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Encyclopedia > Smithsonian Institute
This photograph is from http://kestan.com/ and was taken by Keith Stanley. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections...
This photograph is from http://kestan.com/ and was taken by Keith Stanley. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections... Enlarge
The "Smithsonian castle," as seen through the garden gate.

The Smithsonian Institution is a A museum is a non-profit making, permanent institution in the service of society and of its development, open to the public, which acquires, conserves, researches, communicates and exhibits, for purposes of study, education and enjoyment, the tangible and intangible evidence of people and their environment. This definition is taken... museum complex with most of its facilities in Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United States of America. Washington, D.C. is part of the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area, which also includes... Washington D.C.. It consists of 16 museums, 7 research centers and 142 million items in its collections.


A monthly This article is about the magazine as a published medium. For other meanings, see magazine (disambiguation) A collection of magazines Magazines A magazine is a periodical publication containing a variety of articles on various subjects. Magazines are typically published weekly, biweekly, monthly, or quarterly, with a date on the cover... magazine published by the Smithsonian Institution is also named Smithsonian is a monthly magazine published by the Smithsonian Institution of the United States in Washington, DC External link Smithsonian webpage Categories: Smithsonian Institution | United States magazines | Stub ... Smithsonian.

Contents

History

The Smithsonian Castle - the information centre. Photo taken in October 2003 by Robert Merkel and placed in the public domain. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. This applies worldwide. File history Legend: (cur...
The Smithsonian Castle - the information centre. Photo taken in October 2003 by Robert Merkel and placed in the public domain. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. This applies worldwide. File history Legend: (cur... Enlarge
"The Castle."

The Smithsonian Institution was founded for the promotion and dissemination of knowledge by a bequest to the The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States by James Smithson (1765 - June 27, 1829) was a British mineralogist and chemist noted for having left a bequest in his will to the United States of America, which was used to fund the Smithsonian Institution. Contents // 1 Biography 2 Scientific career 3 The Smithsonian connection 4 Further reading 5 Sources... James Smithson ( Years: 1762 1763 1764 - 1765 - 1766 1767 1768 Decades: 1730s 1740s 1750s - 1760s - 1770s 1780s 1790s Centuries: 17th century - 18th century - 19th century 1765 in art 1765 in literature 1765 in music 1765 in science List of state leaders in 1765 List of religious leaders in 1765 Events March 9... 1765- Years: 1826 1827 1828 - 1829 - 1830 1831 1832 Decades: 1790s 1800s 1810s - 1820s - 1830s 1840s 1850s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1829 in art 1829 in literature 1829 in science 1829 in music 1829 in sports List of state leaders in 1829 List of religious leaders in 1829... 1829). In James Smithson's will, he stated that should his nephew, Henry James Hungerford, die without heirs, the Smithson estate would go to the The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States of America for establishing an institution "for the increase and diffusion of knowledge among men". After the nephew died without heirs in 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). Events January 1 – Ole Pedersen Hoiland breaks into the Bank of Norway and steals 64.000 dalers January 7 - HMS Beagle anchors off the Chonos Archipelago. January 30 - Unsuccessful assassination attempt against President Andrew Jackson in the... 1835, President Andrew Jackson Order: 7th President Vice President: John C. Calhoun (1829-1832) Martin Van Buren (1833-1837) Term of office: March 4, 1829 – March 3, 1837 Preceded by: John Quincy Adams Succeeded by: Martin Van Buren Date of birth: March 15, 1767... Andrew Jackson informed The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. It is established by Article One of the Constitution of the United States, which also deliniates its structure and powers. Congress is a bicameral legislature, consisting of the House of... Congress of the bequest, which amounted to 100,000 A gold sovereign is a British gold coin, first issued in 1489 for Henry VII, generally with a value of twenty shillings or one pound. The name sovereign related to the majestic and impressive size and portraiture of the coin, the earliest of which showed the king facing, seated on... gold sovereigns, or $500,000 The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. It is also widely used as a reserve currency outside of the United States. Currently, the issuance of currency is controlled by the Federal Reserve Banking system. The most commonly used symbol for the U.S. dollar is... U.S. dollars ($8,790,303 in current 2004 U.S. dollars after inflation). Eight years later, Congress passed an act establishing the Smithsonian Institution and the act was signed into law on August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 143 days remaining. The term the 10th of August is widely used by historians as a shorthand for the Storming of the Tuileries Palace on August 10, 1792, the effective end... August 10, Years: 1843 1844 1845 - 1846 - 1847 1848 1849 Decades: 1810s 1820s 1830s - 1840s - 1850s 1860s 1870s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1846 in art 1846 in literature 1846 in rail transport 1846 in science 1846 in music 1846 in sports List of state leaders in 1846 List of... 1846 by James Knox Polk Order: Eleventh President Term of Office: March 4, 1845–March 3, 1849 Preceded by: John Tyler Succeeded by: Zachary Taylor Date of Birth November 2, 1795 Place of Birth: Mecklenburg County, North Carolina Date of Death: June 15, 1849 Place of Death: Nashville, Tennessee First Lady... James Polk. The bill was drafted by State of Indiana (Flag of Indiana) (Seal of Indiana) State nickname: The Hoosier State Other U.S. States Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Governor Mitch Daniels Official languages English Area 94,321 km² (38th)  - Land 92,897 km²  - Water 1,424 km² (1.5%) Population (2000... Indiana The neutrality and factual accuracy of this article are disputed. Please see the relevant discussion on the talk page. Unofficial Democratic Party logo depicts a stylized donkey in red, white, and blue. Democratic Party Founded: Colors: Blue (sometimes Red) Political ideology: Leans Center-Left The Democratic Party is one of... Democratic A Congressman or Congresswoman (generically, Congressperson) is a politician who is a member of a Congress. In countries with a parliament rather than a congress, MP (Member of Parliament) is used instead. In the United States, a Congressman usually refers to a member of the countrys House of Representatives... Congressman Robert Dale Owen (November 7, 1801–June 24, 1877) was a longtime exponent in his adopted United States of the socialist doctrines of his father, the Welshman Robert Owen, as well as a politician in the Democratic Party. Born in Glasgow, Scotland, Owen emigrated to the United States in... Robert Dale Owen, a The color red and particularly the red flag are traditional symbols of Socialism. This article or section is part of or related to the Socialism series. Socialism Branches of Socialism Criticisms of Socialism Definitions of Socialism History of socialism List of social democratic parties List of socialists Socialist International Social... Socialist and son of Robert Owen. Robert Owen (May 14, 1771–November 17, 1858) was a Welsh social reformer. He is considered the Father of the cooperative movement. He was born at Newtown, Montgomeryshire, in mid Wales, where his father had a small business as a saddler and ironmonger, and there young Owen... Robert Owen, the father of the A cooperative (also co-operative or co-op) is an association of persons who join together to carry on an economic activity of mutual benefit, in an egalitarian fashion. The principles of cooperation are periodically updated by the International Cooperative Alliance [1]. The term may be used loosely to signify... cooperative movement. The Smithsonian Institution is established as a In common law legal systems, a trust is a relationship in which a person or entity (the trustee) has legal control over certain property (the trust property or trust corpus), but is bound by fiduciary duty to exercise that legal control for the benefit of someone else (the beneficiary), according... trust administered by a secretary and board of regents. The nominal head of the institute is the Chancellor (Latin: cancellarius), an official title used by most of the peoples whose civilization has arisen directly or indirectly out of the Roman empire. At different times and in different countries it has stood and stands for very various duties, and has been, and is, borne by officers of various... Chancellor, an office which has always been held by the current -1... Chief Justice of the United States. Serving as a member of the board of regents is one of the very few official legal duties of the Dick Cheney 46th and current Vice President (2001- ) The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is a heartbeat from the presidency. As first in the presidential line of succession, the Vice President becomes the new President... Vice President of the United States.


The Information Center in the central complex has architecture reminiscent of a castle and is known informally as "The Castle". It was built by architect James Renwick, Jr. (b. November 11, 1818, Bloomingdale, New York - d. June 23, 1895, New York City, United States), was a well-known American architect in the nineteenth century. The Encyclopedia of American Architecture calls him one of the most successful American architects of his time. He began studying at... James Renwick, Jr. and completed in 1855. Many of the other buildings are landmarks and feature other distinctive architectural styles.


The An asteroid is a small, solid object in our Solar System, orbiting the Sun. An asteroid is an example of a minor planet (or planetoid), which are much smaller than planets. Most asteroids are believed to be remnants of the protoplanetary disc which were not incorporated into planets during the... asteroid 3773 Smithsonian is a small main belt asteroid. It was discovered by astronomers at the Oak Ridge Observatory in 1984. It is named in honour of the Smithsonian Institution, the museum complex in Washington D.C. Categories: Astronomy stubs | Main Belt asteroids ... 3773 Smithsonian is named in honor of the institution.


Secretaries of the Smithsonian

  1. Joseph Henry Joseph Henry (December 17, 1797 – May 13, 1878) was an American scientist. While building electromagnets, he discovered the electromagnetic phenomenon of self-inductance. He also discovered mutual inductance, independently of Faraday, but Faraday was the first to publish his results. His work on the electromagnetic relay was... Joseph Henry Years: 1843 1844 1845 - 1846 - 1847 1848 1849 Decades: 1810s 1820s 1830s - 1840s - 1850s 1860s 1870s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1846 in art 1846 in literature 1846 in rail transport 1846 in science 1846 in music 1846 in sports List of state leaders in 1846 List of... 1846- Years: 1875 1876 1877 - 1878 - 1879 1880 1881 Decades: 1840s 1850s 1860s - 1870s - 1880s 1890s 1900s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1878 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - Sport Lists of leaders: Colonial governors - State leaders Contents // 1 Events 1.1... 1878
  2. Spencer Fullerton Baird Spencer Fullerton Baird (February 3, 1823 – August 19, 1887) was an American ornithologist and ichthyologist. Baird was born in Reading, Pennsylvania. He graduated at Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania in 1840, and next year made an ornithological excursion through the mountains of Pennsylvania, walking, says one of... Spencer Fullerton Baird – 1878- 1887 is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar). Years: 1884 1885 1886 - 1887 - 1888 1889 1890 Decades: 1850s 1860s 1870s - 1880s - 1890s 1900s 1910s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1887 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science... 1887
  3. Samuel Pierpont Langley (August 22, 1834 in Roxbury, Massachusetts near Boston, – February 27, 1906, Aiken, South Carolina) was an American astronomer, physicist, inventor, aeronautics pioneer and aircraft engineer. He was the third Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution and the founder of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. Langley unsuccessfully competed to... Samuel Pierpont Langley – 1887- 1906 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). Contents // 1 Events 2 Unknown dates 3 Births 4 Deaths 5 Nobel Prizes Events January Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15... 1906
  4. Charles Doolittle Walcott (March 31, 1850 _ February 9, 1927) was an eminent American invertebrate paleontologist. He has become well-known for his discovery in 1909 of well-preserved fossils in the Burgess Shale formation of Canada. In this shale, many very rare, soft-bodied animal fossils have been collected... Charles Doolittle Walcott 1907 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January 1.2 February 1.3 March 1.4 May 1.5 June 1.6 July 1.7 August 1.8 September 1.9 November 1.10 Undated 2 Births 2.1 January... 1907- Years: 1924 1925 1926 - 1927 - 1928 1929 1930 Decades: 1890s 1900s 1910s - 1920s - 1930s 1940s 1950s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1927 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science - Television Other topics Canada - Sport Lists of leaders: State leaders - Religious... 1927
  5. Charles Greeley Abbot (May 31, 1872 – December 17, 1973) was an American astrophysicist, astronomer and Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. He was born in Wilton, New Hampshire. Abbot graduated from MIT in 1894 with a degree in chemical physics. Samuel Pierpont Langley was looking for an assistant at the... Charles Greeley Abbot 1928 was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January-May 1.2 June-September 1.3 October-December 1.4 Unknown dates 2 Year in topic 3 Births 3.1 January 3.2 February 3.3 March-April 3... 1928- 1944 was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 World War II 1.1.1 January 1.1.2 February-March 1.1.3 May 1.1.4 June 1.1.5 July-August 1.1.6 September 1.1... 1944
  6. Frank Alexander Wetmore (June 18, 1886 _ December 7, 1978) was an American ornithologist and avian paleontologist. Wetmore was born at North Freedom, Wisconsin and studied at the University of Kansas. In 1925 Wetmore was appointed assistant secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, becoming secretary between 1945 and 1952. He wrote... Alexander Wetmore – 1944- Years: 1949 1950 1951 - 1952 - 1953 1954 1955 Decades: 1920s 1930s 1940s - 1950s - 1960s 1970s 1980s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1952 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science - Television Other topics Canada - Sport Lists of leaders: State leaders - Religious... 1952
  7. Leonard Carmichael – 1953 is a common year starting on Thursday. Years: 1950 1951 1952 - 1953 - 1954 1955 1956 Decades: 1920s 1930s 1940s - 1950s - 1960s 1970s 1980s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1953 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science - Television Other topics... 1953- 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). Table of contents // 1 Events 1.1 January 1.2 February 1.3 March 1.4 April 1.5 May 1.6 June 1.7 July 1.8 August 1.9 September 1.10 October 1... 1964
  8. Sidney Dillon Ripley (20 September 1913 - 12 March, 2001 ) was an ornithologist. He graduated from Yale University, and decided that birds were more interesting than law and took to studying zoology at Columbia University. He visited India with his parents when he was 13 and his special area of interest... Sidney Dillon Ripley – 1964- 1984 is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. Years: 1981 1982 1983 - 1984 - 1985 1986 1987 Decades: 1950s 1960s 1970s - 1980s - 1990s 2000s 2010s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1984 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation - Rail... 1984
  9. Robert McCormick Adams Jr. (born 1926) is a U.S. anthropologist. He served as the provost of the University of Chicago from 1982 and 1984. He served as the secretary of the Smithsonian Institution from 1984 Categories: People stubs ... Robert McCormick Adams – 1984- 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. Years: 1991 1992 1993 - 1994 - 1995 1996 1997 Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1994 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art... 1994
  10. I. Michael Heyman – 1994- 1999 is a common year starting on Friday of the Common Era, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. Years: 1996 1997 1998 - 1999 - 2000 2001 2002 Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1999 in... 1999
  11. Lawrence M. Small – 2000 - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE55Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE60Fixes.css; /**/ 2000 From Wikipedia 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. Popular culture also holds the year 2000 as the first year of the 21st century and the 3rd... 2000-present

See: The Secretaries of the Smithsonian Institution (http://newsdesk.si.edu/HistoryandMore/The%20Secretaries%202003.pdf)


Further reading

  • Nina Burleigh, Stranger and the Statesman: James Smithson, John Quincy Adams, and the Making of America's Greatest Museum, The Smithsonian, The name Collins may refer to: People William Wilkie Collins (1824 – 1889), Victorian era British writer Edward Cocky Trowbridge Collins Sr. (1887 - 1951), Major League Baseball player Vice Admiral Sir John Collins (1899 - 1989), Royal Australian Navy officer Places Fort Collins, Colorado Publishers The Collins publishing company, now part... HarperCollins, September, 2003, hardcover, 288 pages, ISBN 0060002417

List of Smithsonian museums

  • The Smithsonian American Art Museum is a museum in Washington, D.C. with an extensive collection of American art. Part of the Smithsonian Institution, the museum has a broad variety of American art that covers all regions and art movements found in the United States. Among the significant artists represented... American Art Museum
  • The Anacostia Museum is the Smithsonian Institutions museum of African American history and culture, located in and focused on the Washington, DC neighborhood of Anacostia. External link Anacostia Museum Categories: United States-related stubs | Museums in Washington, DC | Smithsonian Institution ... Anacostia Museum
  • The Arts and Industries Building is the second oldest of the Smithsonian museums. The building opened in 1881 as the National Museum, and hosted an inaugural ball for President James A. Garfield. In 1910 the natural history collections were moved to the new National Museum of Natural History, and the... Arts and Industries Building
  • The The Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum is the only museum in the United States dedicated to contemporary design and design history. It is a part of the Smithsonian Institution and is located in New York City at Fifth Avenue and 91st Street, along what is known as Museum Mile. Founded... Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
  • Categories: Stub ... Freer Gallery of Art
  • Categories: Museum stubs | Museums in Washington, DC | Art museums and galleries in the U.S. | Smithsonian Institution | National Mall ... Hirshhorn Museum
  • Interior of museum, with Gemini capsule, Soviet rockets, and Wright Flyer visible The National Air and Space Museum (NASM) of the United States Smithsonian Institution maintains the largest collection of aircraft and spacecraft in the world. Its notable exhibits include: The original Wright Flyer that made the first controlled, powered... National Air and Space Museum
  • This article is about the National Gallery of the United States, for other National Galleries, see National Gallery The East Building of the National Gallery of Art The National Gallery of Art is an art museum owned and managed by the government of the United States. It comprises two buildings... National Gallery of Art (affiliated, though under a separate charter)
  • National Museum of African Art
  • The National Museum of American History is a museum administered by the Smithsonian Institution and located on the National Mall in Washington, DC. It opened in 1964 as the Museum of History and Technology. It adopted its current name in 1980. The museum has three exhibition floors, two floors for... National Museum of American History
  • Categories: Museum stubs | Museums in New York City | Museums in Washington, DC | Smithsonian Institution | National Mall ... National Museum of the American Indian
  • Categories: Museum stubs | Museums in Washington, DC | Smithsonian Institution | National Mall | Natural history museums ... National Museum of Natural History
  • National Portrait Gallery
  • The National Postal Museum in Washington, D.C. is located across the street from Union Station and houses many interactive displays about the history of the United States Postal Service and of mail service around the world. Also on display is a vast collection of stamps. Its building was once... National Postal Museum
  • The elephant exibit at the National Zoo The Smithsonian National Zoological Park, commonly known in the United States as the National Zoo, is a zoo located in Washington, DC. Founded in 1889, it consists of two distinct installations: a 163 acre (0.7 km²) zoo within the Rock Creek Park... National Zoo ( The elephant exibit at the National Zoo The Smithsonian National Zoological Park, commonly known in the United States as the National Zoo, is a zoo located in Washington, DC. Founded in 1889, it consists of two distinct installations: a 163 acre (0.7 km²) zoo within the Rock Creek Park... Smithsonian National Zoological Park)
  • The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery is an underground gallery of Asian art located on the National Mall (in Washington, D.C.), directly behind the Smithsonian Castle. The Sackler is one of two galleries of the National Museum of Asian Art, the other being the Freer Gallery. It connects to both... Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
  • The Castle The Smithsonian Institution Building, located on the National Mall in Washington, DC, houses the Smithsonian Institutions administrative offices and information center. The Building is constructed of red sandstone in the Norman style (a 12th-century combination of late Romanesque and early Gothic motifs) and is appropriately nicknamed... Smithsonian Institution Building

List of Smithsonian research centers

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Smithsonian Institution - LoveToKnow 1911 (1138 words)
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, an American institution of learning in Washington, D.C., founded by the bequest of James Smithson, who seems to have known of Joel Barlow's plan for a national institution of learning in the city of Washington in accordance with George Washington's recommendation in his farewell address of 1796.
By acts of Congress of the 2nd of March 1889 and the 30th of April 1890 the National Zoological Park was established under the Institution; and in a park of 266 acres in the valley of Rock Creek a small collection was installed.
The oldest building, that of the Institution proper, was erected in 1847-1855; it is Seneca brown stone in a mingled Gothic and Romanesque style, designed by James Renwick, and occupies the S.W. corner of the grounds.
Smithsonian Institution - MSN Encarta (511 words)
The Smithsonian was founded in 1846 by an act of the Congress of the United States under the terms of the bequest of British scientist James Smithson.
As one of the world’s leading research institutions, the Smithsonian advances knowledge in fields as diverse as American art, tropical organisms and ecosystems, the care and preservation of museum objects, and the study of comets and asteroids.
A hallmark of the Smithsonian is its accessibility.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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