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Encyclopedia > Smith College

Smith College

Motto EN THI APETHI THN ΓΝΩΣΙΝ - To Virtue Knowledge
Established Charted in 1871; opened its doors in 1875
Type Private women's college
Endowment $1.125 billion[1]
President Carol T. Christ
Faculty 285[2]
Undergraduates 2,600[2]
Location Northampton, Massachusetts, USA
Colors white, blue, gold
Mascot Pioneer
Website smith.edu

Smith College is a private, independent women's liberal arts college located in Northampton, Massachusetts. It is highly selective, and is the largest member of the Seven Sisters. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... Womens colleges in the United States in higher education are American undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institutions, often liberal arts colleges, whose student populations are comprised exclusively or almost exclusively of women. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Carol tenacious t Christ (b. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Nickname: [[Image:Northampton_ma_highlight. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Look up private in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Womens colleges in the United States in higher education are American undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institutions, often liberal arts colleges, whose student populations are comprised exclusively or almost exclusively of women. ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are primarily liberal arts colleges with an emphasis upon undergraduate study in the liberal arts. ... Nickname: [[Image:Northampton_ma_highlight. ... The Seven Sisters is the name given in 1927 to seven liberal arts womens colleges in the Northern United States. ...


Smith is also a member of the Five Colleges consortium, which allows its students to attend classes at four other Pioneer Valley institutions: Mount Holyoke College, Amherst College, Hampshire College, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst. This provides a unique exception to the women only at undergraduate level, as men attending any of the Five Colleges are allowed to attend classes at Smith and Mount Holyoke, and are admitted to 95% of all available classes with the main exception being team sports. Smith is also known for its racial, socio-economic, and sexual-orientation diversity.[3][4][5] The Five Colleges are composed of four liberal arts colleges and one university in the Connecticut River Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts, belonging to a consortium called Five Colleges, Incorporated, which was established in 1965. ... The Pioneer Valley and Connecticut River, looking southward toward the towns of Sunderland, Amherst and Whately. ... Mount Holyoke College is a liberal arts womens college in South Hadley, Massachusetts. ... Amherst College is a private, independent, elite[1][2] liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Hampshire College is an experimenting private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts. ... The University of Massachusetts Amherst (otherwise known as UMass Amherst or UMass) is a research and land-grant university in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. The University of Massachusetts Amherst offers over 90 undergraduate and 65 graduate areas of study. ...

Contents

History

The college was chartered in 1871 by a bequest of Sophia Smith and opened its doors in 1875 with 14 students and six faculty.[6] In 1915-16 the student enrollment was 1,724 and the faculty numbered 163. Today, with some 2,600 undergraduates on campus, Smith is the largest privately endowed college for women in the country. The campus was planned and planted in the 1890s as a botanical garden and arboretum, designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. The campus landscape now encompasses 125 acres (0.5 km²) and includes more than 1,200 varieties of trees and shrubs. Sophia Smith (born Hatfield, Massachusetts on August 27, 1796) founded Smith College in 1870 with the substantial estate she inherited from her father and siblings. ... Inside the United States Botanic Garden Inside the Rio de Janeiro Botanic Garden (Brazil), 1890 Botanical gardens (in Latin, hortus botanicus) grow a wide variety of plants primarily categorized and documented for scientific purposes, but also for the enjoyment and education of visitors, a consideration that has become essential to... An arboretum is a botanical garden primarily devoted to trees and other woody plants, forming a living collection of trees intended at least partly for scientific study. ... Frederick Law Olmsted (April 26, 1822 – August 28, 1903) was a United States landscape architect, famous for designing many well-known urban parks, including Central Park and Prospect Park in New York City. ...


The college began its second century in 1975 by inaugurating its first woman president, Jill Ker Conway, who came to Smith from Australia by way of Harvard and the University of Toronto. Jill Ker Conway (born 9 September 1934) is an Australian-American author, best known for her autobiographies, in particular her first memoirs The Road from Coorain. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... The University of Toronto (U of T) is a public research university in the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ...


Through its history, Smith has been led by 10 presidents and 2 acting presidents. Since President Conway's term, all Smith presidents have been women, with the exception of John M. Connolly's one-year term as acting president in the interim after President Simmons left to lead Brown University. Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ...

Laurenus Clark Seelye (1827-1924) was the first president of Smith College, serving from 1873-1910. ... Marion LeRoy Burton was the second president of Smith College, serving from 1910 to 1917. ... William Allen Neilson (1869 - 1946) was a U.S. (Scottish-born) educator, writer and lexicographer. ... Elizabeth Cutter Morrow (born Elizabeth Reeve Cutter) was an American poet in the early 20th century, and became the first female head of the Smith College, acting as college president from 1939 to 1940 (though she never officially was granted the title). ... Herbert Davis was the fourth official president of Smith College, serving from 1940 to 1949, succeeding acting president Elizabeth Cutter Morrow . ... Thomas Corwin Mendenhall II (born 10 July 1910 in Madison, Wisconsin - died 18 July 1998 on Marthas Vineyard, Massachusetts) was a professor of history at Yale University, the sixth President of Smith College, and the leading authority on the history of collegiate rowing in the United States. ... Jill Ker Conway (born 9 September 1934) is an Australian-American author, best known for her autobiographies, in particular her first memoirs The Road from Coorain. ... Categories: Brown University presidents | People stubs ... Carol tenacious t Christ (b. ...

Academics

Smith has 285 professors in 37 academic departments and programs, for a faculty:student ratio of 1:9.


Smith College is the first and only women's college in the United States to grant its own undergraduate degrees in engineering. The Picker Engineering Program offers a single Bachelor of Science in engineering science, combining the fundamentals of multiple engineering disciplines. Engineering is the design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Ada Comstock Scholars Program is a bachelor's degree program for non-traditional students. A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... Non-traditional students is an American English term referring to students at higher education institutions (undergraduate college or university) who generally fall into two categories: Students who are older than the typical undergraduate college student (usually aged 17-23) and interupted their studies earlier in life Students typical of age...


Smith also has special one-year graduate programs for international students. One of such programs, the American Studies Diploma Program, was founded by prof. Daniel Aaron during the early 1960s, the height of Cold War, to serve as a counterweight of international misunderstanding and violence. Students can design specialized majors and minors with the approval of the College and related departments. Individuals may also enroll as nondegree students by registering for one or more courses. American studies or American civilization is an interdisciplinary field dealing with the study of the United States. ...


Smith runs its own study abroad programs in four European cities. These programs are notable for requiring all studies to be conducted in the language of the host country. In some cases students live in homestays with local families. The programs are located in: Paris, France; Hamburg, Germany; Florence, Italy; and Geneva, Switzerland (students in this program study in French). More than half of Smith's juniors study overseas, either through Smith programs or through programs run by other colleges and universities.


Graduate degrees and study options

Smith's graduate programs are open to both men and women. Each year approximately 100 men and women pursue advanced graduate work at Smith.


The Smith College master of social work (M.S.W.) degree is nationally recognized for its specialization in clinical social work and puts a heavy emphasis on direct field work practice. The program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. The school also offers a Ph.D. program designed to prepare MSWs for leadership positions in clinical research education and practice.


The college has a limited number of other programs leading to Ph.D.s, and is part of a cooperative doctoral program co-administered by Amherst College, Hampshire College, Mount Holyoke College and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Amherst College is a private, independent, elite[1][2] liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Hampshire College is an experimenting private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts. ... Mount Holyoke College is a liberal arts womens college in South Hadley, Massachusetts. ... The center of the UMass Amherst campus. ...


Traditions

Colors and mascot

Smith College does not have college colors in the usual sense. Its official color is white, trimmed with gold, but the official college logo is currently blue and yellow (a previous logo was burgundy and white). NCAA athletic teams have competed in blue and white (or blue and yellow, in the case of both the crew and the squash team) uniforms since the 1970s, and selected Pioneers as the official name and mascot in 1986. Popular club sports are free to choose their own colors and mascot; both Rugby and Fencing have chosen red and black.


Smith has a rotating system of class colors dating back to the 1880s, when intramural athletics and other campus competitions were usually held by class. Today, class colors are yellow, red, blue and green, with incoming first-year classes assigned the color of the previous year's graduating class; their color then "follows" them through to graduation. Alumnae classes, particularly at reunion, continue to identify with and use their class color thereafter.


Residential culture

Smith requires all first-year undergraduate students, as well as most other undergraduates, to live in on-campus houses. This policy is intended to add to the camaraderie and social cohesion of its students. Unlike most institutions of its type, Smith College does not have dorms, but rather 36 separate houses, built in the style that was popular during the time they were constructed (A popular rumor perpetuated by students and Smith College Gold Key guides is that Sophia Smith stated in her will that each house be constructed in the style of the period; this is, however, only a rumor). The campus also houses a Japanese tea house, a traditional rock garden and an exotic greenhouse with many examples of tropical plants. The staircase in Chapin House was the inspiration for the one in Tara in Gone with the Wind. Margaret Mitchell went to Smith. Gone with the Wind, an American novel by Margaret Mitchell, was published in 1936 and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937. ... For the Canadian politician see Margaret Mitchell (politician) Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell (November 8, 1900 – August 16, 1949) was the American author, who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 for her immensely successful novel, Gone with the Wind, which was published in 1936. ...


A novelty of Smith's homelike atmosphere is the continuing popularity of Sophia Smith's recipe for molasses cookies. These are often served at the traditional Friday afternoon tea held in each house, where students, faculty and staff members and alumnae socialize.[7]


Lesbian Culture

Smith has been called the "Home of Lesbians in Massachusetts," by detractors and supporters[8], and prides itself on having an open and diverse culture. The college boasts a Women's Queer Studies program wherein students can achieve a concentration in Women's Queer Studies by taking 15 courses.[9] The college is carefule to invite notable lesbian speakers on social issues[10][11][12], there was a newsworthy issue regarding rape[13], there is a lesbian minister[14], on-campus writers have discussed the subject[15], and Smith Magazine features stories with such topics as Lesbian Families and Diversity.[16]


Academic year events

Mountain Day is a borrowed from Mount Holyoke College tradition observed early in the fall semester. The President of the College selects a crisp, sunny, beautiful autumn day when the leaves are in full color, and announces the cancellation of classes by having bells rung on campus at 7:00 AM on the chosen day. The eager anticipation of Mountain Day leads to intense speculation and an abnormally high interest in meteorology by students in the weeks leading up to the surprise announcement. Traditional observance of Mountain Day by students might involve New England road trips or outdoor pursuits, and college dining services provides box lunches to be taken off-campus. This article is about the region in the United States of America. ...


Otelia Cromwell Day, named for Smith's first African-American alumna, began in 1989 to provide students with an in-depth program specifically addressing issues of racism and diversity. Afternoon classes are cancelled, and students are invited to participate in lectures, workshops, symposia and cultural events centered around a different theme each year. Otelia Cromwell is the first known African-American graduate of Smith College. ...


In February 1876, the College began an annual observance of George Washington's birthday. In 1894, a rally became part of the day's events, and the focus of the celebration became primarily patriotic rather than exclusively social—though always with a women's college twist. Students that year staged a mock debate on the subject, "Does Higher Education Unfit a Man for Domestic Life?" In 1906 the celebration was first referred to as Rally Day (although the name was not used officially by the College until 1992). In 1944, seniors made Rally Day the first public wearing of their graduation caps and gowns; since then, mortarboards have been replaced by wacky, often homemade hats. Today, the Rally Day Convocation is centered around a historical theme, and features a distinguished keynote speaker and the awarding of Smith College Medals to accomplished alumnae. George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ...


Rally Day is observed in the Spring; an all-college gathering honors distinguished alumnae, and a musical is held depicting life at Smith.


Reunions and Commencement events

The Alumnae Association of Smith College hosts official class reunions every five years, plus a special two-year reunion. All alumnae from all classes are welcome to return in any year; "off-year" alumnae attend campus-wide events as the "Class of 1776."


Traditional reunion and Commencement events are linked, and celebrate the close ties between Smith's alumnae and its graduating seniors and their families. At the conclusion of final exams, most underclasswomen leave the campus, while seniors remain in their houses for a week to celebrate and prepare for Commencement. Alumnae arrive for reunions later in the week, and many alumnae arrange for official accommodations in the campus houses, right alongside senior residents.

Ivy Day
Ivy Day

Ivy Day, the day before Commencement, is the high point of reunion and a significant event for seniors as well. Junior ushers lead a parade through campus, carrying vines of ivy to be planted by the departing seniors as a symbol of their lifelong connection to the college. Alumnae (and, often, their children), dressed in white and wearing sashes in their class color, line up in reverse order by class along both sides of the route. Seniors line up nearest the end of the parade route, wearing traditional white outfits and each carrying a single red rose. All cheer each alumnae class as it marches past, then fall in to join the end of the parade. Many alumnae classes carry signs with humorous poems or slogans, or hold balloons or wear hats in their class color. Ivy Day festivities conclude in the Quad, where the seniors plant their ivy and speakers address alumnae on the progress of fundraising and the state of the college. Download high resolution version (1536x1024, 470 KB)Description: Photograph of Smith College Ivy Day Seniors Source: Photograph taken by [Andrea Maurizio] May 2004. ... Download high resolution version (1536x1024, 470 KB)Description: Photograph of Smith College Ivy Day Seniors Source: Photograph taken by [Andrea Maurizio] May 2004. ...


Illumination Night, beginning at dusk on the Saturday evening before Commencement, is a celebration of the campus and a send-off of sorts for graduating seniors. Throughout central campus, electric street lights are replaced for one night by multicolored Japanese-style paper lanterns, lit with real candles. These hang on both sides of every walking path and cast a soft glow over the buildings and lawns. Student acapella singing groups and improv comedy troupes roam the campus, stopping occasionally to entertain the crowds. A jazz band, hired by the college, turns the science buildings' courtyard into a dance floor. Seniors, alumnae, faculty and their families spend the evening on walking tours of the illuminated campus and Botanic Gardens. The major official event of the night is the Senior Step Sing: seniors gather on the steps of Neilson Library, where they are serenaded by members of the Sophomore Push committee, then are physically pushed off the stairs and "into the real world." The Botanic Garden of Smith College is located on the campus of Smith College, in Northampton, Massachusetts, USA. It consists of an fine selection of woody trees, shrubs, herbaceous plants, and an excellent collection of warm-weather plants in a set of historic conservatories. ...


Until the early 1990s, all alumnae reunions were held during Commencement weekend. However, as the number of returning alumnae grew beyond the capacity of the campus, reunions were split into Reunion I/Commencement Weekend and Reunion II, held the following weekend. "Significant" reunions (50-, 25- and 10- year, but also 2-year) and the earliest reunion classes (65-year and prior) are assigned to Reunion I; "lesser" reunions (5-, 15-, 20-, 30-year, and so on) are assigned to Reunion II. Although the AASC sponsors an Alumnae Parade (in place of Ivy Day) and a second Illumination Night, these events are far less festive as the seniors and their families have long since graduated and left campus.


Campus folklore

Smith has numerous folk tales and ghost stories surrounding the campus and historical events. One such tale holds that Sessions House is inhabited by the ghost of Lucy Hunt, who died of a broken heart after being separated from her lover, General Burgoyne. Sessions House is also supposedly haunted by a woman who, in a fit of madness, dressed her children up as native Americans, and after forgetting her actions, was frightened by them and stabbed them with her husband's saber. Upon realizing her error, she shot herself. Another tale tells of a girl who haunts the basement of one of the houses near the river, after a tunnel which led down to the pond collapsed as she was sneaking out to meet a lover.


Notable alumnae

A number of Smith alumnae have gone on to become notable in their respective fields and endeavors, including authors, Margaret Mitchell and Madeleine L'Engle, Betty Friedan, Gloria Steinem, Julia Child, Jane Yolen, Yolanda King, Sylvia Plath, Martha Southgate, Congresswoman Tammy Baldwin, Julie Nixon Eisenhower and First Ladies Barbara Bush and Nancy Reagan. In 2006, 15 Smith graduates won national fellowships for graduate study. The Alumnae Association of Smith College considers all former students to be members, whether they graduated or not, and does not generally differentiate between graduates and non-graduates when identifying Smith alumnae. The following is a list of individuals associated with Smith College through attending as a student, or serving as a member of the faculty or staff. ... For the Canadian politician see Margaret Mitchell (politician) Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell (November 8, 1900 – August 16, 1949) was the American author, who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 for her immensely successful novel, Gone with the Wind, which was published in 1936. ... Madeleine LEngle (born November 29, 1918) is an American writer best known for her childrens books, particularly the Newbery Medal-winning A Wrinkle in Time and its sequels A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet, and Many Waters. ... Betty Friedan, 1960 Betty Friedan (February 4, 1921 – February 4, 2006) was an American feminist, activist and writer, best known for starting what is commonly known as the Second Wave of feminism through the writing of her book The Feminine Mystique. ... Gloria Steinem at news conference, Womens Action Alliance, January 12, 1972 Gloria Marie Steinem (born March 25, 1934) is an American feminist icon, journalist and womens rights advocate. ... Julia Child (August 15, 1912–August 13, 2004) was a famous American cook, author, and television personality who introduced French cuisine and cooking techniques to the American mainstream through her many cookbooks and television programs. ... Jane Yolens Wizards Hall Jane Yolen (born February 11, 1939 in New York City) is an American author, and editor of almost 300 books. ... Yolanda Denise King (November 17, 1955 – May 15, 2007) was the first-born child and first daughter of Coretta Scott King and civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ... Sylvia Plath (October 27, 1932 – February 11, 1963) was an American poet, novelist, and short story writer. ... A Congressman or Congresswoman (generically, Congressperson) is a politician who is a member of a Congress. ... Tammy Suzanne Green Baldwin (born February 11, 1962), American politician, is a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1999, representing the Second Congressional District of Wisconsin (map). ... Julie Nixon Eisenhower was born July 5, 1948 in Washington, D.C. the second daughter of Richard and Pat Nixon. ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies, from left, Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ... White House Portrait Barbara Pierce Bush (born June 8, 1925) is the wife of the 41st President of the United States, George H. W. Bush, and was First Lady of the United States from 1989 to 1993. ... Nancy Davis Reagan (born Anne Frances Robbins on July 6, 1921) is the widow of former United States President Ronald Reagan and was First Lady of the United States from 1981 to 1989. ...


Smith in popular culture

  • The 1966 movie Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and the 1993 movie Malice were both filmed on the Smith campus.
  • I'm Spelling as Fast as I Can: an episode of The Simpsons where Lisa Simpson is tempted by the Siren-like representatives of the Seven Sisters (and George Plimpton), who offer a scholarship to the Sister school of her choice (and a George Plimpton hot plate) if she will throw a Spelling Bee.[17]
  • Running With Scissors: This memoir by Augusten Burroughs details how the author and his foster-sister, Natalie, used to take walks on the campus.
  • Sex and the City: The character Charlotte York is a Smith alum, which she mentions in the Season One episode "Valley of the Twenty-Something Guys."
  • Cristina Yang, the intern played by Sandra Oh on "Grey's Anatomy", graduated from Smith College with degrees in French Literature and Chemistry.
  • Ainsley Hayes (played by Emily Procter), the conservative lawyer hired to work in the White House Counsel's Office on The West Wing, graduated from Smith.
  • The webcomic Questionable Content mentions Smith College as the place where one of the main characters, Marten, is employed as library staff, and one of the minor characters, Ellen, studies marine biology. Jeph Jacques, the author, went to Hampshire College, one of the neighboring schools.
  • The webcomic Minimalist Stick Figure Theatre is set in the town of Northampton, and features multiple female characters who are students of Smith College.[18]
  • In an episode of Mad About You Paul's sister and her girlfriend are referred to as "The Fighting Lesbians." Paul (Paul Reiser) replies, "No, that would be the name of the Smith College Ice Hockey Team."
  • The fictional Catamount College in the novella Beasts by Joyce Carol Oates is based on Smith College.
  • Emily Gilmore in the show Gilmore Girls went to Smith and majored in History.
  • Itty Bitty Titty Committee's Sadie (played by Nicole Vicius) attended Smith.

Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a play by Edward Albee that opened on Broadway at the Billy Rose Theater on October 13, 1962. ... Malice is a 1993 film written by Aaron Sorkin, Jonas McCord and Scott Frank. ... Im Spelling as Fast as I Can is the twelfth episode of The Simpsons fourteenth season. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Lisa Marie Simpson is a character in the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Yeardley Smith; Lisa is the only character Smith voices on a regular basis. ... The Seven Sisters is the name given in 1927 to seven liberal arts womens colleges in the Northern United States. ... George Ames Plimpton (March 18, 1927 – September 25, 2003) was an American journalist, writer, editor, and actor. ... Running with Scissors is the tenth album by song parodist Weird Al Yankovic, released in 1999. ... Augusten Xon Burroughs (born Christopher Robison on October 23, 1965 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is an American writer noted for his New York Times best-selling memoir Running with Scissors (2002), which spawned a feature film of the same name written and directed by Ryan Murphy and starring Joseph Cross as... Sex and the City is a popular American cable television program. ... Emily Mallory Procter (born October 8, 1968 in Raleigh, North Carolina) is an American actress best known for her roles of Ainsley Hayes in The West Wing and Calleigh Duquesne in CSI: Miami. ... The West Wing is an American television serial drama created by Aaron Sorkin that was originally broadcast from 1999 to 2006. ... Questionable Content (abbreviated QC or Q.C.) is a slice-of-life webcomic written and drawn by Jeph Jacques. ... Mad About You was an American sitcom that aired on NBC from September 23, 1992 to May 24, 1999. ... Paul Reiser (March 30, 1957 – March 19, 2007) was an American actor, author and stand-up comedian, best known for his role in Mad About You. ... Beasts is a novella by Joyce Carol Oates and was originally published in 2002. ... Joyce Carol Oates (born June 16, 1938) is an American author and the Roger S. Berlind 52 Professor in the Humanities with the Program in Creative Writing at Princeton University, where she has taught since 1978 ([1]). She serves as associate editor for the Ontario Review, a literary magazine, and... Gilmore Girls is an American television drama/comedy that began on October 5, 2000 and aired its final episode on May 15, 2007. ...

Notes

  1. ^ "Billionaire's Club", Smith Alumnae Quarterly, Spring 2006, p11.
  2. ^ a b c Just the Facts
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ http://www.smith.edu/swg/home.html]
  5. ^ [2]
  6. ^ [3]
  7. ^ http://www.smith.edu/about_justthefacts.php
  8. ^ http://www.massnews.com/2004_editions/05_may/051004_marshall_goes_to_smith_college.htm]
  9. ^ [4]
  10. ^ [5]
  11. ^ [6]
  12. ^ [7]
  13. ^ http://www.gaycitynews.com/gcn.356/lesbianrapecharged.html]
  14. ^ [8]
  15. ^ [9]
  16. ^ http://backissues.saqonline.smith.edu/aarticle.epl?articleid=102]
  17. ^ [10]
  18. ^ [11]

References

  • Horowitz, Helen Lefkowitz. Alma Mater: Design and Experience in the Women's Colleges from Their Nineteenth-Century Beginnings to the 1930s, Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1993 (2nd edition).

Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz is the Sydenham Clark Parsons Professor of History at Smith College. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Smith College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2024 words)
Smith is also a member of the Five Colleges consortium, which allows its students to attend classes at four other Pioneer Valley institutions: Mount Holyoke College, Amherst College, Hampshire College, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst.
The college was established in 1871 by a bequest of Sophia Smith.
Smith College is the first and only women's college in the United States to grant its own undergraduate degrees in engineering.
Smith College Online Applications (1848 words)
Smith College is committed to maintaining a diverse community in an atmosphere of mutual respect and appreciation of differences.
Smith College does not discriminate in its educational and employment policies on the bases of race, color, creed, religion, national/ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, or with regard to the bases outlined in the Veterans Readjustment Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act.
Smith's admission policies and practices are guided by the same principle, concerning women applying to the undergraduate program and all applicants to the graduate programs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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