógos, word), or rarely prolog, is a prefatory piece of writing, usually composed to introduce a drama. ...

Once upon a time there lived a lovely little princess named Snow White. Her vain and wicked stepmother the Queen feared that some day Snow White's beauty would surpass her own. So she dressed the little Princess in rags and forced her to work as a Scullery Maid. Each day the vain Queen consulted her Magic Mirror, 'Magic Mirror on the wall, who is the fairest one of all?' and as long as the Mirror answered, 'You are the fairest one of all,' Snow White was safe from the Queen's cruel jealousy.

One day, however, the Magic Mirror informs the queen that Snow White, despite her rags, is now the fairest in the land. In addition, the queen observes the arrival of a prince, who serenades the young girl as she gathers water from a well to scrub the grounds. These events fuel the queen's jealousy, and she orders her huntsman to take Snow White into the woods and kill her. As proof, the queen requires the huntsman to bring back the dead girl's heart in a jeweled box. The kind-hearted huntsman refuses to commit this murder, and instead urges Snow White to flee into the woods and never come back. The huntsman brings back a pig's heart for the queen instead. The heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ...


The frightened princess finds herself lost in the woods and terrified by numerous glowing eyes peering from within the trees and the brush. These are revealed to be the eyes of friendly woodland creatures who befriend Snow White and lead her to a cottage deep in the forest. Finding seven small chairs in the cottage's dining room, Snow White assumes the cottage is the home of seven children—"Seven untidy children," she notes, as she finds the cottage in disarray. The princess and the animals band together and clean the cottage, hoping that the good deed will convince the children to let Snow White stay with them. For other uses, see Eye (disambiguation). ...


But it soon becomes apparent that the woodland cottage belongs not to seven children but to seven adult dwarfs, who spend their days working in a nearby diamond mine. Upon returning home at the end of the working day, they are alarmed to find their cottage clean and surmise that a monstrous intruder has invaded their home. The dwarfs then come upon Snow White upstairs, asleep in one of their beds. The princess awakens, introduces herself, and the dwarfs, save for one aptly named Grumpy, welcome her as a house guest, particularly after they learn she can cook and has already prepared dinner. They are less pleased, however, at Snow White's insistence that they wash up before eating, something they have never done and only do after much apprehension. This article is about the mineral. ...


Meanwhile, the huntsman has returned to the castle and delivered to the Queen what she assumes to be Snow White's heart. However, the magic mirror informs the Queen that Snow White is in the care of the seven dwarfs and that the huntsman has actually given the Queen a pig's heart. The enraged Queen descends to a secret laboratory, where she practices witchcraft. Using her potions and spells, the Queen disguises herself as an ugly old hag and prepares a poisoned apple to place Snow White in an eternal state of repose called the Sleeping Death. For other uses, see Pig (disambiguation). ... This article is about the fruit. ...


The next morning, the dwarfs leave for the diamond mine, warning Snow White to beware of the evil Queen. However, the Queen's disguise is so convincing that Snow White is neither alarmed nor alert when she arrives at the dwarfs' cottage, pretending to be an apple peddler. The Queen offers Snow White the poisoned apple, claiming it to be a magic wishing apple. Snow White's animal friends are not convinced and rush off to warn the dwarfs. While they are gone, however, Snow White takes a bite out of the apple and falls to the floor, seemingly dead. A storm starts up outside as the ugly old hag cackles, "Now I'll be fairest in the land!"


The dwarfs arrive, riding deer, just in time to catch the Queen fleeing from the cottage. The dwarfs chase the hag through the raging storm, following her up the side of a mountain and trapping her at the edge of a jagged cliff. Desperate to rid herself of the dwarfs, the Queen attempts to push a boulder down the mountainside and onto them. But a bolt of lightning strikes the edge of the cliff where she stands, causing her to fall into the chasm below, crushed by the oncoming boulder. Two vultures who had followed her in anticipation of some kill immediately descend upon her. For other uses, see Mountain (disambiguation). ... “Precipice” redirects here. ... Not to be confused with lighting. ...


Despite having done away with the Queen, the dwarfs return to their cottage and find Snow White seemingly dead. They cannot bear to bury her; they instead build for her a glass coffin trimmed with gold in a clearing in the forest. The dwarfs and the woodland creatures keep watch over Snow White through the autumn, winter, and spring. One day, the prince learns of her plight and visits her coffin. Captivated by her beauty, he kisses Snow White, restoring her to life with "love's first kiss"—-the only possible cure for the sleeping death. The dwarfs and animals all rejoice as Snow White and the prince ride off into the sunset, where the couple lives happily ever after in the prince's castle.

Walt Disney introduces each of the Seven Dwarfs in a scene from the original 1937 Snow White theatrical trailer.
Walt Disney introduces each of the Seven Dwarfs in a scene from the original 1937 Snow White theatrical trailer.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ...

Cast of characters

  • Adriana Caselotti as Princess Snow White: Snow White was the daughter of a great king whose wife died when the daughter was very young. Her wicked stepmother forced her to work as a scullery maid in the castle. Despite this, she retains a cheerful but naive demeanor. Virginia Davis, who starred in Disney's "Alice" series, was considered for the role of Snow White, but was rejected. Deanna Durbin was also considered, but was rejected because her voice was "too mature" for the role. Both a child and a mother-figure.
  • Lucille La Verne as The Queen/Witch: The Queen is the stepmother of Snow White. Once her magic mirror tells her that Snow White is fairer than she is, she immediately enlists Humbert the huntsman to kill her in the woods. After she discovers that Snow White did not die, she disguises herself as an old hag and uses a poisoned apple in order to kill Snow White. While recording the voice of the Queen as the hag, Walt Disney was not happy with the voice Lucille La Verne was producing. After several retakes La Verne asked if she could go to the bathroom. When she returned and tried again to do the voice, she performed it perfectly. Amazed, Disney asked how she had achieved it. La Verne replied that she had removed her false teeth.
  • Roy Atwell as Doc: Doc is considered the leader of the seven dwarfs, and is presumably the oldest. He wears glasses and often mixes up his words. His job in the dwarfs' mine is to check the authenticity of the many gems. Joe Twerp, who was famous for confusing words, was considered for the role, but only played Doc in the radio version of the movie.
  • Pinto Colvig as Grumpy: Grumpy is as his name suggests him to be. He has the biggest nose of the seven and he automatically disapproves of Snow White for the mere fact that she is a woman. However, though initially too proud to show it, deep down he cares perhaps the most for her safety. He repeatedly warns her of the threat posed by the Queen and rushes to Snow White's aid upon realizing that she is in danger, leading the charge himself.
  • Otis Harlan as Happy: Happy is the joyous dwarf. He is the fattest of the seven and is always laughing.
  • Pinto Colvig as Sleepy: Sleepy is always tired, as attested by his heavy eyelids, and therefore usually appears laconic even in the direst situations. His job at the mine is to haul all the diamonds and rubies by cart to Doc for inspection. He has the longest beard of the seven. Usually he is pestered by a fly, who appears as a background character. (Sterling Holloway was considered for the role).
  • Scotty Mattraw as Bashful: Bashful is the shyest of the dwarfs, and is therefore often embarrassed by the presence of any attention directed at him. He frequently annoys Grumpy, though not as much as Doc. In Walt Disney's own words, according to one of the film's original theatrical trailers, Bashful is "secretly in love with Snow White".
  • Billy Gilbert as Sneezy:[2] Sneezy's name is earned by his extraordinarily powerful sneezes, which are seen blowing objects (including his brothers) across a room. He has the shortest beard of the seven (besides the beardless Dopey). The cause of his sneezes is hay fever.
  • Eddie Collins as Dopey:[3] Dopey is the only dwarf to have no beard at all; he is presumably the youngest of the seven. As his name suggests, Dopey is clumsy. His clumsiness provides comic relief to some of the plot. He is a mute, or at any rate never speaks and does not know whether he can. His job at the mine is to clean up all the unusable jewels and lock up the vault. He is always seen last in line whenever the dwarfs walk to and from work. Although he is scared at times, he can also be very brave, especially when Snow White is in danger. Although he does not speak at any point in the movie (in Snow White Remix, he can be found speaking at the end of the never-before-seen footage), Dopey appears to be singing along with other Disney characters in the direct-to-video Christmas release Mickey's Magical Christmas: Snowed in at the House of Mouse, during the song "The Best Christmas of All."
  • Harry Stockwell as The Prince (a.k.a. Prince Charming): The Prince first sees Snow White while she is singing at her wishing well. He immediately falls in love with her and her voice. He later appears to revive her. Oddly enough, the "prince" has no name and is never mentioned at all in any film to this date.
  • Moroni Olsen as The Magic Mirror: The Slave of the Magic Mirror appears as a green mask in clouds of smoke. The Queen regularly asks him who is the fairest in the land.
  • Stuart Buchanan as Humbert the Huntsman: The Huntsman is a kind-hearted person who cannot bear to kill Snow White, even when the Queen orders him to take the princess's heart.

Unvoiced characters include Snow White's animal friends, the Queen's raven, and the vultures who follow the Witch. However, although the animals did not have human speaking voices, their natural calls were very lifelike, and were all voiced by champion whistler and animal mimic A. Purves Pullen, who would provide bird and animal calls for Disney films (including numerous Pluto cartoons) for several decades. Pullen also produced the bird calls for the Enchanted Tiki Room attractions at Disney theme parks. During the 1940s and 1950s, he performed as "Dr. Horatio Q. Birdbath" with the comedy band Spike Jones & His City Slickers. Adriana Hitchell Caselotti (May 16, 1916 - January 19, 1997) was an American actress best known for providing the voice behind the lead character in Walt Disneys Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. ... This article is about the Snow White character. ... This article is about the Snow White character. ... In great houses, scullery maids were the lowest-ranking of the female servants and is assistant to a kitchen maid. ... For other uses, see Castle (disambiguation). ... When Laugh-O-Gram Films began to struggle, four year old model Virginia Davis was hired to act in a film called Alices Wonderland, combining live action with animation. ... Alice in Wonderland is a 1951 animated feature film produced by Walt Disney and originally premiered in London, England on July 26, 1951 by RKO Radio Pictures. ... Deanna Durbin (born Edna Mae Durbin on December 4, 1921, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, to English immigrant parents) was a popular young singer and actress in Hollywood films of the 1930s and 1940s. ... Lucille La Verne (November 8, 1872 – March 4, 1945) was an actress known for her appearances in silent, scolding, and vengeful roles in early color films, as well as for her triumphs on the American stage. ... This article is about the Snow White character. ... Magic Circle by John William Waterhouse Magic in fiction is the endowing of fictional characters or objects with magical powers. ... This article is about wave reflectors (mainly, specular reflection of visible light). ... This article is about the Snow White character. ... This article is about a community of trees. ... Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, The Hag, August 1890. ... This article is about the fruit. ... The Brothers Grimm version The Queen is a fictional character in the Brothers Grimm fairy tale Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, and the Disney animated film based on it. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Witchcraft. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... Lucille La Verne (November 8, 1872 – March 4, 1945) was an actress known for her appearances in silent, scolding, and vengeful roles in early color films, as well as for her triumphs on the American stage. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... Types of teeth Molars are used for grinding up foods Carnassials are used for slicing food. ... Roy Atwell Date of Birth 2 May 1878 Syracuse,New York, USA Date of Death 6 February 1962 New York,New York, USA Actor,comedian,and composer,educated at the Sargent School of Acting. ... A pair of modern glasses Glasses, also called eyeglasses or spectacles are frames, bearing lenses worn in front of the eyes normally for vision correction, eye protection, or for protection from UV rays. ... Words has several meanings: words in Unix. ... For other uses, see Gemstone (disambiguation). ... Vance DeBar Pinto Colvig was a vaudeville actor, radio actor, newspaper cartoonist, prolific movie voice actor, and circus performer whose schtick was playing clarinet off-key while mugging. ... Otis Harlan (December 29, 1865 - January 21, 1940) was an actor who did the voiceover of Happy in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937). ... This article is about the mythical creature. ... Vance DeBar Pinto Colvig was a vaudeville actor, radio actor, newspaper cartoonist, prolific movie voice actor, and circus performer whose schtick was playing clarinet off-key while mugging. ... This article is about the mineral. ... Ruby is a red gemstone, a variety of the mineral corundum in which the color is caused mainly by chromium. ... A cart is a vehicle or device, using two wheels and normally one horse, designed for transport. ... For other uses, see Beard (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fly (disambiguation) and Flies (disambiguation). ... Sterling Price Holloway, Jr. ... Joseph Henry Joe Ranft (March 13, 1960 – August 16, 2005) was an animation storyboard artist and voice actor who worked for Pixar and Disney. ... This article is about the mythical creature. ... Billy Gilbert was an American comedian and actor most known for his odd and unusual sneeze routines. ... For other uses, see Beard (disambiguation). ... Edward Trowbridge Collins Sr. ... For other uses, see Beard (disambiguation). ... This article is about mineral extractions. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Noted Singer and actor Harry Stockwell was born on April 27, 1902. ... Look up Wishing well in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Moroni Olsen (27 June 1889 – 22 November 1954) was an American actor. ... Wiktionary has related dictionary definitions, such as: slave Slave may refer to: Slavery, where people are owned by others, and live to serve their owners without pay Slave (BDSM), a form of sexual and consenual submission Slave clock, in technology, a clock or timer that synchrnonizes to a master clock... Magic Mirror is a lithograph print by the Dutch artist M. C. Escher which was first printed in January, 1946. ... For other uses, see Mask (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cloud (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Stuart Buchanan. ... The heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Raven (disambiguation). ... Orders Falconiformes (Fam. ...


Production

Development on Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs began in early 1934, and in June 1934, Walt Disney announced the production of his first feature to the New York Times.[4] Before Snow White, the Disney studio had been primarily involved in the production of highly successful animated short subjects in the Mickey Mouse and Silly Symphonies series. Disney hoped to expand his studio's prestige and revenues by moving into features, and estimated that Snow White could be produced for a budget of $250,000 - ten times the budget of an average Silly Symphony. For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... A short film (also short or short subject) is a motion picture that is shorter than the average feature film. ... Mickey Mouse is an Academy Award-winning comic animal cartoon character who has become an icon for The Walt Disney Company. ... A scene from The Skeleton Dance (1929). ...


Walt Disney had to fight to get the film produced. Both his brother Roy Disney and his wife Lillian attempted to talk him out of it, and the Hollywood movie industry mockingly referred to the film as "Disney's Folly" while it was in production. He even had to mortgage his house to help finance the film's production, which eventually ran up a total cost of just over $1.5 million, a massive sum for a feature film in 1937. For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... Roy Oliver Disney (June 24, 1893–December 20, 1971) was, with his younger brother Walt Disney, co-founder of what is now The Walt Disney Company. ... This article is about the legal mechanism used to secure property in favor of a creditor. ...


Snow White, which spent three years in production, was the end result of Walt Disney's plan to improve the production quality of his studio's output, and also to find a source of income other than short subjects. Many animation techniques which later became standards were developed or improved for the film, including the animation of realistic humans (with and without the help of the rotoscope), effective character animation (taking characters that look similar — the dwarfs, in this case — and making them distinct characters through their body acting and movement), elaborate effects animation to depict rain, lightning, water, reflections, sparkles, magic, and other objects and phenomena, and the use of the multiplane camera. A short film (also short or short subject) is a motion picture that is shorter than the average feature film. ... Rotoscoping is a technique where animators trace live action movement, frame by frame, for use in animated films. ... A multiplane camera built by an animation hobbyist in 1972. ...


The names of the Seven Dwarfs ("Bashful," "Doc," "Dopey," "Grumpy," "Happy," "Sleepy" and "Sneezy") were created for this production, chosen from a pool of about fifty potentials. The one name he always had in mind from the start was Grumpy, or something similar. Blabby, Jumpy, Shifty, and Snoopy were among those that were rejected, along with Awful, Bald, Biggo-Ego, Biggy, Biggy-Wiggy, Burpy, Busy, Chesty, Cranky, Daffy, Dippy, Dirty, Dizzy, Doleful, Flabby, Gabby, Gloomy, Goopy, Graceful, Helpful, Hoppy, Hotsy, Hungrey, Jaunty, Lazy, Neurtsy, Nifty, Puffy, Sappy, Sneezy-Wheezy, Sniffy, Scrappy, Silly, Soulful, Strutty, Stuffy, Sleazy, Tearful, Thrifty, Tipsy, Titsy, Tubby, Weepy, Wistful, and Woeful.[5].


The songs in Snow White were composed by Frank Churchill and Larry Morey. Paul J. Smith and Leigh Harline composed the incidental music score. Well-known songs from Snow White include "Heigh-Ho," "Some Day My Prince Will Come," and "Whistle While You Work." Because Disney did not have its own music publishing company at this time, the publishing rights for the music and songs were administered through the Bourne Co., which continues to hold these rights. In later years, the Studio was able to acquire back the rights to the music from many of the other films, but not this one. Snow White became the first American film to have a soundtrack album released in conjunction with the feature film. Prior to Snow White, a movie soundtrack recording was unheard of and of little value to a movie studio. Frank Churchill (October 20, 1901 - May 14, 1942) was an American composer of popular music for films. ... For other persons of the same name, see Paul Smith. ... Leigh Harline (March 26, 1907 - December 10, 1969) was an award-winning film composer. ... Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, the soundtrack to the 1937 Walt Disney film, was the first commercially issued film soundtrack[1]. It was released in January 1938 as Songs from Walt Disneys Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (with the Same Characters and Sound Effects as in the...


Reaction

The famous "Heigh-Ho" sequence from Snow White, animated by Shamus Culhane.
The famous "Heigh-Ho" sequence from Snow White, animated by Shamus Culhane.

Disney's wife, Lillian, told him: "No one's ever gonna pay a dime to see a dwarf picture."[6] Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs premiered at the Carthay Circle Theater on December 21, 1937 to a wildly receptive audience, many of whom were the same naysayers who dubbed the film "Disney's Folly." The film received a standing ovation at its completion from a star-studded audience that included such celebrities as Charlie Chaplin and Paulette Goddard, Shirley Temple, Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Judy Garland, Ginger Rogers, Jack Benny, Fred MacMurray, Clark Gable and Carole Lombard, Burns and Allen, Ed Sullivan, Milton Berle, John Barrymore, and Marlene Dietrich. Six days later, Walt Disney and his magical seven dwarfs appeared on the cover of Time magazine. The New York Times said "Thank you very much, Mr. Disney." RKO Radio Pictures put the film into general release on February 4, 1938, and it went on to become a major box-office success, making more money than any other motion picture in 1938. In fact, for a short time, Snow White was the highest-grossing film in American cinema history; it was ousted from that spot by Gone with the Wind in 1939. Adjusted for inflation, and incorporating subsequent releases, the film still registers one of the top ten American film moneymakers of all time. [7] Image File history File links Snow_white_1937_trailer_screenshot_(2). ... Image File history File links Snow_white_1937_trailer_screenshot_(2). ... Heigh-Ho is the first volume of Disney Sing Along Songs. ... James Shamus Culhane was an Irish-American animator, film director, and film producer, often regarded as one of the greatest animators of all time. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles Chaplin redirects here. ... Paulette Goddard (June 3, 1910 – April 23, 1990),[1] an Oscar-nominated American film and theatre actress. ... For the cocktail named after this person, see Shirley Temple cocktail. ... For the Katie Melua song, see Mary Pickford (Used to Eat Roses). ... Douglas Elton Fairbanks, Jr. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... Ginger Rogers (Virginia Katherine McMath, July 16, 1911 – April 25, 1995) was an Academy Award-winning American film and stage actress and singer. ... Jack Benny (February 14, 1894 in Chicago, Illinois – December 26, 1974 in Beverly Hills, California), born Benjamin Kubelsky, was an American comedian, vaudeville performer, and radio, television, and film actor. ... Fred MacMurray (August 30, 1908 – November 5, 1991) was an actor who appeared in over one hundred movies and a highly successful television series during a career that lasted from the 1930s to the 1970s. ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Carole Lombard (October 6, 1908 – January 16, 1942) was an American actress. ... George Burns & Gracie Allen Burns and Allen were an American comedy duo consisting of George Burns and his wife, Gracie Allen. ... For other persons named Edward Sullivan, see Edward Sullivan (disambiguation). ... Milton Berle (July 12, 1908 - March 27, 2002) was an Emmy-winning American comedian who was born Milton Berlinger. ... This article is about John Barrymore, Sr. ... Marlene Dietrich IPA: ; (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born American actress, singer and entertainer. ... TIME redirects here. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The classic logo of RKO Radio Pictures. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the novel, see Gone with the Wind. ...


Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was the first full-length animated feature film made in English and Technicolor (not counting the Academy Award Review of Walt Disney Cartoons), and won an honorary Academy Award for Walt Disney "as a significant screen innovation which has charmed millions and pioneered a great new entertainment field." Disney received a full-size Oscar statuette and seven miniature ones, presented to him by 10-year-old child actress Shirley Temple. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... This film, simply called Academy Award Review of Walt Disney Cartoons, was limited released on May 19, 1937, to help promote the upcoming release of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... For the cocktail named after this person, see Shirley Temple cocktail. ...


The film was also nominated for Best Musical Score. "Some Day My Prince Will Come" has become a jazz standard that has been performed by numerous artists, including Buddy Rich, Lee Wiley, Oscar Peterson, and Miles Davis. The Academy Award for Original Music Score is presented to the best substantial body of music in the form of dramatic underscoring written specifically for the film by the submitting composer. ... Jazz standard refers to a tune that is widely known, performed, and recorded among jazz musicians. ... Bernard Buddy Rich (September 30, 1917 Brooklyn, New York – April 2, 1987) was an American jazz drummer and bandleader. ... Lee Wiley Lee Wiley (9 October 1915 - 11 December 1975) was an American jazz singer popular in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. ... For the United States Navy sailor and Medal of Honor recipient, see Oscar V. Peterson. ... Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz musician, widely considered to be one of the most influential of the 20th century. ...


Noted filmmakers such as Sergei Eisenstein and Charlie Chaplin praised Snow White as a notable achievement in cinema.[8] The film inspired Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer to produce its own fantasy film, The Wizard of Oz in 1939. The 1943 Merrie Melodies short Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs, directed by Bob Clampett, parodies Snow White by presenting the story with an all-black cast singing a jazz score. Sergei Mikhailovich Eisenstein (Russian: Сергей Михайлович Эйзенштейн) (January 23, 1898 – February 11, 1948) was a revolutionary Soviet Russian film director and film theorist noted in particular for his silent films Strike, Battleship Potemkin and Oktober. ... Charles Chaplin redirects here. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... The Wizard of Oz (film) redirects here. ... Merrie Melodies end title Merrie Melodies is the name of a series of animated cartoons distributed by Warner Bros. ... Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs (working title: So White and de Sebben Dwarfs) is a Merrie Melodies animated cartoon directed by Bob Clampett, produced by Leon Schlesinger Productions, and released to theatres on January 16, 1943 by Warner Bros. ... Robert Emerson Bob Clampett (May 8, 1913–May 4, 1984) was an American animator, producer, director, and puppeteer best known for his work on the Looney Tunes series of cartoons from Warner Bros. ... Though most indigenous Africans possess relatively dark skin, they exhibit much variation in physical appearance. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ...


Snow White was such a success that Disney went on to produce 18 more full-length animated feature films during his lifetime.[9]


In June 2008, the American Film Institute revealed its "Ten top Ten"—the best ten films in ten "classic" American film genres—after polling over 1,500 people from the creative community. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was acknowledged as the best film in the animation genre.[10] This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


It has been well documented that Adolf Hitler watched this film with a roomful of children, and was delighted by Disney's adaptation of the German fairy tale. Hitler supposedly offered Disney anything he wanted in exchange for Disney's creation of feature-length animated features in Germany. Though this is the basis for the Walt Disney as a Nazi rumors, Disney's biographer Bob Thomas proves that Disney declined Hitler's invitation, and in fact soon entered production on such anti-German projects as Der Fuehrer's Face and Victory Through Air Power. Hitler redirects here. ... Bob Thomas was one of the top radio announcers in Knoxville, Tennessee for 25 years. ... Sheet music for the title song. ... Victory through Air Power is a 1942 book by Alexander P. de Seversky, and a 1943 Walt Disney animated feature film movie based on the book. ...


On February 22, 2008, William Hakvaag, owner of Lofoten War Museum, said he found four watercolor paintings with Disney motifs hidden inside a painting signed "A. Hitler" that he purchased at auction.[11] Three of them featured dwarfs and Hakvaag claims these have been signed by Hitler himself,[11] while the last one was an unsigned painting of Pinocchio.[12] is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Reine, Lofoten, seen from top of Reinebringen (June, 2003). ... For other uses, see Pinocchio (disambiguation). ...


Re-releases, home video, and related products

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was first re-released in 1944, in order to raise revenue for the Disney studio during the World War II period. This re-release set a tradition of re-releasing Disney animated features every seven to ten years, and Snow White was re-released to theaters in 1952, 1958, 1967, 1975, 1983, 1987, and 1993. The film was restored for its 1987 50th Anniversary re-issue (though the picture was cropped to a flat aspect ratio)[13] and a more comprehensive digital restoration was done for the 1993 re-issue. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other uses, see Aspect ratio (disambiguation). ...


Coinciding with the 1987 release, Disney released an authorized novelization of the story, written by children’s author Suzanne Weyn. On October 28, 1994, it was released as the first video in the Walt Disney Masterpiece Collection. It was the last of the early Disney animated films to be released on home video. Snow White was later released on DVD on October 9, 2001, the first in Disney's Platinum Series line of releases, and featured, across two discs, the digitally restored film, a making-of documentary narrated by Angela Lansbury, an audio commentary by John Canemaker and (via archived audio clips) Walt Disney, and many more special features.[1] Suzanne Weyn is an American author, born in Flushing, New York on July 6, 1955. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... The Walt Disney Masterpiece Collection (Walt Disney Coleccion Maestra in Spanish) is a line of videos released by Walt Disney Home Video from 1994 to 1999. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... -1... Angela Brigid Lansbury, CBE (born October 16, 1925) is an English three-time Academy Award-nominated, Emmy-nominated, four-time Tony-winning and six-time Golden Globe-winning actress and singer best known for her work in film, her award-winning tenures on Broadway in such musicals as Mame, Gypsy... John Canemaker (b. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ...


A Snow White video game was released for the Game Boy Color system. Snow White makes an appearance in the popular PlayStation 2 game Kingdom Hearts as one of the seven fabled Princesses of Heart. Snow White's Scary Adventures is a popular theme park ride at Disneyland (an opening day attraction dating from 1955), Walt Disney World's Magic Kingdom, Tokyo Disneyland, and Disneyland Paris. The Game Boy Color , shortened to GBC) is Nintendos successor to the Game Boy and was released on October 21, 1998 in Japan and in November of 1998 in the United States and 1999 in Europe. ... PS2 redirects here. ... This article contains information on the first Kingdom Hearts video game. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Snow Whites Scary Adventures is a dark ride at the Disneyland, Magic Kingdom, Tokyo Disneyland and Disneyland Paris theme parks around the world. ... Disneyland is a theme park that is located at 1313 South Harbor Boulevard in Anaheim, California, USA. It opened on July 17, 1955. ... Cinderella Castle, at the center of the Magic Kingdom, is Walt Disney World Resorts most recognizable icon Introduction Owned and operated by The Walt Disney Company, the Walt Disney World Resort in Florida, USA is home to four theme parks, two water parks, several resort hotels and golf courses... The Magic Kingdom is a theme park at the Walt Disney World Resort. ... Tokyo Disneyland ) is one of two theme parks in the Tokyo Disney Resort located in Urayasu, Chiba, Japan, near Tokyo. ... Castle of the Sleeping Beauty in Disneyland Park Disneyland Resort Paris is a theme park in Marne-la-Vallée, near Paris. ...


Theatrical release history

United States releases

Worldwide releases

is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... General location of the political entities known as Yugoslavia. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... A 2003 satellite image of the region. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...

Songs

Main article: Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (soundtrack)

Songs written for the film but not used include two songs for the dwarfs: "Music in Your Soup" (the accompanying sequence was completed up to the pencil test stage before being deleted from the film), and "You're Never Too Old to Be Young" (which was replaced by "The Silly Song"). Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, the soundtrack to the 1937 Walt Disney film, was the first commercially issued film soundtrack[1]. It was released in January 1938 as Songs from Walt Disneys Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (with the Same Characters and Sound Effects as in the... With A Smile And A Song is a popular song. ... Whistle While You Work is a song written by Frank Churchill and Leigh Harline for the 1937 animated movie Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. ... Heigh-Ho is the first volume of Disney Sing Along Songs. ... The Silly Song is a song from Walt Disneys animated film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs sung by Otis Harlan and Scotty Mattraw and the Dwarf Chorus. ... Some Day My Prince Will Come is a song from Walt Disneys Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. ... Some Day My Prince Will Come is a song from Walt Disneys Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. ... Pencil test has multiple meanings. ... The Silly Song is a song from Walt Disneys animated film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs sung by Otis Harlan and Scotty Mattraw and the Dwarf Chorus. ...


On Classic Disney: 60 Years of Musical Magic, this includes "Some Day My Prince Will Come" on the red disc, "Heigh-Ho'" on the blue disc, "The Silly Song (Dwarfs' Yodel Song)" on the green disc, and "I'm Wishing" and "One Song" on the purple disc. On Disney's Greatest Hits, this also includes "Heigh-Ho" on another blue disc and "Some Day My Prince Will Come" on the green disc. Some Day My Prince Will Come is a song from Walt Disneys Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. ... Heigh-Ho is the first volume of Disney Sing Along Songs. ... The Silly Song is a song from Walt Disneys animated film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs sung by Otis Harlan and Scotty Mattraw and the Dwarf Chorus. ... Heigh-Ho is the first volume of Disney Sing Along Songs. ... Some Day My Prince Will Come is a song from Walt Disneys Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. ...


See also

  • Disney Mothers
  • List of animated feature-length films

This is a list of animated feature-length films from around the world organised alphabetically under the year of release (the year during which the completed film was first released to the public). ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0029583/business
  2. ^ www.http://disney.go.com/vault/archives/characters/sevendwarfs/sevendwarfs.html Disney Archives
  3. ^ Disney Archives | The Seven Dwarfs Character History
  4. ^ Barrier, Michael (1999). Hollywood Cartoons. New York: Oxford University Press. pgs. 125-126. ISBN 0-19-516729-5.
  5. ^ Walt Disney: The Biography by Neal Gabler, 2007
  6. ^ Walt Disney: The Biography by Neal Gabler, 2007
  7. ^ "All-Time Box Office: Adjusted for Ticket Price Inflation". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved from http://www.boxofficemojo.com/alltime/adjusted.htm on September 8, 2006.
  8. ^ Culhane, John (July 12, 1987). "'Snow White' at 50: undimmed magic." The New York Times. Retrieved May 10, 2007.
  9. ^ Disney World - The Online Guide - Disney films
  10. ^ "AFI's 10 Top 10", American Film Institute (2008-06-17). Retrieved on 2008-06-18. 
  11. ^ a b Did Adolf Hitler draw Disney characters?
  12. ^ Kan ha funnet Hitler-kunst verdt flere hundre tusen - VG Nett
  13. ^ Siskel & Ebert and the Movies review

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Big Cartoon DataBase (BCDB) is an online database of information about animated cartoons, animated movies, animated television shows and cartoon shorts. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic way. ... This article is about the Snow White character. ... For other uses, see Brothers Grimm (disambiguation). ... Snow-White-Fire-Red is an Italian fairy tale collected by Thomas Frederick Crane in Italian Popular Tales. ... Snow White and Rose Red beating the snow off the bear. ... Snow White is a major character in the comic book series Fables. ... Snow White is a 1916 American silent film made by Famous Players-Lasky Corporation and produced by Adolph Zukor and Daniel Frohman. ... Snow White is a 1933 animated short film in the Betty Boop series from Fleischer Studios and distributed by Paramount Pictures. ... Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs (working title: So White and de Sebben Dwarfs) is a Merrie Melodies animated cartoon directed by Bob Clampett, produced by Leon Schlesinger Productions, and released to theatres on January 16, 1943 by Warner Bros. ... Snow White and The Three Stooges (1961) was the second feature film to star the Three Stooges after their 1959 resurgance in popularity. ... VHS cover for A Snow White Christmas A Snow White Christmas, released in 1980 is a Christmas cartoon-movie, that lasts about 50 minutes, dedicated to the young children. ... Snow White is a 1987 film based on the classic fairytale and released as part of the Cannon Movie Tales series. ... The DVD cover Snow White, released in the U.S.A. as Snow White: The Fairest of Them All, was a television film, made in 2001, and based on the Snow White storyline. ... 7 Zwerge – Männer allein im Wald (English: 7 Dwarves - Alone in the Wood), is a German comedy film, created in 2004 by Otto Waalkes, which follows the story of Snow White and the Seven Dwarves by the Brothers Grimm. ... This article is about the film. ... This is a list of theatrical animated feature films produced and/or released by Walt Disney Productions/The Walt Disney Company: // The following is a list of the fifty feature films that are part of the Walt Disney Animation Studios canon, also known as the Walt Disney Animated Classics. ... Pinocchio is the second animated feature in the Disney animated features canon. ... Fantasia is a 1940 motion picture, produced by Walt Disney and first released on November 13, 1940 in the United States. ... Dumbo is a 1941 animated feature film produced by Walt Disney and first released on October 23, 1941 by RKO Radio Pictures. ... Bambi is a 1942 animated feature produced by Walt Disney and originally released to theatres by RKO Radio Pictures on August 13, 1942. ... Saludos Amigos (Alô, Amigos in Portuguese) is a 1942 animated film produced by Walt Disney and released by RKO Radio Pictures. ... The Three Caballeros is a 1945 animated feature film, produced by Walt Disney and distributed by RKO Radio Pictures. ... Make Mine Music is an animated feature produced by Walt Disney and released to theatres by RKO Radio Pictures on April 20, 1946. ... Fun and Fancy Free (first released on September 27, 1947) is a feature film produced by Walt Disney and released by RKO Radio Pictures. ... Melody Time (first released on May 27, 1948) is an animated feature produced by Walt Disney and released to theatres by RKO Radio Pictures. ... The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. ... Cinderella is a 1950 animated feature produced by Walt Disney, and released to theaters on February 15, 1950 by RKO Radio Pictures. ... Alice in Wonderland is a 1951 animated feature film produced by Walt Disney and originally premiered in London, England on July 26, 1951 by RKO Radio Pictures. ... Peter Pan is an animated feature film produced by Walt Disney based on the play Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldnt Grow Up by J. M. Barrie. ... Lady and the Tramp is a 1955 animated feature film produced by Walt Disney, and originally released to theaters on June 16, 1955 by Buena Vista Distribution. ... “Princess Aurora” redirects here. ... This article is about the 1961 film. ... The Sword in the Stone is a 1963 animated feature film produced by Walt Disney and it was originally released to the theaters on December 25, 1963. ... The Jungle Book is a 1967 animated feature film, released on October 18th. ... For the 2005 documentary film, see The Aristocrats (film). ... “Robin Hood (Disney film)” redirects here. ... The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh is a full-length animated film produced by Walt Disney Productions and first released on March 11, 1977. ... The Rescuers is a 1977 animated feature produced by Walt Disney Productions and first released on June 22, 1977. ... The Fox and the Hound is a 1981 animated feature produced by Walt Disney Productions, first released to movie theatres in the U.S. on July 10, 1981. ... The Black Cauldron (also known as Taran and the Magic Cauldron in some countries) is the twenty-fifth animated feature in the Disney animated features canon. ... The Great Mouse Detective is a 1986 animated feature produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation, and originally released to movie theaters on July 2, 1986 by Walt Disney Pictures. ... Oliver & Company is a 1988 animated feature film that was produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation. ... The Little Mermaid is a 1989 Academy Award-winning animated feature film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation with pencil test began on September 23, 1988 and first released on November 17, 1989 by Walt Disney Pictures. ... The Rescuers Down Under is the twenty-ninth animated feature in the Disney animated features canon, produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios, and was released by Walt Disney Pictures and Buena Vista Distribution on November 16, 1990. ... Beauty and the Beast is a 1991 animated American family film. ... This article is about the Disney film. ... This article is about Disneys 1994 film. ... Pocahontas is the thirty-third animated feature in the Disney animated features canon. ... The Hunchback of Notre Dame (also known as The Bells of Notre Dame in some countries) is a 1996 animated feature produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released to theaters on June 21, 1996 by Walt Disney Pictures. ... Hercules is a 1997 animated feature film, produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures on June 27, 1997. ... This article is about the film Mulan. For the legendary person, see Hua Mulan. ... This article is about the 1999 film. ... Fantasia 2000 is an animated feature produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures. ... The Emperors New Groove is an Academy Award-nominated animated feature film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures through Buena Vista Distribution on December 15, 2000. ... Milo trying to convince scholars of Atlantis existence. ... For the television series, see Lilo & Stitch: The Series Lilo & Stitch is a 2002 American animated feature film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures and Buena Vista Distribution on June 21, 2002. ... Treasure Planet is a 2002 Academy Award nominated science fiction animated feature film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation, and released by Walt Disney Pictures on November 27, 2002. ... This article is about a Disney animated feature. ... Home on the Range is a 2004 animated feature produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures on April 2, 2004. ... Chicken Little (2005) is a computer-generated imagery (CGI) animated film and the forty-fifth animated feature made and produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures and Buena Vista Distribution on November 4, 2005. ... Meet the Robinsons is a computer-animated film and the 46th animated feature produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. ... The Princess and the Frog is an animated film currently in development by Walt Disney Animation Studios. ... Rapunzel is an upcoming American computer-animated film produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios and Walt Disney Pictures and to be distributed by Buena Vista Pictures in the United States. ... The Reluctant Dragon is an animated film produced by Walt Disney, directed by Alfred J. Werker, and released by RKO Radio Pictures on June 20th, 1941. ... Victory through Air Power is a 1942 book by Alexander P. de Seversky, and a 1943 Walt Disney animated feature film movie based on the book. ... Song of the South is a feature film produced by Walt Disney, released on November 12, 1946 by RKO Radio Pictures and based on the Uncle Remus cycle of stories by Joel Chandler Harris. ... So Dear to My Heart is a feature film produced by Walt Disney and originally released on January 19, 1949 by RKO Radio Pictures. ... For the 2004 stage musical, see Mary Poppins (musical). ... Bedknobs and Broomsticks is a 1971 musical film produced by Walt Disney Productions, which combines live action and animation; it premiered on October 7, 1971. ... Petes Dragon (first released on November 3, 1977) is a live-action/animated musical feature film from Walt Disney Productions. ... Who Framed Roger Rabbit is a 1988 live-action/animated film produced by Amblin Entertainment and The Walt Disney Company (released on its Touchstone Pictures banner) which blends traditional animation and live action. ... Enchanted is a 2007 musical film, directed by Kevin Lima and produced by Walt Disney Pictures and Josephson Entertainment. ... DisneyToon Studios is an animation studio and a division of Disney Feature Animation. ... DuckTales the Movie: Treasure of the Lost Lamp is a movie made by The Walt Disney Company that is based on the animated series DuckTales. ... A Goofy Movie is an animated musical film, produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation (now called Walt Disney Animation Studios) and released to theatres by Walt Disney Pictures and Buena Vista Distribution in 1995. ... Dougs 1st Movie is an animated film based on the television series Disneys Doug. ... The Tigger Movie is a 2000 film produced by The Walt Disney Company and directed by Jun Falkenstein. ... Return to Never Land (also known as Peter Pan: Return to Never Land) is a 2002 animated feature produced by the DisneyToons studio in Sydney, Australia and released by Walt Disney Pictures and Buena Vista Distribution. ... The Jungle Book 2 is an animated feature produced by the DisneyToons studio in Sydney, Australia and released by Walt Disney Pictures and Buena Vista Distribution. ... Piglets Big Movie is a 2003 animated feature produced by the DisneyToon Studios in Tokyo, Japan and released by Walt Disney Pictures and Buena Vista Distribution. ... Teachers Pet is an musical animated film based on the television series of the same name. ... Poohs Heffalump Movie is an animated Winnie the Pooh film, released by Walt Disney Pictures in 2005. ... Halloween Town redirects here. ... James and the Giant Peach is a 1996 fantasy film directed by Henry Selick, based on the Roald Dahl book of the same name. ... Dinosaur is a feature film produced by Walt Disney Pictures, and released to movie theatres in 2000. ... A Christmas Carol is a 2009 film adaptation of Charles Dickens 1843 story of the same name. ... Pixar Animation Studios is an American computer animation studio based in Emeryville, California, United States, and is notable for its eight Academy Awards. ... Walt Disney Animation Studios is the animation studio that makes up a key element of The Walt Disney Company, and the oldest existing animation studio in the world. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


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Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs - MSN Encarta (288 words)
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (or Snow White and the Seven Dwarves in the United Kingdom) is a 1937 American film based on the eponymous European fairy tale by the Brothers...
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, animated motion picture about a beautiful young woman who befriends a group of dwarfs, based on the brothers Grimm fairy tale.
Released in 1937, this was the first feature-length animated motion picture produced by Walt Disney, and one of the first produced by anyone.
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs - The Film Guide (1053 words)
Based upon the fairy tale Snow White by the Brothers Grimm, the film's plot has a jealous and wicked queen attempt to have her stepdaughter murdered, but the girl escapes and is given shelter by seven dwarfs who live deep in a forest.
Snow White was the first major animated feature made in the United States, the most successful motion picture released in 1938, and, adjusted for inflation, is the tenth highest-grossing film of all time.
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was first re-released in 1944, in order to raise revenue for the Disney studio during the World War II period.
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