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Encyclopedia > Snail
Snails
The common snail
The common snail
Scientific classification
Phylum: Mollusca
Class: Gastropoda
Moche Snails. 200 CE Larco Museum Collection Lima, Peru.
Moche Snails. 200 CE Larco Museum Collection Lima, Peru.

The word snail is a common name for almost all members of the molluscan class Gastropoda which have coiled shells in the adult stage. (Those snails which do not have a shell or only a very small shell are usually called slugs.) Look up snail in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 220 KB) Description: Common variety snail Photographer: macrophile on Flickr Originally described as proud snail after hopping the fence File links The following pages link to this file: Helix (genus) ... For other uses, see Scientific classification (disambiguation). ... Classes Caudofoveata Aplacophora Polyplacophora Monoplacophora Bivalvia Scaphopoda Gastropoda Cephalopoda † Rostroconchia † Helcionelloida † ?Bellerophontida The molluscs (British spelling) or mollusks (American spelling) are members of the very large and diverse phylum Mollusca. ... Subclasses Eogastropoda (True Limpets and relatives) Orthogastropoda The gastropods, also previously known as gasteropods, or univalves, and more commonly known as snails and slugs, are the largest and most successful class of mollusks, with 60,000-75,000 known living species. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... BCE redirects here. ... The Larco Museum (Spanish: ) is located in the Pueblo Libre District in Lima, Peru. ... In science, a common name is any name by which a species or other concept is known that is not the official scientific name. ... Classes Caudofoveata Aplacophora Polyplacophora Monoplacophora Bivalvia Scaphopoda Gastropoda Cephalopoda † Rostroconchia † Helcionelloida † ?Bellerophontida The molluscs (British spelling) or mollusks (American spelling) are members of the very large and diverse phylum Mollusca. ... Subclasses Eogastropoda (True Limpets and relatives) Orthogastropoda The gastropods, also previously known as gasteropods, or univalves, and more commonly known as snails and slugs, are the largest and most successful class of mollusks, with 60,000-75,000 known living species. ... Various seashells Danielle A shell is the hard, rigid outer covering, or integument, allanimals. ... This article is about land slugs. ...


The class Gastropoda (the snails and slugs) is the second only to the insects in terms of total number of species. Snails are extraordinarily diverse, in habitat, in form, in behavior, and in anatomy, and therefore what is true of one snail species may not at all be true of another, more distantly related one. Snails can be found in a huge range of different environments: the great majority are marine, many are terrestrial, and numerous kinds can be found in fresh water, and even brackish water. Many snails are herbivorous, though a few land species and many marine species are omnivores or predatory carnivores. Marine is an umbrella term for things relating to the ocean, as with marine biology, marine geology, and as a term for a navy, etc. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the village on the Isle of Wight, see Freshwater, Isle of Wight. ... Brackish water is water that is saltier than fresh water, but not as salty as sea water. ... A deer and two fawns feeding on some foliage A herbivore is often defined as any organism that eats only plants[1]. By that definition, many fungi, some bacteria, many animals, about 1% of flowering plants and some protists can be considered herbivores. ... Pigs are omnivores. ... This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ... Carnivorism redirects here. ...


Although the average person might perhaps be more familiar with terrestrial snails, land snails are in the minority. Marine snails have much greater diversity, and a greater biomass. Snails which respire using a lung belong to the group Pulmonata, while those with gills form a paraphyletic group, in other words, snails with gills form a number of taxonomic groups that are not very closely related. For the eco-industrial use of the term, which includes dead material used for biofuels, see biomass An Antarctic krill, whose species comprises roughly 0. ... This song is one of Mickey 3Ds most popular. ... Human respiratory system The lungs flank the heart and great vessels in the chest cavity. ... Suborders Systellommatophora Basommatophora Eupulmonata Stylommatophora The Pulmonata are an order (sometimes subclass) of snails and slugs that have developed lungs. ... For other uses, see Gill (disambiguation). ... In phylogenetics, a grouping of organisms is said to be paraphyletic (Greek para = near and phyle = race) if all the members of the group have a common ancestor, but the group does not include all the descendants of the most recent common ancestor of all group members. ... For the science of classifying living things, see alpha taxonomy. ...


Snails with lungs and with gills have diversified widely enough over geological time that surprisingly, a few species with gills can be found on land, numerous species with a lung can be found in freshwater, and a few species with a lung can be found in the the sea.


Although the word snail is often used for all shelled gastropods, the word "snail" is also sometimes applied in a much more limited sense to mean various larger species of air-breathing or pulmonate land snails.

Contents

Land snails

Species of land snails live in almost every kind of habitat, from deserts and mountains, to marshes, woodland, and gardens. However, certain species are "anthropophilic", which means they are found most often around human habitation. Whichever reasonably large land snail species is most commonly seen or most commonly eaten in a given area, that species will usually be referred to simply as "snails" by the local people. In many parts of the world, the edible species Helix aspersa or Cornu aspersum, has been introduced, and has become a pest in farms and gardens, so this is perhaps a good example of a species commonly known as "the snail." Binomial name Helix aspersa (Müller, 1774) The brown garden snail (Helix aspersa) (syn. ...


Slugs, the shell-less snails

Gastropod species which lack a conspicuous shell are commonly called slugs rather than snails, although, other than having a reduced shell or no shell at all, there is really no difference between a slug and a snail, except that a shell-less animal is much more manouverable, thus for example even a fairly large land slug can take advantage of certain habitats or retreats with very little space that would be inaccessible to a similar-sized snail, such as under bark on trees, or under stone slabs lying on the ground. This article is about land slugs. ...


Taxonomic families of land slugs and sea slugs occur within various larger taxonomic groups of shelled species. In other words, the reduction or loss of the shell has evolved many times independently, within several very different lineages of gastropods, thus slugs are not always closely related to one another.


Biology (primarily of pulmonate land snails)

Physical characteristics

Underside of a snail climbing a blade of grass, showing the muscular foot and the pneumostome.
Underside of a snail climbing a blade of grass, showing the muscular foot and the pneumostome.

Most snails move by gliding along on their muscular foot, which is lubricated with mucus. This motion is powered by succeeding waves of muscular contraction which move down the undersurface of the foot. This muscular action is clearly visible when a snail is crawling on the glass of a window or aquarium. Snails move at a proverbially low speed (1 mm/s is a typical speed for adult Helix lucorum [1]). They produce mucus in order to aid locomotion by reducing friction, and the mucus also helps reduce the snail's risk of mechanical injury from sharp objects. Snails also have a mantle, a specialized layer of tissue which covers all of the internal organs as they are grouped together in the visceral mass, and the mantle also extends outward in flaps, which reach to the edge of the shell and in some cases can cover the shell, and which are partially retractible. The mantle is attached to the shell and creates it by secretion. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 516 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1713 × 1989 pixel, file size: 719 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 516 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1713 × 1989 pixel, file size: 719 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Diagram describing the different parts of a slug A black slug, , on a rock, with its pneumostome clearly visible. ... For other uses, see Foot (disambiguation). ... Mucus cells. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Binomial name Helix lucorum Linnaeus, 1758 Helix lucorum is species of land gastropod of family Helicidae. ... In a general sense, locomotion simply means active movement or travel, applying not just to biological individuals. ... For other uses, see Friction (disambiguation). ... The mantle is an organ found in mollusks. ...


When retracted into their shells, some snails are able to protect themselves with a door-like anatomical structure called an operculum. (The operculum of some sea snails has a pleasant scent when burned, so it is sometimes used as an ingredient in incense.) The operculum (plural : opercula or operculums) of gastropods is a corneous plate at the opening of the shell, attached dorsally to the foot. ... Gastropod operculum, especially in varieties from the red sea, has long served as an incense material in ancient Jewish tradition, as well as in Christian and Arabian Muslim faiths. ... Incense is composed of aromatic organic materials. ...


Snails range greatly in size. The largest land snail is the Giant African Snail or Ghana Tiger Snail (Achatina achatina; Family Achatinidae), which can measure up to 30 cm. Pomacea maculata (Family Ampullariidae), or Giant Apple Snail is the largest freshwater snail, with a diameter of up to 15 cm and a mass of over 600 g. The biggest of all snails is Syrinx aruanus, an Australian marine species which can grow up to 77.2 cm (30 inches) in length, [2] and 18 kg (40lbs) in weight.[3] Binomial name (Linné, 1758) The Giant Ghana Snail, Achatina achatina, also known as the Tiger snail, is a species of snail native to the forests of Ghana, Africa. ... Genera Achatina Archachatina Atopocochlis Burtoa Callistopepla Columna Lignus Limicolaria Limocolariopsis Metachatina Perideriopsis Pseudachatina Achitinidae is a family of terrestrial snails from Africa. ... The Family Ampullariidae (Pilidae)—commonly referred to as apple snails—are tropical and subtropical freshwater mollusks. ... Apple snails (Pomacea canaliculata) are tropical and sub-tropical freshwater snails. ... For other uses, see Mass (disambiguation). ...


The proportions of snail and nautilus shells are an example of the appearance of the logarithmic spiral in nature. Patterns on shells of certain sea snails (Conus, Cymbiola) are similar to those formed by cellular automata. Genera Allonautilus Nautilus Nautilus (from Greek ναυτίλος, sailor) is the common name of any marine creatures of the cephalopod family Nautilidae, the sole family of the suborder Nautilina. ... A logarithmic spiral, equiangular spiral or growth spiral is a special kind of spiral curve which often appears in nature. ... This article is about the animal. ... A cellular automaton (plural: cellular automata) is a discrete model studied in computability theory and mathematics. ...


As the snail grows, so does its calcium carbonate shell. A snail's shell forms a logarithmic spiral. Most snail shells are right-handed, meaning that if you hold the shell with the apex (the tip, or the juvenile whorls) pointing up, then the aperture of the shell is on the right hand side. When the animal reaches full adult size, many species of snails build a thickened lip around the opening of the shell. At this point the animal stops growing, and begins reproducing. Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound, with the chemical formula CaCO3. ... A logarithmic spiral, equiangular spiral or growth spiral is a special kind of spiral curve which often appears in nature. ...

Cepaea species, probably C. nemoralis
Cepaea species, probably C. nemoralis

The shells of snails and other molluscs, and some snail egg casings, are primarily made up of calcium carbonate. Because of this, molluscs need calcium in their diet and environment to produce a strong shell. A lack of calcium, or low pH in their surroundings, can result in thin, cracked, or perforated shells. Usually a snail can repair damage to its shell over time if its living conditions improve, but severe damage can be fatal. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 492 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1230 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 492 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1230 pixel, file size: 1. ... For other uses, see PH (disambiguation). ...

Sinistral species of snail from western India
Sinistral species of snail from western India

Most snails bear one or two pairs of tentacles on their heads. In most land snails the eyes are carried on the tips of the first (upper) set of tentacles (called ommatophores or more informally 'eye stalks') which are usually roughly 75% of the width of the eyes. The second (lower) set of tentacles act as olfactory organs. Both sets of tentacles are retractable in land snails. The eyes of most marine and freshwater snails are found at the base of the first set of tentacles Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Tentacles can refer to the elongated flexible organs that are present in some animals, especially invertebrates, and sometimes to the hairs of the leaves of some insectivorous plants. ... Anatomy of a slug A slug from North Bend, WA Slugs are gastropod molluscs without shells or with very small internal shells, in contrast to snails, which have a prominent coiled shell. ... Tentacles can refer to the elongated flexible organs that are present in some animals, especially invertebrates, and sometimes to the hairs of the leaves of some insectivorous plants. ... Olfaction (also known as olfactics) refers to the sense of smell. ... Tentacles can refer to the elongated flexible organs that are present in some animals, especially invertebrates, and sometimes to the hairs of the leaves of some insectivorous plants. ... Anatomy of a slug A slug from North Bend, WA Slugs are gastropod molluscs without shells or with very small internal shells, in contrast to snails, which have a prominent coiled shell. ... Tentacles can refer to the elongated flexible organs that are present in some animals, especially invertebrates, and sometimes to the hairs of the leaves of some insectivorous plants. ...


Internal anatomy (land snails)

The anatomy of a common snail
The anatomy of a common snail

A snail breaks up its food using the radula, which is a chitinous structure containing microscopic hooks called cuticulae. With this the snail scrapes at food, which is then transferred to the digestive tract. This is why, in a quiet setting, a large land snail can be heard 'crunching' its food: the radula is tearing away at what it is eating. Image File history File links Snail_diagram-en_edit1. ... Image File history File links Snail_diagram-en_edit1. ... Transverse view of the buccal cavity with the radula Radula types chart. ... Structure of the chitin molecule, showing two of the N-Acetylglucosamine units that repeat to form long chains in beta-1,4 linkage. ... For the Physics term GUT, please refer to Grand unification theory The gastrointestinal or digestive tract, also referred to as the GI tract or the alimentary canal or the gut, is the system of organs within multicellular animals which takes in food, digests it to extract energy and nutrients, and...


The cerebral ganglia of the snail form a primitive brain divided into four sections. This structure is very much simpler than the brains of mammals, reptiles and birds, but nonetheless, snails are capable of associative learning.[4] This is a dorsal root ganglion (DRG) from a chicken embryo (around stage of day 7) after incubation overnight in NGF growth medium stained with anti-neurofilament antibody. ... Human brain In animals, the brain (enkephale) (Greek for in the skull), is the control center of the central nervous system, responsible for behavior. ... Classical Conditioning (also Pavlovian or Respondent Conditioning) is a form of associative learning that was first demonstrated by Ivan Pavlov. ...


Hibernation/Estivation (land snails)

Some snails hibernate during the winter (typically October through April in the Northern Hemisphere). They may also estivate in the summer in drought conditions. To stay moist during hibernation, a snail seals its shell opening with a dry layer of mucus called an epiphragm. Some apple snails have a "door" or operculum to close the shell when they withdraw, for protection from predators as well as to avoid desiccation. Estivation or aestivation (from Latin aestas, summer) is a state of dormancy similar to hibernation. ... Fields outside Benambra, Victoria, Australia suffering from drought conditions A drought is an extended period of months or years when a region notes a deficiency in its water supply. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary using the Transwiki process. ...


Reproduction (primarily land snails)

Two Helicid snails make contact prior to mating
Two Helicid snails make contact prior to mating
Two Cornu aspersa Garden snails mating
Two Cornu aspersa Garden snails mating

All land snails are hermaphrodites, producing both spermatozoa and ova. Some freshwater snails, such as Apple Snails, and marine species such as periwinkles have separate sexes; they are either male or female. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x653, 55 KB) Summary Two snails investigate each other prior to mating. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x653, 55 KB) Summary Two snails investigate each other prior to mating. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 800 pixel, file size: 136 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this picture in my garden about two weeks ago, I thought it would be a good one for Wikipedia. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 800 pixel, file size: 136 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this picture in my garden about two weeks ago, I thought it would be a good one for Wikipedia. ... For other uses, see Hermaphrodite (disambiguation). ... A spermatozoon or spermatozoan ( spermatozoa), from the ancient Greek σπέρμα (seed) and (living being) and more commonly known as a sperm cell, is the haploid cell that is the male gamete. ... A human ovum Sperm cells attempting to fertilize an ovum An ovum (plural ova) is a haploid female reproductive cell or gamete. ... Apple snails (Pomacea canaliculata) are tropical and sub-tropical freshwater snails. ... Periwinkle is. ...


Prior to reproduction, most land snails perform a ritual courtship before mating. This may last anywhere between two and twelve hours. Prolific breeders, pulmonate land snails inseminate each other in pairs to internally fertilize their ova. Each brood may consist of up to 100 eggs. Insemination is the introduction of semen into the genital tract of a female. ... Internal fertilization is a form of animal fertilization of an ovum by spermatozoon within the body of an inseminated animal, whether female or hermaphroditic. ... In most birds and reptiles, an egg (Latin ovum) is the zygote, resulting from fertilization of the ovum. ...


Pulmonate land snails and slugs have a reproductive opening on one side of the body, near the front, through which the outer reproductive organs are extruded so that exchange of sperm can take place. After this, fertilization occurs and the eggs develop.


Garden snails bury their eggs in shallow topsoil primarily while the weather is warm and damp, usually 5 to 10 cm down, digging with their 'foot'- the back of their 'tail'. Egg sizes differ between species, from a 3 mm diameter in the grove snail to a 6 cm diameter in the Giant African Land Snail. After 2 to 4 weeks of favorable weather, these eggs hatch and the young emerge. Snails may lay eggs as often as once a month. Binomial name Helix aspersa (Müller, 1774) The brown garden snail (Helix aspersa) (syn. ... Topsoil is the uppermost layer of soil, usually the top six to eight inches. ... Binomial name Cepaea nemoralis (Linnaeus, 1758) The grove snail or brown-lipped snail (Cepaea nemoralis) is one of the most common species of land snail in Europe. ...


The snail's shell develops while it is still an embryo; it is, however, very weak, and needs an immediate supply of calcium. Newly hatched snails obtain this by eating the egg they hatched out of. Baby snails cannibalizing other eggs, even unhatched ones, has been recorded. Promptly after they are finished ingesting their egg casings, they crawl upwards through the small tunnel remaining from when their parent dug their nest. At this stage, the young are almost completely transparent and colorless. Their shell is usually slightly smaller than the egg they hatched from, but their body length when out of their shell is slightly greater than the egg diameter. After a few weeks, the snails will begin to show their first tinge of color, usually slightly blue, before they turn their adult color. Roughly three months after they have hatched, they will look like miniature versions of their mature kin. They will continue to grow, usually for two to three years, until they reach adult size, although there have been confirmed recordings of snails growing amazingly fast - becoming even bigger than their parents in little more than a month[citation needed]. Irrespective of their rate of growth, however, it will still take 2 to 6 years before they are sexually mature.


There have been hybridizations of snails; although these do not occur commonly in the wild, in captivity they can be coaxed into doing so.


Parthenogenesis has also been noted in certain species. [5] [6] For the religious belief, see Virgin Birth of Jesus. ...


Pond snails do not lay their eggs in the ground, but attach them to something solid, or in some genera they carry the eggs internally until they hatch, a form of vivipary. To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it easier to understand, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Lifespan

The lifespan of snails varies from species to species. In the wild, Achatinidae snails live around 5 to 7 years and Helix snails live about 2 to 3 years. Aquatic Apple Snails live only a year or so. Most deaths are due to predators or parasites. In captivity, their lifespan is much longer, ranging from ten to fifteen years for most species. On occasions, snails have lived beyond this lifespan, up to 30 years or more.[7] == Genera Achatina Archachatina Atopocochlis Burtoa Callistopepla Columna Lignus Limicolaria Limocolariopsis Metachatina Perideriopsis Pseudachatina Achitinidae is a family of terrestrial snails from Africa. ... Species See text. ... A parasite is an organism that spends a significant portion of its life in or on the living tissue of a host organism and which causes harm to the host without immediately killing it. ...


Diet

In the wild, snails eat a variety of different foods, including leafy vegetation, fruits, feces and carrion. They can cause damage to agricultural crops and garden plants, and are therefore often regarded as pests. When kept as pets, snails will eat nearly anything, and snail owners should make sure which diets are appropriate to the species involved. Horse feces Feces, faeces, or fæces (see spelling differences) is a waste product from an animals digestive tract expelled through the anus (or cloaca) during defecation. ... A gardener Gardening is the practice of growing flowering plants, vegetables, and fruits. ... Carpet beetle larvae damaging a specimen of Sceliphron destillatorius in an entomological collection A pest is an organism which has characteristics that are regarded as injurious or unwanted. ...


Predators

Snails have many natural predators, including members of all major vertebrate groups, decollate snails, ground beetles, leeches, and even the predatory caterpillar Hyposmocoma molluscivora. The botia family of freshwater fish also feed on freshwater snails by sucking them out of their shells. Binomial name Rumina decollata (Linnaeus, 1758) The decollate snail (Rumina decollata) is an omnivorous land snail which is native to the Mediterranean region but has been introduced into North America and other areas as biological control against the brown garden snail. ... Genera Many genera; see text. ... Orders Arhynchobdellida Rhynchobdellida *There is some dispute as to whether Hirudinea should be a class itself, or a subclass of the Clitellata. ... Binomial name Hyposmocoma molluscivora (Rubinoff, 2005) The Snail Eating Caterpillar, Hyposmocoma molluscivora, is a Hawaiian moth whose larvae are predators, capturing snails in their silk, much like a hunting spiders web, and then crawling inside the snails shell to eat it alive. ... Species Botia is a genus of freshwater fish in the Loach family (Cobitidae). ...


In the pulmonate marsh snail, Succinea putris, there is a parasitic flatworm, Leucochloridium paradoxum which prevents the snail from retracting its enlarged and parasitized eye stalk, which thus makes the snail much more likely to be eaten by a bird, its final host. Mites parasitising a harvestman Parasitism is one version of symbiosis (living together), a phenomenon in which two organisms which are phylogenetically unrelated co-exist over a prolonged period of time, usually the lifetime of one of the individuals. ...


Humans also pose great dangers to snails in the wild. Pollution and the destruction of habitats has caused the extinction of a number of snail species in recent years. [8][9]


Human use: land snails as food

Snails have been eaten for thousands of years, beginning in the Pleistocene. They are especially abundant in Capsian sites in North Africa but are also found throughout the Mediterranean region in archaeological sites dating between 12,000 and 6,000 years ago. [10] [11] However, it should be noted that wild-caught snails that are undercooked can harbor a parasite that may cause a rare kind of meningitis.[12] The Capsian culture (named after the town of Gafsa) was a Mesolithic culture of the Maghreb, which lasted from about 10000 BC to 6000 BC. It was concentrated mainly in modern Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia, with some sites attested in Cyrenaica (Libya). ...


Europe

Snails are eaten in several European countries, as they were in the past in the Roman Empire. Mainly three species, all from the genus Helix, are ordinarily eaten: For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Species See text. ...

  • Helix pomatia, or edible snail, generally prepared in its shell, with parsley butter (size: 40 to 55 mm for an adult weight of 25 to 45 g.; typically found in Burgundy, France).
  • Helix aspersa:
    • Helix aspersa aspersa also known as the European brown snail, is cooked in many different ways, according to different local traditions (size: 28 to 35 mm for an adult weight of 7 to 15 g.; typically found in the Mediterranean countries of Europe and North Africa and the French Atlantic coast).
    • Helix aspersa maxima (size 40 to 45 mm for an average weight of 20 to 30 g.; typically found in North Africa).
Cooked French Escargots
Cooked French Escargots

Snails are a delicacy in French cuisine, where they are called Escargot. In an English language menu escargot is generally reserved for snails prepared with traditional French recipes (served in the shell with a garlic and parsley butter). This article is about the herb. ... For other uses, see Butter (disambiguation). ... Coat of arms of the second Duchy of Burgundy and later of the French province of Burgundy Burgundy (French: ; German: ) is a historic region of France, inhabited in turn by Celts (Gauls), Romans (Gallo-Romans), and various Germanic peoples, most importantly the Burgundians and the Franks; the former gave their... Species see text The Genus Helix belongs to the Family Helicidae. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... The Atlantic Ocean, not including Arctic and Antarctic regions. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 2. ... French cuisine is a style of cooking derived from the nation of France. ... Escargot cooked with garlic and parsley butter in a shell (with a €0. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Snails are also popular in the Portuguese cuisine (although not in the north of the country) where they are called in Portuguese caracóis, and served in cheap snack houses and taverns, usually stewed (with different mixtures of white wine, garlic, piri piri, oregano, coriander or parsley, and sometimes chouriço). Bigger varieties, called caracoletas, are generally grilled and served with a butter sauce, but other dishes also exist such as feijoada de caracóis. Overall, Portugal consumes about 4,000 tonnes of snails each year[13]. Portuguese cuisine is characterised by rich, filling and full-flavoured dishes and is a prime example of Mediterranean diet. ... “Norte” redirects here. ... Beef Stew A stew is a common dish made of vegetables (particularly potatoes or beans), meat, poultry, or seafood cooked in some sort of broth or sauce. ... This article is about the beverage. ... Binomial name L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into African birdseye. ... Binomial name Origanum vulgare L. Oregano or Pot Marjoram (Origanum vulgare) is a species of Origanum, native to Europe, the Mediterranean region and southern and central Asia. ... For other uses, see Coriander (disambiguation). ... This article is about the herb. ... A Portuguese smoked dried and spicy sausage. ... Brazilian Feijoada and common accompanying dishes. ...


Traditional Spanish cuisine also uses snails ("caracoles"), consuming several species such as Helix aspersa, Helix punctata, Helix pisana or Helix alonensis among others. Small to medium size varieties are usually cooked in several spicy sauces or even in soups, while the bigger ones may be reserved for other dishes such as the "arroz con conejo y caracoles" (a paella-style rice with snails and rabbit meat, very popular in the inner regions of south-eastern Spain). Spanish cuisine consists of a great variety of dishes which stem from differences in geography, culture and climate. ... Valencian paella. ...


In Greece, snails are popular in the island of Crete, but are also eaten in other parts of the country and can even be found in supermarkets, sometimes placed alive near partly refrigerated vegetables. In this regard, snails are one of the few live organisms sold at supermarkets as food. They are eaten either boiled with vinegar added, or sometimes cooked alive in a casserole with tomato, potatoes and squashes. A third cooking method is the χοχλιοί μπουμπουριστοί[14] traditional Cretan dish, which consists of fried snails in olive oil with lemon. For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... Packaged food aisles in a Fred Meyer store in Portland, Oregon A supermarket is a departmentalized self-service store offering a wide variety of food and household merchandise. ... Vegetables on a market Vegetable is a nutritional and culinary term denoting any part of a plant that is commonly consumed by humans as food, but is not regarded as a culinary fruit, nut, herb, spice, or grain. ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... In cooking, a casserole (from the French for stew pan) is a large, deep, covered pot or dish used both in the oven and as a serving dish. ... For other uses, see Tomato (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Solanum tuberosum L. The potato (Solanum tuberosum) is a perennial plant of the Solanaceae, or nightshade, family, grown for its starchy tuber. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ...


In Sicily, snails (or babbaluci as they are commonly called in Sicilian) are a very popular dish as well. They are usually boiled with salt first, then served with tomato sauce or bare with oil, garlic and parsley. Snails are similarly appreciated in other Italian regions, such as Sardinia. Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Sicilian (, Italian: ) is a Romance language. ... For the place in the United States, see Sardinia, Ohio. ...


Snails are also very popular in Catalonia, where they are called "caragols" or "cargols." In fact, a snail celebration, the "Aplec del cargol," takes place in Lleida each May, drawing more than two hundred thousand visitors from abroad. This article is about the Spanish autonomous community. ... Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Lleida (Catalan) Spanish name Lérida Founded 6th century BC Postal code 25XXX Website http://www. ...


Heliciculture is the farming of snails. "They are protected in the wild almost everywhere (at least, the Roman Snail must not be collected any more), but the Roman Snail and the Garden Snail (Cornu aspersum) especially are cultivated on snail farms."[7] Binomial name Helix pomatia Linnaeus, 1758 Escargot cooked with garlic and parsley butter in a shell The Burgundy snail or Roman Snail or Edible Snail (Helix pomatia) is species of land gastropod of family Helicidae. ...


Snails (or bebbux as they are called in Maltese) are a quite popular dish on the Mediterranean island of Malta.


Elsewhere

Achatina fulica, the Giant East African Snail, is sliced and canned and sold to consumers as escargot.[citation needed] In parts of West Africa, specifically Ghana snails are served as a delicacy. Achatina achatina, Ghana tiger snails, are also known as some of the largest snails in the world. Binomial name Achatina fulica (Férussac, 1821) The East African Land Snail, Achatina fulica, is a terrestrial pulmonate snail species that has been widely introduced to Asia, to Pacific and Indian Oceans islands, and to the West Indies. ...  Western Africa (UN subregion)  Maghreb[1] West Africa or Western Africa is the westernmost region of the African continent. ... Binomial name (Linné, 1758) The Giant Ghana Snail, Achatina achatina, also known as the Tiger snail, is a species of snail native to the forests of Ghana, Africa. ...


Various snail species are also eaten in Asian cuisines as well. For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ...


Gallery

See also

  • Slug
  • Snail racing
  • Pasilalinic-sympathetic compass

This article is about land slugs. ... Snail racing is a sport that involves the racing of two or more snails. ... Jacques Toussaint Benoit believed that, when they touch, two snails form a sympathetic bond. The pasilalinic-sympathetic compass, also referred to as the snail telegraph, was a contraption built to prove the belief that snails create a permanent telepathic link when they touch. ...

References

  1. ^ G.A. Pavlova (May 2001). "Effects of serotonin, dopamine and ergometrine on locomotion in the pulmonate mollusc Helix lucorum" (pdf). Journal of Experimental Biology 204 (9): 1625-1633. PMID 11398751. Retrieved on 2006-05-24. 
  2. ^ Conchologists of America FAQ no. 6
  3. ^ Fun Animal Facts
  4. ^ Christie Sahley, Alan Gelperin, and Jerry W. Rudy (January 1, 1982). "One-Trial Associative Learning Modifies Food Odor Preferences of a Terrestrial Mollusc". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 78 (1): 640-642. National Academy of Sciences. PMID 16592960. 
  5. ^ www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.1420-9101.2004.00791.x
  6. ^ http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0014-3820(199208)46%3A4%3C907%3APIAFSR%3E2.0.CO%3B2-F
  7. ^ a b [http://www.weichtiere.at/Mollusks/Schnecken/weinberg.html == The Roman snail or escargot (Helix pomatia)]
  8. ^ Centre for Biological Diversity: snail extinction update
  9. ^ Hawaii's Extinct Species – Snails
  10. ^ Prehistoric edible land snails in the circum-Mediterranean: the archaeological evidence., D. Lubell. In J-J. Brugal & J. Desse (eds.), Petits Animaux et Sociétés Humaines. Du Complément Alimentaire Aux Ressources Utilitaires. XXIVe rencontres internationales d'archéologie et d'histoire d'Antibes, pp. 77-98. Antibes: Éditions APDCA.]
  11. ^ Are land snails a signature for the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition? In, M. Budja (ed.), Neolithic Studies 11. Documenta Praehistorica XXXI: 1-24. D. Lubell.
  12. ^ Division of Parasitic Diseases - Angiostrongylus Infection Fact Sheet
  13. ^ According to the article Comemos três a quatro mil toneladas de caracóis por ano, by Joana Ferreira da Costa, in the 26.08.2007 edition (n.6358) of the daily newspaper Público.
  14. ^ http://greekfood.about.com/od/maindishes/r/kohlifried.htm
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Helicidae

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External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Snail - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1073 words)
Snails are found in freshwater, marine, and terrestrial environments.
Snail shells, like those of the Nautilus, are one example of the appearance of the phi, the golden ratio, in nature.
Snails are also popular in Portugal, where they are called "caracóis" (Portuguese for "snails"), and served in cheap snack houses and taverns, usually boiled with garlic.
Eye to Eye With Garden Snails (2545 words)
To awaken a snail which is attached to a surface, gently remove the snail from the surface and dip it into water.
Snails which withdraw into their shells during class can usually be coaxed out by a brief dip in a shallow container of water.
One snail race was covered by the local newspaper and a photograph of the winning snail crawling across the nose of its "trainer" made the front page of the paper.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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