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Encyclopedia > Slugging percentage

In baseball statistics, slugging average (SLG) is a measure of the power of a hitter. It is calculated as total bases divided by at bats. As with many sports, and perhaps even more so, statistics are very important to baseball. ... In baseball, a slugger is a powerful batter with a high percentage of extra base hits, but may not have a high batting average. ... In baseball statistics, total bases is the number of bases a player has gained with hits, i. ... In baseball statistics, an at bat (AB) is used to calculate other data such as batting average. ...


SLG = (s + d + 2t + 3h)/(n_{AB}),


where n_{AB}, is the number of at-bats for a given player, and s, d, t, h, are the number of singles, doubles, triples, and home runs, respectively. The following site provides information on calculation, Total Bases, Total Offical At-Bats, Slugging, and other Baseball statistics: ESPN's MLB Statistics Glossary.



For example, in 1920, Babe Ruth was playing his first season for the Yankees. In 458 at-bats, he hit 73 singles, 36 doubles, 9 triples, and 54 home runs, which brings the total base count to (73 × 1) + (36 × 1) + (9 × 2) + (54 × 3) = 388. So his total number of bases divided by his total at-bats is .847, his SLG. The next year he slugged .846, and for 80 years those records went unbroken until 2001, when Barry Bonds hit 411 bases in 476 at-bats, bringing his SLG to .863, unmatched since. George Herman Ruth (February 6, 1895 – August 16, 1948), better known as Babe Ruth, also commonly known by the nicknames The Bambino and The Sultan of Swat, was an American baseball player and United States national icon. ... The New York Yankees are a Major League baseball team based in The Bronx, New York City. ... In baseball statistics, an at bat (AB) is used to calculate other data such as batting average. ... In baseball, a single is the act of a batter safely reaching first base by striking the ball and getting to first before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielders choice. ... In baseball, a double is the act of a batter safely reaching second base by striking the ball and getting to second before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielders choice. ... In baseball, a triple is the act of a batter safely reaching third base by striking the ball and getting to third before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielders choice. ... In baseball, a home run is a base hit in which the batter is able to circle all the bases, ending at home plate and scoring a run, with no errors on the play that result in the batter achieving extra bases. ... Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964 in Riverside, California) is a left fielder in Major League Baseball for the San Francisco Giants; he is most famous for his home run hitting. ...


Common Misconceptions

It is often believed that a batter's Slugging Average is calculated as SLG = (s + 2d + 3t + 4h)/(n_{AB}),, where each base touched counts as one. This however, can be disproven by taking any Major League Baseball player's statistics, which can be found at MLB.com's Statistic's Website and calculating his sluuging percentage using both methods above. The number can then be compared to the SLG average listed on the MLB.com Statistic Website. Among other sites that accept this widely belived fallacy is Baseball Almanac's Statistical Formulas Website, listed here to demonstrate the method by which some incorrectly calculate Slugging Average.



The term Slugging percentage is a misnomer, as it is actually a calculation of average, not percent. Look up Misnomer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A misnomer is a misleading name for a thing. ... In mathematics, there are numerous methods for calculating the average or central tendency of a list of n numbers. ... A percentage is a way of expressing a proportion, a ratio or a fraction as a whole number, by using 100 as the denominator. ...


Slugging percentage forms on-base plus slugging when added to on base percentage. In baseball statistics, on-base plus slugging (denoted by OPS) incorporates on base percentage (OBP) and slugging percentage (SLG). ... In baseball statistics, on base percentage (OBP) (sometimes referred to as on base average (OBA)) is a measure of how often a batter gets to first base for any reason other than a fielding error or a fielders choice. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Slugging percentage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (476 words)
Barry Bonds holds the MLB record for highest slugging percentage in a season (.863).
In baseball statistics, slugging percentage (often abbreviated SLG) is a measure of the power of a hitter.
The term slugging percentage is a misnomer, for it is actually a weighted average, not a percentage.
On-base plus slugging - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (547 words)
On-base plus slugging, or OPS, is a baseball statistic which is calculated as the sum of a player's on-base percentage and slugging percentage.
One fault of OPS is that it weights on-base average and slugging percentage equally, although on-base average correlates better with scoring runs.
Discrepancies between published OPSes and the sum of on-base average and slugging percentage are due to rounding errors.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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