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Encyclopedia > Slovenia
Republika Slovenija
Republic of Slovenia
Flag of Slovenia Coat of arms of Slovenia
Flag Coat of arms
Anthem7th stanza of Zdravljica
"A Toast"
Location of  Slovenia  (orange)

– on the European continent  (camel & white)
– in the European Union  (camel)                 [ Legend] Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovenia. ... Image File history File links Coat_of_Arms_of_Slovenia. ... Flag ratio: 1:2 The national flag of Slovenia features three equal horizontal bands of white (top), blue, and red, with the Slovenian coat of arms located in the upper hoist side of the flag centered in the white and blue bands. ... Slovene coat of arms The Slovenian coat of arms consists of a red bordered blue shield on which there is a stylised white mount Triglav. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... Zdravljica (A Toast) is a famous poem by France PreÅ¡eren. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 526 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Slovenia ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Capital
(and largest city)
Ljubljana
46°03′N, 14°30′E
Official languages Slovenian, Italian1, Hungarian1
Demonym Slovenian, Slovene
Government Parliamentary republic
 -  President Janez Drnovšek
 -  President-elect Danilo Türk
 -  Prime Minister Janez Janša
Independence from Yugoslavia 
 -  Declared June 25, 1991 
 -  Recognized 1992 
EU membership May 1, 2004
Area
 -  Total 20,256 km² (153rd)
7,824 sq mi 
 -  Water (%) 0.6
Population
 -  2007 estimate 2,022,222 2 (143rd)
 -  2002 census 1,964,036 
 -  Density 97/km² (80th)
251/sq mi
GDP (PPP) 2007 estimate
 -  Total $47.841 billion (83st)
 -  Per capita $23,400 (36th)
HDI (2007) 0.910 (high) (27th)
Currency Euro ()3 (EUR)
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 -  Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Internet TLD .si4
Calling code +386
1 In the residential municipalities of the Italian or Hungarian national community.
2 Source: Official Slovenian Population clock, October 23, 2007
3 Prior to 2007: Slovenian tolar
4 Also .eu, shared with other European Union member states.

Slovenia, officially the Republic of Slovenia (Slovenian: Republika Slovenija, listen ), is a country in southern Central Europe bordering Italy to the west, the Adriatic Sea to the southwest, Croatia to the south and east, Hungary to the northeast, and Austria to the north. The capital of Slovenia is Ljubljana. Not to be confused with capitol. ... The majority of Slovenias population is Slovenian (over 88%). Hungarians and Italians have the status of indigenous minorities under the Constitution of Slovenia, which guarantees them seats in the National Assembly. ...   (IPA: ) is the capital and largest city of Slovenia. ... An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... States currently utilizing parliamentary systems are denoted in red and orange—the former being constitutional monarchies where authority is vested in a parliament, and the latter being parliamentary republics whose parliaments are effectively supreme over a separate head of state. ... Look up republic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Presidents of Slovenia: Milan Kučan (1990-2002) Janez Drnovšek (2002-2008) Categories: Lists of office-holders ... Janez DrnovÅ¡ek (pronounced: IPA,  ) (born May 17, 1950) is the current President of Slovenia and the former president of Yugoslavia. ... Presidents of Slovenia: Milan Kučan (1990-2002) Janez Drnovšek (2002-2008) Categories: Lists of office-holders ... Danilo Türk (born 19 February 1952) was an Assistant Secretary-General for Political Affairs for the United Nations. ... There have been five prime ministers of Slovenia since that country gained its independence in the breakup of Yugoslavia. ... Janez JanÅ¡a (born September 17, 1958 as Ivan JanÅ¡a) in Ljubljana is a Slovenian politician and head of the Slovenian Democratic Party since 1995. ... Motto Brotherhood and Unity Anthem Hey, Slavs Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian (spoken throughout the territory), Slovenian, Macedonian, Albanian, Hungarian (all official), and languages of other nationalities. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Austria Poland Belgium Bulgaria Cyprus Czech   Rep. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 10,000 km² and 100,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... A percentage is a way of expressing a proportion, a ratio or a fraction as a whole number, by using 100 as the denominator. ... This is a list of countries ordered according to population. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... PPP The purchasing power parity (PPP) theory was developed by Gustav Cassel in 1920. ... There are three lists of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) (the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year). ... Per capita is a Latin phrase meaning for each head. ... This article includes two lists of countries of the world[1] sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) at purchasing power parity (PPP) per capita, the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year divided by the average population for the same year. ... World map indicating Human Development Index (2006). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Coloured world map indicating Human Development Index (2006) (colour-blind compliant map) This is a list of countries by Human Development Index as included in the United Nations Development Programmes Human Development Report 2006, compiled on the basis of 2004 data. ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve of the twenty-five nations that form the European Union (and four outside it, as well as Montenegro and Kosovo), which form the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU). ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... UTC redirects here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Summer Time (CEST) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... UTC redirects here. ... A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... .si is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for Slovenia. ... This is a list of country calling codes defined by ITU-T recommendation E.164. ... ISO 4217 Code SIT User(s) Slovenia Inflation 0. ... Image File history File links Republika-slovenija. ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... Central Europe The Alpine Countries and the Visegrád Group (Political map, 2004) Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... A satellite image of the Adriatic Sea. ...   (IPA: ) is the capital and largest city of Slovenia. ...


At various points in Slovenia's history, the country has been part of the Roman Empire, the Duchy of Carantania (only modern Slovenia's northern part), the Holy Roman Empire, Austrian empire (later known as Austria-Hungary), the State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs, the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (renamed the Kingdom of Yugoslavia in 1929) between the World Wars, and the SFR of Yugoslavia from 1945 until gaining independence in 1991. Slovenia is a member of the European Union, the Council of Europe and NATO. For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Karantania (also Carantania, Carentania, in old Slovenian onomastics Korotan, or Karantanija) was a Slavic principality that emerged in the 7th century and was centered on the territory of contemporary Carinthia. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Anthem Volkshymne (Peoples Anthem) The Austrian Empire Capital Vienna Language(s) German Hungarian Romanian Czech Slovakian Slovenian Croatian Serbian Italian Polish Ruthenian Religion Roman Catholic Government Monarchy History  - Established 1804  - Ausgleich 1867 The Crown of the Austrian Emperor The Austrian Empire (German: ) was a modern era successor empire founded... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... Flag Capital Zagreb Language(s) Slovenian and Serbo-Croatian Government Republic President¹ Anton KoroÅ¡ec Vice presidents¹ Ante Pavelić Svetozar Pribićević Historical era World War I  - Independence 29 October, 1918  - Joined Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes 1 December, 1918 ¹ President and vice presidents of the National Council. ... The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state which existed from December 1, 1918 to mid-April 1941. ... Motto: One nation, one king, one country Anthem: Medley of Bože pravde, Lijepa naÅ¡a domovino, and Naprej zastava slave Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croato-Slovenian (see: Serbo-Croat and Slovenian) [1] Government Value specified for government_type does not comply King  - 1918-1921 Peter I  - 1921-1934 Alexander... Europe between 1929 and 1938. ... Motto Brotherhood and Unity Anthem Hey, Slavs Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian (spoken throughout the territory), Slovenian, Macedonian, Albanian, Hungarian (all official), and languages of other nationalities. ... Anthem Ode to Joy (orchestral)  ten founding members joined subsequently observer at the Parliamentary Assembly observer at the Committee of Ministers  official candidate Seat Strasbourg, France Membership 47 European states 5 observers (Council) 3 observers (Assembly) Leaders  -  Secretary General Terry Davis  -  President of the Parliamentary Assembly Rene van der Linden... This article is about the military alliance. ...

Contents

History

History of Slovenia Image File history File links Coat_of_Arms_of_Slovenia. ... // The territory of present day Slovenia under the Roman Empire In ancient times Celts and Illyrians inhabited the territory of present-day Slovenia. ...

Samo's Realm
Karantania
Carniola
March of Carniola
Windic march
Illyrian Provinces
Kingdom of Illyria
Duchy of Carniola
Drava Banovina
Socialist Republic of Slovenia
Republic of Slovenia
Main article: History of Slovenia
See also: Timeline of Slovenian history

Slavic ancestors of the present-day Slovenians settled in the area in the sixth century. The Slavic Duchy of Carantania was formed in the seventh century. In 745, Carantania lost its independence, being largely subsumed into the Frankish empire. Many Slavs converted to Christianity. This biography does not cite any references or sources. ... Karantania (also Carantania, Carentania, in old Slovenian onomastics Korotan, or Karantanija) was a Slavic principality that emerged in the 7th century and was centered on the territory of contemporary Carinthia. ... Carniola English and Latin; (Slovenian Kranjska, German Krain) is a name for a region in Slovenia. ... The Mark Krain (March of Carniola) is in the southeast (lower right) of this map of the 10th-century Holy Roman Empire. ... see discussion ... Illyrian Provinces (French Provinces illyriennes) were formed in 1809 when Austria ceded with the Treaty of Schoenbrunn its lands Carinthia, Carniola, Croatia southwest of the river Sava, Gorizia and Trieste to France after the defeat at the Battle of Wagram. ... Illyria (Anc. ... Carniola (Slovenian Kranjska, German Krain) is a region in Slovenia. ... Map showing Yugoslav banovinas in 1929 (The Drava Banovina is coloured yellow, on the top left part of the map) The Drava Banovina or Drava Banate (Slovenian and Croatian: Dravska banovina) was a province (banovina) of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia between 1929 and 1941. ... Flag of Socialist Republic of Slovenia Coat of arms of the Socialist Republic of Slovenia Socialist Republic of Slovenia was the official name of Slovenia as a federal unit in the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... // The territory of present day Slovenia under the Roman Empire In ancient times Celts and Illyrians inhabited the territory of present-day Slovenia. ... Some factual claims in this article need to be verified. ... Distribution of Slavic people by language The Slavic peoples are a linguistic and ethnic branch of Indo-European peoples, living mainly in Europe, where they constitute roughly a third of the population. ... The 6th century is the period from 501 - 600 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Karantania (also Carantania, Carentania, in old Slovenian onomastics Korotan, or Karantanija) was a Slavic principality that emerged in the 7th century and was centered on the territory of contemporary Carinthia. ... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ... This article is about the political and historical term. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... St Francis Xavier converting the Paravas: a 19th-century image of the docile heathen The historical phenomenon of Christianization, the conversion of individuals to Christianity or the conversion of entire peoples at once, also includes the practice of converting pagan practices, pagan religious imagery, pagan sites and the pagan calendar...


The Freising manuscripts, the earliest surviving written documents in a Slovenian dialect and the first ever Slavic document in Latin script, were written around 1000. During the 14th century, most of Slovenia's regions passed into ownership of the Habsburgs whose lands later formed the Austrian Empire, with Slovenians inhabiting all or most of the provinces of Carniola, Gorizia and Gradisca and parts of the provinces of Istria, Carinthia, Styria, the region of Prekmurje that belonged to the Kingdom of Hungary and Ottoman Empire and Venetian Slovenia which was part of the Austrian Empire between 1797-1805 and 1815-1866. Slovenians also inhabited most of the territory of the Imperial Free City of Trieste, although representing the minority of its population. The Freising Manuscripts (also Freising Monuments; Slovene Brižinski spomeniki, German Freisinger Denkmäler, Latin Monumenta Frisingensia, Slovak Frizinské pamiatky) are the first Roman-script record of any Slavic language. ... Abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz redirects here. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... Anthem Volkshymne (Peoples Anthem) The Austrian Empire Capital Vienna Language(s) German Hungarian Romanian Czech Slovakian Slovenian Croatian Serbian Italian Polish Ruthenian Religion Roman Catholic Government Monarchy History  - Established 1804  - Ausgleich 1867 The Crown of the Austrian Emperor The Austrian Empire (German: ) was a modern era successor empire founded... Carniola English and Latin; (Slovenian Kranjska, German Krain) is a name for a region in Slovenia. ... Gorizia and Gradisca (German: ; Italian: ; Slovenian: GoriÅ¡ka in Gradiščanska; Friulian: Gurize e Gradiscje) was a county in what is now a multilingual border area of Italy and Slovenia. ... Istria (Croatian and Slovenian: Istra, Venetian and Italian: Istria), formerly Histria (Latin), is the largest peninsula in the Adriatic Sea. ... Coat of arms of the Dukes of Carinthia, today state coat The Duchy of Carinthia (German language: Kärnten, Slovenian: KoroÅ¡ka) was a duchy of the Holy Roman Empire until its dissolution in 1806, and a crownland of Austria-Hungary until it dissolved in 1918. ... Coat of arms of the Dukes of Styria, crowned with the ducal hat, today state coat The Duchy of Styria (German: Herzogtum Steiermark, Slovenian Å tajerska) was a duchy of the Holy Roman Empire until its dissolution in 1806, and a crownland of Austria-Hungary until its dissolution in 1918. ... The municipalities of Slovenia in Prekmurje Prekmurje is the easternmost region of Slovenia. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... Venetian Slovenia (Italian Slavia Veneta, Slovenian Beneška Slovenija) is a small region in northeastern Italy, near the Slovenian border, north of the town of Gorizia (Slovenian Gorica). ... Anthem Volkshymne (Peoples Anthem) The Austrian Empire Capital Vienna Language(s) German Hungarian Romanian Czech Slovakian Slovenian Croatian Serbian Italian Polish Ruthenian Religion Roman Catholic Government Monarchy History  - Established 1804  - Ausgleich 1867 The Crown of the Austrian Emperor The Austrian Empire (German: ) was a modern era successor empire founded... In the Holy Roman Empire, an imperial free city (in German: freie Reichsstadt) was a city formally responsible to the emperor only — as opposed to the majority of cities in the Empire, which belonged to a territory and were thus governed by one of the many princes (Fürsten) of... For other uses, see Trieste (disambiguation). ...


In 1848, a massive political and popular movement for a United Slovenia (Serbian: Zedinjena Slovenija) emerged as part of the Spring of Nations movement within Austria. United Slovenia (Slovene Zedinjena Slovenija) is a name of political programme of Slovenes from 1848, that demanded (a) unification of all the Slovenes inhabited areas in one single kingdom under the rule of the Austrian Empire, (b) equal rights of the Slovene in public, and (c) strongly opposed planned integration... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... —Alexis de Tocqueville, Recollections The European Revolutions of 1848, in some countries known as the Spring of Nations, were the bloody consequences of a variety of changes that had been taking place in Europe in the first half of the 19th century. ...


During World War I several fronts were opened between the belligerent countries in Europe. After the Italian attack on Austro-Hungary the south-west front was opened, part of which was also The Isonzo Front. The name itself indicates that it ran along the river of Isonzo (Italian name for Soča), with the greatest part on the present territory of Slovenia. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... The Isonzo Front When Austro-Hungary declared war on Serbia on 28 July 1914, the World War I began and Europe became an enormous battlefield. ... The river Soča (Italian Isonzo) is a river in West Slovenia and North Italy. ... The river at at Kanal ob Soči The Isonzo near its outflow into the Adriatic, Isola di Cane, Italy The Soča (Italian: ) is a river in West Slovenia and North Italy. ...


With the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy in 1918, Slovenians initially formed part of the State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs, which shortly joined the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, later renamed (1929) the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. Following the re-establishment of Yugoslavia at the end of World War II, Slovenia became a part of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, officially declared on 29 November 1945. Present-day Slovenia was formed on 25 June 1991 upon its independence from Yugoslavia, gained in the Ten-Day War. Slovenia joined NATO on 29 March 2004 and the European Union on 1 May 2004. Slovenia will hold the Presidency of the Council of the European Union in the first half of 2008. Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... Flag Capital Zagreb Language(s) Slovenian and Serbo-Croatian Government Republic President¹ Anton KoroÅ¡ec Vice presidents¹ Ante Pavelić Svetozar Pribićević Historical era World War I  - Independence 29 October, 1918  - Joined Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes 1 December, 1918 ¹ President and vice presidents of the National Council. ... The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state which existed from December 1, 1918 to mid-April 1941. ... Motto: One nation, one king, one country Anthem: Medley of Bože pravde, Lijepa naÅ¡a domovino, and Naprej zastava slave Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croato-Slovenian (see: Serbo-Croat and Slovenian) [1] Government Value specified for government_type does not comply King  - 1918-1921 Peter I  - 1921-1934 Alexander... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Motto Brotherhood and Unity Anthem Hey, Slavs Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian (spoken throughout the territory), Slovenian, Macedonian, Albanian, Hungarian (all official), and languages of other nationalities. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... Combatants Slovenia Territorial Defence SFR Yugoslavia Yugoslav Peoples Army Commanders Janez JanÅ¡a Veljko Kadijević Strength 16,000 Territorial Defence, 10,000 police 35,200 Yugoslav National Army personnel Casualties 18 killed, 182 wounded (official casualties) 44 killed, 146 wounded 5,000 prisoners (Slovenian Estimates) The Ten-Day War... This article is about the military alliance. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Presidency of the Council of the European Union refers to the responsibility of presiding over all aspects of the Council of the European Union, when exercised collectively by a government, on a pre-established rota of the member states, of the European Union. ...


Politics

Main article: Politics of Slovenia

The Slovenian head of state is the president, who is elected by popular vote every five years. The executive branch is headed by the prime minister and the council of ministers or cabinet, which are elected by the parliament. Politics of Slovenia takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic republic, whereby the Prime Minister of Slovenia is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... For the comedy film of the same name, see Head of State (film). ... Presidents of Slovenia: Milan Kučan (1990-2002) Janez Drnovšek (2002-2008) Categories: Lists of office-holders ... The executive is the branch of a government charged with implementing, or executing, the law and running the day-to-day affairs of the government or state. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... A minister or a secretary is a politician who holds significant public office in a national or regional government. ... Alternate meanings in cabinet (disambiguation) A Cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... The House of Representatives Chamber of the Parliament of Australia in Canberra. ...


The bicameral Parliament of Slovenia consists of the National Assembly, and the National Council. The National Assembly has ninety seats, which are partially filled with directly elected representatives, and partially with proportionally elected representatives (two seats reserved for autochthonous Hungarian and Italian ethnic minorities). The National Council has forty seats, and is made up of representatives of social, economic, professional and local interest groups. Parliamentary elections are held every four years. In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... The Slovenian Parliament (Slovenian: ) is the legislative body of Slovenia. ... The National Assembly (Državni zbor) is the assembly of the parliament of the Republic of Slovenia. ... The National Council (Slovenian: Državni svet) is the constitutional representative of social, economic, professional and local interest groups and can be considered as the upper house of the Slovenian parliament. ... The term National Council may refer to: The National Council of Austria (Nationalrat) The National Council of Monaco The National Council of the Slovak Republic (Národná rada) The National Council of Slovenia (Državni svet) The National Council of Switzerland (Nationalrat, Conseil national) State National Council in Poland, 1944...


The unresolved political issue between Croatia and Slovenia regarding the Gulf of Piran remains in dispute. The Gulf of Piran (Slovenian Piranski zaliv, Serbo-Croatian Piranski zaljev, Italian Baia di Pirano), named after the town of Piran, is a gulf in the northern part of Adriatic Sea and part of Gulf of Trieste. ...


Administrative divisions

Slovenia is traditionally divided into eight regions.
Slovenia is traditionally divided into eight regions.

As given by Encyclopedia of Slovenia, traditional Slovenian regions, based on the former division of Slovenia into four Habsburg crown lands (Carniola, Carinthia, Styria, and the Littoral). Their parts are: Image File history File links Download high resolution version (829x600, 6 KB)A map of Slovenia with regions marked. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (829x600, 6 KB)A map of Slovenia with regions marked. ... Enciklopedija Slovenije is a Slovenian encyclopedia that contains topics connected to Slovenia. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... Crown land is a designated area belonging to the Crown, the equivalent of an entailed estate that passed with the monarchy and could not be alienated from it. ... Carniola English and Latin; (Slovenian Kranjska, German Krain) is a name for a region in Slovenia. ... Carinthia within Austria-Hungary (number 3) Coat of arms of the Dukes of Carinthia, today state arms The Duchy of Carinthia (German: ; Slovenian: ) was a duchy located in southern Austria and parts of northern Slovenia. ... Coat of arms of the Dukes of Styria, crowned with the ducal hat, today state coat The Duchy of Styria (German: Herzogtum Steiermark, Slovenian Štajerska) was a duchy of the Holy Roman Empire until its dissolution in 1806, and a crownland of Austria-Hungary until its dissolution in 1918. ... Slovenian Littoral in Slovenia The Slovenian Littoral (Slovenian: ; Italian: ; German: ) is a traditional region of Slovenia that itself consists of the regions of Goriška and Slovenian Istria (Slovenska Istra). ...

English name Native name Indicated on
map as
Upper Carniola Gorenjska U.C.
Styria Štajerska S
Prekmurje Prekmurje T
Carinthia Koroška C
Inner Carniola Notranjska I.C.
Lower Carniola Dolenjska L.C.
Goriška Goriška G
Slovenian Istria   Slovenska Istra   L

Goriška and Slovenian Istria together are known as the Littoral region (Slovenian: Primorska). White Carniola (Slovenian: Bela krajina), otherwise part of Lower Carniola, is considered a separate region of Slovenia, as are Zasavje and Posavje, the former being a part of Upper Carniola, Lower Carniola and Styria; and the latter part of Lower Carniola and Styria. Upper Carniola (Slovenian: Gorenjska; German: ) is a traditional region of Slovenia. ... Lower Styria (Slovenian Spodnja Å tajerska, German Untersteiermark, Latin Styria) is made up of the southern third of the former Duchy of Styria and is a region in northeastern Slovenia. ... The municipalities of Slovenia in Prekmurje Prekmurje is the easternmost region of Slovenia. ... Carinthia (Slovene KoroÅ¡ka) is an informal province in the north of Slovenia. ... Inner Carniola (Slovenian: Notranjska; German: ) is a traditional region of Slovenia. ... Lower Carniola (Slovenian: Dolenjska; German: ) is a traditional region of Slovenia. ... Most western region in Slovenia, the capital is Nova Gorica. ... Most western region in Slovenia, the capital is Nova Gorica. ... Slovenian Littoral in Slovenia The Slovenian Littoral (Slovenian: ; Italian: ; German: ) is a traditional region of Slovenia that itself consists of the regions of GoriÅ¡ka and Slovenian Istria (Slovenska Istra). ... White Carniola (Bela krajina) is on the south-east part of Slovenia. ... Lower Carniola (Slovenian: Dolenjska; German: ) is a traditional region of Slovenia. ... Sava River in Belgrade Posavina (Serbian, Croatian, and Bosnian: Posavina or Посавина, Slovenian: Posavje) is the name for the Sava river basin in Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Serbia. ... Upper Carniola (Slovenian: Gorenjska; German: ) is a traditional region of Slovenia. ... Lower Carniola (Slovenian: Dolenjska; German: ) is a traditional region of Slovenia. ... “Styria” redirects here. ...


Natural regions

Landscape types in Slovenia.      Alpine landscape      Panonnian landscape      Dinaric landscape      Mediterranean landscape
Landscape types in Slovenia.      Alpine landscape      Panonnian landscape      Dinaric landscape      Mediterranean landscape

The first regionalizations of Slovenia were made by geographers Anton Melik (1935-1936) and Svetozar Ilešič (1968). The newer regionalization by Ivan Gams divides Slovenia in the following macroregions: Image File history File links Si-4geographic-regions. ... Image File history File links Si-4geographic-regions. ... Alpine may refer to: Alpine, a breed of goat. ... The term Dinaric comes from the name of a mountain called Dinara, on the border of Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... Anton Melik (January 1, 1890 – June 8, 1966) was a Slovene geographer. ...

  • the Alps (visokogorske Alpe)
  • the Prealpine Hills (predalpsko hribovje)
  • the Ljubljana Basin (Ljubljanska kotlina)
  • Submediterranean (Littoral) Slovenia (submediteranska - primorska Slovenija)
  • the Dinaric Karst of inner Slovenia (dinarski kras notranje Slovenije)
  • Subpannonian Slovenia (subpanonska Slovenija)

According to a newer natural geographic regionalization, the country consists of four macroregions. These are the Alpine, the Mediterranean, the Dinaric and the Pannonian worlds. Macroregions are defined according to major relief units (the Alps, the Pannonian plain, the Dinaric mountains) and climate types (continental, alpine, mediterranean). These are often quite interwoven. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Ljubljana basin is stretching from Bled to the Ljubljana marshlands. ... A littoral is the region near the shoreline of a body of fresh or salt water. ... Mt Orjen at the Bay of Kotor is the heaviest karstified range of the dinarids View of the central part of the Dinaric Alps (north=down) Valbona pass, northern Albania. ... Karst topography occurs when a landscape is marked by underground drainage patterns. ... Alpine may refer to: Alpine, a breed of goat. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... The term Dinaric comes from the name of a mountain called Dinara, on the border of Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Position of the Roman province of Pannonia Pannonia is an ancient country bounded north and east by the Danube, conterminous westward with Noricum and upper Italy, and southward with Dalmatia and upper Moesia. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Pannonian Plain is a large plain in Central Europe that remained when the Pliocene Pannonian Sea (see below) dried out. ... Continental may refer to: The adjective of continent, such as in continental Europe, continental breakfast, or continental climate, or Continental Glacier; The culture of the continental nation states of Europe, inasmuch as it contrasts with the culture of Anglo-Saxon England; The Lincoln Continental, a car made by Lincoln division... Alpine may refer to: Alpine, a breed of goat. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ...


Macroregions consist of multiple and very diverse mesoregions. The main factor that defines them is the relief together with the geologic composition. Mesoregions in turn consist of numerous microregions. Microregion is a term used for formal and informal geographic divisions in the Czech Republic and Brazil. ...


Statistical regions

Slovenia's twelve statistical regions.
Slovenia's twelve statistical regions.

Slovenia's statistical regions exist solely for legal and statistical purposes. As of May 2005, twelve have been defined: Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1253x868, 42 KB) Summary Map of the regions of Slovenia (statistical purposes only). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1253x868, 42 KB) Summary Map of the regions of Slovenia (statistical purposes only). ...

1      Gorenjska
2      Goriška
3      Jugovzhodna Slovenija
4      Koroška
5      Notranjsko-kraška
6      Obalno-kraška
7      Osrednjeslovenska
8      Podravska
9      Pomurska
10      Savinjska
11      Spodnjeposavska
12      Zasavska

The government is preparing a plan for new administrative regions. On May 24, 2007 the government released a regionalization proposal with 14 regions. It has been stated that 14 will be the maximum allowed number of regions, but their actual names, territories and capitals have yet to be exactly determined. Constitutional changes allowing the creation of regions have been approved by the National Assembly. Upper Carniola in Slovenia Upper Carniola (Slovenian: ; German: ) is a traditional region of Slovenia. ... Most western region in Slovenia, the capital is Nova Gorica. ... Carinthia before 1900. ... Obalno-kraÅ¡ka (English Littoral-Karst) is a statistical region in the south-west of Slovenia. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      The National Assembly is either a legislature, or the lower house of a bicameral legislature in some countries. ...


Municipalities

Slovenia is divided into 210 local municipalities, eleven of which have urban status. Slovenia is divided into 210 municipalities (občine, singular - občina), of which 11 have urban status. ...


Geography

Main article: Geography of Slovenia
See also: Protected areas of Slovenia

Four major European geographic regions meet in Slovenia: the Alps, the Dinarides, the Pannonian plain, and the Mediterranean. Slovenia's highest peak is Triglav (2,864 m; 9,396 ft); the country's average height above the sea level is 557 metres (1,827 ft). Around one half of the country (11,691 km²; 4,514 sq mi) is covered by forests; this makes Slovenia the third most forested country in Europe, after Finland and Sweden. Remnants of primeval forests are still to be found, the largest in the Kočevje area. Grassland covers 5,593 square kilometres (2,159 sq mi) of the country and fields and gardens 2,471 square kilometres (954 sq mi). There are also 363 square kilometres (140 sq mi) of orchards and 216 square kilometres (83 sq mi) of vineyards. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 478 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Auteur original sur le Wikipédia slovène : Andrejj Adresse où jai trouvé limage : http://sl. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 478 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Auteur original sur le Wikipédia slovène : Andrejj Adresse où jai trouvé limage : http://sl. ... For other uses, see Triglav (disambiguation). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Velika_planina_4. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Velika_planina_4. ... The Kamnik Alps (Slovene KamniÅ¡ke Alpe, German Steiner Alpen or Sulzbacher Alpen) are a mountain range, part of the Southern Limestone Alps in north Slovenia and at the border of Austria. ... Slovenia is situated in Central Europe touching the Alps and bordering the Mediterranean . ... Natural heritage in Slovenia is protected either as a national park, a regional park or as a nature park. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mt Orjen at the Bay of Kotor is the heaviest karstified range of the dinarids View of the central part of the Dinaric Alps (north=down) Valbona pass, northern Albania. ... The Pannonian Plain is a large plain in Central Europe that remained when the Pliocene Pannonian Sea (see below) dried out. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... For other uses, see Triglav (disambiguation). ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... This article is about a community of trees. ... Area: 563. ... A community apple orchard originally planted for productive use during the 1920s, in Westcliff on Sea (Essex, England) An orchard is an intentional planting of trees or shrubs maintained for food production. ... A common vineyard. ...


Its climate is Submediterranean on the coast, Alpine in the mountains and continental with mild to hot summers and cold winters in the plateaus and valleys to the east. The average temperatures are -2 °C (28 °F) in January and 21 °C (70 °F) in July. The average rainfall is 1,000 millimetres (39.4 in) for the coast, up to 3,500 millimetres (137.8 in) for the Alps, 800 millimetres (31.5 in) for south east and 1,400 millimetres (55.1 in) for central Slovenia. Alpine may refer to: Alpine, a breed of goat. ... Continental may refer to: The adjective of continent, such as in continental Europe, continental breakfast, or continental climate, or Continental Glacier; The culture of the continental nation states of Europe, inasmuch as it contrasts with the culture of Anglo-Saxon England; The Lincoln Continental, a car made by Lincoln division... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Although located on the shore of the Mediterranean Sea, most of Slovenia is in the Black Sea drainage basin. The geometric center of gravity of Slovenia is located at the geographic coordinates 46°07'11,8" N and 14°48'55,2" E. It lies in Spodnja Slivna near Vače in the municipality of Litija. Mediterranean redirects here. ... For other uses, see Black Sea (disambiguation). ... A drainage basin is the area within the drainage basin divide (blue outline), and drains the surface runoff and river discharge (green lines) of a contiguous area. ... In geometry, the centre (or center) of an object is a point in some sense in the middle of the object. ... Area: 316. ...


Economy

Main article: Economy of Slovenia

Slovenia has a high-income developed economy which enjoys the highest GDP per capita ($28,010.76 estimate for 2008[1]) of the newly joined EU countries which is around 91% of the EU average. Although the country's relatively high rate of inflation declined to 2.3% in 2006 (prior to the adoption of the euro), it has recently reached a rate of 5.1% year-on-year,exceeding the average in the eurozone. Slovenia's economy has started to grow more strongly in the last few years (7.2% in first quarter of 2007, 5.7% in 2006, 4.1% in 2005), after relatively slow growth in 2003 (2.8%). Overall, the country is on a sound economic footing. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... World map indicating Human Development Index (as of 2004). ... The Eurozone (also called Euro Area, Eurosystem or Euroland) refers to the European Union member states that have adopted the euro currency union. ... World GDP/capita changed very little for most of human history before the industrial revolution. ...


Despite its economic success, Slovenia faces growing challenges. Much of the economy remains in state hands and foreign direct investment (FDI) in Slovenia is one of the lowest in the EU on a per capita basis. Taxes are relatively high, the labor market is often seen as inflexible, and legacy industries are losing sales to more competitive firms in China, India, and elsewhere.[2] This article is about economics. ... -1... Labour economics seeks to understand the functioning of the market for labour. ...


During the 2000s, privatizations were seen in the banking, telecommunications, and public utility sectors. Restrictions on foreign investment are slowly being dismantled, and foreign direct investment (FDI) is expected to increase over the next few years. Slovenia is the economic front-runner of the countries that joined the European Union in 2004 and was the first new member to adopt the euro as the country's only currency on 1 January 2007. Moreover, Slovenia will also be the first new member state to hold the Presidency of the Council of the European Union in the first half of 2008. For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... Telecommunication involves the transmission of signals over a distance for the purpose of communication. ... Invest redirects here. ... This article is about economics. ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Presidency of the Council of the European Union refers to the responsibility of presiding over all aspects of the Council of the European Union, when exercised collectively by a government, on a pre-established rota of the member states, of the European Union. ...


Demographics

See also: Roman Catholicism in Slovenia, History of the Jews in Slovenia, and The erased immigrants (Slovenian: Izbrisani)
Ethnic composition of Slovenia
Slovenian
 
83.06%
Serbian
 
1.98%
Croatian
 
1.81%
Bosnian
 
1.10%
Hungarian
 
0.32%
Albanian
 
0.31%
Macedonian
 
0.20%
Romani
 
0.17%
Montenegrin
 
0.14%
Italian
 
0.11%
other minorities
 
1.9%
undeclared or unknown
 
8.9%
source: 2002 census

Slovenia's main ethnic group is Slovenian (83%). Nationalities from the former Yugoslavia (Serbian, Croatian, Bosnian, Macedonian, Montenegrin) form 5.3%, and the Hungarian, Albanian, Roma, Italian and other minorities form 2.8% of the population. Ethnic affiliation of 8.9% was either undeclared or unknown. The majority of Slovenias population is Slovenian (over 88%). Hungarians and Italians have the status of indigenous minorities under the Constitution of Slovenia, which guarantees them seats in the National Assembly. ... The Roman Catholic Church in Slovenia is part of the worldwide Roman Catholic Church, under the spiritual leadership of the Pope and curia in Rome. ... The small Jewish community of Slovenia (Slovenian: ) is estimated at 400 to 600 members, with most living in the capital, Ljubljana. ... The Izbrisani (English: The Erased) is the name used in the media, for a group of people in Slovenia that their legal status after the declaration of the countrys independence in 1991. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below (* many Serbs opted for Yugoslav ethnicity) [27] Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in... Montenegrins (Serbian/Montenegrin: Црногорци/Crnogorci) are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Languages Romani, languages of native region Religions Christianity, Islam Related ethnic groups South Asians (Desi) The Romani people (as a noun, singular Rom, plural Roma; sometimes Rrom, Rroma) or Romanies are an ethnic group living in many communities all over the world. ...


Life expectancy in 2003 was 72.2 years for men and 80 years for women. Slovenia ranks number 5 on the list of countries by suicide rate. World map of suicide rates per 100,000. ...

Religion in Slovenia
Catholic
 
57.8%
Islam
 
2.4%
Orthodox
 
2.3%
Evangelical
 
0.8%
Jewish
 
0.0%
other religions
 
0.3%
Agnostic
 
3.5%
Atheist
 
10.1%
undeclared or unknown
 
22.8%
source: 2002 census

With 99 inhabitants per square kilometre (256/sq mi), Slovenia ranks low among the European countries in population density (compared to 320/km² (829/sq mi) for the Netherlands or 195/km² (505/sq mi) for Italy). The Notranjsko-Kraška region has the lowest population density while the Osrednjeslovenska region has the highest. Approximately 51% of the population lives in urban areas and 49% in rural areas.

Ljubljana's St. Nicholas Cathedral
Ljubljana's St. Nicholas Cathedral

The official language is Slovenian, which is a member of the South Slavic language group. Hungarian and Italian enjoy the status of official languages in the ethnically mixed regions along the Hungarian and Italian borders. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (917x709, 77 KB) St. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (917x709, 77 KB) St. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


By religion, Slovenians are traditionally largely Roman Catholic (57.8%). According to the most recent Eurobarometer poll 2005,[3] 37% of Slovenian citizens responded that "they believe there is a god", whereas 46% answered that "they believe there is some sort of spirit or life force" and 16% that "they do not believe there is any sort of spirit, god, or life force". The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Eurobarometer is a series of surveys regularly performed on behalf of the European Commission since 1973. ...


Culture

Main article: Culture of Slovenia
See also: List of Slovenians, Holidays in Slovenia, Slovene literature, and Music of Slovenia

Slovenia's first book was printed by the Protestant reformer Primož Trubar (1508-1586). It was actually two books, Latin: Catechismus (a catechism) and Abecedarium, which was published in 1550 in Tübingen, Germany. Slovenias first book was printed by the Protestant reformer Primož Trubar (1508-1586). ... This is a list of Slovenians and people from Slovenia that are famous or notable. ... There are two kinds of holidays in Slovenia - national holidays and work-free days. ... Slovene literature starts with Freising manuscripts around 1000. ... Music of Slovenia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Primož Trubar (June 9, 1508 – June 28, 1586) was a Slovenian Protestant reformer, the founder and the first superintendent of the Protestant Church of Slovenia, a consolidator of the Slovenian language and the author of the first printed book in Slovenian. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Codex Manesse, fol. ... Abecedarium (Abecednik) is along with the Katekizem (Catechism) the first Slovenian printed book. ... Tübingen, Neckar front Tübingen, a traditional university town of Baden-Württemberg, Germany, is situated 20 miles southwest of Stuttgart, on a ridge between the River Neckar and the Ammer. ...


The central part of the country, namely Carniola (which existed as a part of Austria-Hungary until the early 20th century) was ethnographically and historically well-described in the book The Glory of the Duchy of Carniola (German: Die Ehre deß Herzogthums Crain, Slovenian: Slava vojvodine Kranjske), published in 1689 by Baron Janez Vajkard Valvasor (1641-1693). Carniola English and Latin; (Slovenian Kranjska, German Krain) is a name for a region in Slovenia. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... The Glory of the Duchy of Carniola (Die Ehre des Herzogtums Crain) is Janez Vajkard Valvasors most important work on the natural history of his homeland, Slovenia. ... Baron Janez Vajkard Valvasor (also spelled Johann Weichert) (baptized on May 28, 1641 - died on September 19, 1693), was a Slovenian nobleman, scholar, and polymath, member of the Royal Society. ...

France Prešeren, a portrait by Božidar Jakac, 1940

Slovenia's two greatest writers were the poet France Prešeren (1800-1849) and writer Ivan Cankar (1876-1918). Drago Jančar is the leading name of Slovenian contemporary literature, and Nejc Gazvoda is the most noticeable name among newcomers. The most important Slovenian painters are Ivana Kobilca and impressionist Rihard Jakopič. The most famed Slovenian architect is Jože Plečnik who worked in Vienna as well as in Prague. The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... France PreÅ¡eren, a portrait by Božidar Jakac, 1940. ... France PreÅ¡eren, a portrait by Božidar Jakac, 1940. ... Ivan Cankar (Vrhnika, 10 May 1876- Ljubljana, 11 December 1918) was a famous Slovenian writer, playwright and poet. ... Drago Jančar (born 13 April 1948, Maribor) is a Slovenian novelist and dramatist. ... Ivana Kobilca (December 20, 1861 - December 4, 1926) was a Slovene realist painter who lived, worked and studied in various European cities including Vienna, Sarajevo, Berlin, Paris and Munich. ... Rihard Jakopič (1869–1943) was a Slovenian painter. ... Jože Plečnik, (born January 23, 1872 in Ljubljana, Austro-Hungary (now Slovenia), died January 7, 1957 in Ljubljana) was a famous Slovene architect who practiced in Vienna, Belgrade, Prague and Ljubljana. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Prague (disambiguation). ...


Slovenia is a homeland of numerous musicians and composers, including Renaissance composer Jacobus Gallus (1550-1591), who greatly influenced Central European classical music. In the twentieth century, Bojan Adamič was a renowned film music composer and Ivo Petrić (born June 16, 1931), is a composer of European classical music. This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... Jacobus Gallus, a portrait from 1590 Jacobus Gallus Carniolus (Jacob Handl or Jacob Handl-Gallus) (July 3, 1550 – July 18, 1591) was a late Renaissance Czech composer of Slovene origin. ... A reknowned Slovenian composer of film scores. ... Ivo Petrić (born June 16, 1931) is a Slovenian composer of European classical music. ...


Contemporary popular musicians have been Slavko Avsenik, Laibach, Vlado Kreslin, Zoran Predin, Pero Lovšin, Silence, Buldožer, Niet, Pankrti, New Swing Quartet, DJ Umek, Valentino Kanzyani, Melodrom, Siddharta, Terrafolk, Magnifico and others. Slavko Avsenik (b. ... Laibach is a Slovenian experimental music group, strongly associated with industrial, martial and neo-classical. ... Vlado Kreslin is a Slovenian folk-rock musician. ... Zoran Predin (born June 16, 1958) is a musician from Maribor, Slovenia. ... Peter LovÅ¡in is an ex punker (Pankrti) and now a solo muzician. ... Silence is a Slovenian electronic, synth pop and soundtrack music composing duo consisting of Boris Benko and Primož Hladnik. ... Buldožer (trans. ... The National Individual Events Tournament (NIET) is a national forensic-speaking tournament. ... Pankrti (The Bastards in Slovenian) were a punk rock band from Ljubljana, Slovenia, active in the late seventies and eighties. ... UroÅ¡ Umek (born 1976 in Ljubljana, Slovenia), better known as DJ Umek, is a Slovenian techno-music composer and DJ. He is perhaps the most famous Slovenian techno artist. ... Melodrom are: Mina Å piler (vocals), Matevž Grad (guitar, programming), Miha Žargi (bass), Matej Nolda (drums) and Polona Janežič (keyboards). ... Siddharta Siddharta Siddharta is a six-piece Slovenian rock band (although described by some critics as Power Metal) founded in 1995, probably Slovenias most popular musical act since Laibach. ... Terrafolk is a Slovenian folk band which formed in 1999 at Festival Lent in Slovenia. ... Magnifico Robert PeÅ¡ut aka Magnifico was born on December 1. ...


Slovenian cinema has more than a century-long tradition with Karol Grossmann, Janko Ravnik, Ferdo Delak, France Štiglic, Mirko Grobler, Igor Pretnar, France Kosmač, Jože Pogačnik, Matjaž Klopčič, Jane Kavčič, Jože Gale, Boštjan Hladnik and Karpo Godina as its most established filmmakers. Contemporary film directors Janez Burger, Jan Cvitkovič, Damjan Kozole, Janez Lapajne and Maja Weiss are most notable representatives of the so-called "Renaissance of Slovenian cinema". BoÅ¡tjan Hladnik BoÅ¡tjan Hladnik (January 30, 1929 – May 30, 2006) was a Yugoslavian/Slovenian filmmaker. ... Janez Lapajne [yannez la-pie-nay], Slovenian film director, * June 24, 1967, Celje, Slovenia. ...


Educated people of Slovenia include a chemist and a Nobel prize laureate Friderik Pregl, a physicist Jožef Stefan, a philosopher Slavoj Žižek, a linguist Franc Miklošič, a physician Anton Marko Plenčič, a mathematician Jurij Vega, and a rocket engineer Herman Potočnik. Fritz (Friderik) Pregl (September 3, 1869 – December 13, 1930) was an Austrian chemist of Slovenian descent. ... Joseph Stefan (Slovene Jožef Stefan) (March 24, 1835 – January 7, 1893) was a Slovene physicist, mathematician and poet. ... Slavoj Žižek (pronounced: ) (born 21 March 1949) is a Slovenian sociologist, postmodern philosopher, and cultural critic. ... Franc MikloÅ¡ič Franc MikloÅ¡ič (de: Franz von Miklosich), (November 29, 1813 – March 7, 1891) was a Slovenian philologist, born at Ljutomer (German Luttenberg), Styria, Slovenia, then a part of Austria. ... Baron Jurij Bartolomej Vega (also correct Veha; official Latin Georgius Bartholomaei Vecha; German Georg Freiherr von Vega) (March 23, 1754 – September 26, 1802) was a Slovenian mathematician, physicist and artillery officer. ... Herman Potočnik (pseudonym Hermann Noordung) (December 22, 1892 - August 27, 1929) was a Slovene rocket engineer and pioneer of cosmonautics (astronautics). ...


Biodiversity

A deciduous forest in Slovenia
A deciduous forest in Slovenia

Although Slovenia is a small country, there is an exceptionally wide variety of habitats. In the north of Slovenia are the Alps (namely, Julian Alps, Karavanke, Kamnik Alps), and in the south stand the Dinaric Alps. There is also a small area of the Pannonian plain and a Littoral Region. Much of southwestern Slovenia is characterized by Classical Karst, a very rich, often unexplored underground habitat containing diverse flora and fauna. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Edelweiss, Julian Alps, Slovenia The Julian Alps is part of the Alps that stretch from north-eastern Italy to Slovenia, where they rise to 2864 metres at Triglav. ... Karavanke (German: Karawanken) is a mountain range on the border between Slovenia and Austria. ... The Kamnik Alps (Slovene Kamniške Alpe, German Steiner Alpen or Sulzbacher Alpen) are a mountain range, part of the Southern Limestone Alps in north Slovenia and at the border of Austria. ... Mt Orjen at the Bay of Kotor is the heaviest karstified range of the dinarids View of the central part of the Dinaric Alps (north=down) Valbona pass, northern Albania. ... The Pannonian Plain is a large plain in Central Europe that remained when the Pliocene Pannonian Sea (see below) dried out. ... // General Definition A littoral is the region near the shoreline of a body of fresh or salt water. ... An image of Italian Karst (Monfalcone). ... In Botany a Flora (or Floræ) is a collective term for plant life and can also refer to a descriptive catalogue of the plants of any geographical area, geological period, etc. ... Fauna is a collective term for animal life. ...


Half of the country (about 58%) is covered by forests. These forests are an important natural resource, but they are also valuable for the preservation of natural diversity. An ecological asset like all forests, they enrich the soil and cleanse the water and air. Slovenians find the social benefits of tourism and recreation. The forests also lend their natural beauty to the Slovenian landscape. In the interior of the country there are typical Central European forests. The predominant trees are oaks and beeches. In the mountains, spruce, fir, and pine are more common. The tree line is at 1,700 to 1,800 metres (or 5,575 to 5,900 ft). Central Europe The Alpine Countries and the Visegrád Group (Political map, 2004) Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... Species See List of Quercus species The term oak can be used as part of the common name of any of several hundred species of trees and shrubs in the genus Quercus (from Latin oak tree), and some related genera, notably Cyclobalanopsis and Lithocarpus. ... For other uses, see Beech (disambiguation). ... Species About 35; see text. ... FIR may stand for: finite impulse response (a property of some digital filters) far infrared, i. ... For other uses, see Pine (disambiguation). ... In this view of an alpine tree-line, the distant line looks particularly sharp. ...


Pinetrees also grow on the Kras plateau. Only one third of Karst is now covered by pine forest. It is said that most of the forest was chopped down long ago to provide the wooden pylons on which the city of Venice now stands. The Kras and White Carniola are well known for the mysterious proteus. The lime/linden tree, also common in Slovenian forests, is a national symbol. An image of Italian Karst (Monfalcone). ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... An image of Italian Karst (Monfalcone). ... White Carniola (Bela krajina) is on the south-east part of Slovenia. ... For other uses, see Olm (disambiguation). ... Species About 30; see text A lime-lined avenue in Alexandra Park, London Tilia leaf Tilia is a genus of about 30 species of trees, native throughout most of the temperate Northern Hemisphere, in Asia (where the greatest species diversity is found), Europe and eastern North America; it is absent...


In the Alps, flowers such as Daphne blagayana, various gentians (Gentiana clusii, Gentiana froelichi), Primula auricula, Edelweiss (the symbol of Slovenian mountaineering), Cypripedium calceolus, Fritillaria meleagris (Snakes's head), and Pulsatilla grandis are found. Species See text. ... Binomial name Gentiana clusii E.P.Perrier & Songeon Synonyms Ciminalis clusii Gentiana clusii (sometimes called Clusius gentian) is a large-flowered, short-stemmed gentian, which is very similar to G. acaulis. ... Binomial name Primula auricula L. Bullwinkle, often known as Auricula or bears ear, is a species of primrose that grows on basic rocks in the mountain ranges of central Europe, including the western Alps, Jura, the Vosges, the Black Forest and the Tatra mountains. ... Binomial name Leontopodium alpinum Cass. ... Binomial name Cypripedium calceolus L. Cypripedium calceolus is a Ladys Slipper orchid. ... Binomial name Fritillaria meleagris Linnaeus Fritillaria meleagris, commonly known as Snakess head (the original English name), and also Snakes Head Fritillary, Leper Lily, and Guinea-hen Flower (possibly also checkered daffodil) is a fritillary, a flower from the family Liliaceae. ...


The country's fauna includes marmots, steenboks, and chamois. There are numerous deer, roe deer, boars, and hares. The edible dormouse is often found in the Slovenian beech forests. Hunting these animals is a long tradition and is well described in the book The Glory of the Duchy of Carniola (Slovenian: Slava vojvodine Kranjske, 1689), written by Janez Vajkard Valvasor (1641-1693). Some important carnivores include the Eurasian lynx (reintroduced to the Kočevje area in 1973), European wild cats, foxes (especially the red fox), and the rare jackal.[4] There are also hedgehogs, martens, and snakes such as vipers and grass snakes. As of March 2005, Slovenia also has a limited population of wolves and around four hundred brown bears. Species See text. ... Binomial name Capra ibex Linnaeus, 1758 The Alpine Ibex or Capra Ibex (is commonly called by its German name, steinbock) is the species of Ibex that lives in the European Alps. ... Binomial name Rupicapra rupicapra (Linnaeus, 1758) The chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra) is a large, goat-like animal that lives in the European Alps and Carpathians. ... This article is about the ruminent animal. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) The European Roe Deer (Capreolus capreolus) is a deer species of Europe, Asia Minor, and Caspian coastal regions. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The wild boar (Sus scrofa) is the wild ancestor of the domestic pig. ... For other uses, see Hare (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Glis glis (Linnaeus, 1766) The edible dormouse or fat dormouse (Glis glis) is a small dormouse and the only species in the genus Glis. ... The Glory of the Duchy of Carniola (Die Ehre des Herzogtums Crain) is Janez Vajkard Valvasors most important work on the natural history of his homeland, Slovenia. ... Baron Janez Vajkard Valvasor (also spelled Johann Weichert) (baptized on May 28, 1641 - died on September 19, 1693), was a Slovenian nobleman, scholar, and polymath, member of the Royal Society. ... Binomial name Lynx lynx (Linnaeus, 1758) The Eurasian Lynx (Lynx lynx) is a medium-sized cat of European and Siberian forests, where it is one of the major predators. ... Area: 563. ... For other meanings of Wild Cat and wildcat, see wildcat. ... This article is about the animal. ... For other uses, see Red Fox (disambiguation). ... Species Canis aureus Canis adustus Canis mesomelas A jackal (from Turkish çakal, via Persian shaghal ultimately from Sanskrit sá¹›gālaḥ [1][2]) is any of three (sometimes four) small to medium-sized members of the family Canidae, found in Africa, Asia and Southeastern Europe. ... Genera Atelerix Erinaceus Hemiechinus Mesechinus Paraechinus A hedgehog is any of the small spiny mammals of the subfamily Erinaceinae and the order Erinaceomorpha. ... Species Martes americana Martes flavigula Martes foina Martes gwatkinsii Martes martes Martes melampus Martes pennanti Martes zibellina For the Wiltshire village see Marten, Wiltshire. ... Synonyms Viperini - Oppel, 1811 Viperes - Cuvier, 1817 Viperides - Latreille, 1825 Viperina - Gray, 1825 Viperiodea - Fitzinger, 1826 Viperiodei - Eichwald, 1831 Viperinae - Cantor, 1847 Viperiformes - Günther, 1864 Viperida - Strauch, 1869[1] Common names: pitless vipers, true vipers, Old World vipers,[2] true adders. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Grass Snake, sometimes called the Ringed Snake or Water Snake (Natrix natrix) is a European non-venomous snake. ... Wolves may refer to: Gray Wolf Other uses of Wolf: see Wolf (disambiguation) Wolverhampton Wanderers F.C. Category: ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Ursus arctos range map. ...


There is a wide variety of birds, such as the tawny owl, the long-eared owl, the Eagle Owl, hawks, and Short-toed Eagles. Various other birds of prey have been recorded, as well as a growing number of ravens, crows and magpies migrating into Ljubljana and Maribor where they thrive. Other birds include (both black and green) woodpeckers and the white stork which nests in Prekmurje. Binomial name Strix aluco Linnaeus, 1758 The Tawny Owl (Strix aluco) is a species of owl resident in much of Europe and southern Russia. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) The Long-eared Owl (Asio otus) is a species of owl which breeds in Europe, Asia, and North America. ... Binomial name Bubo bubo (Linnaeus, 1758) The Eurasian Eagle Owl (Bubo bubo) is a species of horned owl resident in much of Europe and Asia. ... Genera Accipiter Micronisus Melierax Urotriorchis Erythrotriorchis The term hawk refers to birds of prey in any of three senses: Strictly, to mean any of the species in the bird sub-family Accipitrinae in the genera Accipiter, Micronisus, Melierax, Urotriorchis, and Megatriorchis. ... Binomial name ( Gmelin, 1788) Light Green: nesting area Blue: wintering area Dark Green: resident all year The Short-toed Eagle (Circaetus gallicus) is a medium-sized bird of prey in the family Accipitridae which also includes many other diurnal raptors such as kites, buzzards and harriers. ... For other uses, see Raven (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Crow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the bird. ...   (IPA: ) is the capital and largest city of Slovenia. ... Area: 147. ... Genera Melanerpes Sphyrapicus Xiphidiopicus Dendropicos Dendrocopos Picoides Veniliornis Campethera Geocolaptes Dinopium Meiglyptes Hemicircus Micropternus Picus Mulleripicus Dryocopus Celeus Piculus Colaptes Campephilus Chrysocolaptes Reinwardtipicus Blythipicus Gecinulus Sapheopipo For other uses, see Woodpecker (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Ciconia ciconia Linnaeus, 1758 The White Stork (Ciconia ciconia) is a large wading bird in the stork family Ciconiidae. ... The municipalities of Slovenia in Prekmurje Prekmurje is the easternmost region of Slovenia. ...


The indigenous Slovenian fish is the Marmorata, a type of trout. Extensive breeding programs have been introduced to repopulate the Marmorata into lakes and streams invaded by non-indigenous species of trout. The only regular species of cetaceans found in the northern Adriatic sea is the Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).[5] Trinomial name Salmo trutta marmoratus (Cuvier, 1829) Marmorata, or Soča trout (scientific name Salmo trutta marmoratus, Slovenian Soška postrv), is a subspecies of trout indigenous to the Soča (Italian: Isonzo) river in Slovenia. ... Rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss Biwa trout (or Biwa salmon), Oncorhynchus masou rhodurus Trout is the common name given to a number of species of freshwater fish belonging to the salmon family, Salmonidae. ... Suborders Mysticeti Odontoceti Archaeoceti (extinct) (see text for families) The order Cetacea (IPA: , L. cetus, whale) includes whales, dolphins and porpoises. ... Binomial name Montagu, 1821 Bottlenose Dolphin range (in blue) The Bottlenose Dolphin is the most common and well-known dolphin. ...


Domestic animals originating in Slovenia include the Carniolan honeybee, the indigenous Karst Sheepdog and the Lipizzan horse. The exploration of various cave systems has yielded discoveries of many cave-dwelling insects and other organisms. Trinomial name Apis mellifera carnica Pollman, 1879 The Carniolan honeybee (Apis mellifera carnica) is a subspecies of Western honeybee. ... Lipizzan horse The Lipizzan, or Lipizzaner (Slovene Lipicanec), is a breed of horse closely associated with the Spanish Riding School of Vienna, Austria where the finest representatives demonstrate the high school movements of classical dressage, including the highly advanced airs above the ground. ...


Slovenia is a veritable cornucopia of forest, cavern and mountain-dwelling wildlife. Many species that are endangered or can no longer be found in other parts of Europe can still be found here.


Education

Main article: Education in Slovenia

The Slovenian education system consists of: Education in Slovenia // Pre-school education, offered by pre-school institutions, is not compulsory. ... Download high resolution version (1024x680, 190 KB) University of Ljubljana, Slovenia The main building of the university, Rektorat Univerze Photo AndrejJ may 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: University of Ljubljana Categories: GFDL images ... Download high resolution version (1024x680, 190 KB) University of Ljubljana, Slovenia The main building of the university, Rektorat Univerze Photo AndrejJ may 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: University of Ljubljana Categories: GFDL images ... The University of Ljubljana (in Slovenian, Univerza v Ljubljani; in Latin, Universitas Labacensis) is the first and the largest university in Slovenia; with 56,000 enrolled students. ...

  • pre-school education
  • basic education (single structure of primary and lower secondary education)
  • (upper) secondary education: vocational and technical education, secondary general education
  • higher vocational education
  • higher education

Specific parts of the system:

  • adult education
  • music and dance education
  • special needs education
  • programmes in ethnically and linguistically mixed areas

Currently there are four universities in Slovenia:

The University of Ljubljana (in Slovenian, Univerza v Ljubljani; in Latin, Universitas Labacensis) is the first and the largest university in Slovenia; with 56,000 enrolled students. ... University of Maribor (Slovenian Univerza v Mariboru) is the second university in Slovenia, established in 1961. ... University of Primorska (Slovenian Univerza na Primorskem, Italian LUniversità del Litorale) is the third university in Slovenia. ... University of Nova Gorica - UNG (Slovenian Univerza v Novi Gorici), is the fourth university in Slovenia. ...

See also

Slovenia Portal
Geography
Institutions

Image File history File links Portal. ... The Bank of Slovenia is the bank of issue and the central bank of the Republic of Slovenia. ... Telephones - number of subscribers: 562. ... This is the list of computer systems from Slovenia. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Constitution of the Republic of Slovenia was adopted by the Slovenian National Assembly (Državni zbor) on December 23, 1991. ... In regular public statements, Slovenias highest politicians underscore their governments commitment to expanding cooperative arrangements with neighbors and active contributions to international efforts aimed at bringing stability to Southeast Europe. ... The Military of Slovenia consists of the Slovenian Armed Forces (also Slovenian Army; officially Slovene Slovenska vojska; SAF/SV). ... The Central European nation of Slovenia offers tourists a wide variety of landscapes in a small space: Alpine in the northwest, Mediterranean in the southwest, Pannonian in the northeast and Dinaric in the southeast. ... Railways: total: 1,201 km standard gauge: 1,201 km 1. ... Music of Slovenia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Klopotec from Slovenske Gorice has four wings A klopotec is a wooden mechanical device on a high wooden pole, similar to a windmill. ... A kozolec known as an enojni or single-rack type. ... The Geographical institute was founded in 1946 by the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts, and in 1976 it was named after the greatest Slovenian geographer, academician Anton Melik (1890-1966), who was the first head of the Institute. ... ARNES stands for Academic and Research Network of Slovenia. ... The Jožef Stefan Institute is the largest research institute in Slovenia. ...

References

  1. ^ Report for Selected Countries and Subjects. International Monetary Fund. Retrieved on 2007-10-19.
  2. ^ Slovenia. The World Factbook. CIA (2007-05-31). Retrieved on 2007-06-15.
  3. ^ Eurobarometer on Social Values, Science and technology 2005 - page 11. Retrieved on 2007-05-05.
  4. ^ (Slovenian) Maja Berden Zrimec (May 2005). "Šakali". GEA (journal). Retrieved on 2006-04-06.
  5. ^ Dolphins in Slovenia. Morigenos. Retrieved on 2006-04-06.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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  • Government Communication Office - About Slovenia
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  • Guide to virtual Slovenia at Matkurja.com
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  • GeaBios - interactive maps and aerial orthophotos of Slovenia, scale from 1:2.500.000 to 1:2.500 (see also GeaBios)
Culture
  • Slovenia Cultural Profile - national cultural portal on Slovenia created by the Ministry of Culture and Visiting Arts
Institutions
  • Bank of Slovenia
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  • Jožef Stefan Institute - the official site of the leading Slovenian research organization and links to resources on Slovenia
  • The Republic of Slovenia - government links
  • Supreme Court of the Republic of Slovenia
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Slovenian web search engines and directories
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Geographic locale
International organizations

  Results from FactBites:
 
Slovenia (10/07) (6239 words)
Slovenia is situated at the crossroads of central Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Balkans.
Slovenia served as the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) Chairman-in-Office in 2005, was the Chairman of the International Atomic Energy Agency Board of Governors in 2006-2007, and is preparing to be the first of the ten 2004 EU newcomers to hold the EU's rotating presidency in the first half of 2008.
Slovenia is engaged with 29 countries in bilateral military exchange--most actively with the U.S.--and in regional cooperative arrangements in central and southeast Europe; it participates in or intends to contribute forces for five major multinational regional peacekeeping bodies.
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Judging by the muted reactions to the European Commission’s latest economic forecast which puts Slovenia’s economic growth in 2008 at 4.6%, a substantial drop from the expected 6%, a moderate slowdown in economic activity is increasingly being viewed as an effective means of reining in inflation.
With significant investment in conference facilities over the past ten years and highly professional personnel, Slovenia is now ranked as one of the top 50 conference destinations in the world; a small yet diverse country that offers unlimited possibilities for any kind of event.
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