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Karma is a concept in Hinduism, based on the Vedas and Upanishads, which explains causality through a system where beneficial events are derived from past beneficial actions and harmful events from past harmful actions, creating a system of actions and reactions throughout a persons reincarnated lives. ... A puja as performed in Ujjain during the Monsoon on the banks of the overflooding river Shipra. ... Maya (illusion) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Illustration depicting the transmigration of the soul. ... Dharma (Sanskrit धर्म) or Dhamma (Pāli) means Natural Law or Reality, and with respect to its significance for spirituality and religion might be considered the Way of the Higher Truths. ... Vedanta (Devanagari: , ) is a school of philosophy within Hinduism. ... A woman practising hatha yoga in the water wile swimming and drowning it is funny to watch Yoga (Devanagari: योग) is a family of ancient spiritual practices originating in India. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Ama (Ayurveda). ... yugas (Devnāgari: युग) In Hindu philosophy the cycle of evolution of life is divided into four yugs (epochs or eras): Satya Yuga or Krita Yuga Treta Yuga Dvapara Yuga Kali Yuga // The spiritual states of civilization in each yuga In Hindu tradition, the world goes through a continuous cycle of... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Vegetarianism For plant-eating, non-human animals, see Herbivore. ... Bhakti - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Hindu scripture is overwhelmingly written in Sanskrit. ... The Upanishads (उपनिषद्, Upanişad) are part of the Hindu Shruti scriptures which primarily discuss meditation and philosophy and are seen as religious instructions by most schools of Hinduism. ... 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Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada Adi Shankara Amritanandamayi Baba Lokenath Brahmachari Bhakti Vaibhava Puri Maharaj Bhagawan Nityananda Bhagwan Swaminarayan Chinmayananda Gurumayi Chidvilasananda Lahiri Mahasaya Madhvacharya Mahavatar Babaji Mother Meera Muktananda Narayana Guru Nimbarka Nisargadatta Maharaj Raghavendra Swami Ramakrishna... The Gopuram of temples, in south India, are adorned with colourful icons depicting a particular story surrounding the temples deity. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... In Tibet, many Buddhists carve mantras into rocks as a form of devotion. ... Glossary of terms in Hinduism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Nataraja is one of the most famous images of Lord Shiva Murtis (singular Murti, also spelled Murthi or Murthy) refers to deities or images used by Hindus and also by some Mahayana Buddhists during worship as points of devotional and meditational focus. ... 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Smartism[1], (or Smarta Sampradaya, Smarta Tradition, as termed in Sanskrit), is a denomination of the Hindu religion. The term Smarta refers to adherents who follow the Vedas and Shastras. They mainly follow the Advaita Vedanta philosophy of Adi Shankara. But there have been instances when they have advocated or followed other philosophies. In Hinduism, a Sampradaya is a tradition serving as a spiritual channel and encompassing a common philosophy embraced by many schools, groups, or guru lineages (called parampara). ... The Sanskrit language ( , ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, and one of the 22 official languages of India. ... A religious denomination, (also simply denomination) is a large, long-established subgroup within a religion that has existed for many years. ... Hinduism (Sanskrit: , , also known as , ) is a religion that originated on the Indian subcontinent. ... The Vedas (Sanskrit: वेद)are the main scriptural texts of Hinduism, also known as the Sanatana Dharma, and are a large corpus of texts originating in Ancient India. ... Shastra is a Sanskrit word used to denote education/knowledge in a general sense. ... Advaita Vedanta (IAST ; Devanagari ; IPA ) is a sub-school of the Vedānta (literally, end or the goal of the Vedas, Sanskrit) school of Hindu philosophy, the other major sub-schools being Dvaita and . ... Adi Shankara with the Four Disciples Adi Shankara (Åšankara, Shri Shankaracharya, Adhi Shankaracharya, Ä€di Åšhankarācārya; the first Shankara in his lineage), reverentially called Bhagavatpada Acharya (the teacher at the feet of the Lord) (approximately 8th century, but see below) was the most famous advaita philosopher, who had a...


In Sanskrit, Smārta means "relating to memory, recorded in or based on the Smrti, based on tradition, prescribed or sanctioned by traditional law or usage, (etc)", from the root smr ("remember"). Smārta is a vriddhi derivation of Smriti just as Śrauta is a vriddhi derivation of Śruti. The Sanskrit language ( , ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, and one of the 22 official languages of India. ... Smriti (what is fit/deserves to be remembered) refers to a canon of Hindu religious scripture. ... The root is the primary lexical unit of a word, which carries the most significant aspects of semantic content and cannot be reduced into smaller constituents. ... Vrddhi is a Sanskrit word meaning growth (cognate to English weird, Old English wyrd). ... Smriti (Sanskrit स्मॄति, that which is remembered) refers to a specific canon of Hindu religious scripture. ... Åšrauta refers to the tradition of the Åšruti in Vaidika Dharma. ... The Å›ruti (Sanskrit thing heard, sound) is the smallest interval of the tuning system of Indian classical music. ...

Contents

Salient features of Smartism

Smartas are followers and propagators of Smriti or religious texts derived from Vedic scriptures. It is from this that the name smarta is derived. This term is used with respect to a certain specialized category of Brahmins. It was Adi Shankaracharya who brought all the Vedic communities together. He removed the un-Vedic aspects that had crept into them. He said that any of the different Hindu gods could be worshipped, according to the prescriptions given in the smriti texts. He established that worship of various deities are compatible with Vedas and is not contradictory, since all are different manifestations of Brahman. His ideas were accepted as he succeeding in convincing brahmins of his day, that this is exactly what was indicated by the Vedas. Smriti (Sanskrit स्मॄति, that which is remembered) refers to a specific canon of Hindu religious scripture. ... The religion of the Vedic civilization is the predecessor of classical Hinduism, usually included in the term. ... Sri Adi Sankara Adi Shankaracharya or Adi Shankara (the first Shankara in his lineage), reverentially called Bhagavatpada Acharya (the teacher at the feet of Lord), Shankara (approximately 509- 477 BC (though some claim 788-820 CE)) was the most famous Advaita philosopher who had a profound influence on the growth... The Vedas (Sanskrit: वेद)are the main scriptural texts of Hinduism, also known as the Sanatana Dharma, and are a large corpus of texts originating in Ancient India. ...


Advaita Vedanta

Main article: Advaita Vedanta

God, according to Smartas who happen to follow Advaita philosophy, is both Saguna and Nirguna. As a Nirguna he is pure consciousness dissociated from matter. He (the gender itself is meaningless here) has no attributes, and has no form. As a saguna, there is quality that can be attributed. He is infinite and thus can have a multitude of attributes. Accordingly, the scriptures hold that Vishnu and Shiva are ultimately the same. The Smarta theologians have cited many references to support this point. For example, they interpret verses in both the Shri Rudram, the most sacred mantra in Shaivism, and the Vishnu Sahasranama, one of the most sacred prayers in Vaishnavism, to show this unity. Vishnu Purana carries a story about how Maha Vishnu becomes Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva. In other words, these forms and names are just different manifestations of Nirguna Brahman- the Ultimate Reality. Advaita Vedanta (IAST ; Devanagari ; IPA ) is a sub-school of the Vedānta (literally, end or the goal of the Vedas, Sanskrit) school of Hindu philosophy, the other major sub-schools being Dvaita and . ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari , with honorific Shri Vishnu; , ), (also frequently referred to as Narayana) is the most popularly worshipped form of God in Hinduism [1]. Within the Vaishnava tradition he is viewed as the Ultimate Reality or Supreme God (similarly to Shiva within Shaivism). ... Shiva (English IPA: Sanskrit: शिव; Hindi: शिव; Malayalam ശിവന്‍; Tamil: சிவன் (when used to distinguish lordly status), also known as Siva and written Śiva in the official IAST transliteration, pronounced as ) is a form of Ishvara or God in the later Vedic scriptures of Hinduism. ... The Shri Rudram Chamakam (TS 4. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Vishnu The Vishnu sahasranāma (literally: thousand names of Vishnu) is a list of 1,000 names for Vishnu, one of the main forms of God in Hinduism and the only Ultimate Reality for Vaishnavites (followers of Vishnu). ... Maha-Vishnu depicted as resting on the causal ocean, with countless universes emanating from his skin pores. ... The Vishnu Purana is one of the oldest of the Puranas (dating to maybe the 5th century), containing some 23,000 shlokas, presented as a dialogue between Parasara with his disciple Maitreya. ... Macha, a cat like NPC in . ... Brahma (written Brahmā in IAST) (Devanagari ब्रह्मा, pronounced as ) is the Hindu God (deva) of creation, and one of the Hindu Trinity - Trimurti, the others being Vishnu and Shiva. ...


One great advaita scholar, Sri Chandrasekhara Bharati (1892 - 1954), commentating on this, said. "you cannot see the feet of the Lord, why do you waste your time debating about the nature of His face?" [2] His Holiness Jagadguru Sri Chandrasekhara Bharathi Mahaswamigal, a world-renowned Jivanmukta, adorned the Dhakshinamnaya Sringeri Sharada Peetham as its 34th pontiff. ...


It is most essential for Smarta Brahmins to specialize in the Karma Kanda of the Vedas and associated rituals diligently, and to teach the subsequent generations. This is the only reason that these families continue to be called Smartas. The Vedas (Sanskrit: वेद)are the main scriptural texts of Hinduism, also known as the Sanatana Dharma, and are a large corpus of texts originating in Ancient India. ...


Shanmata and influence on contemporary Hinduism

Adi Shankara propagated the tradition of Shanmata (Sanskrit, meaning Six Opinions). In this six major deities are worshipped. This is based on the belief in the essential sameness of all deities, the unity of Godhead, and their conceptualization of the myriad deities of India as various manifestations of the one divine power, Brahman. Smartas accept and worship the six manifestations of God, (Ganesha, Shiva, Shakti, Vishnu, Surya and Skanda) and the choice of the nature of God is up to the individual worshipper since different manifestations of God are held to be equivalent. Many Hindus, who may not understand or follow Advaita philosophy, in contemporary Hinduism, invariably follow the Shanmata belief worshiping many forms of God. One commentator, noting the influence of the Smarta tradition, remarked that although many Hindus may not strictly identify themselves as Smartas but, by adhering to Advaita Vedanta as a foundation for non-sectarianism, are indirect followers [2]. Additionally, many of the Hindu teachers of the modern era such as Ramakrishna, with the notable exception of A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, the founder of the Hare Krishna movement, all had teachings that were in accord with this tradition. The Smarta view dominates the view of Hinduism in the West. Smartas believe that Brahman is essentially attribute-less (nirguna), all attributes (gunas) equally belong to It, within empirical reality[3]. Adi Shankara with the Four Disciples Adi Shankara (Åšankara, Shri Shankaracharya, Adhi Shankaracharya, Ä€di Åšhankarācārya; the first Shankara in his lineage), reverentially called Bhagavatpada Acharya (the teacher at the feet of the Lord) (approximately 8th century, but see below) was the most famous advaita philosopher, who had a... Shanmata (IAST ) is the system of worship founded by Adi Shankara, the 8th century CE Hindu philosopher. ... The Sanskrit language ( , ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, and one of the 22 official languages of India. ... This list of deities aims at giving information about deities in the different religions, cultures and mythologies of the world. ... Oneness is a spiritual term referring to the experience of the absence of egoic identity boundaries, and, according to some traditions, the realization of the awareness of the absolute interconnectedness of all matter and thought in space-time, or ones ultimate identity with God (see Tat Tvam Asi). ... In Christianity, the Godhead is a unit consisting of God the Father, Jesus Christ (the Son), and the Holy Spirit. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Brahman (Devanagari: ब्रह्म ) in the Vedantic schools of Hindu philosophy, is the signifying name given to the concept of the unchanging, infinite, immanent and transcendent reality of all things in this universe. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... In Hinduism, Ganesha (Sanskrit: गणेश or श्रीगणेश ( ) (when used to distinguish lordly status) (or lord of the hosts, also spelled as Ganesa and Ganesh, often also referred to as Ganapati) is one of the most well-known and venerated representations of God. ... Shiva (English IPA: Sanskrit: शिव; Hindi: शिव; Malayalam ശിവന്‍; Tamil: சிவன் (when used to distinguish lordly status), also known as Siva and written Åšiva in the official IAST transliteration, pronounced as ) is a form of Ishvara or God in the later Vedic scriptures of Hinduism. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari , with honorific Shri Vishnu; , ), (also frequently referred to as Narayana) is the most popularly worshipped form of God in Hinduism [1]. Within the Vaishnava tradition he is viewed as the Ultimate Reality or Supreme God (similarly to Shiva within Shaivism). ... This article is in need of attention. ... In Hinduism, Kartikeya (also Murugan, Subrahmanya, Skanda, Kumaran, Swaminanda) is a deity born out of a magical spark created by Shiva. ... Advaita Vedanta (IAST ; Devanagari ; IPA ) is a sub-school of the Vedānta (literally, end or the goal of the Vedas, Sanskrit) school of Hindu philosophy, the other major sub-schools being Dvaita and . ... Ramakrishna Paramahamsa (Bangla: রামকৃষ্ণ পরমহংস), born Gadadhar Chattopadhyay (Bangla: গদাধর চট্টোপাধ্যায়) , (February 18, 1836 - August 16, 1886) was one of the most important Hindu religious leaders, and is deeply revered by millions of Hindus and non-Hindus to this date as a messenger of God. ... A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada (September 1, 1896–November 14, 1977) was born Abhay Charan De, in Kolkata, West Bengal. ... Hinduism (Sanskrit: , , also known as , ) is a religion that originated on the Indian subcontinent. ... Brahman (Devanagari: ब्रह्म ) in the Vedantic schools of Hindu philosophy, is the signifying name given to the concept of the unchanging, infinite, immanent and transcendent reality of all things in this universe. ... Nirguna Brahman, stresses the Ultimate Truth which exists and pervades through the Universe. ... The Sanskrit word guna (guṇa) has the basic meaning of string or a single thread or strand of a cord or twine. In more abstract uses, it may mean a subdivision, species, kind, and generally quality. In Classical literature In Classical literature (e. ...


Comparison with other Hindu denominations

By contrast, a Vaishnavite considers Vishnu to be the true God who is worthy of worship and other forms as his subordinates. See for example, an illustration of the Vaishnavite view of Vishnu as the one true God, at this link. Accordingly, Vaishnavites, for example, believe that only Vishnu can grant the ultimate salvation for mankind, moksha. See for example, this link. Similarly, many Shaivites also hold similar beliefs about Lord Shiva, as illustrated here and here. Moksha - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


Notably, Shakti is worshipped to reach Shiva, whom for Shaktas is the impersonal Absolute. In Shaktism, emphasis is given to the feminine manifest through which the male unmanifested, Lord Shiva, is realized. Additionally, Shaivites and Vaishnavites often regard Surya as an aspect of Shiva and Vishnu, respectively. For example, the sun is called Surya Narayana by Vaishnavites. In Saivite theology, the sun is said to be one of eight forms of Shiva, the Astamurti. Additionally, Ganesh and Skanda for them, would be aspects of Shakti and Shiva, respectively. According to smartism, most Hindus worship Saguna Brahman as Vishnu or Shiva. The Absolute is the totality of things, all that is, whether it has been discovered or not. ... Shaktism is a denomination of Hinduism that worships Shakti, or Devi -- the Hindu name for the Great Mother -- in all of her forms whilst not rejecting the importance of masculine and neuter divinity. ... Saguna Brahma, in Hindu philosophy, is God or Supreme Consciousness with gunas (qualities or attributes). ...


Smarta practices

Daily routine

The Smartas hold practice of Dharma more important than beliefs. This is a distinct feature of the Dharmic religions. The practices include mainly Yajnas. The daily routine[4] includes performing Dharma (Sanskrit धर्म) or Dhamma (Pāli) means Natural Law or Reality, and with respect to its significance for spirituality and religion might be considered the Way of the Higher Truths. ... map showing the prevalence of Dharmic (yellow) and Abrahamic (purple) religions in each country. ... In Hinduism, Yajna (यज्ञ IAST , also anglicized as Yagna or Yagya) is a Vedic ritual of sacrifice (Monier-Williams gives the meanings worship, prayer, praise; offering, oblation, sacrifice), performed to please the Devas, or sometimes to the Supreme Spirit Brahman. ...

The last two named Yajnas are performed in only a few households today. This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Japa, or Japam, is a spiritual discipline in which a devotee repeats a mantra or the name of the God. ... A puja as performed in Ujjain during the Monsoon on the banks of the overflooding river Shipra. ... Aupasana is a yajna performed on a daily basis by Hindus who have been initiated during marriage for this. ... The Agnihotra is a Hindu religious ritual, performed at dawn. ... In Hinduism, Yajna (यज्ञ IAST , also anglicized as Yagna or Yagya) is a Vedic ritual of sacrifice (Monier-Williams gives the meanings worship, prayer, praise; offering, oblation, sacrifice), performed to please the Devas, or sometimes to the Supreme Spirit Brahman. ...


Brahmacharis perform: Brahmachari is a sacred word in India. ...

instead of Agnihotra or Aupasana. Agnikaryam is the Yajna performed in a loukika agni (worldly fire) by brahmacharis (celibate bachelors). ... The Agnihotra is a Hindu religious ritual, performed at dawn. ... Aupasana is a yajna performed on a daily basis by Hindus who have been initiated during marriage for this. ...


The other rituals followed include Amavasya tarpanam and Shraddha. Amavasya - A Hindu Custom Amavasya is nothing but the no-moon day. ... Shraddha are the funeral rites and funeral offerings for the dead among the Hindus. ...

See also: Nitya karma and Kaamya karma

Nitya karma refers to those karmas (or rituals) which have to be performed daily by Hindus. ... Kaamya karmas refer to those Karmas (or rituals) in Hinduism which are performed with a specific objective in view. ...

Panchayatana Puja

Most Smartas worship at least one of the following Gods: Shiva, Vishnu, Ganesha, Surya, Durga, and/or Skanda. Shiva (English IPA: Sanskrit: शिव; Hindi: शिव; Malayalam ശിവന്‍; Tamil: சிவன் (when used to distinguish lordly status), also known as Siva and written Åšiva in the official IAST transliteration, pronounced as ) is a form of Ishvara or God in the later Vedic scriptures of Hinduism. ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari , with honorific Shri Vishnu; , ), (also frequently referred to as Narayana) is the most popularly worshipped form of God in Hinduism [1]. Within the Vaishnava tradition he is viewed as the Ultimate Reality or Supreme God (similarly to Shiva within Shaivism). ... In Hinduism, Ganesha (Sanskrit: गणेश or श्रीगणेश ( ) (when used to distinguish lordly status) (or lord of the hosts, also spelled as Ganesa and Ganesh, often also referred to as Ganapati) is one of the most well-known and venerated representations of God. ... This article is in need of attention. ... In Hinduism, Durga (Sanskrit: , Bengali: ) is a form of Devi, the supreme goddess, also identified with Parvati. ... In Hinduism, Kartikeya (also Murugan, Subrahmanya, Skanda, Kumaran, Swaminanda) is a deity born out of a magical spark created by Shiva. ...


Adi Shankaracharya recommended the Smartas to follow Panchayatana worship. This puja or worship includes the worship of the first five deities mentioned above. (In Tamil Nadu Skanda is also worshipped). In this form of worship, the favorite family deity is placed in the center. All other Gods were placed around this central God and worshipped. Panchayatana puja (IAST ) is the system of worship in the Smarta sampradaya of Hinduism. ... A puja as performed in Ujjain during the Monsoon on the banks of the overflooding river Shipra. ...


There are different sets of rules for each stage of an individual's life. The stages of life prescribed in the Vedic scriptures are Brahmacharya Ashrama, Grihastha Ashrama, Vanaprastha Ashrama and Sannyasa Ashrama. Brahmacharya (pronounced /brʌmatʃərɪə/) is a Sanskrit word. ... This article is about the Hindu religion; for other meanings of the word, see Hindu (disambiguation). ... Pronunciation Gri as the Gru in Gruel Has as the Hus in Husk tha as in thaw Word Root This is a Sanskrit word. ... A vanaprastha (from Sanskrit vana, forest, and prus, dwelling) is a person who is living in the forest as a hermit after partially giving up material desires. ... Samnyasa (IAST , also spelled , Sannyasa) in Hinduism symbolizes the conception of the life of a monk, a person is now integrated into the spiritual world after wholly giving up material life. ...


Other practices

All Smartas who take up the Brahmacharya Ashrama by undergoing Upanayana, are expected to learn the Vedas and Shastras besides leading a celibate Life. They are expected to eat satvik food and adhere to other rules of the Smriti tradition of their respective families. Brahmacharya (pronounced /brÊŒmatʃərɪə/) is a Sanskrit word. ... This article is about the Hindu religion; for other meanings of the word, see Hindu (disambiguation). ... Upanayana is a Hindu samskara for children of the three highest castes. ... The Vedas (Sanskrit: वेद)are the main scriptural texts of Hinduism, also known as the Sanatana Dharma, and are a large corpus of texts originating in Ancient India. ... Shastra is a Sanskrit word used to denote education/knowledge in a general sense. ... Smriti (Sanskrit स्मॄति, that which is remembered) refers to a specific canon of Hindu religious scripture. ...


Smartas are recommended to follow the Brahma form of Vedic marriage (a type of arranged marriage). The marriage ceremony is based on Vedic prescriptions. Women acquire the traditions of her husband's family.


The Shrauta Tradition

Main article: Shrauta

Traditionally the Smartas also follow the Shrauta tradition. The Shrauta tradition emphasises on performance of Yajnas which are described in the Vedas. The number of Smartas who follow Shrauta tradition is quite less today. However in the southern states the Shrauta tradition is held to be strong. Shruti (what is heard) is a canon of Hindu scriptures. ... Shruti (what is heard) is a canon of Hindu scriptures. ... In Hinduism, Yajna (यज्ञ IAST , also anglicized as Yagna or Yagya) is a Vedic ritual of sacrifice (Monier-Williams gives the meanings worship, prayer, praise; offering, oblation, sacrifice), performed to please the Devas, or sometimes to the Supreme Spirit Brahman. ... The Vedas (Sanskrit: वेद)are the main scriptural texts of Hinduism, also known as the Sanatana Dharma, and are a large corpus of texts originating in Ancient India. ...


Religious institutions

The few of the traditional Smarta religious institutions are:

Some modern Hindu missions that can be said to follow Smarta tradition are: Sri Sringeri Sharada Peetham is one of the important Hindu Advaita maṭhas. ... Jyotirmath, also called Jyotir Math and Joshimath, is a place in Uttaranchal, India in the Himalayas. ... The Govardhana matha is located in the city of Puri in Orissa state (India), and is associated with the Jagannath temple. ... The Dwaraka Pītha or Dwaraka matha is situated in the coastal city of Dwaraka, Gujarat — which itself is a great site of pilgrimage for the Hindus, dedicated to Krishna. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Chinmaya Mission Chinmaya Mission was founded in 1953 by the devotees of Swami Chinmayananda. ... Divine Life Society // Founder Swami Sivananda Saraswati Year & place of founding At Rishikesh in 1936, India Aims & ideals To Disseminate Spiritual Knowledge By publication of books, pamphlets and magazines dealing with ancient, oriental and occidental philosophy, religion and medicine in the modern scientific manner, and their distribution on such terms...

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Advaita Vedanta

The Smarta worldview is influenced by Advaita philosophy. Adi Shankaracharya, who founded the Advaita Mathas in Sringeri (Sharada Pītha), Dvaraka (Dwaraka Pītha), Puri (Govardhana Pītha) and Badrinath (Jyotirmaţha Pītha)kama, is considered to be the fountainhead of the Smarta tradition as it stands today. All the Jagadgurus (heads) of the Advaita Mathas (also known as Shankara Mathas) are Smartas. Advaita Vedanta (IAST ; Devanagari ; IPA ) is a sub-school of the Vedānta (literally, end or the goal of the Vedas, Sanskrit) school of Hindu philosophy, the other major sub-schools being Dvaita and . ... Adi Shankara with the Four Disciples Adi Shankara (Åšankara, Shri Shankaracharya, Adhi Shankaracharya, Ä€di Åšhankarācārya; the first Shankara in his lineage), reverentially called Bhagavatpada Acharya (the teacher at the feet of the Lord) (approximately 8th century, but see below) was the most famous advaita philosopher, who had a... A maÅ£ha (also written math, matha or mutt) is a term for monastic and similar religious establishments of the Hindu and Jain traditions. ... Sringeri is the site of the first matha established by the Adi Sankaracharya, the 8th century Hindu reformer and exponent of the Advaita Vedanta philosophy. ... Sri Sringeri Sharada Peetham is one of the important Hindu Advaita maá¹­has. ... Dwarka   is a city and a municipality in Jamnagar district in the state of Gujarat, India. ... The Dwaraka PÄ«tha or Dwaraka matha is situated in the coastal city of Dwaraka, Gujarat — which itself is a great site of pilgrimage for the Hindus, dedicated to Krishna. ... Puri can mean: Puri, a city in the Indian state of Orissa, which is famous for the Jagannath temple and the serene beaches located there . ... The Govardhana matha is located in the city of Puri in Orissa state (India), and is associated with the Jagannath temple. ... ... Jyotirmath, also called Jyotir Math and Joshimath, is a place in Uttaranchal, India in the Himalayas. ...


Prominent advaitins

Some of the prominent Smarta Advaitins are:

Some of the later advaitins include: Adi Shankara with the Four Disciples Adi Shankara (Śankara, Shri Shankaracharya, Adhi Shankaracharya, Ādi Śhankarācārya; the first Shankara in his lineage), reverentially called Bhagavatpada Acharya (the teacher at the feet of the Lord) (approximately 8th century, but see below) was the most famous advaita philosopher, who had a... Hastamalakacharya (IAST ) (c. ... Image:.jpg The debate with the master Sureśvara (c. ... Padmapāda (fl. ... Totakacharya (IAST ) (c. ...

See also: Jagadguru of Sringeri Sharada Peetham

Madhusūdana Sarasvatī (c. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... Vachaspati Misra was a philosopher of the Indian Nyaya school from the 8th-9th century AD, who worked on problems of perception, epistemology and language (as they relate to religion). ... The Sage of Kanchi H.H. Jagadguru Shankaracharya Shri Chandrashekarendra Saraswati Paramacharya Swamigal (1894–1994) or the Sage of Kanchi was considered by believers to have been one of the greatest saints of Bharata Varsha. ... Jagadguru of Sringeri Sharada Peetham is the head presiding over the Sringeri Sharada Peetham. ...

Carnatic music

The Music Trinity (Sangeetha Mummoorthigal, in Tamil) are Smartas, Sri Muthuswamy Dikshitar, Sri Shyama Shastry, Sri Tyagaraja are Smartas. The famous song on Krishna, alaipayude is by Utthukadu Sri Venkatasubba Iyer, a Smarta. Many major carnatic musicians including Semmangudi Srinivassa Iyer, Lalgudi Jayaraman, Violin maestro Kunnakudi, Veena Balachandar, Balamuralikrishna, Maharajapuram Santhanam, D.K Pattamal and Mandolin Srinivas are Smartas. Tamil (தமிழ் ) is a classical language and one of the major languages of the Dravidian language family. ... Muttusvami Dikshitar is one of the Carnatic music composer trinity. ... Sri Tyagaraja (శ్రీ త్యాగరాజ) (17??-1848), an ardent devotee of Sri Ramachandra, was one of the most important composers of Carnatic music. ... Krishna with Radharani, 18th C Rajasthani painting Krishna (कृष्ण in Devanagari, in IAST ), according to various Hindu traditions, is the eighth avatar of Vishnu. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Woman playing the Veena. ... Carved and round backed mandolins (front) A mandolin is a small, plucked, stringed musical instrument, descended from the mandora. ...


Other philosophies

  • Sreekanta was the founder of Siva Advaita.
  • Tyagaraja, a Smarta, was a Bhakti Saint and musical genius who inspired Hindus of many different sects. Deeply immersed in Bhakti, this devotee of Lord Rama, was acceptable to even non Smartas. In his compositions, the Saint is a simple and humble Bhakta. In one of his compositions he asks which one is better "Dvaita or Advaita?". He leaves the question open. He belonged to that category of saints who believe in Bhakti as the path to God. In this sense his teachings were suitable to people of all the three major south Indian sects- Smartas, Sri Vaishanavas and Madhvas. His music was said to be so enchanting that even people of all sects, castes and creeds flocked to listen to him.
  • The modern philosopher Jiddu Krishnamurti, who was born in a Smarta Muluknadu family, refused to be tied down by his own tradition. Initially influenced by theosophy, he later moved away from even this. He believed in independently evaluating all spiritual questions and refusing to be tied down by any sect or tradition.
  • Besides these there were a number of other Non Advaitic Scholars among Smartas prior to Shankaracharya. Ramanujacharya, Madhavacharya, Vallabhacharya were only some of the Smartas who broke away from the parent group and founded their own sects. The philosophy of the new sects was directed against the teachings of Advaita philosophy. The new sects distinguished themselves and separated from Smartas. These new groups followed different philosophies like Dvaita (dualism) and Vishishtadvaita (qualified monism) and also changed their rituals. Appaiah Deekshita, a Smarta Iyer, followed Sreekanta's Sivadvaita philosophy in his early days. This philosophy was similar to Vishishtadvaita of the Sri Vaishnavas. Siva Advaita, however, considers Shiva to be the supreme God. Communities like the Sri Vaishnavas, Madhvas and Veera Saivas are some of the other Hindu sects which have branched/broken away from the Smarta stream. A distinctive feature of these communities is the fact that none of them subscribe to Advaita. Some of these sects have also accepted people who came from outside the Smarta Brahmin fold; indeed, the Veera Saiva community includes non-Brahmins. Another feature of these sects is that they follow rituals recommended by their lineage of Gurus, which are different from the rituals of the Smartas.

Sri Tyagaraja (శ్రీ త్యాగరాజ) (17??-1848), an ardent devotee of Sri Ramachandra, was one of the most important composers of Carnatic music. ... Dvaita, a school of Vedanta (the most widespread Hindu philosophy) founded by Shri Madhvacharya, stresses a strict distinction between God and souls. ... Advaita Vedanta is probably the best known of all Vedanta schools of Hinduism, the others being Dvaita and Vishishtadvaita. ... Jiddu Krishnamurti or J. Krishnamurti (May 11, 1895–February 17, 1986), was born in Madanapalle, India and discovered, in 1909, as a teenager by C.W. Leadbeater on the private beach at the Theosophical headquarters at Adyar in Chennai, India. ... Mulukanadu Brahmins are a sub-sect of Telugu speaking Vaidiki Smartha Brahmins. ... Possible emblem of some Theosophical Society Theosophy, literally knowledge of the divine, designates several bodies of ideas. ... Sri Ramanuja Acharya (1017 - 1137 AD) was an Indian philosopher and is recognized as the most important saint of Sri Vaishnavism. ... It has been suggested that Vidyaranya be merged into this article or section. ... Vallabhacharya (1479 - 1531) was the founder of the Vallabha sect in Indian philosophy. ... Dvaita, a school of Vedanta (the most widespread Hindu philosophy) founded by Shri Madhvacharya, stresses a strict distinction between God and souls. ... Vishisthadvaita is a qualified monism in which God alone exists but admits plurality. ... Appayya Dikshidar (1520-1593), born in Adayapalam, near Vellore, South India, a great householder in the orthodox Indian tradition, was a remarkable expositor and practitioner of the advaita school of Indian Philosophy. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Vishisthadvaita is a qualified monism in which God alone exists but admits plurality. ... Sri Vaishnava is a hindu sect,the members of which follow Vishishtadvaita. ... Virashaivism is a religious movement of Hinduism in India. ...

Scriptures followed

Smartas follow the Hindu scriptures. These include: Hindu scriptures Hindu scripture is overwhelmingly written in Sanskrit. ...


The Vedas (Rig Veda, Yajur Veda, Sama Veda and Atharva Veda). These are considered primary spiritual resources; every Brahmin family is affiliated to one or more of the Vedas. The Upanishads, which are part of the Vedas, are often mentioned separately, given their especial importance as products of past intellectual ferment. The Smritis" are religious books based on Vedas and are written by important Sages/Rishis of the past. Each of them contains recommendations and practices unique to itself. The Book an individual followed depended on his family. Thus, ritual practices sometimes varied from family to family, depending on family tradition. Some of the more common religious law books were the Manu Smriti, the Apastamba Smriti and the Bodhyayana Smriti. The Puranas contain the lore and explanations of the theology of the Vedas. They are basically a collection of sacred historical events that were passed from one generation to the next in the form of mythological stories. Smarta philosophers use the puranas to get a better understanding of Vedas, but do not consider them as completely authentic texts. However, the eighteen Puranas are revered by Smartas, just like any other Hindus. Today the Puranas are the main inspiration for many Smartas. The Vedas (Sanskrit: वेद)are the main scriptural texts of Hinduism, also known as the Sanatana Dharma, and are a large corpus of texts originating in Ancient India. ... The Rig Veda ऋग्वेद (Sanskrit ṛc praise + veda knowledge) is the earliest of the four Hindu religious scriptures known as the Vedas. ... The Yajur Veda यजुर्वेद is one of the four Hindu Vedas; it contains religious texts focussing on liturgy and ritual. ... The Sama Veda (सामवेद), or Veda of Holy Songs, is third in the usual order of enumeration of the four Vedas, the ancient core Hindu scriptures. ... The Atharva Veda is a sacred text of Hinduism, part of the four books of the Vedas. ... A Brahmin (anglicised from the Sanskrit word IAST ; Devanagari ), also known as Vipra, Dvija, Dvijottama (best of the Dvijas), (god on Earth) is a member of an upper caste within Hindu society. ... The Upanishads (उपनिषद्, Upanişad) are part of the Hindu Shruti scriptures which primarily discuss meditation and philosophy and are seen as religious instructions by most schools of Hinduism. ... The Vedas (Sanskrit: वेद)are the main scriptural texts of Hinduism, also known as the Sanatana Dharma, and are a large corpus of texts originating in Ancient India. ... In Hinduism, a Rishi ( ऋषि) is a sage and/or seer who heard (cf. ... The Manusmriti (Sanskrit मनुस्मृति), translated Laws of Manu is regarded as an important work of Hindu law and ancient Indian society. ... Purana (Sanskrit पुराण, purāṇa, meaning ancient or old) is the name of a genre (or a group of related genres) of Indian written literature (as distinct from oral literature). ... The Vedas (Sanskrit: वेद)are the main scriptural texts of Hinduism, also known as the Sanatana Dharma, and are a large corpus of texts originating in Ancient India. ...


Smartas also recite Shlokas or Stotras (devotional hymns) composed by various Hindu saints and poets. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Stotras are Hindu prayers that praise aspects of God, such as Devi, Siva, or Vishnu. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

See also: Shastras

Shastra is a Sanskrit word used to denote education/knowledge in a general sense. ...

Communities

Smarta communities of South India are:

See:Kannada brahmins
  • Andhra Pradesh
    • Vaidiki
    • Niyogi
      • Arvel Niyogi

Babburkammes are a community that mainly reside in Karnataka, as well as living in different other countries like USA, UK, Australia and New Zealand. ... The Sankethis are Smartha brahmins residing in Karnataka, they are one of the many subcastes of the Tamil Iyers [See: Iyer]. There are also some Sanketis in Tamil Nadu and Kerala. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Literally, it means the northern land, probably originating from vadaga (north) and tenkana(south) etc. ... Kota Brahmins hail from the Kundapur and surrounding areas of Udupi district in Karnataka. ... Kannada Brahmins are Brahmins whose mother-tongue is the Kannada language. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Namboothiris (Malayalam :നമ്പൂതിരി) are the Brahmins of Kerala, thought to be the most orthodox brahmins in India. ... // Introduction The Mulukanadu community is a caste of Telugu speaking Vaidiki Smartha Brahmins. ... SHIRALI Shirali is located in the southern part of North Kanara (Uttar Kannada) district of Karnataka state and is easily accessible to the Chitrapur Saraswat devotees settled in both South and North Kanara districts. ... The Saraswat Brahmins claim descent from a Brahmin caste mentioned in ancient Hindu scriptures as inhabiting the Saraswati River valley, the geographic location of which is unknown. ...

See also

Advaita Vedanta (IAST ; Devanagari ; IPA ) is a sub-school of the Vedānta (literally, end or the goal of the Vedas, Sanskrit) school of Hindu philosophy, the other major sub-schools being Dvaita and . ... Hinduism (Sanskrit: , , also known as , ) is a religion that originated on the Indian subcontinent. ... Ishta-Deva, or Ishta Devata is a term from Hinduism that means chosen Deity or revered aspect of God by a devotee and is a widely held concept in Smartism. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Smartism is a new coined term derived from the word smarta by the shaivite scholar Sivaya Subramuniyaswami[1]
  2. ^ Advaita Vedanta FAQ
  3. ^ Advaita Vedanta FAQ
  4. ^ A day in the life of a Brahmin
  5. ^ Sankethis.com
  6. ^ Namboothiri Websites Trust

Sivaya Subramuniyaswami (1927 - 2001), affectionately known as Gurudeva, was born in Oakland, California on January 5th, 1927. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
NodeWorks - Encyclopedia: Smartism (370 words)
Smartas (followers of Smartism) accept and worship all major forms of God, (Ganesha, Siva, Sakti, Vishnu, Surya and Skanda).
The Ishta-Deva concept has confused outsiders and hence made them perceive Hinduism as polytheistic as Smartas are monists, and view multiple manifestations of the one God or source of being.
Notably, Shakti is worshipped to reach Shiva, whom for Shaktas is the impersonal Absolute.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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