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Encyclopedia > Smeg (vulgarism)

Smeg is a mild vulgarism. Grant Naylor has stated it was not related to a medical term and was a made up swear word. Like saying fudge or shoot in place of common swear words." It greatly increased its prominence through its use as a supposedly inoffensive expletive in the British sci-fi/sit-com Red Dwarf. The word was used to replace almost every vulgar term used in the show's conversations, with the exception of the very mild. Additionally, the word itself had many variants, including "smegging" and "smeghead"; it was also used in phrases like "smeg off", "for smeg's sake", "smegging hell", "you smegging smegger", and the longest version "Oh smeg! What the smegging smeg he's smegging done!? He's smegging killed me!" The show's creators have continually claimed that they knew nothing of the word "smegma", and that "smeg" was entirely made up, sounding as it did like a generic, four-letter, single-syllable swear-word that might be used in the future (and so could be used in the programme in place of swear words that, at the time, would not usually be used in mainstream sitcoms). “Vulgar” redirects here. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... This article is about a genre of comedy. ... For the type of star, see Red dwarf. ... Smegma, a transliteration of the Greek word σμήγμα for soap, is a combination of exfoliated (shed) epithelial cells, transudated skin oils, and moisture, and can accumulate under the foreskin of males and within the vulva of females. ...


Lexicographer Tony Thorne, in his 1990 Dictionary of Contemporary Slang (ISBN 0-7475-2856-X), reports instances of "smeg" (and derivatives) being used as a term of "mild contempt and even affection" among "schoolboys, students and punks" as early as the mid-1970s — a decade or so prior to the inception of the Red Dwarf phenomenon — and claims unequivocally that the etymology of the term traces back to "smegma". A lexicographer is a person devoted to the study of lexicography, especially an author of a dictionary. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...


In the "Let's Swear" item in Bachelor Boys, the Young Ones book, the character Rick, played by Rik Mayall, calls another character "smeg face". The Young Ones was a popular British sitcom, first seen in 1982, which aired on BBC2. ... Richard Michael Rik Mayall (born 7 March 1958) is an English comedian and actor. ...

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Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Smeg (vulgarism) (161 words)
Smeg is a mild vulgarism which is conjecturally a shortened version of the word "smegma." It gained greatly increased prominence through its use as a supposedly inoffensive expletive in the British sci-fi/sit-com Red Dwarf.
The word was used to replace almost every vulgar term used in the show's conversations, with the exception of the very mild.
Additionally, the word itself had many variants, including "smegging" and "smeghead"; it was also used in phrases like "smeg off", "for smeg's sake", and "smegging hell".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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