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Encyclopedia > Sneaker (footwear)
Sneakers
Sneakers

Sneakers are footwear of flexible material, typically featuring a sole made of rubber. Sneakers were originally sporting apparel, but are today worn much more widely as casual footwear. They are now very popular, especially with young people. The British English equivalent of "sneaker" is "trainer" in its modern meaning; however, the traditional "sneaker" (pictured) is closer to the British "plimsoll". In some urban areas in the United States, the slang for sneakers are kicks. In Hiberno-English the term is runners. Download high resolution version (2400x1600, 748 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2400x1600, 748 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Rubber is an elastic hydrocarbon polymer which occurs as a milky emulsion (known as latex) in the sap of several varieties of plants though can be produced synthetically. ... Dialect areas of England British English (BrE) is a term used to differentiate between the form of the English language used in the British Isles and those used elsewhere. ... A Plimsoll shoe is an early type of training shoe with a canvas upper and rubber sole, developed as beachwear in the 1830s by the Liverpool Rubber Company (later to become Dunlop), was first called the sand shoe, and in the 1870s acquired the nickname plimsoll because the colored horizontal... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

Contents


Etymology

The term "sneaker" itself was first used in 1916 by the US Rubber Company for the Keds brand, because rubber soles made the shoes less squeaky. The Keds brand of shoe has been around since 1916, when they were first made by U.S. Rubber (now known as Uniroyal). ...


The British English term "trainer" derives from "training shoe". Dialect areas of England British English (BrE) is a term used to differentiate between the form of the English language used in the British Isles and those used elsewhere. ...


Popular Brands

Popular brands include Nike, Adidas, Reebok, New Balance, Converse, PUMA, Shaq, Asics, Etnies, etc. Nike, Inc. ... Adidas is a German sports apparel manufacturer, part of the Adidas Group. ... Reebok International Limited (NYSE: RBK) is a Fortune 500 company and producer of athletic footwear, apparel, and accessories. ... New Balance is a brand of shoe produced by the company New Balance Athletic Shoe, Inc. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... PUMA AG logo PUMA AG Rudolf Dassler Sport (PUMA) is a large German-based multinational company that produces athletic shoes and other sportswear. ... Shaquille Rashaun ONeal (born March 6, 1972 in Newark, New Jersey), commonly known as Shaq, is one of the most dominant basketball players today and currently plays for the Miami Heat of the National Basketball Association. ... ASICS (アシックス; TYO: 7936 ) is an athletic shoe company that started in 1949 when Kihachiro Onitsuka began manufacturing basketball shoes at his home in Kobe, Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. ... etnies is an American footwear manufacturer in Lake Forest, CA owned by Sole Technology, Inc. ...


Invention

The first "sneaker" was invented in 1893. It was made of canvas and was invented so boaters would not have to wear dress shoes when they were on deck- compare boating shoes. air bapes very hot sneakers.


Fair Trade sneakers

The first brand of fair trade sneakers, Veja, has been launched in 2005 in London, Paris and Tokyo. Material used are organic cotton and natural latex from Amazonia. Veja Sneakers Veja is the first brand of fair trade sneakers. ...



Image File history File linksMetadata Fair_Trade_sneakers_veja. ...


Other use

Being conveniently at hand (actually on the foot), they make obvious pervertibles for corporal punishment of the type usually called slippering, especially in gym class (e.g. traditional in the case of the Spanish zapatilla) and similar training, or in BDSM (associated with humiliation and/or foot fethishism). Pervertible (frequently misspelt pervertable) is a term originally coined by David Stein to describe ordinary non-sexual objects, especially everyday household objects, that can be used sexually, particularly in BDSM play such as spanking (and thus also outside the BDSM scene). ... Similar in usage to a shoe, a slipper is an indoors version along the same vein. ...


Sources and references

(incomplete)

  • Solepedia.com The Online Sneaker Encyclopedia

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Footwear Business: Running a Sneaker Store | Sneaker-Websites.com (1894 words)
Amy: Sneaker expert meets a computer guy and they both believe that they have a golden opportunity to make a wider selection of styles available to people who wouldn’t otherwise have access to them.
Sneaker sales online is one of the most difficult kinds of sales - you can’t try the shoes on or feel the material.
They are some of the best sneakers made in the last 10 years, another classic in my shelf are the Terra Humara’s -best ACG ever… But there are a lot of favorites on the shelfs at home kinda lost count, but I’m closing in on 200.
Sneaker (footwear) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (266 words)
Sneakers are footwear of flexible material, typically featuring a sole made of rubber.
The British English equivalent of "sneaker" is "trainer" in its modern meaning; however, the traditional "sneaker" (pictured) is closer to the British "plimsoll".
The term "sneaker" itself was first used in 1916 by the US Rubber Company for the Keds brand, because rubber soles made the shoes less squeaky.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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