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Encyclopedia > Snow
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Weather
 
Seasons
Temperate

SpringSummer
AutumnWinter
Look up snow in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the physical universe. ... For the geological process, see Weathering or Erosion. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... For the usage in virology, see temperate (virology). ... For other uses, see Spring. ... For other uses, see Summer (disambiguation). ... This article is about the temperate season. ... For other uses, see Winter (disambiguation). ...

Tropical

Dry season
Wet season The tropics are the geographic region of the Earth centered on the equator and limited in latitude by the two tropics: the Tropic of Cancer in the north and the Tropic of Capricorn in the southern hemisphere. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A wet season or rainy season is a season in which the average rainfall in a region is significantly increased. ...

Storms

ThunderstormTornado
Tropical Cyclone (Hurricane)
Winter stormBlizzard For other uses, see Storm (disambiguation). ... A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... Cyclone Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004 Hurricane and Typhoon redirect here. ... A typical view of a winter storm. ... This article is about the winter storm condition. ...

Precipitation

FogDrizzleRain
Freezing rainSleet
HailSnow For other uses, see Fog (disambiguation). ... Drizzle is fairly steady, light precipitation. ... This article is about precipitation. ... Freezing Rain is a type of precipitation that begins as snow at higher altitude, falling from a cloud towards earth, melts completely on its way down while passing through a layer of air above freezing temperature, and then encounters a layer below freezing at lower level to become supercooled. ... Sleet is a term used in a variety of ways to describe precipitation intermediate between rain and snow but distinct from hail. ... This article is about the precipitation. ...

Topics

Meteorology
Weather forecasting
ClimateAir pollution This page has a list of meteorology topics. ... // Meteorology (from Greek: μετέωρον, meteoron, high in the sky; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the interdisciplinary scientific study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting. ... Modern weather predictions aid in timely evacuations and potentially save lives and property damage Human beings have attempted to predict the weather since time immemorial. ... Air pollution is the modification of the natural characteristics of the atmosphere by a chemical, particulate matter, or biological agent. ...

Portal · Project  v  d  e 

Snow is a type of precipitation in the form of crystalline water ice, consisting of a multitude of snowflakes that fall from clouds. Since snow is composed of small ice particles, it is a granular material. It has an open and therefore soft structure, unless packed by external pressure. For other uses, see Crystal (disambiguation). ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... This article is about water ice. ... For other uses, see Cloud (disambiguation). ... A granular material is a conglomeration of discrete solid, macroscopic particles characterized by a loss of energy whenever the particles interact (the most common example would be friction when grains collide). ... This article is about pressure in the physical sciences. ...

Contents

Snowflakes

Animation of snowcover changing with the seasons
Animation of snowcover changing with the seasons
Trees covered with snow
The "Japanese Tsuzumi", an unusual variation of snow crystal, is named after the hourglass-shaped tsuzumi drum.
The "Japanese Tsuzumi", an unusual variation of snow crystal, is named after the hourglass-shaped tsuzumi drum.

A snowflake is an aggregate of ice crystal that forms while falling in and below a cloud. They are typically hexagonally symmetrical.[1] Image File history File links Earth-satellite-seasons. ... Image File history File links Earth-satellite-seasons. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 500 pixel Image in higher resolution (2816 × 1760 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 500 pixel Image in higher resolution (2816 × 1760 pixel, file size: 1. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1731x2598, 1362 KB) This snow crystal formation is called a Japanese tsuzumi for its resemblance to the hourglass-shaped drum of the same name. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1731x2598, 1362 KB) This snow crystal formation is called a Japanese tsuzumi for its resemblance to the hourglass-shaped drum of the same name. ... A tsuzumi is an hourglass-shaped drum introduced from Asia in the 17th century. ... Icicles A natural ice block in Iceland Ice is the solid form of water. ... For other uses, see Cloud (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hexagon (disambiguation). ... The triskelion appearing on the Isle of Man flag. ...


Geometry

Large, well formed snowflakes are relatively flat and have six approximately identical arms, so that the snowflake nearly has the same 6-fold dihedral symmetry as a hexagon or hexagram. This symmetry arises from the hexagonal crystal structure of ordinary ice. However, the exact shape of the snowflake is determined by the temperature and humidity at which it forms.[1]. Rarely, at a temperature of around -2 °C (28 °F), snowflakes can form in threefold symmetry - triangular snowflakes. [2] Snowflakes are not perfectly symmetric however. The most common snowflakes are visibly irregular, although near-perfect snowflakes may be more common in pictures because they are more visually appealing. This article deals with three infinite series of point groups in three dimensions which have a symmetry group which as abstract group is a dihedral group Dihn ( n ≥ 2 ). See also point groups in two dimensions. ... For other uses, see Hexagon (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Pascals Mystic Hexagram be merged into this article or section. ... Enargite crystals In mineralogy and crystallography, a crystal structure is a unique arrangement of atoms in a crystal. ... Ice Ih is the hexagonal crystal form of ordinary ice, or frozen water. ...


Snowflakes can come in many different forms, including columns, needles, bricks and plates (with and without "dendrites" - the "arms" of some snowflakes). These different forms arise out of different temperatures and water saturation - among other conditions. Six petaled ice flowers grow in air between 0 °C (32 °F) and -3 °C (27 °F). The vapor droplets solidify around a dust particle. Between temperatures of -1 °C (30 °F) and -3 °C (27 °F), the snowflake will be in the form of a dendrite or a plate or the six petaled ice flower. As temperatures get colder, between -5 °C (23 °F) and -10 °C (14 °F), the crystals will form in needles or hollow columns or prisms. When the temperature becomes even colder (from -10 °C to -22 °C) the ice flowers are formed again, and at temperatures below -22 °C, the vapors will turn into prisms again. If a crystal has started forming at around -5 °C, and is then exposed to warmer or colder temperatures, a capped column may be formed which consists of a column-like design capped with a dendrite or plate-like design on each end of the column.[1] At even colder temperatures, the snowflake design returns to the more common dendrite and plate. At temperatures approaching -20 °C, sectored plates are formed which appears as a dendrite, with each dendrite appearing flattened, like the design of a snowflake plate.[1] This rock was used a pavement around swimming pool area in Kona A crystal dendrite is a crystal that develops with a typical multi-branching tree-like form. ...


There are, broadly, two possible explanations for the symmetry of snowflakes. First, there could be communication or information transfer between the arms, such that growth in each arm affects the growth in each other arm. Surface tension or phonons are among the ways that such communication could occur. The other explanation, which appears to be the prevalent view, is that the arms of a snowflake grow independently in an environment that is believed to be rapidly varying in temperature, humidity and other atmospheric conditions. This environment is believed to be relatively spatially homogeneous on the scale of a single flake, leading to the arms growing to a high level of visual similarity by responding in identical ways to identical conditions, much in the same way that unrelated trees respond to environmental changes by growing near-identical sets of tree rings. The difference in the environment in scales larger than a snowflake leads to the observed lack of correlation between the shapes of different snowflakes. The sixfold symmetry happens because of the basic hexagonal crystalline structure from which the snowflake grows. The exact reason for the threefold symmetry of triangular snowflakes is still a mystery [citation needed] although trigonal symmetry is a subsymmetry of hexagonal. Surface tension is an effect within the surface layer of a liquid that causes that layer to behave as an elastic sheet. ... Normal modes of vibration progression through a crystal. ... Humidity is the amount of water vapor in air. ... Pinus taeda Cross section showing annual rings Cheraw, South Carolina Dendrochronology or tree-ring dating is the method of scientific dating based on the analysis of tree ring patterns. ... The triskelion appearing on the Isle of Man flag. ... In crystallography, the rhombohedral (or trigonal) crystal system is one of the seven lattice point groups, named after the two-dimensional rhombus. ... In crystallography, the hexagonal crystal system is one of the 7 lattice point groups (see Hexagonal_lattice). ...


There is a widely held belief that no two snowflakes are alike. Strictly speaking, it is extremely unlikely for any two macroscopic objects in the universe to contain an identical molecular structure; but there are, nonetheless, no known scientific laws that prevent it. In a more pragmatic sense, it's more likely—albeit not much more—that two snowflakes are visually identical if their environments were similar enough, either because they grew very near one another, or simply by chance. The American Meteorological Society has reported that matching snow crystals were discovered in Wisconsin in 1988 by Nancy Knight of the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The crystals were not flakes in the usual sense but rather hollow hexagonal prisms. Macroscopic is commonly used to describe physical objects that are measurable and observable by the naked eye. ... The American Meteorological Society promotes the development and dissemination of information and education on the atmospheric and related oceanic and hydrologic sciences and the advancement of their professional applications. ... NCAR, Boulder, Colorado National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) is a U.S.-based institute whose stated mission is: NCARs flagship Mesa Laboratory is located in the outskirts of Boulder, Colorado, in a dramatic complex of buildings designed by architect I.M. Pei. ... For other uses, see Hexagon (disambiguation). ... In geometry, an n-sided prism is a polyhedron made of an n-sided polygonal base, a translated copy, and n faces joining corresponding sides. ...

Snowflake Gallery.
Snowflake Gallery.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3971x560, 328 KB) Galerie de flocons de neige, par Jerome Mathey et Valérian Mazataud. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3971x560, 328 KB) Galerie de flocons de neige, par Jerome Mathey et Valérian Mazataud. ...

Snow on the ground

Snow in the city of Dorval, part of the Island of Montreal, in Quebec, Canada
Snow in the city of Dorval, part of the Island of Montreal, in Quebec, Canada


The image above is proposed for deletion. See images and media for deletion to help reach a consensus on what to do.

Snow remains on the ground until it melts. In colder climates this results in snow lying on the ground all winter; when the snow does not all melt in the summer it becomes glaciers. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,021 × 764 pixels, file size: 310 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) en: Street in Dorval, Island of Montreal fr: Rue de Dorval, sur lÎle de Montréal File historyClick on a date/time to... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,021 × 764 pixels, file size: 310 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) en: Street in Dorval, Island of Montreal fr: Rue de Dorval, sur lÎle de Montréal File historyClick on a date/time to... Dorval is a city in southwestern Quebec, Canada in the western part of the Island of Montreal; pop. ... The Island of Montreal (in French, île de Montréal), in extreme southwestern Quebec, Canada, is located at the confluence of the Saint Lawrence and Ottawa Rivers. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Physics In physics, melting is the process of heating a solid substance to a point (called melting point) where it turns liquid. ... A glaciation (a created composite term meaning Glacial Period, referring to the Period or Era of, as well as the process of High Glacial Activity), often called an ice age, is a geological phenomenon in which massive ice sheets form in the Arctic and Antarctic and advance toward the equator. ...


This is often called snowpack, especially when it does persist a long time. The deepest snowpacks occur in mountainous regions. It is influenced by temperature and wind events which determine melting, accumulation and wind erosion. For other uses, see Mountain (disambiguation). ...


The water equivalent of the snow is thickness of the layer of water having the same content. For example, if the snow covering a given area has a water equivalent of 50 centimetres (20 in), then it will melt into a pool of water 50 centimetres (20 in) deep covering the same area. This is a much more useful measurement to hydrologists than snow depth, as the density of even freshly fallen snow widely varies. New snow commonly has a density of between 5% and 15% of water. Snow that falls in maritime climates is usually denser than snow that falls in mid-continent locations because of the higher average temperatures over oceans than over land masses. Cloud temperatures and physical processes in the cloud affect the shape of individual snow crystals. Highly branched or dendritic crystals tend to have more space between the arms of ice that form the snow flake and this snow will therefore have a lower density, often referred to as "dry" snow. Conditions that create columnar or platelike crystals will have much less air space within the crystal and will therefore be more dense and feel "wetter". Water covers 70% of the Earths surface. ...


Once the snow is on the ground, it will settle under its own weight (largely due to differential evaporation) until its density is approximately 30% of water. Increases in density above this initial compression occur primarily melting and refreezing, caused by temperatures above freezing or by direct solar radiation. By late spring, snow densities typically reach a maximum of 50% of water.[3]


Spring snow melt is a major source of water supply to areas in temperate zones near mountains that catch and hold winter snow, especially those with a prolonged dry summer. In such places, water equivalent is of great interest to water managers wishing to predict spring runoff and the water supply of cities downstream. Measurements are made manually at marked locations known as snow courses, and remotely using special scales called snow pillows.  Areas with Mediterranean climate A Mediterranean climate is a climate that resembles the climate of the lands in the Mediterranean Basin. ... Runoff flowing into a stormwater drain Surface runoff is water, from rain, snowmelt, or other sources, that flows over the land surface, and is a major component of the water cycle[1][2]. Runoff that occurs on surfaces before reaching a channel is also called overland flow. ... Water supply is the process of self-provision or provision by third parties of water of various qualities to different users. ...


Many rivers originating in mountainous or high-latitude regions have a significant portion of their flow from snowmelt. This often makes the river's flow highly seasonal resulting in periodic flooding. In contrast, if much of the melt is from glaciated or nearly glaciated areas, the melt continues through the warm season, mitigating that effect. A flood (in Old English flod, a word common to Teutonic languages; compare German Flut, Dutch vloed from the same root as is seen in flow, float) is an overflow of water, an expanse of water submerging land, a deluge. ... Austrias longest glacier, the Pasterze, winds its 8 km (5 mile) route at the foot of Austrias highest mountain, the Grossglockner A glacier is a large, long-lasting river of ice that is formed on land and moves in response to gravity. ...


Energy balance

The energy balance of the snowpack is dictated by several heat exchange processes. The snowpack absorbs solar shortwave radiation that is partially blocked by cloud cover and reflected by snow surface. A longwave heat exchange takes place between the snowpack and its surrounding environment that includes overlaying air mass, tree cover and clouds. Convective (sensible) heat exchange between the snowpack and the overlaying air mass is governed by the temperature gradient and wind speed. Moisture exchange between the snowpack and the overlaying air mass is accompanied with latent heat transfer that is influenced by vapor pressure gradient and air wind. Rain on snow could induce significant heat input to the snowpack. A generally insignificant conductive heat exchange takes place between the snowpack and the underlying ground. [4]


Impact on human society

Snow serves as a thermal insulator conserving the heat of the Earth and protecting crops from subfreezing weather. But substantial snowfall sometimes disrupts infrastructure and services, even those of a region that is accustomed to such weather. Automotive traffic may be greatly inhibited or may be stifled entirely. Basic infrastructures such as electricity, telephone lines, and gas supply can also be shut down. This can lead to a "snow day," a day on which school sessions or other services are canceled owing to an unusually heavy snowfall. Some agricultural areas depend on an accumulation of snow during winter that melts gradually in spring providing water for the crops. Thermal insulation on the Huygens probe The term thermal insulation can refer to materials used to reduce the rate of heat transfer, or the methods and processes used to reduce heat transfer. ... Agriculture is the production of food, feed, fiber and other goods by the systematic raising of domesticated plants and animals. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... 11kV/400V-230V transformer in an older suburb of Wellington, New Zealand Electricity distribution is the penultimate stage in the delivery (before retail) of electricity to end users. ... A telephone line (or just line) is a single-user circuit on a telephone communications system. ... For other uses, see Natural gas (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Snow day (disambiguation). ...


Populations living on snow-prone areas developed ways to travel across the snow: skis, snowshoes and sleds (pulled by horses or dogs). A shaped, twin-tip alpine ski. ... For other uses, see Snowshoe (disambiguation). ... Scene from winter nearly anywhere snow may fall on a handy hill—Children at play sledding. ...

Section of an icehouse.
Section of an icehouse.

In areas near mountains, people would climb in winter to pick snow that they brought down to their villages, where it was stored in icehouses covered with layers of straw for insulation. Thus they could enjoy ice and snow in the summer time for food refrigeration or medical treatments. Image File history File links Nevero. ... Image File history File links Nevero. ... An ancient ice house, called a yakhchal, built in Kerman, Iran during the middle ages, for storing ice during summers. ... Bales of straw bundles of rice straw Pile of straw bales, sheltered under a tarpaulin Straw is an agricultural byproduct, the dry stalk of a cereal plant, after the nutrient grain or seed has been removed. ...


In areas that normally have very little or no snow, a snow day may occur with light accumulation or even the threat of snowfall, as those areas are ill prepared to handle any amount of snow. A mudslide, flash flood, or avalanche can occur when excessive snow has accumulated on a mountain and there is a sudden change of temperature. A mudflow or mudslide is the most rapid (up to 80 km/h) and fluid type of downhill mass wasting. ... Lower Antelope Canyon was carved out of sandstone by flash floods A Flash Flood is a rapid flooding of geomorphic low-lying areas (washes), rivers and streams, caused by the intense rainfall associated with a thunderstorm, or multiple training thunderstorms. ... The toe of an avalanche in Alaskas Kenai Fjords. ...


Records

The highest seasonal total snowfall ever measured was at Mount Baker Ski Area, outside of Bellingham, Washington in the United States during the 19981999 season. Mount Baker received 1,140 inches (29 m) of snow,[5] thus surpassing the previous record holder, Mount Rainier, Washington, which during the 19711972 season received 1,122 in. (28.5 m) of snow.[6] Guinness World Records list the world’s largest snowflakes as those of January 1887 at Fort Keogh, Montana;. allegedly one measured 15 inches (38 cm) wide. A view of Mt. ... Bellingham, Washington is the county seat of Whatcom County in the U.S. state of Washington. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see Mount Rainier (disambiguation). ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Recreation

Building a snowman.
Building a snowman.

Some forms of recreation depend on snow Download high resolution version (500x752, 55 KB)Caption: 031206-N-0399H-003 Philadelphia, Pa. ... Download high resolution version (500x752, 55 KB)Caption: 031206-N-0399H-003 Philadelphia, Pa. ... A classic snowman. ... “Fun” redirects here. ...

A winter sport is a sport commonly played during winter. ... Cross-country skiing (skating style) in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. ... Snowboarder in a half-pipe Snowboarder riding off cornice Snowboarding contributes greatly to the economies of ski resorts Snowboarding is a sport that involves descending a snow-covered slope on a snowboard that is attached to ones feet using a boot/binding interface. ... A snowmobile tour at Yellowstone National Park (NPS Photo) A snowmobile is a land vehicle propelled by one or two rubber tracks, with skis for steering. ... For other uses, see Snowshoe (disambiguation). ... Scene from winter nearly anywhere snow may fall on a handy hill—Children at play sledding. ... For the cricket meaning, see Sledging (cricket) A sled, sledge or sleigh is a vehicle with runners for sliding instead of wheels for rolling. ... A classic snowman. ... A snow fort is a usually open topped temporary structure made of snow walls that is used for recreational purposes. ... A sampling of snowballs. ... Four college students from Montclair State University attack their friend during a snowball fight. ... Teasing is the act of playfully disturbing another person, either with words or with actions. ... A Snow Angel is a man-made depression formed in an area of snow in the shape of an angel. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... SnowCastle in 2006 Snow Restaurant The SnowCastle of Kemi is the biggest snow castle in the world. ... Kemi is a town and municipality of Finland. ...

Types of snow

Hoar frost that grows on the snow surface due to water vapor moving up through the snow on cold, clear nights
Hoar frost that grows on the snow surface due to water vapor moving up through the snow on cold, clear nights

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 2581 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 2581 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Hoar frost on a rose twig. ...

Falling Snow

Blizzard
A long-lasting snow storm with intense snowfall and usually high winds. Particularly severe storms can create whiteout conditions where visibility is reduced to less than 1 m.
Columns
A class snow flakes that is shaped like a six sided column. One of the 4 classes of snow flakes.
Dendrites
A class of snow flakes that has 6 points, making it somewhat star shaped. The classic snow flake shape. One of the 4 classes of snow flakes.
Flurry
A period of light snow with usually little accumulation with occasional moderate snowfall.
Freezing rain
Rain that freezes on impact with a sufficiently cold surface. This can cover trees in a uniform layer of very clear, shiny ice – a beautiful phenomenon, though excessive accumulation can break tree limbs and utility lines, causing utility failures and possible property damage.
Snowbird ski resort, one of the snowiest places in the U.S.
Snowbird ski resort, one of the snowiest places in the U.S.
Graupel
Precipitation formed when freezing fog condenses on a snowflake, forming a ball of rime ice. Also known as snow pellets.
Ground blizzard
Occurs when a strong wind drives already fallen snow to create drifts and whiteouts.
Hail
Many-layered ice balls, ranging from "pea" sized (0.25 in, 6 mm) to "golf ball" sized (1.75 in, 43 mm), to, in rare cases, "softball" sized or greater (­>4.25 in, 108 mm).
Hailstorm
A storm of hail. If the hail is sufficiently large, it can cause damage to cars or even people.
Lake effect snow
Produced when cold winds move across long expanses of warmer lake water, picking up water vapor which freezes and is deposited on the lake's shores.
Needles
A class of snow flakes that are ascicular in shape (their length is much longer than their diameter, like a needle). One of the 4 classes of snow flakes.
Rimed snow
Snow flakes that are partially or completely coated in tiny frozen water droplets called rime. Rime forms on a snow flake when it passes through a super-cooled cloud. One of the 4 classes of snow flakes.
Sleet
In Britain, rain mixed with snow; in America, ice pellets formed when snowflakes pass through a layer of warm air, partially or completely thaw, then refreeze upon passing through sufficiently cold air during further descent. The proper term term for the American definition is "Ice Pellets."
Snow pellets
See graupel.
Snow squall
A brief, very intense snowstorm.
Snow storm
A long storm of relatively heavy snow.
Soft hail
See graupel.
Thundersnow
A thunderstorm which produces snow as the primary form of precipitation.

This article is about the winter storm condition. ... Whiteout is a weather condition in which visibility is reduced by snow and diffuse lighting from overcast clouds. ... For other meanings of the term, see column (disambiguation). ... In biology, a dendrite is a slender, typically branched projection of a nerve cell, or neuron, which conducts the electrical stimulation received from other cells to the body or soma of the cell from which it projects. ... Look up flurry in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Freezing Rain is a type of precipitation that begins as snow at higher altitude, falling from a cloud towards earth, melts completely on its way down while passing through a layer of air above freezing temperature, and then encounters a layer below freezing at lower level to become supercooled. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1640 KB) Summary Own work Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Snow Snowboard Skiing Ski Utah Snowboarding Ski resort Snowbird ski resort Metadata This file... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1640 KB) Summary Own work Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Snow Snowboard Skiing Ski Utah Snowboarding Ski resort Snowbird ski resort Metadata This file... Inside the Snowbird Cliff Lodge Snowbird is a year-round ski and summer resort located in the U.S. state of Utah on the eastern border of the Salt Lake City suburb of Sandy in the Little Cottonwood Canyon of the Wasatch mountain range in the Rocky Mountains. ... Graupel can be any of the following types of solid-ice precipitation: hail - large chunks of ice such as from a strong or severe thunderstorm sleet - small pellets of raindrops that have frozen in mid-air, in winter or a thunderstorm snow pellets - when freezing fog forms 2-5mm balls... A ground blizzard in Ontario, March 21st, 2004 The term Ground Blizzard refers to a weather condition where loose snow or ice on the ground is lifted and blown by strong winds. ... This article is about the precipitation. ... This article is about the precipitation. ... Lake-effect precipitation coming off the Great Lakes, as seen from NEXRAD. Lake effect snow, which can be a type of snowsquall, is produced in the winter when cold, artic dry winds move across long expanses of warmer lake water, picking up water vapor which freezes and is deposited on... The word needle has several meanings: Sewing Needles used for sewing In sewing, a needle is a long, slender, object with a pointed tip, usually made of metal. ... Sleet is a term used in a variety of ways to describe precipitation intermediate between rain and snow but distinct from hail. ... Streaming lake-effect clouds off Lakes Nipigon, Superior, Michigan, Huron, St. ... ... For other uses, see Storm (disambiguation). ... Soft hail is a form of precipitation where snow flakes partially melt on falling into warmer air forming sleet with the loss of their flake structure, and then re-freeze on passing back into colder air to form amorphous or semi-crystalline pellets of snow. ... Thundersnow is a particularly rare meteorological phenomenon that includes the typical behavior of a thunderstorm, but with snow falling as the primary precipitation instead of rain. ... A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, The Netherlands. ...

Snow on the ground

Snow covering a leaf.
Snow blowing from a roof in Ottawa
Snow blowing from a roof in Ottawa
Artificial snow
Snow can be also manufactured using snow cannons, which actually create tiny granules more like soft hail (this is sometimes called "grits" by those in the southern U.S. for its likeness to the texture of the food). In recent years, snow cannons have been produced that create more natural-looking snow, but these machines are prohibitively expensive.
Blowing snow
Snow on ground that is being moved around by wind. See ground blizzard.
Corn
Coarse, granular wet snow. Most commonly used by skiers describing good spring snow. Corn is the result of diurnal cycle of melting and refreezing.
Crust
A layer of snow on the surface of the snowpack that is stronger than the snow below, which may be powder snow. Depending on their thickness and resulting strength, crusts can be termed "supportable," meaning that they will support the weight of a human, "breakable," meaning that they will not, or "zipper," meaning that a skier can break and ski through the crust. Crusts often result from partial melting of the snow surface by direct sunlight or warm air followed by re-freezing.
Depth Hoar
Faceted snow crystals, usually poorly or completely unbonded (unsintered) to adjacent crystals, creating a weak zone in the snowpack. Depth hoar forms from metamorphism of the snowpack in response to a large temperature gradient between the warmer ground beneath the snowpack and the surface. The relatively high porosity (percentage of air space), relatively warm temperature (usually near freezing point), and unbonded weak snow in this layer can allow various organisms to live in it.
Ice
Densely packed material formed from snow that doesn't contain air bubbles. Depending on the snow accumulation rate, the air temperature, and the weight of the snow in the upper layers, it can take snow a few hours or a few decades to form into ice.
Firn
Snow which has been lying for at least a year but which has not yet consolidated into glacier ice. It is granular.
Packed Powder
The most common snow cover on ski slopes, consisting of powder snow that has lain on the ground long enough to become compressed, but is still loose.
Packing snow
Snow that is at or near the melting point, so that it can easily be packed into snowballs and hurled at other people or objects. This is perfect for snow fights and other winter fun, such as making a snowman, or a snow fort.
Penitentes
Tall blades of snow found at high altitudes.
Powder
Freshly fallen, uncompacted snow. The density and moisture content of powder snow can vary widely; snowfall in coastal regions and areas with higher humidity is usually heavier than a similar depth of snowfall in an arid or continental region. Light, dry (low moisture content, typically 4 - 7% water content) powder snow is prized by skiers and snowboarders. It is often found in the Rocky Mountains of North America and in Niseko, Japan.
The textures of a snowdrift on the Long Mynd, Shropshire
The textures of a snowdrift on the Long Mynd, Shropshire
Pukak
See Depth Hoar
Slush
Snow which partially melts upon reaching the ground, to the point that it accumulates in puddles of partially-frozen water.
Snowdrift
Large piles of snow which occur near walls and curbs, as the wind tends to push the snow up toward the vertical surfaces.
Surface Hoar
Faceted, corn-flake shaped snow crystals that are a type of frost that forms on the surface of the snow pack on cold, clear, calm nights. Subsequent snow fall can bury layers of surface hoar encorporating them into the snowpack where they can form a weak layer. Sometimes referred to as hoar frost.
Watermelon snow
A reddish/pink colored snow that smells like watermelons, and is caused by a red colored green algae called chlamydomonas nivalis
Wind slab
A layer of relatively stiff, hard snow formed by deposition of wind blown snow on the leeward side of a ridge or other sheltered area. Wind slabs can form over weaker, softer freshly fallen powder snow creating an avalanche hazard on steep slopes.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3008x2000, 1923 KB) Own work. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3008x2000, 1923 KB) Own work. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1944 × 2592 pixel, file size: 676 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Snow blowing from a roof in New Edinburgh (Ottawa). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1944 × 2592 pixel, file size: 676 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Snow blowing from a roof in New Edinburgh (Ottawa). ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... Snow cannon at Mölltaler Gletscher, Austria A snow cannon (also called snowgun or snow maker) is a device used to produce snow artificially. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Historic Southern United States. ... A ground blizzard in Ontario, March 21st, 2004 The term Ground Blizzard refers to a weather condition where loose snow or ice on the ground is lifted and blown by strong winds. ... This article is about water ice. ... Los Hermanos de la Fraternidad Piadosa de Nuestro Padre Jesús Nazareno (Spanish: The Brothers of the Pious Fraternity of Our Father Jesus the Nazarene, also known as Los Penitentes, Los Hermanos, and the Penitente Brotherhood) is a lay confraternity of Roman Catholic men active in Northern New Mexico and... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 189 KB) Self made: This photo was taken on the Long Mynd in Shropshire after a snow storm hit the region in early 2005 (February 24th) This shows the Texture of a Snow Drift when formed, with contrast to a... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 189 KB) Self made: This photo was taken on the Long Mynd in Shropshire after a snow storm hit the region in early 2005 (February 24th) This shows the Texture of a Snow Drift when formed, with contrast to a... View down Townsbrook Valley over towards Burway Hill The Long Mynd in Shropshire, England, is a part of the Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. ... Shropshire (pronounced /, -/), alternatively known as Salop[6] or abbreviated Shrops[7], is a county in the West Midlands of England. ... This article is about the mixture of solid and liquid snow. ... A fairly common sight during snowstorms big and small. ... Hoar frost on a rose twig. ... Binomial name Chlamydomonas nivalis (Bauer) Wille Watermelon snow is snow that is reddish or pink in color, with the slight scent of a fresh watermelon. ... For the political designation, see Eco-socialism. ... Divisions Chlorophyta Charophyta Green algae are microscopic protists; found in all aquatic environments, including marine, freshwater and brackish water. ... Binomial name Chlamydomonas nivalis (Bauer) Wille Watermelon snow is snow that is reddish or pink in color, with the slight scent of a fresh watermelon. ...

See also

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Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ... On February 2, 2007, malodorous orange snow, oily to the touch, and reported to contain four times the normal level of iron, fell across an area of 1,500 square kilometres in Omsk Oblast, Russia. ... A cold wave is a weather phenomenon that is distinguished by marked cooling of the air, or the invasion of very cold air, over a large area. ... Frost on black pipes Frost is a solid deposition of water vapor from saturated air. ... A grit bin made from fibreglass. ... Igloo An igloo (Inuit language: iglu, Inuktitut syllabics: ᐃᒡᓗ, house, plural: iglooit or igluit, but in English commonly igloos), translated sometimes as snowhouse, is a shelter constructed from blocks of snow, generally in the form of a dome. ... Lake-effect precipitation coming off the Great Lakes, as seen from NEXRAD. Lake effect snow, which can be a type of snowsquall, is produced in the winter when cold, artic dry winds move across long expanses of warmer lake water, picking up water vapor which freezes and is deposited on... A glacier is a large, long-lasting river of ice that is formed on land and moves in response to gravity. ... A snowbelt is a region, many of which lie downwind of the Great Lakes, where heavy snowfall is particularly common. ... SnowCastle in 2006 Snow Restaurant The SnowCastle of Kemi is the biggest snow castle in the world. ... A sidewalk clearing plow in Ottawa, Canada Snow removal is the job of removing snow after a snowfall to make travel easier and safer. ... Snow sculpture is a sculpture form comparable to ice sculpture in that most of it is now practiced outdoors, and often in full view of spectators, thus giving it kinship to performance art in the eyes of some. ... For other meanings see Snowblind. ... Nickname: Location of Syracuse within the state of New York Coordinates: , City Government  - Mayor Matthew Driscoll (D) Area  - City 66. ... It is a popular urban legend that the Inuit or Eskimo have an unusually high number of words for snow. ... Wilson Snowflake Bentley (1865–1931), born in Jericho, Vermont, was the first known photographer of snowflakes. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d Klesius, Michael (2007), "The Mystery of Snowflakes", National Geographic 211 (1): 20, ISSN 0027-9358
  2. ^ http://www.its.caltech.edu/~atomic/snowcrystals/class/class.htm
  3. ^ http://cdec.water.ca.gov/snow/misc/density.html
  4. ^ http://www.scientificjournals.org/journals2007/articles/1118.pdf
  5. ^ http://www.usatoday.com/weather/news/1999/wsnorcrd.htm
  6. ^ http://www.nps.gov/archive/mora/interp/faq.htm

External links

  • Snowpack energy and mass balance An article that contains detailed analysis of snowpack energy and mass balance.
  • Ultra-high resolution images of snowflakes, hosted by the Electron Microscopy Unit of the USDA Beltsville Agricultural Research Center
  • Snow at above freezing temperatures
  • Kenneth G. Libbrecht - Snowflake FAQ
  • United Nations Environment Programme: Global Outlook for Ice and Snow

 
 

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