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Encyclopedia > Smallville (TV series)
Smallville

Intertitle
Genre Action/Adventure Sci-fi
Created by Characters:
Jerry Siegel
Joe Shuster
Developed by Alfred Gough
Miles Millar
Starring see below
Opening theme "Save Me" by Remy Zero
Composer(s) Mark Snow
Country of origin United States
Language(s) English
No. of seasons 7
No. of episodes 147 (List of episodes)
Production
Executive
producer(s)
Alfred Gough
Miles Millar
Mike Tollin
Brian Robbins
Joe Davola
Ken Horton
Greg Beeman
Location(s) British Columbia, Canada
Running time approx. 42 minutes
Broadcast
Original channel The WB (2001-2006)
The CW (2006-present)
Picture format 480i (SDTV),
1080i (HDTV)
Original run October 16, 2001 – present
Chronology
Related shows Aquaman
Birds of Prey
External links
Official website
IMDb profile
TV.com summary

Smallville is an American television series created by writer/producers Alfred Gough and Miles Millar, and was initially broadcast by The WB. After its fifth season, the WB and UPN merged to form The CW, which is the current broadcaster for the show in the United States.[1] Smallville premiered on October 16, 2001, and completed its sixth season on May 17, 2007.[2] An eighth season was officially announced by The CW on March 3, 2008.[3] It is filmed in and around Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The action genre is a class of creative works characterised by a greater emphasis on exciting action sequences than on character development or story-telling. ... Look up adventure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Jerome Jerry Siegel a. ... Joseph Joe Shuster (July 10, 1914 - July 30, 1992) was a Canadian-born comic book artist best known for co-creating the DC Comics character Superman, with writer Jerry Siegel, first published in Action Comics #1 (March 1938). ... Alfred Gough is a screenwriter and producer. ... Miles Millar is a screenwriter and producer. ... Save Me is a song by Remy Zero on their album, the The Golden Hum. ... Remy Zero is a Los Angeles based alternative rock band made up of Cinjun Tate (vocals, guitar), Shelby Tate (guitar, keyboards, vocals), Gregory Slay (drums, percussion), Cedric Lemoyne (bass guitar), and Jeffrey Cain (guitar). ... Mark Snow (born Martin Fulterman on 26 August 1946 in New York City) is a prolific composer for film and television. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The following is an episode list for the television series Smallville. ... Mike Tollin (born in Havertown, Pennsylvaniais the best town in teh world in 1956) is a movie director and producer. ... Brian Robbins (born November 22, 1963) is an American actor and producer. ... Joe Davola is TV writer and producer. ... Greg Beeman (born 1962 in Honolulu, Hawaii, United States is an American director and producer best known for his work with television servies Smallville and JAG and numerous comedy films. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... The Warner Bros. ... This is a list of television-related events in 2001. ... The year 2006 in television involved some significant events. ... “The CW” redirects here. ... The year 2006 in television involved some significant events. ... 480i is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... Standard-definition television or SDTV refers to television systems that have a lower resolution than HDTV systems. ... 1080i is a shorthand name for a category of video modes. ... High-definition television (HDTV) is a digital television broadcasting system with greater resolution than traditional television systems (NTSC, SECAM, PAL). ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Aquaman is a television pilot developed by Smallville creators Al Gough and Miles Millar for The WB Television Network, based on the DC Comics character Aquaman. ... For other meanings of the term, see Bird of prey. ... This article is about television in the United States, specifically its history, art, business and government regulation. ... Alfred Gough is a screenwriter and producer. ... Miles Millar is a screenwriter and producer. ... The Warner Bros. ... UPN (which originally stood for the United Paramount Network) was a television network in over 200 markets in the United States. ... “The CW” redirects here. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944...


The plot follows the adventures of a young Clark Kent's life in the fictional town of Smallville, Kansas, during the years before he becomes Superman. The first four seasons focused on Clark and his friends' high school years. Since season five, the show has ventured into more adult settings, with some characters attending college. Recent seasons have seen an increase in the introductions of other DC comic book superheroes and villains. For other uses, see Clark Kent (disambiguation). ... FicTioNaL is a Gaming Legend. ... This article is about Supermans adoptive home town. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... Doctor Doom, one of the most archetypal supervillains and his arch-enemies The Fantastic Four (in background). ...


Smallville inspired an Aquaman spin-off pilot, which was not picked up by The CW network, as well as promotional tie-ins with Verizon, Sprint, Toyota, Stride. In other media, the show has spawned a series of young-adult novels, a DC Comics comic book and soundtrack releases. The show broke the record for highest rated debut for The WB, with 8.4 million viewers tuning in for its pilot episode.[4] Aquaman is a television pilot developed by Smallville creators Al Gough and Miles Millar for The WB Television Network, based on the DC Comics character Aquaman. ... A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... This article or section should include material from Bell Atlantic This article or section should include material from GTE Verizon Communications (NYSE: VZ) is a local exchange telephone company formed by the merger of Bell Atlantic, a former Bell Operating Company, and GTE, which was the largest independant local exchange... Sprint Nextel Corporation (NYSE: S) is one of the largest telecommunications companies in the US. With 55 million subscribers, Sprint Nextel operates the third largest wireless telecommunications network in the United States (based on total wireless customers), behind AT&T and Verizon Wireless. ... This article is about the automaker. ... Stride is one of the many brands of chewing gum created by Cadbury-Schweppes. ... Smallville (season 1) List of Smallville episodes The pilot episode of the television series Smallville premiered on The WB on October 16, 2001. ...

Contents

Production

Development

Originally, Tollin/Robbins Productions wanted to do a show about a young Bruce Wayne. The feature film division of Warner Bros. had decided to develop an origin movie for Batman, and, because they didn't want to compete with a television series, had the television series idea nixed.[5] In 2000, Tollin/Robbins approached Peter Roth, the President of Warner Bros. Television, about developing a series based on a young Superman. That same year, Alfred Gough and Miles Millar developed a pilot based on the film Eraser. After watching the pilot, Roth approached the two men about developing a second pilot, based on the young Superman concept that was brought to him.[5] After meeting with Roth, Gough and Millar decided that they didn't want to do a series where there was lots of flying, and a cape.[5] It was here that they developed a "no tights, no flights" rule, vowing Clark would not, at any point, fly or don the suit during the run of the show.[6] Tollin/Robbins Productions is an American movie and television production company operated by Mike Tollin and Brian Robbins, the latter probably best known for his role as Eric Mardian in the 1980s TV series Head of the Class. ... For other uses, see Batman (disambiguation). ... “WB” redirects here. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Warner Bros. ... Eraser is a 1996 action movie starring Arnold Schwarzenegger and Vanessa Williams. ...


Gough and Millar wanted to strip Superman down to his "bare essence", and see the reasons behind why Clark became Superman.[5] Gough and Millar felt the fact that they were not comic book fans played into their favor. Not being familiar with the universe would allow them an unbiased approach to the series. This didn't keep them from learning about the characters; they both did research on the comics and picked and rearranged what they liked.[5] They returned and pitched their idea to both the WB and FOX in the same day.[7] A bidding war ensued between FOX and the WB, which the WB won with a commitment of 13 episodes to start.[7] FOX redirects here. ...


Roth, Gough, and Millar knew the show was going to be action oriented, but they wanted to be able to reach that "middle America iconography" that 7th Heaven had reached. To help create this atmosphere, the team decided the meteor shower that brings Clark to Earth would be the foundation for the franchise of the show. Not only does it act as the primary source behind the creation of the super powered beings that Clark must fight, but it acts as a sense of irony in Clark's life. The meteor shower would give him a life on Earth, but it would also take away the parents of the girl he loves, and start Lex Luthor down a dark path, thanks to the loss of his hair during the shower. Roth loved the conflict that was created for Clark, in forcing him to deal with the fact that his arrival is what caused all of this pain.[5] This article is about the TV program. ... A meteor shower, some of which are known as a meteor storm or meteor outburst, is a celestial event where a group of meteors are observed to radiate from one point in the sky. ...


Another problem the creators had to address was why Lex Luthor would be hanging out with a bunch of teenagers. They decided to create a sense of loneliness in the character of Lex Luthor, which they felt would require him to reach out to the teens.[5] The loneliness was echoed in Clark and Lana as well.[8] Gough and Millar wanted to provide a parallel to the Kents, so they created Lionel Luthor, Lex's father, which they saw as the "experiment in extreme parenting".[5] Gough and Millar wanted a younger Kent couple, because they felt they needed to be able to be involved in Clark's life, and help him through his journey.[8] Chloe Sullivan, another character created just for the show, was meant to be the "outsider" the show needed. Gough and Millar felt the character was necessary so someone would notice the weird happenings in Smallville.[5] She was meant to act as a "precursor to Lois Lane".[8] Chloe Ann Sullivan is a fictional character from the television series Smallville, played by Allison Mack. ...


The concept of Smallville has been described by Warner Brothers as being a reinterpretation of the Superman mythology from its roots. Recently, since the November 2004 reacquisition of Superboy by the Siegels, there has arisen contention regarding a possible copyright infringement. The dispute is over ownership of the fictional Smallville, title setting of the show, and a claimed similarity between Superboy's title character and Smallville's Clark Kent. The heirs of Jerry Siegel claim "Smallville is part of the Superboy copyright", of which the Siegels own the rights.[9] Superboy is the name of several fictional characters in the DC Universe, most of them youthful incarnations of Superman. ... Jerome Jerry Siegel a. ... The Cathach of St. ... Jerome Jerry Siegel a. ... Superboy is the name of several fictional characters in the DC Universe, most of them youthful incarnations of Superman. ...


Filming

The Cloverdale welcome sign
The Cloverdale welcome sign

The show is produced at BB Studios in Burnaby. Initially, production was going to be in Australia, but Vancouver had more of a "Middle America landscape". The city provided a site for the Kent farm, as well as doubling for Metropolis. It also provided a cheaper shooting location, and was in the same time zone as Los Angeles.[5] "Main street" Smallville is at a combination of two locations. Portions were shot in the town of Merritt, and the rest was shot in Cloverdale.[8] Cloverdale is particularly proud of being a filming site for the show; at its entrance is a sign which reads "Home of Smallville." Image File history File links Download high resolution version (480x640, 72 KB)Welcome sign for Cloverdale, British Columbia, aka downtown Smallville. Licensing This image has been (or is hereby) released into the public domain by its creator, Buchanan-Hermit. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (480x640, 72 KB)Welcome sign for Cloverdale, British Columbia, aka downtown Smallville. Licensing This image has been (or is hereby) released into the public domain by its creator, Buchanan-Hermit. ... “Burnaby” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Coordinates: , Country Province Regional District Thompson-Nicola Settled 1893 (townsite) Incorporated 1 Apr 1911 (city)   1967 (district) Government  - Mayor David Laird  - Governing body City Council  - MP Stockwell Day  - MLA Harry Lali Area  - Total 24. ... Cloverdale, famously known as the filming location for Downtown Smallville. ...


Vancouver Technical School doubled as the exterior for Smallville High, as the film makers believed Van Tech had the "mid-American largess" they wanted.[8] This kept in-line with Millar's idea that Smallville should be the epitome of "Smalltown, USA".[10] The interiors of Templeton Secondary School were used for Smallville High's interior.[11] The Kent farm is a real farm located in Aldergrove. Owned by The Andalinis, the production crew had to paint their home yellow for the show.[7] Exterior shots of Luthor Mansion were filmed at Hatley Castle in Victoria.[8] The interior shots were done at Shannon Mews, in Vancouver, which was also the set for the Dark Angel pilot and Along Came a Spider.[8] Movie house Clova Cinema, in Cloverdale, is used for exterior shots of The Talon, the show's coffee house.[12] Vancouver Technical Secondary from East Broadway Vancouver Technical Secondary School is located on the east side of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Templeton Secondary Schools exteriors. ... Population 5,000 Aldergrove is a small city in The Township of Langley. ... Hatley Castle Legacy The centrepiece of Hatley Estate is a magnificent 40-room replica of a 15th century Edwardian castle. ... This article is about the city of Victoria. ... Dark Angel is an American cyberpunk science fiction television program, created by James Cameron and Charles H. Eglee, which ran from 2000 to 2002 on the FOX network. ... This article is for the film Along Came a Spider. ...


Music

Composer Mark Snow works in tandem with producer Ken Horton to create the underscore for the show. As Mark Snow summarizes his job, "I get a locked picture on a videotape which syncs up with all my gear in the studio. I write the music, finish it up, mix it up, send it through the airwaves on the internet, and the music editor puts it in. They call up usually and say, 'Thank you, well done.' Sometimes they call and say, 'Thank you, no so well done – can you change this or that?' I say 'Sure,' make the changes and send it back." More specifically, Snow creates his music on the spot, as he watches the picture, and then tweaks his performance upon reviewing the recordings from his initial play. Most episodes feature their own soundtrack, comprised of one or more songs by musical bands. Jennifer Pyken and Madonna Wade-Reed of Daisy Music work on finding these songs for the show's soundtrack. Pyken and Wade-Reed's choices are then discussed by the producers, who decide which songs they want and organize the process of securing the licensing rights to the songs. Although Snow admits that it initially seemed odd to combine the two musical sounds on a "typical action-adventure" television show, he admits that "the producers seem to like the contrast of the modern songs and the traditional, orchestral approach to the score".[13] Mark Snow (born Martin Fulterman on 26 August 1946 in New York City) is a prolific composer for film and television. ...


The main theme to Smallville is not a score composed by Snow, who is used to composing the opening themes as well, like he did for The X-Files, but the single "Save Me" by Remy Zero. Since the show's premier, two soundtrack albums have been released. On February 25, 2003, Smallville: The Talon Mix was released featuring a selected group of artists that licensed their music to the show.[14] Following that release, on November 8, 2005, Smallville: The Metropolis Mix was released featuring another select group of artists.[15] The X-Files is an American Peabody and Emmy Award-winning science fiction television series created by Chris Carter, which first aired on September 10, 1993, and ended on May 19, 2002. ... Save Me is a song by Remy Zero on their album, the The Golden Hum. ... Remy Zero is a Los Angeles based alternative rock band made up of Cinjun Tate (vocals, guitar), Shelby Tate (guitar, keyboards, vocals), Gregory Slay (drums, percussion), Cedric Lemoyne (bass guitar), and Jeffrey Cain (guitar). ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Season overviews

See also: Powers and abilities of Superman and Kryptonite in Smallville

Season one sees the introduction of the regular cast, and storylines that regularly included a villain deriving a power from kryptonite exposure. The one-episode villains were a plot device developed by Gough and Millar. Instead of creating physical monsters, the kryptonite would enhance the personal demons of the character.[8] To prove the show was not simply about a new kryptonite monster every week, the writers attempted to craft episodes that had nothing to do with kryptonite, like "Rogue".[16] The first season primarily dealt with Clark trying to come to terms with his alien origins, and the revelation that his arrival on Earth was connected to the deaths of Lana's parents.[5] Clark develops X-ray vision this season, and, unlike his super strength and speed that he was already aware of, is forced to exercise his new ability to gain control over it.[17] The following is an episode list for the television series Smallville. ... The powers of the DC Comics character Superman have changed a great deal since his introduction in the 1930s. ... Kryptonite is a fictional element originating from a meteor shower composed of the radioactive remains of the planet Krypton. ... This article contains a complete review of the first season of the American drama action/adventure sci-fi television series Smallville. ... In fictional stories, X-ray vision has generally been portrayed as the ability to see through layers of objects at the discretion of the holder of this superpower. ...


Season two has fewer villain of the week episodes, focusing more on story arcs that affect each character and explore Clark's origins.[18] Several key plot points include Lex becoming more entangled in conflict with his father, Chloe digging into Clark's past while dealing with Lionel, Martha and Jonathan Kent's financial troubles, and Lana and Clark's vacillating relationship though they end the season apart. The main story arc, however, focuses on Clark's discovery of his Kryptonian origins.[19] The disembodied voice of Clark's biological father Jor-El is introduced, communicating to Clark via his space ship, setting the stage for plots involving the fulfillment of Clark's earthly destiny.[20] Christopher Reeve, who portrayed Superman in the 1970s and 1980s film series, appears as Dr. Virgil Swann to provide Welling's Clark with information regarding his heritage.[19] Season two saw the emergence of heat vision,[21] as well as a new form of kryptonite. Red kryptonite causes Clark to set aside moral compunctions and act out on his impulses and dark desires,[22] unlike green kryptonite, which physically weakens him and could possibly kill him if he is exposed to it for too long.[10] Season two of Smallville, an American television series, began airing on September 24, 2002. ... Jor-El is a fictional character. ... For other uses, see Destiny (disambiguation). ... Christopher DOlier Reeve[1] (September 25, 1952 – October 10, 2004) was an American actor, director, producer, and writer. ... Heat vision is a superhuman power, best known as one of the powers possessed by the DC Comics character Superman, in which beams of intense radiation are projected from the eyes. ...


Season three focuses on loyalty, betrayal, and new revelations involving Jor-El. Early in the season, Michael McKean, Annette O'Toole's real-life husband, portrays Clark's future Daily Planet editor Perry White; from this point on, other major characters present in the Superman mythology and the DC Universe are introduced to Smallville.[23] Pete Ross' inability to deal with keeping Clark's secret causes him to move to Wichita, Kansas with his mother after his parents' divorce.[24] Season three introduced Clark's "super hearing", which developed when his heat vision accidentally blinded him.[25] This article contains a complete review of the third season of the American drama action/adventure sci-fi television series Smallville. ... Michael McKean (born October 17, 1947) is an American actor, comedian, composer and musician, best known for his portrayal of Leonard Lenny Kosnowski on the sitcom Laverne and Shirley; as one of the members of Spinal Tap; as a Saturday Night Live cast member; and for other various appearances in... This article is about the fictional newspaper. ... Perry White is a fictional character who appears in the Superman comics, and is the editor-in-chief of the Metropolis newspaper the Daily Planet. ... For other uses, see Wichita (disambiguation). ...


Season four ventures further into the Superman mythology by creating a story arc that runs the length of the season; it involved Clark seeking out three Kryptonian stones, at the instruction of Jor-El, which contain the knowledge of the universe.[26] The majority of this season revolves around Lex trying to rekindle a strained friendship with Clark, Lana dating Jason Teague (Jensen Ackles), a young man she meets in France, Clark and numerous other characters vying with one another in attempts to obtain the stones, and Lionel's ambiguous transformation into a good father and person.[27] This season introduced Lois Lane (Erica Durance), Chloe Sullivan's (Allison Mack) cousin, as well as Bart Allen (Kyle Gallner).[26][28] The season began with the appearance of a new form of kryptonite; black kryptonite held the ability to split Clark into—and merge back together from—two separate beings exhibiting two personalities.[26] Season four of Smallville, an American television series, began airing on September 22, 2004. ... Jason Teague is a character from the WB series Smallville. ... Jensen Ross Ackles (born March 1, 1978) is an American television actor. ... For the Dutch girl group, see Loïs Lane. ... Erica Durance (French surname pronounced (IPA) [dy. ... Bartholomew Bart Allen II is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Kyle Gallner (born October 22, 1986) is an American actor. ...


Season five brings in more elements of the Superman mythology, including the Fortress of Solitude,[29] the Phantom Zone,[29] and Zod.[30] The villain Brainiac, in the guise of Professor Milton Fine (James Marsters), becomes a recurring antagonist. The season's central plot revolves around Clark using the knowledge contained in the Fortress of Solitude to train for an impending doom that will befall Earth: the release of Zod from the Phantom Zone due to Fine's machinations.[31] Clark and Lana finally begin a relationship with one another.[32] Season five featured a gradually unveiling storyline in conjunction with multiple minor story arcs running in parallel, mid-season and season finale cliffhangers, and cameos from two other notable DC characters, Aquaman (Alan Ritchson) and Cyborg (Lee Thompson Young).[33][34] This article contains a complete summary of the fifth season of the American drama action/adventure sci-fi television series Smallville. ... The Fortress of Solitude is the occasional headquarters of Superman in DC Comics. ... The Phantom Zone is a fictional prison dimension featured in the Superman comic books and related media. ... General Zod is a fictional comic book supervillain who is an enemy of Superman. ... Brainiac is a fictional character, a DC Comics supervillain and frequent opponent of Superman. ... James Wesley Marsters (born August 20, 1962) is an American actor and musician, best known for playing the popular platinum-blond character Spike, an English of a vampire, in the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer and its spinoff series Angel. ... Aquaman is a fictional character, superhero in DC Comics. ... Alan Ritchson is a 62, blonde, blue eyed former male model turned actor. ... This article is about the Teen Titans member. ... Lee Thompson Young as Victor Stone in Smallville Lee Thompson Young (born February 1, 1984) is an American actor, best known for starring in the Disney television series, The Famous Jett Jackson. ...


Season six takes Clark inside the Phantom Zone, inhabited by a society of exiled criminals from the "28 known inhabited galaxies".[35] The destinies of Lionel and Lex play out in the aftermath of Lex's possession by Zod and Lionel's adoption as the "oracle" of Jor-El. Several prisoners escape the Phantom Zone with Clark.[35] Clark acquires "super breath", after developing a cold from over-exerting himself cleaning up Lex/Zod's destruction in Metropolis, and having no abilities while in the Phantom Zone.[36] DC Comics characters Jimmy Olsen (Aaron Ashmore),[35] Oliver Queen (Justin Hartley) (and his superhero alias Green Arrow) and Martian Manhunter (Phil Morris) are introduced this season,[37][38] and many of them unite in Smallville to fight a common threat.[39] Clark promises to continue his training, at the Fortress of Solitude, once all the escaped Phantom Zone criminals are either returned or destroyed.[40] Other storylines involve Lana and Lex's marriage,[41] Lex's secret "33.1" experiments,[39] and the introduction of Clark's evil doppelgänger.[42] This article contains a complete summary of the sixth season of the American drama action/adventure sci-fi television series Smallville. ... James Bartholomew Jimmy Olsen is a fictional character, a photojournalist that appears in DC Comics’ Superman stories. ... Aaron Robert Ashmore (born October 7, 1979) is a Canadian film and television actor. ... This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ... Justin Hartley (born January 29, 1977 in Knoxville, Illinois) is an American actor who is most popular for having portrayed the role of Fox Crane on the NBC daytime drama Passions and Oliver Queen/Green Arrow in Smallville. ... Martian Manhunter is the superhero alias of Jonn Jonzz, alternately known as the Manhunter from Mars, a fictional comic book superhero who was created by DC Comics. ... Phil Morris (born April 4, 1959 in Iowa City, Iowa) is an American TV and movie actor. ... This article is about the fictional character. ...


Season seven introduces Clark's biological cousin, Kara (Laura Vandervoort) as a main character of the series. Her storyline focuses on Clark teaching her to blend in to society, controlling her powers, and learning to cope with the destruction of Krypton.[43] Her trust in her father Zor-El inadvertantly causes her to betray Clark.[44] Lana, after faking her own death, begins stalking Lex in order to find incriminating evidence against him.[45] Chloe, who learns she has kryptonite-induced abilities,[46] struggles to keep her power a secret from those around her. Lex's younger brother Julian,[47] who was believed to have been killed in his crib when Lex was a young boy,[48] becomes the new editor of the Daily Planet under the assumed name Grant Gabriel.[46] "Grant" subsequently hires Lois as a new reporter, based on some of the stories she wrote for The Inquisitor,[46] with the two beginning a romantic relationship afterward, until Lex hires someone to kill him after Grant discovers he is only a clone.[49] The series also features appearances from veteran Superman actors Dean Cain, Helen Slater and Marc McClure, with DC Comics character Black Canary (Alaina Huffman) also introduced in this season. Season seven of Smallville, an American television series, began airing on September 27, 2007. ... Kara Zor-El is a fictional character appearing in comic books published by DC Comics and related media. ... Laura Vandervoort (b. ... In publications from DC Comics, Zor-El was the father of Supergirl and uncle of Superman. ... Investigative journalism is a kind of journalism in which reporters deeply investigate a topic of interest, often involving crime, political corruption, or some other scandal. ... Dean Cain (born as Dean George Tanaka on July 31, 1966 in Mount Clemens, Michigan) is an American actor who is best known for his role as comic book legend Superman in the television series Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, in which he co-starred with Teri... Helen Rachel Slater (born December 15, 1963) is an American film actress and singer-songwriter. ... Marc McClure (b. ... Black Canary is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ...


Cast

Unlike most shows, which generally get about four weeks of casting, Gough and Millar had five months.[5] In October 2000, the two producers began their search for the three lead roles, and had casting directors in ten different cities.[7] There were originally eight series regulars, but since the first season four members of the original cast were written off the show, while five new actors were hired as series regulars during the succeeding seasons.


Original cast

"He hasn't been able to choose whether or not he has these abilities. All this responsibility has just been thrust on him, and he has to deal with it."
Tom Welling on Clark Kent[50]
  • Tom Welling as Clark Kent: A young man with superhuman abilities, who tries to find his place in life after being told he is an alien. He uses his abilities to help others in danger. Clark's problem in season one is not being able to share his secret with anyone. He just wants to be normal. Clark is afraid to open up to Lana, for fear that she will not accept him if she knows the truth.[50] After months of scouting, Tom Welling was cast as Clark Kent.[50] David Nutter was looking through pictures of actors and stumbled upon Tom Welling's image. When he asked about Welling, the casting director said Welling's manager didn't want him to do the role, because it could hurt his feature film career. After a conversation with Welling's manager, Nutter got him to read the script for the pilot, which convinced him to do the part.[8] For one of his auditions, he read the graveyard scene with Kristin Kreuk; the network thought they had "great chemistry".[5] Welling believes his lack of knowledge of the Superman mythology helps his performance because Gough and Millar have set up the series so that the previous mythology is not important.[50]
The original cast: (from left) Annette O'Toole, John Schneider, Tom Welling, Kristin Kreuk, Michael Rosenbaum, Eric Johnson, Allison Mack, and Sam Jones III
  • Kristin Kreuk as Lana Lang: The girl next door. She is the "beautiful, popular girl who is really lonely."[51] She has a "hole in her heart," because of the loss of her parents, and feels empathy for everyone. She feels connected to Clark.[51] Gough and Millar were initially trying to find someone for the role of Clark Kent, but Kristin Kreuk was the first to be cast, as Lana Lang. Casting director Coreen Mayrs sent David Nutter, the director of the pilot episode, a tape of 69 people and the second person on the tape was Kristin Kreuk.[8] They loved her audition tape so much they immediately showed her to the network.[5]
  • Michael Rosenbaum as Lex Luthor: A billionaire's son, sent to Smallville to run the local fertilizer plant. After Clark saves his life, the two become quick friends.[10] Lex tries to be a hero, but his motives are usually driven by curiosity for the unexplained, like the day Clark rescued him from drowning. He is searching for that unconditional love, something his mother had for him before her death.[52] Smallville's Lex Luthor was not supposed to be a precursor to the more comedic role performed by Gene Hackman; he was meant to be likeable and vulnerable.[52] The role was hard to cast, as no one could agree on who they liked for the role. Gough and Millar wanted to cast a comedian for the series, on the belief that comedians always want to "please and be loved at the same time."[5] Michael Rosenbaum auditioned for Lex Luthor twice. Feeling he didn't take his first audition seriously, Rosenbaum outlined a two-and-a-half-page scene, indicating all the places to be funny, charismatic, or menacing.[52] His audition went so well that everyone agreed he was "the guy".[5]
  • Allison Mack as Chloe Sullivan: One of Clark's best friends. She is in love with Clark, although the feeling isn't reciprocated.[53] Editor of the school newspaper, her journalistic curiosity — always wanting to "expose falsehoods" and "know the truth"[54] — causes tension with her friends, especially when she is digging in Clark's past.[55] She is intelligent and independent, but also an outcast in the school during season one.[54] After learning about Smallville from the show's casting director, Dee Dee Bradley, Allison Mack thought about auditioning for the role of Lana Lang. Mack instead auditioned twice for the role of Chloe Sullivan.[54] The character was created just for the series,[5] and was intended to have an ethnic background before Mack was hired.[54] Part of the reason she was cast was because Gough and Millar felt she had a "rare ability to deliver large chunks of expositionary [sic] dialogue conversationally".[5]
  • Sam Jones III as Pete Ross: Another of Clark's best friends. He hates the Luthors for what he sees as their thievery of his family's creamed corn business.[56] He is the first person Clark voluntarily informs of his secret.[57] He is in love with Chloe,[58] which he keeps to himself because of the Clark-Lana-Chloe love triangle already taking place.[59] Pete Ross was written out of the series at the end of season three. Sam Jones III, who portrayed Pete Ross, was the last of the series regulars to be cast. Gough and Millar saw Jones four days before they began filming for the pilot.[59] In the comics, Pete Ross is Caucasian, and the producers chose to cast Jones, who is African-American, against the mythology.[59]
"...I have the feeling that she didn't have a mother growing up — they've never introduced a mother for her. That's why being a mother is so important to her — and being the 'picture book' kind of mother at that."
Annette O'Toole on Martha Kent[60]
  • Annette O'Toole as Martha Kent: Clark's adopted mother. She, along with her husband Jonathan, give Clark sage advice about how to cope with his growing abilities. Annette O'Toole devised her own background for the character, in an effort to help her identify with the role. In her vision, Martha was originally from Metropolis, but she left because she felt it was "too phony".[60] O'Toole also believes Martha carries sympathy for Lex, because of all the loss he endured as a child (his mother and his hair). According to O'Toole, Martha will always give Lex "the benefit of the doubt," even when he reaches the point that he has crossed to the "dark side".[60] In season five, she takes a state senate seat.[61] This leads to a job as US Senator in Washington, D.C. in season six, and the character's exit from the show.[62] Cynthia Ettinger was originally cast as Martha Kent, but during filming everyone realized that she was not right for the role, including Ettinger.[5] Annette O'Toole was committed to the television series The Huntress when Ettinger was filming the original pilot. Around the time the creators were looking to recast the role of Martha Kent, The Huntress was canceled, which allowed O'Toole to join the cast of Smallville.[60] O'Toole had previously portrayed Lana Lang in Superman III.[63]
  • John Schneider as Jonathan Kent: Clark's adopted father. He goes to great lengths to protect his son's secret. According to Schneider, Jonathan is "perfectly willing to go to jail, or worse, to protect his son."[64] Schneider also believes, "The least important person in Jonathan Kent's life is Jonathan Kent."[64] John Schneider was written out of the show on the series' 100th episode.[65] Millar and Gough wanted a recognizable face for Smallville. Gough and Millar loved the idea of casting John Schneider as Jonathan Kent, because Schneider was already known as Bo Duke from The Dukes of Hazzard,[66] which Gough saw as adding belief that he could have grown up running a farm.[5]
  • Eric Johnson as Whitney Fordman: Lana's boyfriend. He becomes jealous of Clark and Lana's budding friendship, going so far as to haze Clark.[10] He eventually reconciles with Clark, before joining the Marines.[67] Kristin Kreuk feels audiences did not get to know the character, because he was only seen through Clark's eyes.[51] Whitney was written out of the show in the first season's finale, but he made cameo appearances in the season two episode "Visage", where it is revealed he died in combat overseas, and the season four episode "Façade", during a flashback to Clark's freshman year. Eric Johnson has expressed his pleasure in the way the writers handled Whitney's departure, by giving the character the exit of a hero.[68] Johnson auditioned for the roles of Lex and Clark, before finally being cast as Whitney Fordman.[69] When the producers called him in for one more audition, after passing on him for the major roles, Johnson informed them that if they wanted him then they would need to bring him in for a screen-test. After the screen-test, Johnson was cast and spent only one day filming his scenes for the pilot.[69]

Thomas John Patrick Welling (born April 26, 1977 in Putnam Valley, New York) is an American actor, director, and former male fashion model, most famous for playing Clark Kent on the current television series Smallville. ... For other uses, see Clark Kent (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Image File history File links SmallvilleSeason1fullcast. ... Image File history File links SmallvilleSeason1fullcast. ... Kristin Laura Kreuk (born December 30, 1982 in Vancouver, BC) is a Canadian actress. ... Lana Lang is a supporting character in DC Comics Superman series. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Michael Owen Rosenbaum (born July 11, 1972) is an American actor. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and the archenemy of the superhero Superman. ... Eugene Allen Gene Hackman[1] (born January 30, 1930) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Allison Mack (born July 29, 1982, in Preetz, Germany) is an American film and television actress. ... Chloe Ann Sullivan is a fictional character from the television series Smallville, played by Allison Mack. ... For other uses, see SIC. Sic is a Latin word, originally sicut [1] meaning thus, so, or just as that. In writing, it is placed within square brackets and usually italicized — [sic] — to indicate that an incorrect or unusual spelling, phrase, punctuation, and/or other preceding quoted material has been... Sam L. Jones III (born April 29, 1983 in Boston, Massachusetts) is an American actor, and the son of basketball player Sam Jones. ... Pete Ross is a fictional character who appears in the Superman comic books published by DC Comics. ... A bowl of creamed corn Creamed corn is a side dish of the cuisine of the Midwest and has now become a common part of American cuisine, typically sold canned by firms such as Del Monte Foods. ... For the peoples actually from the Caucasus, see Peoples of the Caucasus. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Annette OToole (born Annette Toole on April 1, 1952[1] in Houston, Texas) is an American dancer and actress. ... Martha Clark Kent and Jonathan Kent, also known as Ma and Pa Kent, are fictional characters published by DC Comics. ... A State Senator is a member of a state Senate, the upper legislative chamber in the government of a U.S. state. ... ... Cynthia Ettinger is an American actress. ... This series is a spin off of the movie The Hunter. ... Superman III (originally titled Superman vs. ... John Richard Schneider (Born April 8, 1960 in Mount Kisco, New York) is an American actor who shot to fame during the 1980s as Bo Duke in the American television series The Dukes of Hazzard. ... Martha Clark Kent and Jonathan Kent, also known as Ma and Pa Kent, are fictional characters published by DC Comics. ... Cast of The Dukes of Hazzard, starting from the left going counter-clockwise: Sorrell Booke (Boss Hogg), Tom Wopat (Luke Duke), Catherine Bach (Daisy Duke), John Schneider (Bo Duke), James Best , Sonny Shroyer (Deputy Enos Strate), Denver Pyle (Uncle Jesse), Christopher Mayer (Vance Duke), Byron Cherry (Coy Duke), and Ben... The Dukes of Hazzard is an American television series that originally aired on the CBS television network from 1979 to 1985. ... Eric Johann Johnson (born August 7, 1979 in Edmonton, Alberta) is best known for playing the role of Whitney Fordman on the television series Smallville. ... Hazing is an often ritualistic test and a task, which may constitute harassment, abuse or humiliation with requirements to perform random, often meaningless tasks, sometimes as a way of initiation into a social group. ... British Royal Marines in a Rigid Raider assault watercraft Marines (from the English adjective marine, meaning of the sea , from Latin language mare, meaning sea, via French adjective marin(e), of the sea) are, in principle, seaborne land soldiers that are part of a navy. ... A cameo role or cameo appearance (often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance of a known person in a work of the performing arts, such as plays, films, video games and television. ...

Additional cast

  • John Glover as Lionel Luthor: Lex's father. Lionel is responsible for the Kents being able to adopt Clark without any legal ramifications or questions of his origins.[55] Glover tried to make Lionel appear as though he was trying to "toughen [Lex] up". The character is made to "go out his way, to give [Lex] tests, so [Lex] can prove himself." Glover saw the character as someone who was a rich and powerful business man, disappointed in his son. Glover's goal, for season one, was to show Lionel's attempts to make Lex tougher; he interprets the character's motto, in regards to raising Lex, as "no risk, no rewards."[70] Lionel was created specifically for the show, to provide a parallel to the Kents, as an "experiment in extreme parenting."[5] In season two, John Glover, who had been a recurring guest on the show in season one, became a part of the regular cast.
  • Erica Durance as Lois Lane: Chloe's cousin, she comes to Smallville investigating the supposed death of Chloe.[26] She stays with the Kents while in town. Durance was a recurring guest for season four; she returned as a regular cast member in season five.
  • Jensen Ackles as Jason Teague: A love interest for Lana in season four. He follows Lana to Smallville, from Paris, France, and takes a position as the school's assistant football coach.[71] He was fired from the school when his relationship with Lana came to light. By the end of the season, it is revealed that he has been working with his mother to track the three Kryptonian stones of knowledge.[72] Ackles received top billing for season four and was contracted to remain through season five, but was written out of the show in season four's finale due to his commitments to Supernatural.[73]
  • Aaron Ashmore as Jimmy Olsen: Chloe's photographer boyfriend; he also works at the Daily Planet. Ashmore was a recurring guest for season six but became a regular cast member in season seven.
  • Laura Vandervoort as Kara: Clark's Kryptonian cousin. She was sent to look after Kal-El (Clark), but was stuck in suspended animation for eighteen years. When the dam confining her ship broke in the season six finale, "Phantom", she was set free. She has all of Clark's abilities, as well as a few that he doesn't have at the moment, including the ability to fly.[74] Gough has stated that she will not wear any version of the Supergirl costume.[75]

John Glover (born August 7, 1944 in Salisbury, Maryland) is an American actor, best known for a range of villainous roles in films and television, including Lionel Luthor in Smallville. ... Lionel Luthor is a fictional character in the CW Network television series Smallville, played by John Glover. ... Martha Clark Kent and Jonathan Kent, also known as Ma and Pa Kent, are fictional characters published by DC Comics. ... Erica Durance (French surname pronounced (IPA) [dy. ... For the Dutch girl group, see Loïs Lane. ... Jensen Ross Ackles (born March 1, 1978) is an American television actor. ... The love interest is a stock character, an object of romantic admiration and attraction for the principal character(s), or heroes. ... The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... This article is about the US TV series. ... Aaron Robert Ashmore (born October 7, 1979) is a Canadian film and television actor. ... James Bartholomew Jimmy Olsen is a fictional character, a photojournalist that appears in DC Comics’ Superman stories. ... Laura Vandervoort (b. ... For other uses, see Supergirl (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Supergirl (disambiguation). ...

Reception

Smallville's first accomplishment was breaking the record for highest rated debut for The WB, with 8.4 million viewers tuning in for its pilot.[4] A common criticism for the first season was the use of "villain of the week" storylines. By the time the first seven episodes aired, at least one journalist had had enough; Pittsburgh Post-Gazette's Rob Owen stated, "Smallville flies high with super character interaction and a nice performance by John Schneider as Pa Kent, but the series needs better plots than the "monster of the week" stories seen so far."[76] Jordan Levin, president of The WB's Entertainment division, recognized the concerns that the show had become a villain-of-the-week series. Levin announced that season two would see more "smaller mini-arcs over three to four episodes, to get away from some of the formulaic storytelling structure we were getting ourselves boxed into... We don't want to turn it into a serialized show."[77] Smallville's first season placed sixth on the Parents Television Council's list of the "best shows for families".[78] The Warner Bros. ... King Sphinx, an example of a Villain of the Week, from the Power Rangers series Villain of the week (or, depending on genre, monster of the week or freak of the week) is a term that describes the nature of one-use antagonists in episodic fiction, specifically ongoing American genre... The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, also known simply as the PG, is the largest daily newspaper serving metropolitan Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. // The paper began publication on July 29, 1786, with the encouragement of Hugh Henry Brackenridge as a four-page weekly, initially called The Gazette. ... Rob Owen (birthdate unknown) is an American journalist and newspaper editor. ... The Parents Television Council (PTC) is a US-based nonprofit organization run and founded by conservative activist L. Brent Bozell III whose stated goal is to promote and restore responsibility to the entertainment industry. ...


On January 24, 2006, it was confirmed Smallville would be part of the new The CW's Fall 2006–2007 lineup once The WB and UPN ceased separate operations and merged as The CW in September 2006.[1] is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... “The CW” redirects here. ... The Warner Bros. ... UPN (which originally stood for the United Paramount Network) was a television network in over 200 markets in the United States. ...

Seasonal rankings (based on average total estimated viewers per episode) of Smallville on The WB and The CW:
Season Timeslot Season Premiere[2] Season Finale[2] TV Season Rank # Viewers
(in millions)
1st Tuesday 9/8C [79] October 16, 2001 May 21, 2002 2001-2002 115 [80] 5.9[80]
2nd Tuesday 9/8C[81] September 24, 2002 May 20, 2003 2002-2003 113 [82] 6.3[82]
3rd Wednesday 8/7C[81] October 1, 2003 May 19, 2004 2003-2004 141[83] 4.9[83]
4th Wednesday 8/7C[84] September 22, 2004 May 18, 2005 2004-2005 124[85] 4.4[85]
5th Thursday 8/7C[86] September 29, 2005 May 11, 2006 2005-2006 117[87] 4.7[87]
6th Thursday 8/7C[88] September 28, 2006 May 17, 2007 2006-2007 125[89] 4.1[89]
7th Thursday 8/7C[90] September 27, 2007 2007-2008

is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Awards

Throughout its first six seasons, Smallville has won numerous awards ranging from Emmys to Teen Choice Awards. In 2002, the show was recognized with an Emmy for Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series.[91] Four years later, the series was awarded an Emmy for Outstanding Editing for a Series for its fifth season episode "Arrival".[92][93] An Emmy Award. ... The Teen Choice Awards is an awards show presented annually by FOX (United States) and Global TV (Canada). ...


The series has been awarded Leo Awards on multiple occasions. Make-up artist Natalie Cosco was awarded the Leo Award for Best Make-Up twice, one for her work in the fourth season episode "Scare",[94] and one for her work in the sixth season episodes "Hydro" and "Wither".[95] In the 2006 Leo Awards, Barry Donlevy took home Best Cinematography in a Dramatic Series for his work on the fourth season episode "Spirit", while David Wilson won Best Production Design in a Dramatic Series for "Sacred".[96] Smallville's sixth season won a Leo Award for Best Dramatic Series; James Marshall won Best Direction for "Zod"; Caronline Cranstoun won Best Costume Design for her work on "Arrow", and James Philpott won Best Production Design for "Justice".[95] The visual effects team was recognized for their work on the pilot with an award for Best Visual Effects in 2002.[97] They were later recognized by the Visual Effects Society with a 2004 VES Award for Outstanding Compositing in a Televised Program, Music Video or Commercial, for the work they did on the second season episode "Accelerate". That same year, they won for Outstanding Matte Painting in a Televised Program, Music Video, or Commercial for season two’s "Insurgence".[98] The Leo Awards are an annual set of awards, given each May, which honor the best in British Columbian television and film production. ... The Visual Effects Society (VES) is the entertainment industrys only organization representing the full breadth of visual effects practitioners including artists, technologists, model makers, educators, studio leaders, supervisors, PR/marketing specialists and producers in all areas of entertainment from film, television and commercials to music videos and games. ... 3rd Visual Effects Society Awards February 16, 2005 Best Visual Effects - Motion Picture: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban The 3rd Visual Effects Society Awards, given in on 16 February 2005, honored the best visual effects in film and television. ...


In 2002, the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers honored the band Remy Zero, who provide the opening theme song, "Save Me", for Smallville, and composer Mark Snow for their contributions to the show. The award is given to individuals who wrote the theme, or underscore for the highest rated television series during January 1 - December 31, 2001.[99] The American Society of Cinematographers gave the series an award for the work done on the sixth season episode "Arrow".[100] Members of the regular cast have won awards for their portrayals on the show. In 2001, Michael Rosenbaum won a Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actor.[101] Tom Welling won a Teen Choice Award for Choice Breakout TV Star – Male in 2002,[102] while Allison Mack was awarded Best Sidekick in 2006.[103] Mack won Best Sidekick for the second year in a row when she took home the award in the 2007 Teen Choice Awards.[104] The American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP) is an organization known as a collecting society that protects copyright, ensuring that music which is broadcast, commercially recorded, or otherwise used for profit, pays a fee to compensate the creators of that music. ... Remy Zero is a Los Angeles based alternative rock band made up of Cinjun Tate (vocals, guitar), Shelby Tate (guitar, keyboards, vocals), Gregory Slay (drums, percussion), Cedric Lemoyne (bass guitar), and Jeffrey Cain (guitar). ... Save Me is a song by Remy Zero on their album, the The Golden Hum. ... Mark Snow (born Martin Fulterman on 26 August 1946 in New York City) is a prolific composer for film and television. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) is not a labor union or guild, but rather an educational, cultural and professional organization. ... The Saturn Award is an award presented annually by the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films to honor the top works in science fiction, fantasy, and horror in film, television, and home video. ...


Other media

Allison Mack's character Chloe Sullivan has starred in two promotional tie-in series, Smallville: Chloe Chronicles, and Vengeance Chronicles. There were two volumes of "Chloe Chronicles"; the first featured Chloe investigating the events that lead to the death of Earl Jenkins, who held Chloe and her friends hostage at the LuthorCorp plant in the first season episode "Jitters". Volume one began aired between April 29, 2003 and May 20, 2003, and was exclusive to AOL subscribers. According to Lisa Gregorian, senior vice president, television, Warner Bros. Marketing Services, "Our goal is to create companion programming that offers new and exciting ways to engage the audience, just as music videos did for record promotion."[105] The second volume was a continuation of the first, but with Sam Jones III appearing as Pete Ross. In total, the first two series included seven mini-episodes. It was created after the first volume received a positive response from viewers. This volume utilized the Smallville comic books as a secondary tie-in to the series. Viewers could watch Smallville, then download the latest webisode of Chloe's Chronicles and finish with a specific issue of the Smallville comic book which would provide an "enhanced backstory to the online segments".[106] Vengeance Chronicles is a spin-off of the fifth season episode "Vengeance". In this series, Chloe joins forces with a costumed vigilante, whom she dubs the "Angel of Vengeance", to expose Lex Luthor's Level 33.1 experiments on meteor-infected people. This article contains a complete review of the first season of the American drama action/adventure sci-fi television series Smallville. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article contains a complete summary of the fifth season of the American drama action/adventure sci-fi television series Smallville. ...


For the season three premiere, the Smallville producers teamed up with Verizon to provide registered users a chance to view plot updates—in the presentation of a press release from The Daily Planet—as well as quizes and games related to the show. As part of the payment, Verizon products and services were placed in various episodes of the show.[107] In a promotional tie-in with Sprint, Smallville Legends: The Oliver Queen Chronicles was released dictating the early life of Oliver Queen in a six-episode CGI series. According to Lisa Gregorian, Executive Vice President of worldwide marketing at Warner Bros. Television Group, explained that these promotional tie-ins are ways to get fans more connected to the show.[108] On April 19, 2007, a tie-in with Toyota, promoting their new Yaris,[109] featured an online comic strip as interstitial programs, during new episodes of Smallville, titled Smallville Legends: Justice & Doom. The interactive comic was based on the episode "Justice", which follows the adventures of Oliver Queen, Bart Allen, Victor Stone, and Arthur Curry as they seek to destroy all of LuthorCorp's secret experimental labs. The online series allowed viewers to investigate alongside the fictional team, in an effort to win prizes. Stephan Nilson wrote all five of the episodes, while working with a team of artists for the illustrations. The plot for each comic episode would be given to Nilson as the production crew for Smallville was filming their current television episode. Artist Steve Scott would draw comic book panels, which would be sent to a group called Motherland. That group would review the drawings and tell Scott which images to draw on a separate overlay. This allowed for multiple objects to be moved in an out of the same frame.[110] In 2008, The CW entered into a partnership with makers of the Stride brand of chewing-gun to give viewers the opportunity to create their own Smallville digital comic. The writers and producers developed the comic's beginning and end, but are using the viewers to provide the middle. The CW began their tie-in campaign with the March 13, 2008 episode "Hero", where Pete develops superhuman elasticity after chewing some kryptonite-infused Stride gum. Going to The CW's website, viewers vote on one of two options—each adds four pages to the comic—every Tuesday and Thursday until the campaign officially ends on April 7, 2008.[111] Verizon Communications, Inc. ... Sprint Nextel Corporation (NYSE: S) is one of the largest telecommunications companies in the US. With 55 million subscribers, Sprint Nextel operates the third largest wireless telecommunications network in the United States (based on total wireless customers), behind AT&T and Verizon Wireless. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about the automaker. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... In television, interstitials refers to short programming which is often shown between movies or other events. ... Stride is one of the many brands of chewing gum created by Cadbury-Schweppes. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


Smallville creators Al Gough and Miles Millar developed an Aquaman pilot for The WB Television Network, with Justin Hartley as Arthur Curry.[112] However, as work progressed on "Aqua", the character was recognized to have potential for his own series,[113] but the episode was never meant to be a backdoor pilot for an Aquaman series.[114] Alan Ritchson was not considered for the role in the new series, because Gough and Millar did not consider it a spin-off from Smallville. Gough said in November 2005, "[The series] is going to be a different version of the 'Aquaman' legend."[113] Gough did express the idea of a crossover with Smallville at some point.[115] The pilot was considered to have a good chance of being picked up, but when The WB and UPN merged into the CW, the resulting network passed on the show.[116][117][118] Aquaman is a television pilot developed by Smallville creators Al Gough and Miles Millar for The WB Television Network, based on the DC Comics character Aquaman. ... Justin Hartley (born January 29, 1977 in Knoxville, Illinois) is an American actor who is most popular for having portrayed the role of Fox Crane on the NBC daytime drama Passions and Oliver Queen/Green Arrow in Smallville. ... A television pilot is a test episode of an intended television series. ... Media spin-off is the process of deriving new radio or television programs from existing ones (see list of television spin-offs). ... UPN (which originally stood for the United Paramount Network) was a television network in over 200 markets in the United States. ...


DVD releases

Seasons one through to six have been released in Regions 1, 2 & 4. DVD releases include commentary by cast and crew members on select episodes, deleted scenes, and featurettes. The promotional tie-ins, Chloe Chronicles and Vengeance Chronicles, accompanied the season two, three, and five box sets respectively. Other special features include interactive features such as a tour of Smallville, or a comic book. There are also DVD-ROM features on some DVDs.

Complete Season Release dates
Region 1 Region 2 Region 4
1st September 23, 2003[119] October 13, 2003[120] December 3, 2003[121]
2nd May 18, 2004[122] September 17, 2004[123] January 1, 2005[124]
3rd November 16, 2004[125] April 18, 2005[126] July 13, 2005[127]
4th September 13, 2005[128] October 10, 2005[129] November 11, 2006[130]
5th September 12, 2006[131] August 28, 2006[132] April 4, 2007[133]
6th September 18, 2007[134] October 22, 2007[135] March 5, 2008[136]

Region 1–8 redirects here. ... Region 1–8 redirects here. ... Region 1–8 redirects here. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about the day. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... TV Guide is the name of two North American weekly magazines about television programming, one in the United States and one in Canada. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Titan Books is a UK publisher of graphic novels. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Warner Bros. ... Warner Bros. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Amazon. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Warner Bros. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Warner Bros. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kenneth Biller is a television producer, television writer, television director as well as television editor, best known for his work in Star Trek: Voyager. ... Michael Katleman is an American director and actor. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Warner Bros. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Joseph Jeph Siegbert Loeb III is an American motion picture and television producer/writer and award-winning comic book writer. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Mark Verheiden is a television, movie, and comic book writer. ... Jeannot Szwarc (born 21 November 1939) is a French film director. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kelly Souders is an American screenwriter and producer, most famous for working on the American television program Smallville. ... Brian Wayne Peterson is a screenwriter and television producer. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Warner Bros. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Greg Beeman (born 1962 in Honolulu, Hawaii, United States is an American director and producer best known for his work with television servies Smallville and JAG and numerous comedy films. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Todd Slavkin is an American Screenwriting and producer, most famous for working on the American television program Smallville. ... Darren Swimmer is an American screenwriter and producer, most famous for working on the American television program Smallville. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Steven S. DeKnight is a television script-writer best known for working on Smallville, Buffy, and Angel Buffy episodes Main article: List of Buffy the Vampire Slayer episodes Seeing Red (2002) TV Episode (writer) Dead Things (2002) TV Episode (writer) All the Way (2001) TV Episode (writer) Spiral (2001) TV... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... “The CW” redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “The CW” redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Rick Rosenthal (born June 15, 1949, in New York, New York) is an American film director known for his work in horror films. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Todd Slavkin is an American Screenwriting and producer, most famous for working on the American television program Smallville. ... Darren Swimmer is an American screenwriter and producer, most famous for working on the American television program Smallville. ... James L. Conway (born October 27, 1950 in New York City, New York, USA) is an American film and television director, producer and writer. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Rick Rosenthal (born June 15, 1949, in New York, New York) is an American film director known for his work in horror films. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kelly Souders is an American screenwriter and producer, most famous for working on the American television program Smallville. ... Mike Rohl is an American TV director. ... “The CW” redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Warner Bros. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Warner Bros. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Warner Bros. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Warner Bros. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Warner Bros. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Warner Bros. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Warner Bros. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Warner Bros. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Rob Owen (birthdate unknown) is an American journalist and newspaper editor. ... The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, also known simply as the PG, is the largest daily newspaper serving metropolitan Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. // The paper began publication on July 29, 1786, with the encouragement of Hugh Henry Brackenridge as a four-page weekly, initially called The Gazette. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Warner Bros. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Warner Bros. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Warner Bros. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... TV Guide is the name of two North American weekly magazines about television programming, one in the United States and one in Canada. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... TV Guide is the name of two North American weekly magazines about television programming, one in the United States and one in Canada. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Rob Owen (birthdate unknown) is an American journalist and newspaper editor. ... The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, also known simply as the PG, is the largest daily newspaper serving metropolitan Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. // The paper began publication on July 29, 1786, with the encouragement of Hugh Henry Brackenridge as a four-page weekly, initially called The Gazette. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, also known simply as the PG, is the largest daily newspaper serving metropolitan Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. // The paper began publication on July 29, 1786, with the encouragement of Hugh Henry Brackenridge as a four-page weekly, initially called The Gazette. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Hollywood Reporter is one of two major trade papers of the film industry in the United States, the other being Variety. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP) is an organization known as a collecting society that protects intellectual property, ensuring that music which is broadcast, commercially recorded, or otherwise used for profit, pays a fee to compensate the creators of that music. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Saturn Award is an award presented annually by the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films to honor the top works in science fiction, fantasy and horror in film, television and home video. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... FOX redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Business Wire logo == THIS POSTING MAY BE IN VIOLATION AND MAY NEED TO BE EDITED. IT READS AS AN ADVETISIMENT AND ITS CLAIMS HAVE NOT BEEN VERIFIED. == Business Wire is a company that disseminates full-text news releases from thousands of companies and organizations worldwide to news media, financial markets... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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  • The Kryptonite closet: Silence and queer secrecy in Smallville by Dr. Jess Battis
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikia (no official pronunciation[2]; originally Wikicities) is a selective wiki hosting service (or wiki farm) operated by Wikia, Inc. ... Wiki wiki redirects here. ... Cyclopedia redirects here. ... The following is an episode list for the television series Smallville. ... This article contains a complete review of the first season of the American drama action/adventure sci-fi television series Smallville. ... Season two of Smallville, an American television series, began airing on September 24, 2002. ... This article contains a complete review of the third season of the American drama action/adventure sci-fi television series Smallville. ... Season four of Smallville, an American television series, began airing on September 22, 2004. ... This article contains a complete summary of the fifth season of the American drama action/adventure sci-fi television series Smallville. ... This article contains a complete summary of the sixth season of the American drama action/adventure sci-fi television series Smallville. ... Season seven of Smallville, an American television series, began airing on September 27, 2007. ... For other uses, see Clark Kent (disambiguation). ... Lana Lang is a supporting character in DC Comics Superman series. ... Chloe Ann Sullivan is a fictional character from the television series Smallville, played by Allison Mack. ... Lionel Luthor is a fictional character in the CW Network television series Smallville, played by John Glover. ... For the Dutch girl group, see Loïs Lane. ... James Bartholomew Jimmy Olsen is a fictional character, a photojournalist that appears in DC Comics’ Superman stories. ... Kara Zor-El is a fictional character appearing in comic books published by DC Comics and related media. ... Martha Clark Kent and Jonathan Kent, also known as Ma and Pa Kent, are fictional characters published by DC Comics. ... Pete Ross is a fictional character who appears in the Superman comic books published by DC Comics. ... Smallville is an American television series created by writer/producers Alfred Gough and Miles Millar, and was initially broadcast by The WB. After its fifth season, the WB and UPN merged to form The CW, which is the current broadcaster for the show in the United States. ... Smallville is an American television series created by writer/producers Alfred Gough and Miles Millar, and was initially broadcast by The WB. After its fifth season, the WB and UPN merged to form The CW, which is the current broadcaster for the show in the United States. ... Kryptonite is a fictional element originating from a meteor shower composed of the radioactive remains of the planet Krypton. ... LuthorCorp is a fictional company in the CW Network television series Smallville. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... The comic book character Superman is an extremely recognizable American cultural icon, and has appeared throughout American popular culture, even achieving international fame. ... Bud Collyer on Beat The Clock, 1957 Bud Collyer (b. ... Kirk Alyn as Superman Kirk Alyn (October 8, 1910 - March 14, 1999) was an American actor, best known for being the first actor to play Superman on screen, in the 1948 film serial Superman, and its 1950 sequel Atom Man Vs. ... George Reeves (January 5,[1] 1914 – June 16, 1959) was an American actor, best known for his role as Superman in the 1950s television program Adventures of Superman and his controversial death at the age of 45. ... Image:Bobholiday. ... Danny Dark (December 19, 1938 - June 13, 2004) was an announcer who came to be known as the voice of the NBC television network for several years. ... David Bud Wilson (born in 1956) played Superman in the 1975 TV musical special Its a Bird, Its a Plane, Its Superman! an adaptation of the the 1966 Broadway musical. ... Christopher DOlier Reeve[1] (September 25, 1952 – October 10, 2004) was an American actor, director, producer, and writer. ... Laura S 01:23, 11 April 2006 (UTC) Category: ... John Newton (also credited as John Haymes Newton) is an American actor. ... Gerard Christopher (born 1959) is an American Actor. ... Dean Cain (born as Dean George Tanaka on July 31, 1966 in Mount Clemens, Michigan) is an American actor who is best known for his role as comic book legend Superman in the television series Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, in which he co-starred with Teri... This biographical article needs additional references for verification. ... Christopher McDonald Christopher McDonald (born February 15, 1955 in New York City, New York, USA) is an American actor. ... Thomas John Patrick Welling (born April 26, 1977 in Putnam Valley, New York) is an American actor, director, and former male fashion model, most famous for playing Clark Kent on the current television series Smallville. ... George Newbern (born December 10, 1964) is an American television and film actor. ... Brandon Routh (born October 9, 1979) is an American actor and former fashion model. ... Yuri Lowenthal (born on March 5, 1971 in Alliance, Ohio) is a voice actor that has voiced several anime and video game characters. ... Adam Baldwin (born February 27, 1962) is an American actor. ... Kyle MacLachlan (born February 22, 1959, in Yakima, Washington) is a Golden Globe award winning American actor. ... The Superman film series currently consists of five superhero films based on the fictional DC comics character of the same name. ... The Superman serial was a 1948 15-part black-and-white movie serial starring Kirk Alyn as Superman and Noel Neill as Lois Lane. ... Atom Man vs. ... Superman and the Mole Men is a 1951 black and white movie starring the titular Superman. ... For the franchise, see Superman film series. ... Superman II is the 1980 sequel to the 1978 superhero film Superman. ... Superman III (originally titled Superman vs. ... Supergirl is a 1984 superhero film. ... Superman IV: The Quest For Peace is a 1987 film, the last of the Superman theatrical movies. ... For the video game of the same name, see Superman Returns (video game). ... This article is about the television series. ... Superboy is a half-hour live-action television series based on the fictional DC Comics character Superboy. ... Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman was a live-action television series based on the Superman comic books. ... This image of Superman appeared at the beginning of each of the cartoons. ... The New Adventures of Superman was an animated series that aired on CBS for four seasons between September 10, 1966 and September 5, 1970, although the Man of Steel shared an hour with Aquaman and Batman during the middle seasons. ... This article is about the Hanna-Barbera television series. ... As a 50th anniversary gift, DC Comics legendary Man of Steel got a brand-new Saturday morning cartoon. ... Superman: The Animated Series is the unofficial title given to Warner Bros. ... Justice League is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... Legion of Super Heroes is an American animated television series produced by Warner Bros. ... For other uses, see Superman (disambiguation). ... Superman is an arcade game released by Taito Corporation in 1988, featuring popular DC Comics character Superman. ... For the Atari 2600 video game, see Superman (Atari game). ... Superman is the title of a video game released by Sunsoft for the Super Nintendo and Mega Drive/Genesis in 1992. ... The Death and Return of Superman is a beat em up video game based on the Death of Superman storyline. ... Superman 64 is a video game that was released by Titus Software on May 31, 1999 on the Nintendo 64. ... For the Game Boy Advance version, see Superman Returns: Fortress of Solitude. ... Its A Bird, Its A Plane, Its Superman is a musical with music by Charles Strouse and lyrics by Lee Adams, with a book by David Newman and Robert Benton. ... The daily Superman newspaper comic strip began in January 6, 1939, and a separate Sunday strip was added on November 5, 1939. ... The Ultimate Superman Collection (also known as The Superman Ultimate Collectors Edition and Superman: The Ultimate Collection) is a 14-disc DVD box set of Superman films (13 Disc box set outside of the US), released on November 28, 2006 by Warner Home Video. ... The Christopher Reeve Superman Collection is an 8-disc DVD box set of Superman films, released on November 28, 2006 by Warner Home Video. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Smallville (TV series) - Smallville Wiki - a Wikia wiki (0 words)
Smallville is an American television series that debuted in 2001 on the WB Television Network.
The series follows the life of a teenage Clark Kent living in the town of Smallville, Kansas that is set at the start of the 21st century.
The element of Kryptonite is used as a recurring plot device throughout the series.
Smallville (TV series) - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia (780 words)
It tells the story of Clark Kent as a young man living in the town of Smallville, Kansas, coping with adolescence while he is developing superhuman powers, exploring his extraterrestrial origins, and struggling to find his destiny.
Smallville is filmed at various locales in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, Canada.
However, scenes on the "main street" of Smallville, as well as the exterior of the Kent Farm, are shot in the town of Cloverdale, British Columbia.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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