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Encyclopedia > Snoopy
Snoopy
Peanuts character
Gender Male
Family Mother Missy,
Siblings: Brothers Spike, Andy, Olaf, Marbles, Rover, Sister Belle and Molly; owner Charlie Brown
Original voice actor Mel Blanc
Other voice actors Robert Towers,

Cam Clarke (stage) For other uses, see Peanut (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Snoopy_wwi_ace_lb. ... Spike is the name of the most frequently appearing of Snoopys brothers in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz. ... This article is about the character from Peanuts. ... Melvin Jerome Blanc (May 30, 1908 – July 10, 1989) was a prolific American voice actor. ... Cameron A. Clarke (born November 6, 1957 in Burbank, California) is an American voice actor, made famous for his many starring roles in popular video games and animated television and film. ...

Snoopy is a fictional character in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. He is Charlie Brown's pet beagle. Snoopy began his life in the strip as a fairly ordinary dog, but eventually evolved into perhaps the strip's most dynamic character — and among the most recognizable comic characters in the world. The original drawings of Snoopy were based on Schulz's childhood dogs, Snooky and Spike.[1] A fictional character is any person, persona, identity, or entity that is created from ones imagination or from an adaption of an existing entity. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... For other uses, see Peanut (disambiguation). ... Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922[1] – February 12, 2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known worldwide for his Peanuts comic strip. ... This article is about the dog breed. ...

Contents

Character

Snoopy, while born on October 2nd, first made his appearance on the strip on October 4, 1950, two days after the strip premiered and was identified by name on November 10. Schulz was originally going to call him "Sniffy" (as described in 25th anniversary book), until he discovered that name was used in a different comic strip. He changed it to "Snoopy" after remembering that his late mother Dena Schulz had commented that if their family were ever to acquire a third dog, it should be called Snoopi.[2] In earlier strips it is not clear who Snoopy belongs to; for instance in the February 2, 1951 strip, Charlie Brown accuses Snoopy of following him, only to be told by Patty that Snoopy isn't following Charlie Brown but merely lives in the same direction.[3]. Indeed many early strips show Snoopy interacting with Shermy and Patty without Charlie Brown, making Snoopy appear to belong to all of the neighborhood kids, similar to the dog Pete in the Our Gang comedies, who is everyone's dog. is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A poster for the 1931 Our Gang comedy Love Business featuring depictions of (from left to right): Pete the Pup, Jackie Cooper, and Norman Chubby Chaney. ...


Snoopy was a silent character for the first two years of his existence, but on May 27, 1952 he verbalized his thoughts to readers for the first time via a thought balloon; Schulz would utilize this device for nearly all of the character's appearances in the strip thereafter. In addition to Snoopy's ability to "speak" his thoughts to the reader, many of the human characters in Peanuts have the uncanny knack of reading his thoughts and responding to them. In the animated Peanuts films and television specials, Snoopy's thoughts are not verbalized; his moods are instead conveyed through growls, sobs, laughter, etc., as well as through pantomime and foreign languages. The only exceptions are in You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown and Snoopy!!! The Musical, in which Snoopy's thoughts are verbalized through voiceovers (by Robert Towers and Cam Clarke, respectively). Bill Melendez voiced both Snoopy and (eventually) Woodstock in numerous television specials from 1965 to 2006. is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Four different shapes of speech or thought balloons Speech balloons (also speech bubbles or word balloons) are a graphic convention used in comic books, strips, and cartoons to allow words (and much less often, pictures) to be understood as representing the speech or thoughts of a given character in the... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ... For other uses, see Pantomime (disambiguation). ... A foreign language is a language not spoken by the indigenous people of a certain place: for example, English is a foreign language in Japan. ... Youre a Good Man, Charlie Brown is one of many prime-time animated TV specials, based on characters from the Charles M. Schulz comic strip Peanuts. ... Snoopy!!! The Musical is one of many prime-time animated TV specials, based on characters from the Charles M. Schulz comic strip Peanuts. ... VoiceOver is a feature built into Apple Computers Mac OS X v10. ... Woodstock is a fictional character in Charles M. Schulzs comic strip Peanuts. ... A television special is a television program, typically a short film or television movie, which interrupts or temporarily replaces programming normally scheduled for a given time slot. ...

October 4, 1950 - Snoopy's first appearance.
October 4, 1950 - Snoopy's first appearance.

Oddly enough, the first time a beagle is mentioned in the strip (December 5, 1960), Snoopy denied being one. As Snoopy dozed, Charlie Brown paraphrased Gertrude Stein: "Beagles on the grass, alas." To this, Snoopy replied, "I ain't no stupid beagle." (Years later, Snoopy would paraphrase the Stein expression himself: "Birds in the grass, alas; beagle on the roof, aloof.")[citation needed] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gertrude Stein (February 3, 1874 – July 27, 1946) was an American writer who became a catalyst in the development of modern art and literature. ...


Many of Peanuts' memorable moments come in Snoopy's daydream as a writer: his eternal opener on the typewriter "It was a dark and stormy night..." is taken from Edward George Bulwer-Lytton's 1830 novel Paul Clifford. The contrast between Snoopy's existence in a dream world and Charlie Brown's in the real world is central to the humour and philosophy of Peanuts (e.g., the Peanuts book title Life's a dream, Charlie Brown). The phrase It was a dark and stormy night, made famous by comic strip artist Charles M. Schulz, was originally penned by Victorian novelist Edward Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton as the beginning of his 1830 novel Paul Clifford. ... Edward George Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton (May 25, 1803 - January 18, 1873) was an English novelist, playwright, and politician. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... Paul Clifford is a novel published in 1830 by English author Edward Bulwer-Lytton. ...


Schulz summed up Snoopy's character in a 1997 interview: "He has to retreat into his fanciful world in order to survive. Otherwise, he leads kind of a dull, miserable life. I don't envy dogs the lives they have to live."[4]


Developments

Schulz once said that the best idea he ever had in the strip was to move Snoopy from inside his doghouse to the rooftop. Preceding that, there was a gradual evolution of the character, from something like an actual dog to an anthropomorphic character, more like typical cartoon animals.


His earliest impersonation was of a bird on August 9, 1951. Later (starting November 17, 1955), Snoopy engaged in dead-on imitations of Violet, a pelican, Lucy, a moose, Beethoven and Mickey Mouse. He would also pretend to be various other animals, including a snake, rhinoceros, and vulture. But his eccentricities did not stop there. is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Violet from a comic strip. ... For other uses, see Pelican (disambiguation). ... Book cover Lucy van Pelt is a character in the syndicated comic strip Peanuts, written and drawn by Charles Schulz. ... For other uses, see Moose (disambiguation). ... “Beethoven” redirects here. ... Mickey Mouse is an Academy Award-winning comic animal cartoon character who has become an icon for The Walt Disney Company. ... For other uses, see Snake (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rhinoceros (disambiguation). ... Orders Falconiformes (Fam. ... This page refers to eccentricity in behavior and popular usage. ...


On January 9, 1956, Snoopy walked on his two hind legs, like a human, for the first time. This soon became so commonplace as to be almost unnoticeable, as Snoopy developed a variety of Walter Mitty-esque alter egos. Snoopy's transformation to walking to two feet also was accompanied by his larger snout and great body length. is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Information Nickname(s) The Old Man (in one fantasy) Occupation unknown; various fantasy occupations Title Commander, Doctor (in fantasies) Spouse(s) unnamed except as Mrs. ... Alter Ego has multiple meanings: Alter Ego is a game for the Commodore 64 computer. ...


Snoopy has been known by fans as a time traveler in which his most famous alter-ego is as the World War I Flying Ace, often seen battling his arch-enemy, Manfred von Richthofen (the Red Baron). For this, he would climb to the top of his doghouse, don goggles and a scarf (trailing behind in the "wind"), and thus fly his Sopwith Camel (the type of plane flown by Arthur "Roy" Brown, who was credited with shooting down the Red Baron in World War I, and whose surname matches that of Snoopy's owner) and travel all the way back to July 27, 1914 the day World War I began. The Red Baron, like other adult figures in Peanuts, was never drawn in a strip; his presence was indicated through the bullet holes that would riddle the doghouse in a dogfight, and Snoopy's angry outbursts in German: (usually accompanied by fist-shaking and "Curse you Red Baron" while his "Sopwith Camel" doghouse plummets to earth trailing smoke). In I Want a Dog for Christmas, Charlie Brown Charlie Brown's sister Sally Brown jumps on the doghouse and flies with Snoopy. Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Red Baron, Manfred von Richthofen, perhaps the most famous ace of all The first ace, Adolphe Pegoud being awarded the Croix de Guerre A flying ace or fighter ace is a military aviator credited with shooting down five or more enemy aircraft during aerial combat. ... Arch Enemy is a Swedish melodic death metal band, formed in 1996 by ex-Carcass guitarist Michael Amott. ... Red Baron redirects here. ... Red Baron redirects here. ... The Sopwith Camel Scout is a British First World War single-seat fighter aircraft that was famous for its maneuverability. ... Captain Arthur Roy Brown Captain Arthur Roy Brown (DFC and bar) (23 December 1893–9 March 1944) was a Canadian World War I flying ace whom the Royal Air Force officially credited with shooting down Manfred von Richthofen, the Red Baron, although evidence has shown that it is very unlikely... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... I Want a Dog for Christmas, Charlie Brown is one of the Peanuts made-for-television specials. ... Sally Brown is the younger sister of Charlie Brown in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz. ...

Joe Cool as depicted at the Universal Studios in Osaka, Japan
Joe Cool as depicted at the Universal Studios in Osaka, Japan

Snoopy also became "Joe Cool", as he put on sunglasses and leaned against the wall doing nothing. A song called Joe Cool was sung by Vince Guaraldi. Snoopy has also been a famous writer (who was actually published once, in an October 1995 storyline, in which one copy of his unnamed novel was written, but it failed to sell); a bow-tie wearing attorney (who once defended Peter Rabbit), a hockey player, an Olympic figure skater (who used to skate with Sonja Henie before he became "big time"); a world famous grocery checkout clerk who operated from the top of his dog house in an apron; the "Lone Beagle" (the first dog to fly solo across the Atlantic - a play on Charles Lindbergh, "The Lone Eagle"); and even the first astronaut to land on the moon. In "It's Flashbeagle, Charlie Brown", Snoopy becomes a Flash dancer named "Flashbeagle". Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 77 KB)Joe Cool as depicted over at the Universal Studios in Osaka, Japan. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 77 KB)Joe Cool as depicted over at the Universal Studios in Osaka, Japan. ... Joe Cool is a nickname given primarily to those who display a calm or placid attitude, especially in the face of adversity. ... Ray-Ban Wayfarer sunglasses (RB2132 901L) Sunglasses or sun glasses are a visual aid, variously termed spectacles or glasses, which feature lenses that are coloured or darkened to prevent strong light from reaching the eyes. ... Vince Guaraldi (July 17, 1928 - February 6, 1976) was an American jazz musician and pianist best known for composing music for animated adaptations of the Peanuts comic strip. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... An attorney is someone who represents someone else in the transaction of business: For attorney-at-law, see lawyer, solicitor, barrister or civil law notary. ... Peter Rabbit and wife being asked for cabbages by Benjamin and Flopsy Bunny in The Tale of the Flopsy Bunnies Peter Rabbit is the main character in a series of childrens books by Beatrix Potter. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Figure skating is an ice skating sporting event where individuals, mixed couples, or groups perform spins, jumps, and other moves on the ice, often to music. ... Sonja Henie (April 8, 1912 - October 12, 1969) was a Norwegian figure skater and actress. ... For a large scale grocery store, see supermarket. ... Atlantic and North Atlantic redirect here. ... Charles Augustus Lindbergh (February 4, 1902 – August 26, 1974) (nicknamed Lucky Lindy and The Lone Eagle) was an American aviator, author, inventor, explorer, and peace activist who, on May 20–21, 1927, rose instantaneously from virtual obscurity to world fame as the result of his piloting of the first solo... For other uses, see Astronaut (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Flash dance (disambiguation). ...


Outside of his fantasy life he is the shortstop for Charlie Brown's Little League team (and the best player, nearly passing Babe Ruth on the career home run list). Snoopy is also a "Beagle Scout", the Peanuts version of Eagle Scout and is the Scout leader for a troop comprised of Woodstock and his other bird friends. This Scouting theme reappears throughout the comic strip. See fantasy for an account of the literary genre involving the development of common or popular fantasies. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Little League Baseball - Logo Little League pitcher in Winesburg, Ohio Little League, Wayne, Michigan Little League Baseball is the name of a non-profit organization in the United States which organizes local childrens leagues of baseball and softball throughout the USA and the rest of the world. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... An Eagle Scout is a Scout with the highest rank attainable in the Boy Scouting program of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). ... Scouter The scanner (or scouter) is an instrument in the fictional manga series Dragon Ball/Dragon Ball Z and the anime Dragon Ball Z, which Freeza and his people use to measure a life forms power. ... This article is about the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts/Girl Guides organizations. ...


Snoopy is also a tennis player. He does tend to double-fault frequently, which sends him into rage-filled temper tantrums during which he screams and destroys his racket. He has also played in mixed-doubles, usually pairing with the garage door (whose best quality as a player, according to Snoopy, is that "he never foot faults") and later teaming up with the short-tempered Molly Volley. The following is a list of all notable secondary characters in the American comic strip Peanuts. ...


Snoopy loves root beer and pizza, hates coconut candy, gets claustrophobia in tall weeds, and is deathly afraid of icicles dangling over his doghouse. One of his hobbies is reading Leo Tolstoy's epic novel War and Peace at the rate of "a word a day". Snoopy also has the uncanny ability to play fetch with soap bubbles, and can hear someone eating marshmallows or cookies at a distance, or even peeling a banana. Snoopy is also capable of disappearing, like the Cheshire Cat from Alice in Wonderland, as shown in an extended strip, whenever Charlie Brown reads the book to him. ("Grins are easy. Noses are hard. Ears are almost impossible.") A glass of root beer with foam Root beer is a beverage also known as Sasparilla outside of North America. ... For other uses, see Pizza (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Coconut (disambiguation). ... Claustrophobia is an anxiety disorder that involves the fear of enclosed or confined spaces. ... Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (September 9 [O.S. August 28] 1828 – November 20 [O.S. November 7] 1910) (Russian: , Russian pronunciation:  ), commonly referred to in English as Leo (Lyof, Lyoff) Tolstoy, was a Russian writer – novelist, essayist, dramatist and philosopher – as well as pacifist Christian anarchist and educational reformer. ... For other uses, see War and Peace (disambiguation). ... For the plant, see Althaea (genus). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alice in Wonderland is the widely known and used title for Alices Adventures in Wonderland, a book written by Lewis Carroll -- as well as several movie adaptations of the book -- and is also the setting for several short stories. ...


He can also use his ears to fly about as a "whirlydog". Snoopy even became a canine helicopter, with Woodstock piloting. This gag appeared in the strip several times, most famously rescuing Linus from the top of a barn after being commissioned by Sally. When asked by Linus where he learned to pilot, Woodstock replied in his usual apostrophes, which Linus interpreted as meaning "'Nam". For other uses, see Helicopter (disambiguation). ... Linus van Pelt is one of the characters in Charles M. Schulzs comic strip Peanuts. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


Snoopy "understands a little French and Serbo-Croatian." His dog food brand is called "For Dogs who flew in World War I and understand a little French." He later was also depicted as a sergeant in the French Foreign Legion, with Woodstock and his avian friends as members of his patrol. He failed his high school geometry course, which was his excuse for not being able to follow a golf course's 90 degree golf cart driving rule. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Geometry (disambiguation). ... This article is about the game. ...


Snoopy has his own little dance, variously known as The Beagle, the Suppertime Dance, or simply the Snoopy Dance. Most often he dances at suppertime and has broken his foot from being too excited. One strip includes a joke that he has forgotten the steps.


Snoopy climbed trees at least three times -- once to rescue Schroeder's piano, once to see a "strange creature" in Woodstock's nest which turned out to be an egg, and once after Frieda's cat Faron. He fell out of the tree every time. Schroeder is a fictional character in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, created by Charles M. Schulz. ... Frieda is a character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz. ...


Every Veterans Day, Snoopy dresses as an army veteran and goes to army cartoonist Bill Mauldin's house to "quaff root beer and tell war stories."[5] For Veterans Day in the United Kingdom, see Veterans Day UK. President Eisenhower signs HR7786, officially changing Armistice Day to Veterans Day. ... William Henry Bill Mauldin (October 29, 1921 – January 22, 2003) was a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the United States. ...


Snoopy wears contacts, as explained in a strip where he lost them.[6]


He has failed several times in the love department. In 1965, he met a girl beagle at a skating rink and fell in love. However, his girlfriend's father forbade marrage between the two. On one occasion, he met a female while serving as guarddog for Peppermint Patty, but was crushed on his wedding day when she ran off with the "best beagle", Spike(although when they arrived in Needles, she left Spike for a coyote. On yet another occasion, he went to the Daisy Hill Puppy Farm (where he'd allegedly taught Sunday school at one point) to give a 4th of July speech; however, as he was about to begin, he was beaed in the head with a supper dish(apparantly by anti-Vietnam War protesters, and a full scale riot broke out, and police used tear gas to control the crowd. In all the confusion, Snoopy ran of the podium, and was lost in the crowd. While blinded by tear gas, he felt a girl beagle's paws, but thanks to the tear gas, he didn't see her. By the time Charlie Brown had tracked her down, the Farm informed tham that she'd been adopted, thus breaking his heart again. Rockefeller Centre ice rink An ice rink is a frozen body of water where people can ice skate or play winter sports. ... This article is about the character from Peanuts. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up spike in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Coyote (disambiguation). ... Sunday school, Indians and whites. ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... For other uses, see Head (disambiguation). ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Teamsters, armed with pipes, riot in a clash with riot police in the Minneapolis Teamsters Strike of 1934. ... A riot control agent is a type of lachrymatory agent (or lacrimatory agent). ...


Puppyhood and siblings

Main article: Snoopy's siblings

Over the course of the strip's run, it was revealed that Snoopy had been born and raised at the Daisy Hill Puppy Farm. His father used to run with hunting dogs, but would secretly run ahead and warn the rabbits. His mother is famous for her tapioca pudding, and in a 1990s Peanuts strip, came over on a WWI-era troopship to visit Snoopy and Spike, who had been ill with the flu. Out of all his siblings, Snoopy's brother Olaf was sold last. Before they were sold, Snoopy and his brothers and sister made a band and one by one each was sold. Snoopy's original owner was a little girl named Lila, who had to return him to Daisy Hill after her family moved to an apartment where dogs were forbidden. In the television special Snoopy's Reunion, Snoopy and his siblings get together at Daisy Hill Puppy Farm for a picnic, but sadly find out that it was demolished for a parking garage. In the comic strip, Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz, Snoopy was often stated to have seven siblings. ... Flu redirects here. ... Lila was a minor character in the comic strip Peanuts, created by Charles M. Schulz. ...


Shortly after his return to the farm, Snoopy was selected by Charlie Brown's parents as a companion for him. At one point in the series, Charlie Brown said that his parents bought Snoopy for him to cheer him up after another child threw sand in his face while they were playing in a sandbox. In the late 1970s, Snoopy embarked upon a journey to visit Daisy Hill, only to find that the puppy farm had been replaced by a five-story parking garage, causing Snoopy to wail, "You stupid people! You're parking on my memories!"


Snoopy is usually depicted as having seven siblings, five of whom appear at some point in the strip: Andy, Belle, Marbles, Olaf, and Spike. Most often seen is Spike, who lives in the desert (near the real-life locale of Needles, California). Sharing Snoopy's penchant for a fantasy life, he is friends with saguaro cacti. Spike is very thin, wears a fedora and has long whiskers. (Spike was the name of one of Schulz's childhood pet dogs.) Needles (Mojave ʼAha Kuloh) is a city located on the western banks of the Colorado River in San Bernardino County, California. ... Subfamilies Cactoideae Maihuenioideae Opuntioideae Pereskioideae See also taxonomy of the Cactaceae A cactus (plural: cacti, cactuses, or cactus) is any member of the succulent plant family Cactaceae, native to the Americas. ... A fedora, which in this case has been pinched at the front and being worn pushed back on the head, with the front of the brim bent down over the eyes. ... There are several kinds of whisker: Look up whisker in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Andy looks like a disheveled version of Snoopy. Olaf, who wears a fur cap, is round in both body and face. Marbles is the smartest in the group. He has spots on his fur, wears shoes, and considers some of Snoopy's behavior very odd. Belle, who looks like Snoopy with long eyelashes, is most notable in that there was a Belle stuffed animal available for many years. Although Snoopy often mentions that he was one of eight puppies, the two other siblings never appeared in the comic strip. According to the animated special Snoopy's Reunion, they are named Molly and Rover. They all play in a country band in that special, with Snoopy on the acoustic guitar. An eyelash or simply lash is one of the hairs that grow at the edge of the eyelid. ... For preserved dead animals, see taxidermy. ... Acoustic guitar can refer to the following musical instruments: Nylon and gut stringed guitars: Renaissance guitar Baroque guitar Romantic guitar Classical guitar, the modern version of the original guitar, with nylon strings Flamenco guitar Steel stringed guitars: Steel-string acoustic guitar, also known as western, folk or country guitar Twelve...


Many years before his siblings appeared, Snoopy referred to himself as an "only dog" who had no brothers or sisters.


Doghouse

In the early years of the strip, Snoopy's doghouse was typically seen from the front or front plus one side, with the standard arched doorway of a doghouse, and Snoopy's name arched over the door. Snoopy would sleep in the doghouse.


On December 12, 1958, Snoopy slept on top of his doghouse, rather than inside it, for the first time. Thereafter, Snoopy was seldom seen to venture inside the doghouse, except to retrieve something, instead spending the bulk of his time sitting or lying on its pitched roof. One strip ascribed Snoopy's ability to sleep there to his ears, which "lock" him to the top so that he doesn't fall. is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... First dog Dash, outside of his doghouse during U.S. President Harrisons tenure. ...


At this point, the side view of the doghouse became standard in the strip, which allowed the imagination of Schulz (and Snoopy) to expand this dwelling beyond the limits of a normal doghouse.


Despite Snoopy's tendency to stay outside in all weather (in some cases even allowing snow to accumulate on his supine body, or wearing a snorkel when it rains), a running gag established that the interior of Snoopy's doghouse was something extraordinary. It defied physics, being dramatically larger on the inside than the outside, with a carpeted foyer, a den, a library, a guest room, a stairway and a basement. The first indication of the doghouse's unique layout occurred on January 31, 1954 when Charlie Brown was puzzled to see all his neighborhood friends crawling into it for a visit. The doghouse was destroyed several times over the years, being hit by a tree due to a chase over Linus' blanket (July 26, 1959), crushed by a large icicle (February 13, 1960), and finally burned to the ground (September 19, 1966). In each case the doghouse was soon rebuilt. Although individual items were lost in the fire, each replacement doghouse appears to have retained the spaciousness and opulence of its predecessor. The running gag is a popular hallmark of comic and serious forms of entertainment. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... July 26 is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Icicle on a tree Icicles on a bush Icicle on a roof Close up of an icicle A large icicle Icicle (yacht) is also the name of the largest Ice yacht An icicle is a spike of ice formed when water dripping or falling from another object freezes. ... February 13 is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ...


The interior was decorated with several pricey acquisitions including a painting by Van Gogh, first mentioned on February 29, 1964. After the fire destroyed the Van Gogh, it was replaced by an Andrew Wyeth. At various times the interior of Snoopy's doghouse also held bunk beds, a pool table, a ping pong table, a television, a mural (painted by Linus), a shower, a cedar closet, a grandfather clock, and a jacuzzi.[5] van gogh is a piece of shit Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890), Netherlands artist. ... February 29 is a day added into a leap year of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Andrew Newell Wyeth (born July 12, 1917) is an American realist painter, one of the best-known of the 20th century and sometimes referred to as the Painter of the People due to his popularity with the American public. ... This article is about the various cue sports. ... Regional competition level table tennis, showing table, net, and player getting ready to return the ball with a winning backhand topspin stroke. ... A longcase clock with a pine case, c. ... For other uses, see Jacuzzi (disambiguation). ...


Features established in the television specials include a fine kitchen (A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving), and sound equipment (A Boy Named Charlie Brown). In It's Magic, Charlie Brown, Snoopy enters his dog house and the underground interior is depicted as spacious and well equipped for anything he needs. Its Magic, Charlie Brown is a 1981 Peanuts special directed by Phil Roman and of course, written by Charles M. Schulz, which earned him a nomination for an Emmy award. ...


The doghouse also serves as a prop for Snoopy, often imagined as a World War I "Sopwith Camel" fighting plane in Snoopy's battles with the Red Baron. During these aerial fights, Snoopy's house often suffers from bullet holes and occasionally crashes. However, this seems to take place solely in Snoopy's imagination, as the house is in perfect shape later. The Sopwith Camel Scout is a British First World War single-seat fighter aircraft that was famous for its maneuverability. ...


Snoopy and aviation

  • Following the tragic Apollo I fire, Snoopy became the official mascot of aerospace safety, testing and the rebuilding of the Apollo Program, due to his refusal to accept defeat and his "'outside the doghouse' way of looking at things." A series of Snoopy-in-Space ("Astrobeagle") products arrived with this campaign, and originals are still prized.
  • The Apollo 10 lunar module was nicknamed "Snoopy" and the command module "Charlie Brown". While not included in the official mission logo, Charlie Brown and Snoopy became semi-official mascots for the mission, as seen here [7] and here. Schulz also drew some special mission-related artwork for NASA , and several regular strips related to the mission; one showing Snoopy enroute to the moon atop his doghouse with a fishbowl on his head for a space helmet; one where Snoopy is on the moon beating everyone else there, including "that stupid cat that lives next door"; one where Snoopy is returning to Earth, and explains to the audience, "You can tell I'm headed back because I'm pointed the other way"; and one where Charlie Brown consoles Snoopy about how the spacecraft named after him was left in lunar orbit.
  • The Silver Snoopy award is a special NASA honor, in the form of a sterling silver pin with an engraving of Snoopy in a spacesuit helmet. It is given by an astronaut to someone who works in the space program that has gone above and beyond in pursuit of quality and safety.[8]
  • A series of postage stamps featuring Snoopy as a World War I flying ace was released on May 17, 2001 in Santa Rosa, California.
  • Snoopy, piloting his "Sopwith Camel" (i.e. his doghouse), is featured in the logo of Charles M. Schulz - Sonoma County Airport.
  • Snoopy is the US Air Force Technical Control mascot. He can be seen on the Tech Control emblem holding an old analog patch cord above his head as he walks on water.
  • During the Gulf War Snoopy appeared as nose art on several aircraft. He remains a popular image in air forces that still allow crews to customize the appearance of their planes.
  • Snoopy is the name of a U.S. Air Force B-58 Hustler bomber, serial number 55-0665, which was modified to test a radar system. [9]
  • Snoopy is the name of the primary research vehicle of Check-Six.com.
  • The black-and-white communications helmets that are worn as part of NASA spacesuits, carrying radio earphones and microphones, are universally known as "Snoopy caps," due to the resemblance of the white center and black outer sections to Snoopy's head.
  • In 1966, the "Ace" was immortalized in song by the Royal Guardsmen with their hit, Snoopy Vs. The Red Baron. This was followed in 1967 by Snoopy's Christmas, in which the two foes temporarily set aside their differences for a Christmas toast, as per the Christmas Truces that occurred during World War I. Snoopy's Christmas continues to be played as a holiday favorite on most "oldie" radio stations. Two additional songs were released by the Guardsmen in 1968 during the Presidential election, "Snoopy for President", in which Snoopy's bid for the nomination of the Beagle party is tipped in his favor by the Red Baron, and "Down Behind the Lines", which does not mention Snoopy specifically but describes the attempts of a World War I pilot to fly his damaged Sopwith Camel back to friendly territory.
  • Snoopy One, Snoopy Two and Snoopy Three are three airships owned and operated by MetLife and provide aerial coverage of American sporting events. [10]

Image File history File links Waterwalker. ... Image File history File links Waterwalker. ... USAF redirects here. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Apollo One is the name given to the Apollo/Saturn 204 (AS-204) spacecraft after it was destroyed by fire during a training exercise on January 27, 1967, at Pad 34 atop a Saturn IB rocket. ... The Apollo program was a human spaceflight program undertaken by NASA during the years 1961 – 1975 with the goal of conducting manned moon landing missions. ... Apollo 10 was the fourth manned mission in the Apollo program, and the first (and only manned Saturn V) mission to launch from pad 39B. The mission included the second crew to orbit the Moon, and the test of the lunar module in lunar orbit. ... The LEM flight instrumentation panel and front windows. ... The Command/Service Module (CSM) was a spacecraft built for NASA by North American Aviation. ... The Silver Snoopy award is a special honor awarded to NASA employees and contractors for outstanding achievements related to human flight safety or mission success. ... The sterling silver standard has a minimum millesimal fineness of 925. ... A selection of Hong Kong postage stamps A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Location in Sonoma County and the state of California Country State County Sonoma Area  - City 40. ... Charles M. Schulz - Sonoma County Airport (IATA: STS, ICAO: KSTS, FAA LID: STS) is an airport located a few miles northwest of Santa Rosa serving Sonoma County and the surrounding areas of Wine Country in California. ... USAF redirects here. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... It is a cord designed to connect between 2 computers as a bridge. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Nose art on a B-17 Flying Fortress Nose art is a painting or design done on the fuselage near the nose of a warplane, usually for decorative purposes. ... Seal of the Air Force. ... The Convair B-58 Hustler was a American high-speed jet bomber capable of Mach 2 supersonic flight. ... Apollo 15 space suit A spacesuit is a complex system of garments, equipment, and environmental systems designed to keep a person alive and comfortable in the harsh environment of outer space. ... The Royal Guardsmen are a rock band from Ocala, Florida, a sextet composed of Bill Balough (bass), John Burdette (drums), Chris Nunley (vocals), Tom Richards (guitar), Billy Taylor (organ), and Barry Winslow (vocals/guitar). ... Snoopy Vs. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A cross, left near Ypres in Belgium in 1999, to commemorate the site of the Christmas Truce in 1914. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Oldies is a generic term commonly used in the United States and Canada to describe a radio format that usually concentrates on Top 40 music from the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. ... A radio station is a site configured for broadcasting sound. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      Third parties in the United States are political parties other than the two... Akron in flight, 2 November 1931 An airship is a buoyant (lighter_than_air) aircraft that can be steered and propelled through the air. ... MetLife, Inc. ...

Outside of Peanuts

Simpsons redirects here. ... A parody (pronounced ), in contemporary usage, is a work created to mock, comment on, or poke fun at an original work, its subject, or author, by means of humorous or satiric imitation. ... Santas Little Helper or once known as Santos L. Halper (voiced by Frank Welker or Dan Castellaneta) is the Simpson familys pet dog. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... Logans Run is a 1976 science fiction film based on the novel of the same name by William F. Nolan and George Clayton Johnson. ... Brian Griffin is a fictional character from the animated television series Family Guy, and is voiced by show creator, Seth MacFarlane. ... Berkeley (Berke) Breathed (last name rhymes with method) is a cartoonist, childrens book author/illustrator, director and screenwriter, best know for his comic strip Bloom County, a 80s era cartoon-comic strip which dealt with socio-political issues, as seen through the eyes of highly exaggerated characters, and humorous... Bloom County was a popular American comic strip by Berke Breathed which ran from December 8, 1980 until August 6, 1989. ... This article is about the CGI film. ... Information Species Orange Tabby cat Gender Male Age 29 Date of birth June 19, 1978 Family Sonja (mother), Raoul (half-brother),jon (owner) Portrayed by Lorenzo Music (voice in all animated appearances) Bill Murray (voice in the live-action films) Lou Rawls (singing voice in early TV specials) Created by... Odie is a fictional character in the Jim Davis comic strip Garfield. ... For other uses, see Balloon (disambiguation). ... The Adventures of Tintin (French: ) is a series of Belgian comic books created by Belgian artist Hergé, the pen name of Georges Remi (1907–1983). ... Tintin and the Picaros (Tintin et les Picaros) is one of The Adventures of Tintin, a series of classic comic-strip albums, written and illustrated by Belgian writer and illustrator Hergé, featuring young reporter Tintin as a hero. ... Asterix (French: Astérix) is a fictional character, created in 1959 as the hero of a series of French comic books (with the same title) by René Goscinny (stories) and Albert Uderzo (illustrations). ... Mickey Mouse is an Academy Award-winning comic animal cartoon character who has become an icon for The Walt Disney Company. ...

References

  1. ^ "Snoopy, Charlie Brown et les autres. L'album de famille de Schulz. ISBN 978-27-3242-681-5
  2. ^ Michaelis, David Schulz and Peanuts: a Biography, Harper, 2007, p. 220.
  3. ^ The Complete Peanuts Volume 1
  4. ^ Groth, Gary (December 1997). "Charles Schulz at 3 o'clock in the morning". The Comics Journal, p. 27 (flip).
  5. ^ a b Bang, Derrick (2006-11-12). "Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Charles Schulz and his Peanuts cartoon strip" (text). Peanuts Collectors Club. Retrieved on [[2006-12-29]].
  6. ^ The Complete Peanuts: 1965-1966, page 38 - strip dated March 28, 1965
  7. ^ "Picture of Charlie Brown and Snoopy on Apollo 10". Retrieved on 2006-10-01.
  8. ^ "Space Flight Awareness Awards: SFA Silver Snoopy". Space Flight Awareness, NASA website. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Retrieved on 2007-06-21.
  9. ^ B-52s in the Desert
  10. ^ Airship Operations information for MetLife blimp

Gary Groth (born 1954) is an American comic book publisher, critic, editor in chief of the Comics Journal and co-founder of Fantagraphics Books. ... The cover of TCJ #115 (April 1987) celebrated their court victory in defending a libel suit. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... NASA Logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... For other uses, see Peanut (disambiguation). ... Charlotte Braun is a long-forgotten character from Charles M. Schulzs comic strip Peanuts, who first appeared on November 30, 1954. ... This article is about the character from Peanuts. ... Sally Brown is the younger sister of Charlie Brown in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz. ... Franklins July 31, 1968 introduction in Peanuts. ... For other uses of the name see Frida (disambiguation) Frieda is a character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz. ... Linus awaits the Great Pumpkin. ... Charles Charlie Brown is the principal character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... Lila was a minor character in the comic strip Peanuts, created by Charles M. Schulz. ... The Little Red-Haired Girl is an unseen character in the Peanuts comic strip by Charles M. Schulz, and is a symbol of unrequited love. ... “Marcie” redirects here. ... Patty from a comic strip. ... Peggy Jean shows off her new pair of gloves. ... This article is about the character from Peanuts. ... Pig-Pen is a character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... Schroeder is a fictional character in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, created by Charles M. Schulz. ... First Peanuts comic strip, featuring Shermy Shermy was one of the four original characters in the comic strip Peanuts, by Charles Schulz. ... In the comic strip, Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz, Snoopy was often stated to have seven siblings. ... Linus van Pelt is one of the characters in Charles M. Schulzs comic strip Peanuts. ... Book cover Lucy van Pelt is a character in the syndicated comic strip Peanuts, written and drawn by Charles Schulz. ... Rerun on the back of his mothers bicycle. ... Violet from a comic strip. ... Woodstock is a fictional character in Charles M. Schulzs comic strip Peanuts. ... The following is a list of all notable secondary characters in the American comic strip Peanuts. ... For the television documentary, see A Boy Named Charlie Brown (TV program). ... Snoopy, Come Home is an 1972 musical animated film, produced by Cinema Center Films and Lee Mendelson Films for National General Pictures, directed by Bill Melendez, and based on the Peanuts comic strip. ... Race For Your Life, Charlie Brown is a 1977 animated film produced by United Feature Syndicate for Paramount Pictures, directed by Bill Melendez and Phil Roman, and based on the Peanuts comic strip. ... Bon Voyage, Charlie Brown (and Dont Come Back!!) is a 1980 animated film produced by United Feature Syndicate for Paramount Pictures, directed by Bill Melendez. ... This is a list of adaptations in film, television and musical theater, based on characters from the Peanuts comic strip by Charles M. Schulz. ... There are at least two versions of the Christmas music album A Charlie Brown Christmas. ... The Charlie Brown and Snoopy Show is an animated television series featuring characters and storylines from the Charles M. Schulz comic strip Peanuts. ... Linus and Lucy, aka The Linus and Lucy Rag, is a popular jazz piano piece written by Vince Guaraldi appearing in many of the Peanuts animated television specials. ... Snoopy!!! The Musical is a musical comedy by Larry Grossman and Hal Hackaday that was based on the Charles M. Schulz comic strip Peanuts. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This is America, Charlie Brown opening title sequence This is America, Charlie Brown was an eight-part animated TV mini-series, depicting events in American history with characters from the Charles M. Schulz comic strip Peanuts. ... This article is about the stage musical. ... Snoopy title screen. ... Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922[1] – February 12, 2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known worldwide for his Peanuts comic strip. ... Bill Meléndez (born José Cuauhtemoc Meléndez on November 15, 1916 in Hermosillo, Mexico) is a Mexican-born American character animator, film director, and film producer, known for his cartoons for Warner Brothers and the Peanuts series. ... Lee Mendelson (born ca. ... Vince Guaraldi (July 17, 1928 - February 6, 1976) was an American jazz musician and pianist best known for composing music for animated adaptations of the Peanuts comic strip. ... The Charles M. Schulz Museum and Research Center is a museum dedicated to the works of Charles Schulz, creator of the Peanuts comic strip. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Snoopy at AllExperts (1938 words)
Snoopy was a silent character for the first two years of his existence, but on May 27, 1952 he verbalized his thoughts to readers for the first time via a thought balloon; Schulz would utilize this device for nearly all of the character's appearances in the strip thereafter.
Snoopy also "understands a little French." His dog food brand is called "For Dogs who flew in World War I and understand a little French." He failed his high school geometry course, which was his excuse for not being able to follow a golf course's 90 degree golfcart driving rule.
Snoopy's original owner was a little girl named Lila, who had to return him to Daisy Hill after her family moved to an apartment where dogs were forbidden.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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